Although the word archetype has a long history, Carl Jung used it to express something he observed in human dreams. He said the archetypes are a tendency or instinctive trend in the human unconscious to represent certain motifs or themes. As our instinctive urge to reproduce may show itself in consciousness as sexual fantasies, so archetypes show themselves as cenain dream, fantasy, or story themes. Just as each individual animal does not create its own instincts, we do not create our own collective thought pattern.

The influ­ence these archetypes have upon our conscious self is varied. Panly they are supportive, as instincts are to an animal.

Some ancient cultures erected a pantheon of gods and god­desses. Many of these gods were expressions of archetypal themes, such as death, rebirth and womanhood.

A sheepdog has in itself, unconsciously, a propensity to herd animals un­der direction. Through the worship of gods, perhaps ancient people touched similar reservoirs of strength and healing. Without such, the individual might find it mcre difficult to face the fact that death waits at the end of their life, or to allow sexuality to emerge into their life at pube ty.

The dream of a girl suffering from anorexia shows her cutting off her own breasts with scissors. Here her developing sexual traits and urges are unacceptable to her. Perhaps she ‘cuts them off’ by not eating, thus preventing her body and psyche from matur­ing. In the past it would have been recommended that she give offerings to a goddess, thus aligning her with an uncon­scious power to adapt and mature.

Some of these archetypal patterns of behaviour, such as territorialism and group identity, are only too obviously be­hind much that occurs in war, and their influence needs to be brought more fully into awareness. But we must be careful in accepting Jung s descnption of the archetypes. In more recent years, through the tremendously amplified access to the un­conscious made possible in psychiatry through such drugs as LSD, a lot more information about unconscious imagery has been made available. It is possible thai certain synthesising aspects of the mind produce images to represent huge areas of collected experience, i.e. the Mystic Mother or Madonna rep­resenting our collected experience of our mother.

Whatever may be the explanation of these archetypal themes, they are imponant because they illustrate how we as individuals, and as human beings collectively, have been able to develop^ur sense of conscious identity amidst enormous forces of unconsciousness, collectivity and external stresses. Below are some common archetypal symbols and their associ­ated images.

A number of archetypes come up in dreams again and again.

Mother image: including grandmothers, stepmothers, mother-in-laws, midwives, wise women, goddesses, the Church, universities, towns, countries, heaven, earth, oceans, fields, gardens, springs, baptismal vessels, the womb, ovens, cooking pots, cows, rabbits. All these symbols stand for childhood memories, emotional connection to our mothers, difficulties in growing up, our own character traits, and more.

Serpent biting its aum tail: conscience and ego are in need of reconciliation (this is a reference to the fundamental struggle all human beings face—the polarities of good and evil, men and women, etc.).

Mandala: this symbol of circles and quadrants represent self-realization.

1- Archetypes are basic pictures that each of us hold deep within our subconscious. They are in a sense ‘psychic’ blueprints. These blueprints while potentially perfect can become distorted by- childhood experiences, socialisation and even parental experience.

C G Jung began studying archetypes and dividing function into thinking, feeling, sensation and intuition. Following various work by his pupils, it became possible to build up a type of ‘map’ of the interaction between all of these functions and to discover where one’s own distortions occur. Each function has a ‘positive’ and ‘negative’ quality which is perhaps better described as ‘greater’ and ‘lesser’. Each of the masculine and feminine sides of the personality has these four functions, thus there are 64 (8 x 8) interactions possible. Where a distortion has occurred, we tend to project onto those around us the archetype with which we have most difficulty (often the Shadow). Consequently there will be a tendency to repeat situations over and over (e.g. the woman who continually finds herself in close relationships with a father-figure type, or the man who continuallv finds himself at odds with women executives) until we learn how to cope with and understand our distortion.

The obverse of this is that, with awareness, one is able to accept other’s projections onto oneself without being affected bv them. Perfect balance would be achieved by using all aspects of the personality as shown below. Kindly Father and Mother are self explanatory. Ogre represents masculine anger used negatively and Destructive Mother may be wilfully destructive, or simply the smothering type that is the mother who prevents the adequate growth of her children. Youth and Princess are the more gentle, fun-loving aspects of the personality while Tramp is the eternal wanderer and Siren is the seductress or sexually active part of femininity. Hero is the self- sufficient Messianic part of the personality, while Amazon is the ‘self-sufficient’ female the efficient business woman type. Villain is the masculine part of the self who uses power for his own ends, while Competitor is die typical ‘women’s libber’ who feels that she has 110 need for men. Priest and Priestess are the powers of intuition used for the ‘greater good’, while Sorcerer uses inner power totally dispassionately and Witch uses that same power rather more emotionally and perhaps negatively.

2- More specifically the feminine archetypes arc:

Kindly Mother

This is the conventional picture of the caring mother figure, forgiving transgression and always understanding. Because much has been made of this side of femininity, until recently it was very easy to overdevelop this aspect at the expense of other sides of the personality. Destructive Mother This woman may be the ‘smothermother’ type or the frankly destructive, prohibitive mother. Often it is this aspect who either actively prevents or because of her effect on the dreamer causes difficulty in other relationships. Princess The fun-loving, innocent childlike aspect of femininity. She is totally spontaneous, but at the same time has a subjective approach to other people. Siren This type is the seductress, the sexually and sensually aware woman who still has a sense of her own importance. In dreams she often appears in historic, flowing garments as though to highlight the erotic image.

Amazon

The self-sufficient woman who feels she docs not need the male: often becomes the career woman. She enjoys the cut and thrust of intellectual sparring. Competitor - She is the woman who competes with all and sundry both men and women - in an effort to prove that she is able to control her own life. Priestess - This is the highly intuitive woman who has learnt to control the flow of information and use it for the common good. She is totally at home within the inner world.

Witch

The intuitive woman using her energy to attain her own perceived ends. She is subjective in her judgement and therefore loses her discernment.

The masculine archetypes are: Kindly Father This side of the masculine is the conventional kindly father figure who is capablc of looking after the child in us. but equally of being firm and fair. Ogre This represents the angry; overbearing, aggressive and frightening masculine figure. Often this image has arisen because of the original relationship the dreamer had with their father or father figure.

Youth

The fun-loving, curious aspect of the masculine is both sensitive and creative. This is the ‘Peter Pan’ figure who has never grown up.

Tramp

This is the real freedom lover, the wanderer, the gypsy. He owes no allegiance to anyone and is interested only in what lies around the next corner. Hero The hero is the man who has clcctcd to undertake his own journey of exploration. He is able to consider options and decide his next move. Often he appears as the Messianic figure in dreams. He will rescue the damsel in distress, but only as part of his growth proccss.

Villain

The villain is completely selfishly involved, not caring who he tramples on in his own search. He is often the aspect of masculinity women first meet in everyday relationships, so can remain in dream images as a threatening figure if she has not come to terms with his selfishness.

Priest

The intuitive man is the one who recognises and understands the power of his own intuition, but who usually uses it in the services of his god or gods. He may appear in dreams as the Shaman or Pagan priest.

Sorcerer

This is the man who uses discernment in a totallv dis- passionate way for neither good nor evil, but simply because he enjoys the use of power. In his more negative aspect he is the Trickster or Master of unexpected change.

3- Spiritually, when we have access to all the archetypes, we are ready to become integrated and whole.



Archetypes | The Dream Meanings

Keywords of this dream: Archetypes

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Gives gender - specific: In a man’s dream an actor can represent the public figure while an actress will suggest one of the feminine archetypes and his anima. In a woman’s dream an actor may represent her animus and an actress a hidden, perhaps unrecognized part of herself.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of an actor or actress represent the archetypes you embody, or the roles you play in life.

If you dream of an actor/actress that you admire, then this dream is revealing qualities that you like most about yourself or that you aspire to embody.

If the actor/actress represents qualities that you dislike, then this dream is assisting you to embrace your shadow. See Famous, Celebrity and Integration Dreams.... Strangest Dream Explanations

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Psychological / emotional perspective: Alchemy from a psychological perspective is a philosophy of the cosmos and of mankind’s place in the scheme of things. It is the refinement of thought, having the key through the archetypes to unlocking an understanding of the innermost and unconscious part of the psyche. As an agent for change it has a relevance in dreams through both its symbolism and processes.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Self giving—this can be a very positive action, or a son of self punishment out of guilt; place of death, but also of rebinh. See archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Meanings of Versatile

See archetypes in the introduction... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- When animals appear in a dream they usually represent an aspect of the personality which cannot be properly understood except on an instinctive level.

Animal with a cub

This will represent motherly qualities and therefore the mother.

Baby animals

The dreamer will be dealing with the child-like side of his or her personality, or possibly children known to him.

The hurt young animal

The dreamer may perceive a difficulty in becoming mature or facing life.

Eating the animal

The dream could be about the ‘demons’ one creates which can only be overcome by assimilating them in a constructive way. Pagan belief thought that one took up certain aspects of the animal that were superior in certain respects to ordinary’ human attitudes.

Godlike, talking awe-inspir- ing or wise animals, or those with human characteristics

Animals have not vet become conscious of, or pitted themselves against, the power from which they came so the wisdom they show is innocent and simple. It is always important to pay attention to this aspect of animal life in fairy tales and dreams, since we need to be in touch with that part of ourselves.

Helpful animals

The subconscious is producing helpful images from its depths.

The figures of animals arc an easy way for the dreamer to accept that help.

Killing the animal may destroy the energy derived from the instincts. Taming or harnessing the animal shows the efforts made to control the dreamer’s instincts and, if possible, make them productive and useful.

To dream of trying to find some refuge from animals whether by building defences - or perhaps by running away - is indicative of the dreamer’s struggle with his animal instincts, and whether the action being taken is adequate. Such instincts may be threatening or damaging to aspects of the dreamer’s life.

2- When we need some sort of understanding of our own psychological urges, animals will appear which symbolise those qualities. These are:

Bear

The mother (see Family) appears in dreams in many forms, the bear being one of them.

The image may be of the possessive, devouring mother or of the all- caring mother.

If it is recognised in the dream that the bear is masculine the image may then be of an overbearing person, or possibly the father.

Bull

Usually the bull in a dream denotes the negative side of behaviour, such as dcstructivcness, fear or anger (for example a bull in a china shop). However, more positively, the bull is recognised as sexual passion or creative power.

Slaying the bull

indicates initiation into the world of the mature adult who succeeds in mastering his instincts and can also represent the sign of Taurus in the Zodiac.

Cat

To dream of cats is to link with the feline, sensuous side in human beings, usually in women. Goddesses such as Bast the Egyptian cat goddess arc usually represented as having two sides to their natures, one devious and one helpful, so the cat often denotes the capricious side of the feminine.

The elegant but also the powerful, yet overly self-sufficient aspect of woman, may also be perceived as the cat. Chameleon The dreamer is recognising either in himself or others the ability to adapt and to change according to surrounding circumstances.

Cold-blooded animals or reptiles

The unfeeling, inhuman aspect of the instincts is often portrayed by reptiles and other cold-blooded animals. They are usually recognised as being destructive and alien.

Composite animals

To dream of composite animals could indicate some confusion in sorting out what qualities are needed.

The various qualities of the different animals of which they are made up need to be assimilated and integrated. There are two potentials of development in one figure.

Half-animal, half-man

The dreamer’s animal instincts arc beginning to be recognised and humanised.

Cow

The eternal feminine, especially the mother (see Family) or mother figure (see Archetypes) is often depictcd by the cow. This is partly because it provides milk and nourishment.

Deer/Reindeer

The deer and the reindeer herd have a strict hierarchical structure.

The dreamer recognises his place in the world.

The deer symbolises pride/nobility

Deformed animals

The dreamer realises that some of his impulses are offensive, or revolting.

Dog

also see individual entry The dreamer may recognise a faithful and constant companion, a protector or more negatively, somebody the dreamer can’t shake off and who might make trouble.

A dog that the dreamer owned or knew at some period of his life There may be memories asso- ciated with that period of his life, which hold clues to present behaviour.

A huntress with dogs The dreamer is making a connection with one of the feminine archetypes, that of the Amazon (see Archetypes).

A dog guarding gates, being near a cemetery In dreams this indicates the guardian of the threshold, and creatures which must be put to sleep or tamed before there can be an initiation into the underworld Domesticated (tame) animals When we dream of domesticated animals we arc aware of those parts of ourselves with which we have come to terms. There are passions which arc being used in a controlled way although there is the suggestion that those passions were never very formidable. Elephant To see an elephant in a dream is to recognise the qualities of patience, long memory, strength and fidelitv. In the more esoteric sense it signifies radiant and glowing wisdom.

Fox

A fox in a dream tells of hypocrisy, cunning and slyness.

Frog

A period or act of transformation (a frog transforms from a tadpole and moves on to the land). There is something repugnant which is turning into something of value (i.e. a frog into a prince). Also see Snake as all reptiles have the same significance.

Goat

To dream of a goat is to recognise creative energy and masculine vitality. It may also represent the dark side of human nature, promiscuousness and sexuality.

To be riding a goat is to be trying to come to terms with the dreamer’s relationship with the dark side of his nature.

The goat may also represent the Devil or Satan. It is also the symbol for Capricorn.

Hare

The hare highlights intuition, spiritual insight and intuitive ‘leaps’. Intuition may be debased into madness by fear or ignorance. Because of its association with the moon, the hare can, in its negative aspect, signify the Priestess/Witch aspect of femininity or the Priest/Sorcerer of the masculine (see Archetypes). In its positive imagery however it is the radiant hare (often holding its baby in a cave) and thus the Mother of God.

Hedgehog

The hedgehog can represent evil and bad manners, or literallv our inability to handle a ‘prickly’ situation.

Horse

The horse in a dream represents the energy at the dreamer’s disposal.

A white horse depicts the spiritual awareness of the dreamer; a brown one the more pragmatic and down-to-earth side, while a black horse is the passionate side of the dreamer’s nature.

A pale horse is taken to indicate death, and a winged horse depicts the soul’s ability to transcend the earthly- plane.

If the horse is under strain or dying there is a severe weakening of the dynamic power that carries the dreamer forward. Ibo much pressure may be being experienced in our lives.

If the horse is being harnessed to a cart the dreamer may be concentrating too hard on thoroughly- utilitarian objectives.

In a man’s dream, a mare will denote the Anima, a woman; or the realm of the feminine (see Archetypes).

In a woman’s dream, being kicked by a horse may indicate the Animus or her relationship with a man.

A horse that can get through any door and batter down all obstacles is the collective Shadow (see Introduction) those aspects of the personality which most people attempt to suppress.

The horse as a beast of burden is often the Great Mother (See Introduction). or mother archetype (see Archetypes). In modern dreams the car has largely taken over from the horse as a symbol with many of the same associations (see Car and Journey Sections).

Hyena

The hyena is generally taken in dreams to signify impurity, instability and deviousness.

Jackal

The jackal is associated with the graveyard, and therefore with Death. As a scavenger it is also a cleanser. Esoterically, it is the servant of the transformer, guiding souls from the earth plane into the light.

Jaguar

The jaguar’s main qualities are its speed and balance. It stands for the balance of power between the dark and light forces. Kangaroo This somewhat exotic animal often stands for motherhood. and also strength. Lamb The lamb is the innocent side of man’s nature. It is said that evil cannot withstand such innocence.

Leopard

The leopard represents cruelty and aggression, and traditionally the deviousness of wrongly used power. Lion The lion stands for majesty, strength and courage. It can also represent the ego and the passions associated with it.

If the dreamer is struggling with the lion there should be a succcssful development as long as the dreamer is not overpowered, or the lion killed.

A man-eating lion shows that an aspect of the personality- has slipped out of alignment, putting both the dreamer and his surroundings at risk.

A lion lying with a lamb There is a union, or compatibility of oppositcs; instinct and spirit going hand in hand. Lizard also see Reptiles The lizard appearing in a dream represents instinctive action or ‘one-track’ thinking.

Lynx

The main quality associated with the lynx is its keen eyesight, thus in a dream it can often portray objectivity. Monkey The monkey characterises the infantile, childish and arrested side of the dreamer’s character.

The qualities of mischief, impudence and inquisi- tiveness all belong to the monkey. While these are often seen as regressive tendencies, that of lively- curiosity maintains a necessary lightness of spirit.

Mare

see Horse

Mole

The mole is often taken to represent the powers of darkness, but can often signify the blind persistence and determination which enables the dreamer to succeed. Monster/Dragon also see Dragon in D Section A fear which is beyond understanding, usually welling up from within rather than from the outside world, is often represented in dreams by monsters and dragons.

The devouring monster The dream may deal with a recognition that ultimately we arc all absorbed back into a greater whole.

If the dreamer gets the better of the monster he will have mastery over his own fear of death, and may be able to harness this forcc for his own use. Cutting out the monster’s heart or other vital organ, or lighting a fire inside it, depicts the struggle against the dark forces of the underworld.

Mouse

also see Vermin The mouse’s quality of timidity can often be addressed in the dreamer, if it is recognised that this can arise from turbulence and lack of understanding.

Otter

The otter is uniquely equipped to exist within its chosen element of water and to be able to gain subsistence from its environment, all things the dreamer may- need to develop.

Ox

The ox depicts the ability to be patient, and to make sacrifices for others.

Parts of animals

{the limbs, eyes, mouth, etc.) These have the same significance as parts of the human body (see Body).

If the four legs are particularly emphasised possibly in contrast with a three-legged animal the whole rounded personality with all four functions of the mind fully developed is being highlighted. Pig or Wild Boar The pig is taken in Western belief to indicate ignorance, stupidity, selfishness, and gluttony.

The dreamer’s better self may be beginning to recognise these unattractive qualities in himself. Without such recognition there can be no transformation or mastcry of them. Pigs and jewels There is a conflict between the lower urges and spiritual values. Perhaps there is a failure to appreciate spiritual values. Big litters of piglets can represent fruitful- ness, although sometimes without result, since the sow can depict the Destructive Mother (see Archetypes). Wild Boar The wild boar depicts the archetypal masculine principal, and therefore the negative Animus in a woman’s dream. (See Introduction).

The dreamer may be evading an issue that should be challenged and dealt with more daringly.

Prehistoric animals

A trauma from the past, or from childhood, may be causing difficulty. Rabbit Rabbits appearing in a dream can mean one of two things.

The obvious connection with fertility could be important or it could be that the trickster aspect of the personality could be coming to the fore (see Hare).

A white rabbit may show the dreamer the way to the inner spiritual world and, as such, act as a guide.

Ram

The ram is a svmbol of masculine virility and power, and by association has those qualities of the sign of Aries in the Zodiac.

Rat

also see Vermin ‘flic rat signifies the diseased and devious part of the dreamer or of his situation. It can also represent something which is repulsive in some way.

The dreamer may be experiencing disloyalty from a friend or colleague.

Reptiles

To dream of reptiles indicates that we are looking at the more frightening lower aspects of the personality. We may have no control over these, and could therefore be easily devoured by them. We are afraid of Death or the death process, but must go through a process of change in order to be reborn.

Seal

Dreaming of a seal suggests that we are at one with the clement in which we live.

Serpent

also see Snake The serpent is a universal symbol which can be male or female or it can be self-created. It can signify death or destruction or conversely life and also rejuvenation. It is the instinctive nature and is also potential energy. When the power of the instinctive nature is understood and harnessed, the dreamer comes to terms with his or her own sexuality and sensuality and is able to make use of the higher and more spiritual energies which become available. In a man’s dream a snake may appear if he has not understood the feminine or intuitive part of himself, or when he doubts his own masculinitv. In a woman’s dream the snake may manifest if she is afraid of sex, or sometimes of her own ability to seduce others. Because of its connection with the Garden of Eden, the serpent is the symbol of duplicity and trickery; and also of temptation. Sheep The sheep is renowned for its flock instinct, and it is this interpretation which is most usually accepted in dreams.

The helplessness of the sheep when off balance is also another aspect which is recognisable, as is the apparent lack of intelligence.

The god-fearing, ‘good sheep’ and also the passive and ‘sheepish’ may have relevance within the context of the dream.

To dream of sheep and wolves or of sheep and goats is to register the conflict between good and evil.

Sinister Animals Any threat from animals indicates the fears and doubts the dreamer has over his ability to cope with the stirrings of the unconscious. Snake - also see Serpent. Snake dreams occur like serpent dreams - when the dreamer is attempting to come to terms with his or her more instinctive self.

Inevitably, this has to do with the recognition and harnessing of energies which have been suppressed and thwarted. Since the most primeval urge is sexuality, the image of the snake is the most primitive one available.

A snake twined around the body or limb

This indicates some form of bondage, possibly being enslaved to the passions.

A snake, or worm, leaving a corpse by its mouth

This can sometimes represent the sexual act (the little death), but can also signify the dreamer’s control of his or her libido.

A snake in the grass This image denotes disloyalty, trickerv and evil. With its tail in its mouth This image is one of the oldest available to man and signifies completion and the union of the spiritual and physical (see Shapes, Circle). Being swallowed by a snake This shows the need and ability to return to the ultimate, and lose our sense of space and time (see Eating). Because snakes are such a low form of life, while also being in some cases poisonous, they have become associated with death, and all that man fears. Snake twined around a staff or similar (see Caduceiis) The unconscious forces that are released once the dreamer reconciles the opposing sides of himself create healing, rebirth and renewal, and this is universally represented as two snakes entwined round a central staff. It is a symbolic representation of the basic form of DXA, the ‘building blocks’ of life.

The colours of the snake may give additional insight into the meaning of the dream (see Colours). Squirrel The squirrel represents the hoarding aspcct of our personalities.

Tiger

The tiger signifies royalty, dignity and power and is both a creator and a dcstrover

Toad

To dream of toads is lo connect with whatever the dreamer may consider ugly in life, or in his behaviour. However, implicit in that ugliness is the power of transformation and growth into something beautiful.

For a toad and an eagle to appear is to note the difference between earthly and spiritual values.

Transformation of animals In dreams, the metamorphosis of the dreamer or other people into animals and vice versa shows the potential for change within any situation.

Unicorn

The unicorn is a symbol of purity and traditionally could only be owned and perceived by virgins. It is a return to, and a resurgence of, an innocence necessary in self-understanding, and it often suggests the control of the ego and selfishness.

Vermin

In dreams vermin may represent the enforced contemplation of something that is unnecessary or that has invaded one’s spacc.

Vertebrates

Animals with backbones often give an understanding of the qualities associated with that animal.

The smaller and lower orders of animal signify the unconscious, the higher orders the emotions.

Whale

The whale, because it is a mammal which lives within water, indicates the power of resurrection and rebirth man’s abilitv to come back from the dead.

Weasel

The weasel traditionally highlights the devious, more criminally oriented side of ourselves.

Werewolf

see Sinister Animals

Wild animals

Usually wild animals stand for danger, dangerous passions, or dangerous people. There is a destructive force arising from the unconscious, threatening the safety of the individual. Such a dream may be a way of understanding anxiety.

Domesticating wild animals The dreamer may- have come to terms with his or her wilder side.

Wolf

Dreaming of wolves may- indicate that we are being threatened by others, whether singly or by the pack.

The dreamer may- have cruel sadistic fantasies without taking responsibility for them.

The She-wolf The hussy; but also the carer for orphans and rejected young.

Wounded animals

The dreamer may be suffering either emotional or spiritual wounds.

Zebra

This animal has the same significance as the horse, but with the additional meaning of balancing the negative and the positive in a very dynamic way.

3- By understanding animals and their symbolism we approach life in a more simplistic and natural way.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Animals emerge from the Lower World as powerful archetypes and energies. They may lend their wisdom, attributes, and supernatural powers to the dreamer.

The appearance of any animal in a dream may point out that man and nature are not separate but are intricately connected.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Dreamers Dictionary

Symbol: Animals represent, as Archetypes, the depths of our unconscious or our instincts. Animals in dreams are always repressed symbols of our urges—a dream language of the forbidden.

Bear: a symbol of vitality, power, and endurance (particularly in women’s dreams). See Bear.

Fish: a fear of losing love; your partner is “slipping” through your fingers, but when the fish is alive, it is a sign of successful planning. See Fish.

Dog: extremely repressed sexual urges. See Dog.

Insects: repressed anger, emotional stress, family problems. See Flies, Insects.

Cat: a symbol of female eroticism, and sometimes a repressed desire for independence. See Cat.

Cow: female sexual urges—but always combined with patience and calm. See Cow.

Lion: glorified and powerful physical contact between men and women.

Mouse: a symbol of the female; the fear of mice is an expression of the dreamer’s fear of a vet-to-be-acknowledged femininity. See Mouse, Rat.

Horse: aroused, but unrealized physical energies, or controlled vitality. See Horse, Horseback Riding.

Serpent: a phallic symbol; women who dream about serpents suffer from unfulfilled sexuality; a serpent crawling up your legs means sexual desires have been awakened. See Dragon, Serpent.

Small animals often symbolize a small sibling; large animals usually stand for the dreamer’s own character traits and repressed cravings. Animals with human voices: a warning not to let other people hurt or take advantage of you. Dead animals are a sign of changes in your personal situation.

Depth Psychology: Animals are a symbol of primitive character traits, like greed, passion, or anger.

The other symbols in the dream are very important.... Dreamers Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

An expression of the Self. What this means is that some part of our consciousness, such as the memory of our address, or emotion about our dog, will have many intercon­nections with other ideas and related feelings. We can asso­ciate the idea of address with home, room, family, food, rent, bed, and each of those with other connected ideas and feel­ings. Sometimes we touch a concept or feeling which has massive connections, so vast they begin to build up beyond usual levels of realisation. We might call it a mega-concept, which goes on building and generating realisations we have never made before—that is, we have never made those connec­tions before.

An aura around an object, person or animal de­picts this mental function. See the self under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Way of Dreams and Visions

General Meaning: These are those people who are senior to you and have authority over you.

• They may be represented by your parents, boss, pastor or any other figure who is set over you in an administrative or spiritual position.

Dreams Positive:

If you dream of an authority in a positive light, then it could indicate that your leadership is being accepted and that you are growing in that area.

• It could mean that you are attaining to that level of leadership and authority in your spiritual walk.

• If they are authorities from worldly circles, they could speak of archetypes and mindsets that control your thinking.

Negative:

Dreaming of being in bondage to an authority would mean that you are under some form of oppression or attack.

• Perhaps you are being controlled by influences not of God and been brought under the domination of something that is against the Word. It may also indicate that you are trying to dominate and impose your own will on others.

Visions Positive:

Romans 13:1 Let every person be subject to higher authorities.

For there is no authority except from God: those that exist are ordained by God.

• The highest authority is naturally the Lord Himself.

• I will often see this depicted as an umbrella in the spirit. I will see someone with an umbrella above them with holes in it. Or I will perhaps see that they are not standing under the umbrella away from the storm.

• When I see this I know that the Lord is saying that this person’s authority is not covering them correctly. Secondly they are not under cover at all and are under attack.

• As the Scripture says, all authority ultimately comes from the Lord. Negative: To rebel against an authority that you personally know God has told you to be under, is tantamount to rebelling against the Lord Himself.

See also:

Father • ... The Way of Dreams and Visions

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Spiritually there is a degree of ambivalence in the symbol of the beard and the meaning will depend on the dreamer’s own culture. It may mean wisdom and dignity, or alternatively it may mean deceit and deviousness.

The bearded wise old man of the archetypes signifies inner wisdom.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

DreamPedia

By bringing meaning to the signs, symbols, archetypes, and elements of the Upper World, whether through night dreams or collected through the synchronistic events of the waking dream, we discover that the otherworidly intersects the worldly. Symbols of a divine origin, such as angels, halos. rainhows, suns, moons and stars, bring the qualities of the Upper World of dreams into life By engaging in meaningful play with these symbolic reprc-sentations from our dreams, we may thus realize that our wodd can be traced to divine origins.

Upper World dreams deliver us into the certainty that spirit is all around us. assembled in the moment. And at any given moment our lives may take new. more positive direction if we choose to become lucid in our waking life and accept the grace around us. Enlightenment is the realization that heaven's dream is here on earth and we need not seek to leave our bodies to ascend Dreaming itself is a process of ascension.

Dreams in general are of transcendent value to the spintual- ly centered mind.

The related psychological work may even be viewed as spirit-driven. Each growth step we take through conscious dream work affects die collective unconscious, which includes every soul and every living thing The reverberation of our progress transforms the organism of the universe We may ourselves become like shamans and mediate the Upper World with the Middle World through recognizing dreams of a transcendent quality and bnnging the visions and information they communicate to those around us. By doing so, we bring inspiration and wisdom to our community of friends.

Spirituality and psychology have come together within the field of transpersonal psychology, which investigates transcendent states as an integral pan of rhe whole of an individual For the conscious dreamer, the exploration of dreams is a quest lor personal truth and spintual ccrtainty. By honoring the dreams from the Upper World as containing sacred information, one may be guided and supported toward life's fulfillment.... DreamPedia

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The creative but practical part of us; the side of us which tends to create with old ideas and attitudes (the wood) but which perhaps is not very radical; sometimes the self. See Christ under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Celebrities appeanng on the stage of your dream are often acting out archetypal dramas and comedies, which we call myths. They may appear as some of the archetypes from the mythologies of the world, such as the Greek myths, which still drive Western culture. They may offer their associated character traits and roles to represent aspects of your personality, or they may come to represent an idealized version of a person in your life.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Dream Meanings of Versatile

To be particularly conscious of the centre of any aspect of a dream indicates we are aware of a goal or objective, or perhaps even of our real self. We may need to be the centre of attention whatever the circumstances. Also consult the section on archetypes in the introduction.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see journey

1- In modern times most people will dream about the car or other forms of transport.

To dream of a chariot would possibly imply the nccessitv for old-fashioned methods of control within the situations surrounding the dreamer.

2- On a psychological level we may have to explore archetypal images (see Archetypes) for an understanding of our own motivations.

The chariot may represent basic urges before they have been altered by conditioning.

3- The Sun and the Divine are represented by the chariot in dreams.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Religious feeling or beliefs, including moral code, or our feelings about organised religion. Each of us has a sense of our relationship with the forces of life within us, and the world outside us.

A church may depict this sense and what we do with it; our sense of what is holy or fundamental to all life, and therefore eternal, such as the urge to exist; the cycles of life and growth; reproduction and interdependence. See Christ and archetypes; religion and dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Meanings of Versatile

See sirens in archetypes in the introduction... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: My son comes in and I see he is unwashed and seems preoccupied and as if he has not cared for himself for some days. I ask him what is wrong. He tells me his mother is dead. I then seem to know she has been dead for days, and my two sons have not told anyone. In fact my other son has not even accepted the fact’ (Anthony). Anthony is a divorcee. Processing the dream he realised the two sons are ways he is relating to the death of his marriage to the chil­dren’s mother.

A dead body, death of someone we know: very often, as in the example, the death of some aspect of our outer or inner life. Our drive to achieve something might die, and be shown as a death in our dreams. Lost opportunities or unexpressed potentials in ourselves are frequently shown as dead bodies. All of us unconsciously leam attitudes or survival skills from parents and others. Often these are unrecognised and may be shown as dead.

Example: ‘During my teens I was engaged to be married, when I found a more attractive panner and was in consider­able conflict. Consistently I dreamt I was at my fiance’s fu­neral until it dawned on me the dream was telling me I wanted to be free of him. When I gave him up the dreams ceased1 (Mrs D).

If the death is of someone we know: fre­quently, as in the example, desire to be free of the person, or unexpressed aggression; perhaps one’s love for that person has ‘died’. We often ‘kill’ our partners in dreams as we move towards independence. Or we may want someone ‘out of the way so we do not have to compete for attention and love.

Death of oneself: exploration of feelings about death; re­treat from the challenge of life; split between mind and body.

The experience of leaving the body is frequently an expression of this schism between the ego and life processes. Also death of old patterns of living—one’s ‘old self.

The walking dead, rigor mortis: aspects of the dreamer which are denied, per­haps through fear. Dancing with, meeting death or dark fig­ure: facing up to death.

Example: ‘I dream I have a weak heart which will be fatal.

It is the practice of doctors in such cases to administer a tablet causing one painlessly to go to sleep—die. I am completely calm and accepting of my fate. I suddenly realise I must leave notes for my parents and children. I must let them know how much I love them, must do this quickly before my time runs out’ (Mrs M). This is a frequent type of ‘death* dream. It is a way of reminding ourselves to do now what we want to, espe­cially regarding love. Although the unconscious has a very real sense of its eternal nature and continuance after physical death, the ego seldom shares this. We have an unconscious realisation that collective humanity carries the living experi­ence from the life of the dead.

The farmer roday uncon­sciously uses the collective experience of humanity in farming. What innovation he does today his children or others will learn and carry into the future. Idioms: dead and buried, dead from the neck up/down; dead to the world, play dead. See death and rebirth under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Meanings of Versatile

We may recognize a faithful and constant companion, a protector or, more negatively, somebody we can’t shake off and who might make trouble. Dreaming of a dog we once owned or knew at a previous time in our lives shows that there may be memories associated with that period of our life, which hold clues to present behaviour.

A huntress with dogs indicates we are making a connection with one of the feminine archetypes, that of the amazon.

A dog guarding gates or being near a cemetery signifies the guardian of the threshold and creatures that must be put to sleep, tamed or brought under control before there can be an initiation into the secrets of the underworld.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Sigmund Freud was the founder of modern therapeutic analysis of dreams. Freud encouraged clients to relax on a couch and allow free associations to arise in con­nection with aspects of their dream. In this way he helped the person move from the surface images (manifest content) of the dream to the underlying emotions, fantasies and wishes (latent content), often connected with early childhood. Be­cause dreams use condensation—a mass of different ideas or experiences all represented by one dream image or event— Freud stated that the manifest content was meagre’ compared with the ‘richness and variety’ of latent content.

If one suc­ceeds in touching the feelings and memories usually con­nected with a dream image, this becomes apparent because of the depth of insight and experience which arises. Although ideally the Freudian analyst helps the client discover their own experience of their dream, it can occur that the analyst puts to the client readymade views of the dream. Out of this has occurred the idea of someone else ‘analysing or telling us about our dream.

Carl Jung used a different approach. He applied amplifica­tion (see entry), helped the client explore their associations, used active imagination (see entry) and stuck to the structure of the dream. Because amplification also put to the client the information and experience of the therapist, again the dreamwork can be largely verbal and intellectual, rather than experiential.

In the approach of Fritz Perls (gestalt therapy) and Moreno (psychodrama), dream analysis is almost entirely experiential.

The person exploring the dream acts out or verbalises each role or aspect of the dream.

If one dreamt of a house, in gestalt one might stan by saying I am a house’ and then go on to describe oneself just as one is as the particular house in the dream. It is important, even if the house were one existing externally, not to attempt a description of the external house, but to stay with the house as it was in the dream. This is like amplification, except the client gives all the information. This can be a very dramatic and emotional experience because we begin consciously to touch the immense realms of experience usually hidden behind the image. When successful this leads to personal insights into behaviour and creativity. See dream processing; amplification; gestalt dream work.

dream as a meeting place Any two people, or group of people who share their dreams, particularly if they explore the associated feelings and thoughts connected with the dream images, achieve social intimacy quickly. Whether it is a family sharing their dreams, or two fnends, an environment can be created in which the most profound feelings, painful and wonderful, can be allowed. Such exposure of the usually pri­vate areas of one s feelings and fears often presents new infor­mation to the dreamer, and also allows ventilation of what may never have been consciously expressed before. In doing so a healing release is reached, but also greater self under­standing and the opportunity to think over or reconsider what is discovered.

Herbert Reed, editor of the dream magazine Sundance, and resident in Virginia Beach, Va., initiated group dreaming ex­periments. It started because Reed noticed that in the dream groups he was running, when one of the group aired a prob­lem, other members would subsequently dream about that person’s problem. He went on to suggest the group should attempt this purposely and the resulting dreams shared to see if they helped the person with the problem.

The reported dreams often formed a more detailed view of the person’s situation. In one instance the group experienced many dream images of water. It aided the woman who was seeking help to admit she had a phobia of water and to begin thinking about learning to swim. In another experiment, a woman presented the problem of indecision about what college to transfer to and what to study. Her group subsequently said they were confused because they had not dreamt about school. Several had dreams about illicit sex. though, which led the woman to admit she was having an affair with a married man. She went on to realise that it was the affair which was underlying her indecision. She chose to end the affair and further her career.

Whatever may be underlying the results of Reed’s expen- ments, it is noticeably helpful to use the basic principles he is working with. They can be used by two people equally as well as a group—by a parent and child, wife and husband, busi­nessman and employee. One sets out to dream about each other through mutual agreement. Like any undertaking, the involvement, and therefore the results, are much more pro­nounced if there is an issue of reasonable importance behind the experiment. It helps if one imagines that during sleep you are going to meet each other to consider what is happening between you. Then sleep, and on waking take time to recall any dream. Note it down, even if it seems far removed from what you expected. Then explore its content using the tech­niques in dream processing.

Example: My wife and I decided to attempt to meet in our dreams. I dreamt I was in a room similar to the back bedroom of my previous marnage. My present wife was with me. She asked me to help her move the wardrobe. It reminded me of, but did not look like, the one which had been in that bed­room. I stood with my back to it, and reached my hands up to press on the top, inside. In this way I carried it to another wall. As I put it down the wood broke. I felt it ought to be thrown away’ (Thomas B). Thomas explored the dream and found he connected feelings about his first marriage with the wardrobe and bedroom. In fact the shabby wardrobe was Tom’s feelings of shabbiness at having divorced his first wife. In his first marriage, represented by the bedroom, he always felt he was married for life. In divorcing, he had done some­thing he didn’t like and was carrying it about with him. He says ‘1 am carrying this feeling of shabbiness and second best into my present relationship, and I need to get rid of it.’

dream as a spiritual guide Dreams have always been con­nected with the spiritual side of human experience, even though today many spiritual leaders disagree with consider­ation of dreams. Because dreams put the dreamer in touch with the source of their own internal wisdom and certainty, some conflict has existed between authoritative priesthood and public dreaming.

A lay person finding their own ap­proach to God in a dream might question the authority of the priests. No doubt people frequently made up dreams about God in order to be listened to. Nevertheless, despite opposi­tion, Matthew still dreamt of an angel appearing to him, Jo­seph was still warned by God to move Jesus; Peter still dreamt his dream of the unclean animals.

The modern scientific approach has placed large question marks against the concept of the human spirit. Study of the brain’s functions and biochemical activities have led to a sense of human personality being wholly a series of biological and biochemical events.

The results of this in the relationship between doctor and patient, psychiatrist and client, some­times results in the communication of human personality be­ing of little consequence. It may not be put into words, but the intimation is that if one is depressed it is a biochemical prob­lem or a brain malfunction.

If one is withdrawn or autistic, it is not that there is a vital centre of personality which has for some reason chosen to avoid contact, but that a biochemical or physiological problem is the cause—it’s nothing personal, take this pill (to change the biochemistry, because you are not really a person). Of course we have to accept that human personality must sometimes face the tragedy of biochemical malfunction, but we also need to accept that biochemical and physiological process can be changed by human will and courage.

In attempting to find what the human spirit is by looking at dreams, creativity stands out.

The spiritual nature may not be what we have traditionally considered it to be.

An overview of dreams and how dreamers relate to them suggests one amaz­ing fact. Let us call it the ‘seashell effect’. When we hear sounds in a shell that we hold to our ear, the noises heard seem exterior to oneself, yet they are most likely amplification of sounds created in our own ear, perhaps by the passage of blood. Imagine an electronic arcade machine which the player could sit in and, when running, the player could be engulfed in images, sounds, smell and sensation. At first there is shim­mering darkness, then a sound, and lights move. Is it a face seen, or a creature. Like Rorschach’s ink blots, the person creates figures and scenes out of the shapeless light and sound.

A devil appears which terrifies the player. People, de­mons, animals, God and angels appear and fade. Scenes are clearcut or a maelstrom of movement and ill-defined activity. Events arise showing every and any aspect of human experi­ence. Nothing is impossible.

If, on stepping out, we told the player that what occurred was all their own creation due to unconscious feelings, fears, habits, thoughts and physiological processes occurring within them, like the seashell effect, they might say ‘Good God, is that all it was, and I thought it was real. What a waste of time.’

Whether we can accept it or not, as a species we have created out of our own longings, fears, pain and perhaps vi­sion, God, with many different names—politics, money, dev­ils, nationalism, angels, an, and so on and on. All of it has flowed out of us. Perhaps we even deny we are the authors of the Bible, wars, social environments. Responsibility is diffi­cult. It is easier to believe the source is outside oneself. And if we do take responsibility for our amazing creativity, we may feel ‘is that all it is—me?’ Yet out of such things, such fears, such drives, such unconscious patterns as we shape our dreams with, we shape our life and fonune, we shape our children, we shape the world and our future.

The shadow of fear we create in our dream, the situation of aloneness and anger, becomes a pattern of feelings, real in its world of mind. We create a monster, a Djinn, a devil, which then haunts and influences us. Or with feelings of hope, of purposiveness and love, create other forces in us and the world. But we are the creator. We are in no way separate from the forces which create our existence. We are those creative forces. In the deep­est sense, not just as an ego, we create ourselves, and we go on creating ourselves. We are the God humanity has looked so long for.

The second aspect of the human spirit demonstrated by dreams is consciousness.

The unconscious mind, if its func­tion is not clogged with a backlog of undealt with painful childhood experience and nonfunctional premises, has a pro­pensity to form gestalts. It takes pieces of experience and fits them together to form a whole. This is illustrated by how we form gestalts when viewing newsprint photographs, which are made up of many small dots. Our mind fits them together and sees them as a whole, giving meaning where there are only dots. When the human mind is working well, when the indi­vidual can face a wide range of emotions, from fear and pain to ecstasy, this process of forming gestalts can operate very creatively. This is because it needs conscious involvement, and if the personality is frightened of deep feeling, the uniting of deeply infantile and often disturbing cxpcrience is cut out. Yet these areas are very rich mines of information, containing our most fundamental learning.

If the process is working well, then one’s expenence is gradually transformed into insights which transcend and thereby transform one s personal life.

For instance, we have witnessed our own binh in some manner, we also see many others appeanng as babies. We see people ageing, dying. We see millions of events in our life and in others.

The uncon­scious, deeply versed in imagery, ritual and body language, out of which it creates its dreams, picks up information from music, architecture, traditional rituals, people walking in the street, the unspoken world of parental influence.

The sources are massive, unbelievable. And out of it all our mind creates meaning. Like a process of placing face over face over face until a composite face is formed, a synthesis of all the faces; so the unconscious scans all this information and creates a world view, a concept of life and death.

The archetypes Jung talks of are perhaps the resulting synthesis of our own expenence, reaching points others have met also.

If so, then Chnst might be our impression of humanity as a whole.

If we dare to touch such a synthesis of experience it may be seanng, breathtaking.

It breaks the boundaries of our present personality and con­cepts because it transcends. It shatters us to let the new vision emerge. It reaches, it soars, like an eagle flying above the single events of life. Perhaps because of this the great hawk of ancient Egypt represented the human spirit.

Lastly, humans have always been faced by the impossible.

To a baby, walking and not wetting its pants is impossible, but with many a fall and accident it does the impossible. It is a god in its achievement.

To talk, to fly heavier-than-air planes, to walk on the Moon, were all impossible. Humans challenge the impossible every day. Over and over they fall, back into defeat. Many lie there broken. Yet with the next moment along come youngsters with no more sense than grasshoppers, and because they don’t know what the differ­ence is between right and left, do the impossible. Out of the infinite potential, the great unknown, they draw something new. With hope, with folly, with a wisdom they gain from who knows where, they demand more. And it’s a common everyday son of miracle. Mothers do it constantly for their children—transcending themselves. Lovers go through hell and heaven for each other and flower beyond who they were. You and I grow old on it as our daily bread, yet fail to see how holy it is. And if we turn away from it, it is because it offers no certainties, gives no authority, claims no reward. It is the spir­itual life of people on the street. And our dreams remember, even if we fail.

For this is the body and blood of the human spirit.

dream as a therapist and healer There is a long tradition of using dreams as a base for both physical and psychological healing. One of the earliest recorded incidents of such healing is when Pharaoh’s ‘spirit was troubled, and he sent for all the magicians of Egypt and all its wise men; and Pharaoh told them his dream, but there was none who could interpret it’. Then Joseph revealed the meaning of the dream and so the healing of Pharaoh’s troubled mind took place (Genesis 41).

The Greek Temples of Asclepius were devoted to using dreams as a base for healing of body and mind (see dreams and ancient Greece).

The Iroquois Amerindians used a social form of dream therapy also (see Iroquoian dream cult).

The dream process was used much more widely throughout his­tory in such practices as Pentecostal Christianity, shaktipat yoga in India, and Anton Mesmer’s groups (see sleep move­ments).

Sigmund Freud pioneered the modern approach to the use of dreams in therapy, but many different approaches have developed since his work. Examples of the therapeutic action of gaining insight into dreams are to be found in the entnes on abreaction, recurring dreams, reptiles.

The entry on dream processing gives information about using a dream to gain insight and healing. See also dream as meeting place.

A feature which people who use their dreams as a thera­peutic tool mention again and again is how dreams empower them. Many of us have an unconscious feeling that any impor­tant healing work regarding our body and mind can only be undertaken and directed by an expert, the expert might be a doctor, a psychiatrist, psychotherapist, or osteopath. Witness­ing the result of their own dream process, even if helped by an expert, people feel in touch with a wonderful internal process which is working actively for their own good. One woman, who had worked on her dream with the help of a fnend (non expert), said It gave me great confidence in my own internal process. I realised there was something powerful in myself working for my own good. It was a feeling of cooperating with life.’ One is frequently amazed by one’s own resources of wisdom, penetrating insight and sense of connection with life, as met in dreamwork. This is how dreams play a pan in helping one towards wholeness and balance.

The growing awareness of one’s central view of things, which is so wide, piercing and often humorous, brings developing self respect as the saga of one’s dreams unfolds.

There may be no hint of this, however, if a person simply records their dreams without attempting to find a deeply felt contact with their contents. It is in the searching for associ­ated feelings and ideas that the work of integrating the many strands of one’s life begins. Gradually one weaves, through a co-operative action with the dream process, a greater unifica­tion of the dark and the light, the painful and transcendent in one’s nature.

The result is an extraordinary process of educa­tion. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dreamers Dictionary

Symbols, metaphors, and archetypes in your dream do not appear by accident but usually have a deeper and more powerful significance. Some dreams are simply a way for us to MdigestH the previous day’s events. Most of the time, however, they are messages from our soul, unresolved events and feelings that still reside in our unconscious; they also may provide “visionary” suggestions. That is the reason why we believe it is so important to try to decipher dreams.

The best “specialist” to do this is you.

An expert dream analyst or a psychotherapist would at best be a “midwife” or guide, and then only if your dream presented clear indications that there was emotional illness and that psychological support was important.

A dream symbol often points to several possibilities.

For instance, the question of whether you are the victim or the perpetrator plays a major role that only honest self-examination can answer. Dream interpretation is not a game, some thing you do every now and then. It only makes sense if it becomes—like daily hygiene—a consistent part of your daily routine—a form of “emotional hygiene.” The rewards are well worth the effort. Nothing can replace self-analysis followed by self-awareness. Only in this way can you lead a happy and productive life and be at peace with yourself.

Your unconscious is often the best friend you can have, because it provides advice and suggestions about how to deal with the problems that arise.

The wisdom of your unconscious can even open a window into the future—allowing you to face the unknown with confidence.

The increase in the number of people who suffer from emotional problems can be laid at the door of today’s culture, with its emphasis on acquiring money, property, and success. But those who are in touch with their unconscious and its messages won’t easily violate the natural needs of their soul.

The best protection we have against depression, anxieties, and coundess other emotional problems is effective dream interpretation.... Dreamers Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The enormous potential power of life, in growth and activity.

If we run from the elephant we are afraid of our own strength or inner drive. Idioms: white elephant; pink elephants; rogue elephant. See the self under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘At the top of the stairs is a small door, half opened as if inviting me to go up. I get an overpowering sense of something evil beyond the door just waiting for me’ (Charles M). Usually refers to some of our own urges which we have judged as wrong because of moral values, and thus denied expression. Charles probably feels that what he identi­fies with as himself—his established values and beliefs—is threatened by what he senses beyond the door. Whatever threatens our T or ego is often felt to be evil, even if it is natural urges.

The unbalanced and real evils in the world, such as terrorising of individuals and minority groups, can of course be shown as the feeling of evil.

Example: %I am lying on the floor in my bedroom with a towel over me. I am trying to hide and protect myself because I am terrified. There are four devils trying to get into my body and take over. My bedroom is going like a whirlpool around me, like evil all around me. I wake in a hot sweat and am terrified to go back to sleep’ (Joanna). Joanna is most likely in conflict with her sexuality—the bedroom. When we fight with our own urges they often feel like external agencies—evil forces—attacking us. Sometimes refers to repressed emotional pain. See aboriginal; devil under archetypes. See also active/ passive. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Language of Dreams

(see Dragon, Monsters, Phoenix, Storytellers)

Characters or themes from the fables of our youth commonly appear in dreams as archetypes of personality traits or prevalent situations. Normally, the subconscious tries to illustrate a key that will help you develop those traits, overcome negative habits, or succeed in your present circumstances.

For example, the tale of Goldilocks and the Three Bears could be counseling you to be less selfish or bearish in the way you act toward strangers.

The hero or heroine reflects your Higher Self, and the best personal characteristics you hope to eventually develop. Pay close attention to what these people do (see Icons, Men, Women).

Kings and queens reflect authority figures (or situations, belief systems, etc.) to whom you subjugate yourself.

The question here is whether such service is beneficial to you as a whole person. Alternatively, these can be icons of gods and goddesses.

Fantastic creatures represent your ability to imagine and reach beyond surface reality. Each creature also has a unique symbolic message to consider.

For example, dreaming of a Lilliputian might indicate that you feel very “small” about something right now, or that you lack self-confidence.... The Language of Dreams

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

such as Griffins, Unicorns, Minolaurs

1- In dream imagery, in order to draw the dreamer’s attention to certain qualities, animals may be shown as having characteristics belonging to other creatures. Archctypally, there arc many combinations which arc possible and which will give unlimited potential to the creative abilities within the dreamer (see Archetypes).

The dreamer is being shown that there is Freedom from conventional principles.

2- Given the freedom to crcate, the mind can produce both the fantastic and the grotesque. Such fabulous beasts are the result of trying to reconcile these two polarities.

3- Fearsome and terrifying powers of nature arc represented in this interpretation.

The dreamer should be aware of his own ‘animalistic’ power and whether he can control it.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

From our family we leam most of the positive and negative patterns of relationship and attitudes towards living, which we carry into daily events. Father’s uncertainty in deal­ing with people, or his anxiety in meeting change, may be the roots of our own difficulties in those areas.

If our mother is unable to develop a feeling contact with us, we may lack the confidence to meet our emotions.

Our maturation as a man or woman calls us in some way to meet and integrate our childhood desire, which includes sexual desire for our parent of the opposite sex, and rivalry with, mingled with dependence on, the parent of the same sex. Even a missing parent, the mother or father who died or left, is a potent figure internally.

An absence of a father’s or mother’s love or presence can be as traumatic as any power­fully injuring event. Our parents in our dreams are the image (full of power and feeling) of the formative forces and experi­ences of our identity. They are the ground, the soil, the bloody carnage, out of which our sense of self emerged. But our iden­tity cannot gain any real independence while still dominated by these internal forces of our creation. Heraclitus said we cannot swim in the same river twice; attempting to repeat or compete with the vinues of a parent is a misapprehension of the true nature of our own personality. Sec individuation.

Family group: The whole background of experience which makes up our values and views. This background is made up of thousands of different obvious and subtle things such as social status; amount of books in the home; how parents feel about themselves; how they relate to life outside the family; whether dominant roles are encouraged; what nationality par­ents are; what unconscious social attitudes surround the fam­ily (i.e. the master and servant, or dominating employer and subservient employee, roles which typified England at the turn of the century still colour many attitudes in the UK). Simply put, it is our internal ‘family’ of urges and values; the overall feeling tone of our family life—security, domination, whatever it was, the unconscious coping patterns of the fam­ily.

Parents together in dream: our general wisdom, back­ground of information and experience from which we make important decisions or gain intuitive insights. Parents also de­pict the rules and often irrational disciplinary codes we learnt as a child which still speak to us from within, and perhaps pass on to our own children without reassessment. These in­clude everything from ‘Don’t speak with your mouth full’ to the unspoken Masturbation is unholy/

Dead parent in dream: the beginning of independence from parent; repression of the emotions they engendered in us, our emotions regarding our parent’s death; feelings about death. See dead people dreams.

Example: ‘My father was giving me and another woman some medicine. Something was being forced on us. I started to hit and punch him in the genitals and, when he was facing the other way, in the backside. I seemed to be just the right height to do this and I had a very angry feeling that I wanted to hurt him as he had hurt me’ (Audrey V). Hurting, burying , killing parent: in the example Audrey’s height shows her as a child. She is releasing anger about the attitudes and situations her father forced down her throat’.

To be free of the intro­verted restraints and ready made values gathered from our parents, at some time in our growth we may kill or bury them. Although some people arc shocked by such dreams, they are healthy signs of emerging independence. Old myths of killing the chief so the tribe can have a new leader depict this pro­cess. When father or mother are dead’ in our dream, we can inherit all the power gained from whatever was positive in the relationship. Seeing parent drunk, incapable, foolish: another means of gaining independence from internalised values or stultifying drives to ‘honour’ or admire father or mother.

father

Generally positive: authority; ability in the external world; family or social conventions, how we relate to the ‘doer’ in us; physical strength and protectiveness; the will to be. Generally negative: introvened aggression; dominance by fear of other people’s authority, uncaring sexual drive; feelings of not being loved. See father under archetypes; man.

mother

Generally positive: feelings; ability in relationships; uniting spirit of family; how we relate to feelings in a relation­ship; strength to give of self and nunure; intuition. Generally negative: will based on irrational likes and dislikes; opinion generated by anxiety or jealousy; domination by emotions; lack of bonding. See Great Mother under archetypes; woman.

siblings and children

Whether brother, sister, daughter or son (see below in this entry), the most general use in our dreams is to depict an aspect of ourself. However it is almost universal to believe with great conviction that our dream is about the person in our dream.

A mother seeing a son die in her dream often goes through great anxiety because there lurks in her a sense of it being a precognitive dream. Vinually everyone at some time dreams about members of their close family dying or being killed—lots of mothers dream this, and their chil­dren live till 80. But occasionally children do die. Is the dream then precognitive, or is it coincidental?

Example: ‘I was walking along a rather dusty track carrying my younger son who would be around 10 months old and I was feeling rather tired. Suddenly I met a man who stopped to talk to me and commented I looked rather weary carrying the baby. He said, come with me and look over this wall and you will see such a sight that will gladden your hean. By standing on tiptoe I could just see over the wall and the sight I beheld took my breath away, it was so beautiful’ (Johan E). Here Johan’s son depicts the weight of responsibility she feels.

The beauty is her own resources of strength in motherhood.

Example: ‘I have just given binh to twins and they lay on the floor. We started to care for them. My mother took them to the doctor for his advice while I went to see my married sister who has two children. I met them there with the twins so that my sister could give her opinion on the babies. She had recent experience of childbirth and could tell us if the babies were good specimens’ (Miss E). Miss E has no children of her own, so she is uncertain of her own capacity to have and raise them.

The mother depicts her own mothering abilities, which seek confidence from an authority figure. Her sister is her own nearest experience of childbirth. So out of what she has leamt from observing her sister, she is assessing her own qualities.

Most often the family member depicts the qualities in our­self which we feel are part of the character of the person dreamt of. So the passionate one in the family would depict our passions; the intellectual one our own mind, the anxious one our hesitations. Use the questions in dream processing to define this. Having done this, can you observe what the dream depicts? For Miss E it would be questions regarding mother­hood.

Example: ‘My daughter told me the only positive part of my work in a helping profession was with a woman who had turned from it to religion. There followed a long and powerful interchange in which I said she had as yet no mind of her own. She was dominated by her mother’s anxiety, and the medical rationalism of her training. When she had dared to step beyond her own anxieties to integrate the lessons of her own life, then I would listen again’ (Desmond S). Desmond was divorced and struggling with his own pain and guilt about leaving his daughter while still a teenager. His daughter de­picts this conflict between his feelings and his rational self.

brother

Oneself, or the denied pan of self, meeting whatever is met in the dream; feelings of kinship; sense of rivalry, feel­ings about a brother. Woman’s dream, younger brother: out­going but vulnerable self; rivalry. Woman’s dream, older brother, authority, one’s capable outgoing self. Man’s dream, younger brother: vulnerable feelings; oneself at that age. Man’s dream, older brother: experience; authority, feelings of persecution. See boy; man. Idioms: big brother, brothers in arms; blood brother.

sister

Feeling self, or the lesser expressed pan of self; rival; feelings about a sister. Man s dream, younger sister: vulnera­ble emotions; rival for love of parents. Man’s dream, older sister: capable feeling self; feelings of persecution. Woman’s dream , younger sister: one’s experiences at that age; vulnera­ble feelings, rival for parents’ love. Woman’s dream, older sister: capable feeling self. See girl; woman. Idioms: sisters under the skin.

daughter

One’s relationship with the daughter, the daughter, or son, can represent what happens in a marnage between husband and wife.

The child is what has arisen from the bonding, however momentary, of two people. In dreams the child therefore is sometimes used to depict how the relation­ship is faring. So a sick daughter might show the feelings in the relationship being ‘ill’.

In a mother’s dream: often feelings of suppon or compan­ionship; feelings of not being alone in the area of emotional bonds; or one’s feeling area; responsibility; the ties of parent­hood; oneself at that age; one’s own urges, difficulties, hurts, which may still be operative. Also a comparison; the mother might see the daughter’s youth, opportunity, and have feelings about that. So the daughter may represent her sense of lost opportunity and youth—even envy, competition in getting the desire of a man.

In a father’s dream: one’s feeling self, the feelings or diffi­culties about the relationship with daughter; the struggles one’s own feeling self goes through to mature, how the sexual feelings are dealt with in a family—occurs especially when she starts courting; sister, parental responsibility; one’s wife when younger. Someone else’s daughter: feelings about one’s own daughter, feelings about younger women.

Example: 1 am standing outside a supermarket with heavy bags wearing my mac, though the sun is warm. My daughter and two friends are playing music and everyone stops to lis­ten. I start to wnte a song for them, but they pack up and go on a bus whilst I am still writing. I am left alone at the bus stop with my heavy burden of shopping, feeling incredibly unwanted’ (Mrs F). Such dreams of the daughter becoming independent can occur as soon as the child starts school, per­sisting until the mother finds a new attitude. See child; woman.

son

Extroverted self; desires connected with self expression; feelings connected with son; parental responsibility. Mother’s dream: one’s ambitions; potential, hopes; your marriage—see example.

Example: ‘My wife and I were walking out in the country­side. I looked around suddenly and saw my four-year-old son near a hole. He fell in and I raced back.

The hole was narrow but very deep. I could see water at the bottom but no sign of my son. I didn’t know whether I could leap down and save him or whether it was too narrow. Then somehow he was out. His heart was just beating’ (Richard H). Richard had argued with his wife in such a way he feared the stability of their marriage.

The son represents what they had created together —a child, a marriage.

The marriage survived, as his dream self-assessed it would. Death of son: a mother often kills off her son in her dreams as she sees him make moves towards independence. This can happen from the first day of school on. Example: T am on a very high bridge over an extremely wide and deep river with steep banks. My son does a double somersault over the railing, falls into the water. I think he is showing off. I am unable to save him. My son is 18 and has staned a structural engineering course at university’ (Joyce H).

The showing-off suggests Joyce feels her son is doing daring things with his life, and the relationship in its old form dies.

Father’s dream: yourself at that age; what qualities you see in your son; your own possibilities, envy of youth and oppor­tunities; nvalry. Someone else’s son: feelings about one’s own son; feelings about younger men. Dead son: see dead people dreams. Sec boy. See also man; first example in falling.

wife

Depicts how you see the relationship with your wife; your relationship with your sexuality; sexual and emotional desire and pleasure; how you relate to intimacy in body, mind and spirit; your feeling, intuitive nature; habits of relationship developed with one’s mother. Example: ‘My wife was trying to get me out of her life, and out of the house. It was as if she were attempting to push me into a feeling of tension and rejection which would make me leave’ (David P). Out of childhood experience, in which his mother repeatedly threat­ened to give him away, David was finding it difficult to com­mit himself emotionally to his wife. In the dream his wife represents these feelings, so he sees her—his anxiety and pain —pushing him to break up the marriage.

Example: I was standing with my wife at the end of the garden of the house I lived in as a child. We were looking over the fence to the rising meadow beyond. She said, “Look at that bird in the tree there.” On our right, in a small ash tree, an enormous owl perched. It was at least 4 feet high, the biggest bird I have ever seen. I recognised it in the dream as a greater hooded owl, which was not native to our country. I was so excited I ran into the house to telephone someone— zoo, police, newspapers?—to tell them about the bird. I can­not remember contacting anyone, but felt the bird was there in some way to meet me. Also it was hungry and looking at next door’s bantams. So I wondered what I could give it to eat’ (David P). This shows the positive side of David’s rela­tionship with his wife.

The garden is the boundanes which arose from his childhood. But he is growing—the garden— and looking beyond them in connection with his marnage.

The amazing bird is the deep feelings he touches because he has a mate, like any other natural creature. Out of his mating he becomes aware of drives to build a home—nest—and give himself to his mate. These are natural and are a pan of his unconscious or spiritual nature.

The bird is a hooded owl which can see in the dark—the unconscious—because David is realising things he had never seen’ before.

The bird is masked, meaning putting the ego aside, which is a necessity for touching the wider dimension of life or the unconscious.

The hunger of the bird shows an intimate detail of what David has learnt from his wife. She had been working as a waitress and bringing home pieces of chicken for him, saved from her own meal.

The spiritual side of David wants to develop this quality of selfgiving, which his wife’s love had helped him see.

Example: ‘1 have been a widower since January 1979, hav­ing married in October 1941. I continually dream I am in London where my business was. I am walking the streets with my wife and suddenly I see her ahead of me in a yellow raincoat and hat. I call her and try to catch up, but suddenly she vanishes. In spite of calling and searching I cannot find her’ (Douglas G). This is a common theme dreamt by widow­ers or widows, disappearance of spouse. Douglas has ‘lost’ his wife. His dream shows the paradox of love after death of panner. His love is still there, years after her death. He is possibly still trying to love his wife as an externally real per­son. so his feelings can make no connection.

To meet what actually remains of his wife, within himself, he would need to face his own internal grieving, emotions, and all the feelings, memories, angers and beauty which make up the living re­mains of his wife within him. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- “flic family is the first basic security image that a child has. Often, through circumstances not within that child’s control, that image becomes distorted, and dreams will either attempt to put this image right or will confirm the distortion. Thus we may dream of an argument with a family member, but the interpretation will depend on both the circumstances of the dream and our everyday relationship with that person. All future relationships are influenced by the ones we first develop within the family.

Psychologically the struggle for individuality should take place within the safety of the family unit. This, however, docs not always happen. In dreams we are able to ‘manipulate’ the images of our family members, so that we can work through our difficulties without harming anyone else (It is interesting to note that one person working on his own dreams can have a profound noticeable cffcct on the interactions and unconscious bondings between other members of his family). Almost all of the problems we encounter in life are reflected within the family, so in times of sUess we will dream of previous problems and difficulties that the family has experienced.

The Spiritual Triangle.

A group in which we feel safe.

Since relationships in the family- are so important, dreams containing family members can have extra significance. Some typical dreams are:

A man’s mother being transformed into another woman

A man’s first closc relationship with a woman is with his mother. Depending on the circumstances of the dream, such a transformation can be either positive or negative. It can be a sign of growth for him to realise, through dream, that he can let mother go. This transformation indicates some change in his perception of women (sec Airima).

A woman’s father, brother or lover turning into someone else Similarly, a woman’s first relationship with the male is usually with her father. She must learn to walk away from that relationship in order to progress onto fuller relationships. When she can handle her Animus (See Introduction), she is ready for that transformation.

A man’s brother or a woman’s sister appearing in a dream often represents the Shadow (See Introduction). Often it is easier to project the negative side of our personalities onto members of the family.

If this projection is allowed to continue, it can cause difficulty with family relationships in later life. Often the solution will present itself in dreams to enable us to come to terms with our own projections. “fhe pattern of aggressions between familv members is fairly typical, but oddly is often easier to work through in dreams than in everyday life.

Dreams about the family figure so prominently because most of the conflicts and problems in life are experienced first within that environment. It is as though a pattern is laid down which, until it is broken willingly, will continue to appear.

Confusion of family members e.g. mother’s face on father’s body suggests that we may be having problems in deciding which parent is most important to us. Family members suffering from injury or trauma or appearing to be distorted in some way may reflect the dreamer’s fear for, or about, that person.

A family member continually appearing in dreams or, conversely, not appearing when expected The relationship with that person (or the dreamer’s concept of that person) needs to be better understood. Dreaming of an incestuous relationship may indicate that the dreamer has become obsessed in some way with the other person.

The dream has occurred in order to highlight either the importance or the potential danger - of such a relationship.

Dreamer’s parents crushing the dreamer and thus forcing rebellion. This suggests that the dreamer needs to break away from learnt childhood behaviour and develop as an individual. Dreaming of a parent’s death can also have the same significance. When a parent appears in our own environment, we will have learnt to change roles within the parent/child relationship and perhaps will accept our parents as friends. Parents behaving inappropriately can indicate our need to recognise that they are only human, and not as perfcct as we had first perceived. Dreaming of rivalry with one parent When a child is first born, it moves through extreme self- involvement to an exclusive relationship, usually with mother. Onlv later docs he or she becomc aware of the need for a different relationship with a third person. Often this relationship causes the child to question his or her own validity as a person. When this question is not resolved successfully it may persist in the dream image of conflict with a parent. Dreaming of conflict between a loved one and a member of one’s family The dreamer has not fully differentiated between his needs and desire for each person. Learning how to love outside the family is a sign of maturity.

The figure of a family member intruding in dreams suggests that family loyalties can get in the way within the dreamer’s everyday life. Rivalry between siblings in dreams usually harks back to a feeling of insecurity and doubt, possibly as to whether we are loved enough within the family framework.

Individual members and then- position within the family can symbolise the various archetypes. Thus, father can represent the masculine principle and authority; whereas mother represents the nurturing, protective principle. Brother As already stated, a brother can represent both feelings of kinship and of rivalry. In a man’s dream an older brother can represent experience and authority, while a younger brother suggests vulnerability and possibly lack of maturity. In a woman’s dream, a younger brother can represent a sense of rivalry, but also of vulnerability; whether her own or her brother’s.

An older brother can signify her extrovert self.

Daughter When the relationship with a daughter is highlighted in dreams, it often represents the outcome of the relationship between husband and wife. In a woman’s dream, the relationship with the daughter usually suggests a mutually supportive one although rivalry and jealousy can arise and needs to be dealt with. Sometimes this can safely be done in dreams. In a man’s dream his daughter may represent his fears and doubts about his own ability to handle his vulnerability.

Extended family (such as cousins, aunts, uncles)

Members of the extended family usually appear in dreams either as themselves, or as typifying various parts of ourselves which arc recognisible.

Father If the relationship with father has been successful in waking life, the image of father in dreams will be a positive one. Father represents authority and the conventional forms of law and order. In a man’s life father becomes a role model, whether appropriate or not. It is often only when the individual realises that he is not being true to his own nature that dreams can point the way to a more successful life. In a woman’s life, father is the ‘pattern’ on whom she bases all later relationships. When she appreciates that she longer need use this pattern. she is often able to work out in dreams a more appropriate way to have a mature relationship.

If the relationship with father has been a difficult or negative one, there mav be some resistance to resolving the various conflicts which will have arisen. Often this can be accomplished in dreams. Grandparents Grandparents appearing in dreams can highlight our attitude to them, but also to the traditions and beliefs handed down by them. It could be said that grandparents do not know whether they have clone a good job of raising their children until their sins and daughters have children of their own.

Husband/Live in partner

Crucial within the husband/wife relationship are the wife’s feelings about her own sexuality and intimacy of body, mind and spirit. Her view of herself will have been formed by her connection with her father, and any subsequent partnering will be coloured by that attachment.

If her doubts and fears about validity are not properly expressed, they will surface in dreams about the loss, or death, of her husband. They may also be projected onto other women’s husbands.

Mother A child’s relationship with mother is pivotal in its development. Largely it is the first relationship which the child develops, and should be perceived by the child as a nurturing, caring one.

If this does not happen, fears and doubts may arise. In a man’s life this may result in continually developing dependent relationships with older women, or denying his right to a relationship completely. In a woman’s life, her relationship with her mother will colour all other relationships. She may find herself pushed into nurturing the needy male, or in forming relationships with both men and women which do not satisfv her basic needs. There arc many ways through dreams of working through relationships with mother, and much can be gained by daring to take this step. Provided one has come to terms with this relationship, much material and spiritual success can be achieved.

Sister The sister in dreams usually represents the feeling side of ourselves. VVe have the ability to make links with that side of ourselves through being able to understand our sister’s personality. In a man’s dream if she is older, the sister can represent the potential for persecution, but also of caring.

If she is younger then she can epitomise the more vulnerable side of him. In a woman’s dream if the sister is younger, she can represent rivalry.

If older she stands for capability. Son The son in dreams can signify the dreamer’s need for self- expression and for extroversion. He can also signify parental responsibility. In a mother’s dream he may represent one’s ambitions, hope and potential. In a father’s dream he can highlight unfulfilled hopes and dreams. Wife/Live in partner The wife/husband relationship is based on how the man perceives himself to be.

If he has previously formed a good, if not successful relationship with his mother, he will attempt to prove himself a good husband through his dreams. He will experience potential loss and death of his partner in the same way as he experienced the ‘loss’ of his mother.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Psychological / emotional perspective: Psychologically the struggle for individuality should take place within the safety of the family unit. This, however, does not always happen. In dreams we are able to ‘manipulate’ the images of our family members, so that we can work through our difficulties without harming anyone else (it is interesting to note that one person working on his own dreams can have a profound noticeable effect on the interactions and unconscious bondings between other members of his family). Almost all of the problems we encounter in life are reflected within the family, so in times of stress we will dream of previous problems and difficulties that the family has experienced. Dreams about the family figure so prominently because most of the conflicts and problems in life are experienced first within that environment. It is as though a pattern is laid down which, until it is broken willingly, will continue to appear. Individual members and their position within the family can also symbolize the various archetypes – father can represent the masculine principle and authority, whereas mother represents the nurturing, protective principle.

For ease of reference the relevance of each figure in men’s and women’s dreams is included under each heading. Because we have had an intimate connection with members of the family they become easy targets for projection as dream images. We do have to decide whether they are in our dreams as themselves or whether they are there in a symbolic capacity.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- We may be word-associating as in the sense of being ‘fleeced’ or cheated.

The fleece of a sheep also represents security, warmth and comfort and will often signify those creature comforts we are able to give ourselves.

2- Dreaming of a fleece, as opposed to the sheep itself, signifies a return to an older set of values. It links with the tasks which are given us when we set out on our Hero’s journey (See Archetypes).

We may fear that what we are about to do is impossible, but our sense of self-preservation will not allow us to give up.

3- We may be in line for a spiritual reward. In this case the message would be ‘keep up the good work’. Our task will bring us success.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Feelings about one’s own death; very occasionally warning about health of person buried. One’s own funeral: it is a common dream to watch one s own funeral. It depicts your own philosophy about your end. May also remind you of what you want to do while alive; desire for sympathy from family; retreat from world; a feeling of deadness in life. Bury­ing yourself: leaving an old way of life or self behind. Some­one else’s funeral: a wish they were dead; a wish to be rid of them. Often unconsciously used as an easy way out of a rela­tionship—to fantasise them dead. It avoids the responsibility of making your wishes known. See second example under death. Parents’ funeral: difficulties with, or move towards in­dependence; exploring the feeling of their loss; repressing or letting go of the painful past. See buried; death. See also death and rebirth under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Generally, the inner life of the dreamer, the area of growth or change in your life; what you are trying to cultivate in yourself; feelings of peace; being near to one’s natural self, meditative attitude. See also second example in wife under family.

Example: ‘I was working in quite a large garden by my house.

A pan of the garden was like a little alcove by other buildings.

The garden was kidney shaped. I had dug this small plot and was considering how I might relax and sun­bathe there. My daughter said I should have worked harder on it—dug it better. I felt intense emotions of resentment and anger at her criticism. I staned telling her what a bad time I had in the past. How difficult it was even to work, let alone work hard’ (Beatrice G). This shows the garden as depicting what one has ‘worked on’ or produced in life. This could mean externally, or one’s own nature.

The daughter is Bea­trice’s own self criticism, which pushes her on, though she has a tendency to want to relax ‘in the sun*. This aspect of garden suggests how ‘fruitful’ one’s life has been socially and spiritually.

Beautiful garden: suggests satisfaction at time of dream. Overgrown, weeds in garden: awareness of particular parts of your personality which need working on. Perhaps negative habits need weeding out’. Square, circular garden: holds a lot of your gathered wisdom and insights which would be useful if made conscious. Garden pool: childhood, or early stage in the evolution of one’s self consciousness, during which there was a sense of communal awareness; sense of unity with life. See dream processing; the self under archetypes. Idioms: bear garden, up the garden path. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Jung says that while the Catholic church admits of dreams sent by God, most theologians make little attempt to understand dreams.

God in a dream can depict several things: a set of emotions we use to deal with anxiety, i.e. our own belief that a higher power is in charge, so therefore we are all right in the world and are not responsible; a parent image from early infancy; a set of moral or philosophical beliefs one holds; self judgment; something/one we worship; a feeling of connection with hu­manity; an expression of the fundamental creative/destructive process in oneself. See the self under archetypes; religion and dreams. See also individuation. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Religious Imagery

1- Dreaming of mythical goddesses connects us with our archetypal images of femininity (see Archetypes). In a woman’s dream a goddess will clarify the connection through the unconscious that exists between all women and female creatures. It is the sense of mystery, of a shared secret, which is such an intangible force within the woman’s psyche. In the waking state it is that which enables women to crcate a sisterhood or network among themselves in order to bring about a common aim.

To dream about goddesses therefore is to accept our right to initiation into this group. In a man’s dream the goddess figure signifies all that a man fears in the concept of female power. It usually also gives an insight into his earliest view of femininity through his experience of his mother.

2- There are many goddess figures in all cultures. There are those perceived as being destructive such as Kali, Bast and Lilith. and also beneficent ones such as Athena and Hermia.

The beneficent ones which women most closely relate to are given here: Aphrodite, goddess of love and beauty, moves women to be both creative and procreativc. She governs a woman’s enjoyment of love and beauty. Artemis, who is the goddess of the moon, personifies the independent feminine spirit whose ultimate goal is achievement. She is often pictured as the hunter. Athena is goddess of wisdom and strategy. She is logical and self-assured and is ruled by her mental faculties rather than her emotions. Demeter, the maternal archetype and goddess and fertility, highlights a woman’s drive to provide physical and spiritual support for her children. Hera, the goddess of marriage, denotes the woman who has her essential goal of finding a husband and being married as paramount and anv other role as secondary.

Hestia. goddess of the hearth, manifests the patient woman who finds steadiness in seclusion. She emits a sense of wholeness. Persephone, who is ultimately queen of the underworld but only- through having rejected her status as Demeter’s daughter, gives expression to woman’s tendency towards a need to please and be needed bv others. Her submissive behaviour and passivity must change to an ability to take responsibility for who she is.

3- Spiritually; women are able to make intuitive links with the essential aspects of her own personality. She then achieves a greater understanding of her own make up, and is able to use all facets of her being within her normal everyday life.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

See God; the self under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: A guru appearing in a dream nowadays need not only be a holy figure, but more a person whose words can be heeded. Thus, someone who is considered to be knowledgeable in the field of business might be seen as a guru. Consult the information on archetypes and also religious leaders in spiritual imagery in the introduction for further clarification.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Gives gender - specific: To be harassed in a dream by the opposite sex suggests that a man must pay attention to his softer side and a woman to her more assertive aspects. By a figure of the same sex suggests that a better balance needs to be established between the archetypes.

The dream character will usually indicate what needs attention.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Consult the entry for hunt / hunting / huntsman as well as the information on archetypes in the introduction for further clarification.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

If threatening: emotions, anxieties which one is fearful of; one’s self created misery, perhaps arising out of such things as anger or resentment we cling to, or a sense of being different or unwanted; feelings which burn in us. Sometimes people reverse the roles of heaven and hell. Hell becomes attractive, full of excitement, heaven an insipid place. See devil under archetypes; mention of heaven and hell in dream as spiritual guide. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Little Giant Encyclopedia

A well-known desire for acceptance and validation, even if you are the hero or heroine yourself.

If you see a hero, it would indicate that you are hoping for help, but pettiness is involved. Adventuresome, craving for admiration, exaggerated and immature masculinity and femininity; but also vitality and the ability to succeed, similar to Hammer.

It may also mean the opposite—that you feel like a failure—or you must be in control of everything. Dreams about heroes belong usually to so-called “big dreams,” which take place in a person just prior to puberty, during midlife crisis, or before dying.

According to Jung, the hero is one of the important archetypes.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

see Archetypes... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

If we are not the hero/ine of our own dream, we are probably still not accepting responsibility for our own drives, potentials and weaknesses.

The hero/ine frequently depicts our initiative and unexpressed potential. We might see our highest ideals as coming from an exterior figure such as Christ, and so miss touching the depths of our own being, avoid responsibility for our urges or actions. What happens to the hero/ine shows how one’s own creativity and expressed love fare. See Christ, hero/ine and the self under archetypes; religion and dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Meanings of Versatile

The horse in a dream represents the energy at our disposal.

A white horse depicts our spiritual awareness, a brown one the more pragmatic and down-to-earth side, while a black horse is the passionate side of our nature.

A pale horse has the same symbolism as the figure of death with this scythe.

A winged horse depicts the soul’s ability to transcend the earthly plane and, therefore, pass through the astral planes.

If the horse is under strain or dying there is a severe weakening of the dynamic power that carries us forward. Too much pressure may be being experienced in our lives.

If the horse is being harnessed to a cart we may be concentrating too hard on thoroughly utilitarian objectives. In a man’s dream a mare will denote the anima, a woman, or the realm of the feminine. In a woman’s dream, being kicked by a horse may indicate the animus or her relationship with a man.

A horse that can get through any door and batter down all obstacles is the collective shadow – those aspects of the personality that most people attempt to suppress.

The horse as a beast of burden is often the great mother or mother archetype. Even though the horse has been superceded in waking life by the car, it still has huge significance in dreams. Also consult the entry for car as well as the information on archetypes in the introduction.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Direct expression of that feeling. It is worthwhile considering who or what the dream suggests you feel hostile towards. In general the most powerful hostile feelings are to­wards parents, having been generated in infancy. These need to be met if one is to become an adequate sexual person in relation to an adult of the opposite sex and social authority. Unconscious hostility causes one to remain at a mystic or idealistic level of relationship with the opposite sex. causing difficulty in meeting the real individual. Meeting anger, ag­gression and hostility does not mean suppressing it or ex­pressing it socially. Many of us have become, in the words of WV. Caldwell, the author of LSD Psychotherapy, ‘hostility cripples’. As human animals, anger and aggression are natu­ral, but growing in a society which, although it practices the most terrible aggression at a national level, suppresses indi­vidual aggression, it is difficult for us to lead these urges to­wards maturity. Maturity in love is often talked about, but not maturity in hate. It helps if we can recognise whether we are repressing aggressions or hostility in our dreams.

If anger is felt but not expressed in a dream, then use the technique explained in dream processing, in which you carry the dream forward and express in imagination the emotions held back. This should begin the process of moTe expressive anger in one’s dreams, allowing the maturing of the aggression to be­gin. See Sunday school Christ under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

In a general sense, free from institutional dogma, Jesus can represent the human expenence of life in the body, in which we meet conflict, temptation, and meet death—life itself becoming conscious. See Christ under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Son of a pastor, his paternal grandfather and great grandfather were physicians. He took a degree in medicine at the University of Basle, then specialised in psychiatry. In early papers he pioneered the use of word- association, and influenced research into the toxin hypothesis regarding schizophrenia. Jung’s addition to modern therapeu­tic attitudes to dream work arose out of his difference of view with Freud regarding human life. Jung felt life is a meaningful experience, with spiritual roots. His interest in alchemy, myths and legends added to the wealth of ideas he brought to his concept of the collective unconscious.

The subject of sym­bols fascinated him and he devoted more work to this than any other psychologist. He saw dream symbols, not as an attempt to veil or hide inner content, but an attempt to eluci­date and express it. It is a way of transformation where what was formless, non-verbal and unconscious moves towards form and becoming known. In this way dreams ‘show us the unvarnished natural truth’. By giving attention to our dreams we are throwing light/upon who and what we really are—not simply who we ait/as a personality, but who we are as a phenomenon of cosmic interactions.

Jung recommended looking at a series of one’s dreams in order to develop a fuller insight into self. In this way one would see cenain themes arising again and again. Out of these we can begin to see where we are not balancing the different aspects of ourself. See abreaction; active imagination; ampli­fication; archetypes; black person; collective unconscious; compensatory theory; creativity and problem solving in dreams; dream analysis; Fromm, Erich; identity and dreams; individuation; lucidity; mandala; dream as spiritual guide; unconscious. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Control, Law, Authority Figure. Special someone in your life. In African folklore, the King is said to be “the one who holds all life, human and cosmic, in his hands; the keystone of society and the universe.” In the modern world, we may not associate the King with ultimate power, knowledge or wisdom. However, historically the mythical King was highly spiritual, was the center of the wheel of life and was said to have a regulatory function in the cosmos. Psychologically, the king and the queen are said to be the “archetypes of human perfection.” As a dream symbol, you can understand the king or queen in your dream by realizing that they represent your ability for independence, self-understanding and self-determination. They also represent inner wealth that will enable you to be your best and help you to achieve your goals. Consciously, you may never have the desire to be a king or queen, but psychologically, these figures are symbolic of our highest potential and our desire to be the “king or queen” of our own world and our own lives. On rare occasions and depending on the details of the dream, the king and queen may represent a powerful force that is unkind and tyrannical.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Little Giant Encyclopedia

Lover. Archetypal symbol for father / mother, dependency on father / mother. Also always the dreamer himself.

See Dictator / Ruler. May also represent the Great Father and Great Mother.

The Great Father is the symbol of an aware and elevated consciousness. You are standing with great awareness in the world. In fairy tales, as well as in dreams, the self usually has a royal beginning, from which it is separated in order for it to master the adventures in the world.

The king also means wholeness and completeness.

The Great Mother is symbolized in the dream as a queen, always representing the image of wholeness. In the end she represents the integrating power of nature. Furthermore, the image of the queen as the fertile mother always addresses the self of the dreamer. Implied here is the idea that we should rely on our own abilities, care for ourselves, and find a Home within ourselves.

Kings and queens also represent one’s masculinity (animus) and femininity (anima). Such archetypes are not only persons of authority, but they also represent the image of a loved one (idealized and elevated masculinity or femininity). According to Freud, often the symbol of parents who are seen as overly powerful.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- A knight appearing in a dream, particularly a woman’s, can have the obvious connotation of a romantic liaison - the knight in shining armour. This actually is a manifestation of her own Animus (see Introduction) - her own inner masculine - and is to do with her search for perfection. In a man’s dream it indicates he may be searching for the Hero (see Archetypes) in himself.

2- Psychologically, the knight in a dream signifies the guiding principle. He is that part of ourselves which is sometimes known as the Higher Self, the spirit guiding the physical.

The black knight is the embodiment of evil. It is interesting that often the white knight appears with his visor up, whereas the black knight appears with his visor down.

3- Initiation, in order to develop one’s finer qualities.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

You might also like to consult the entries for camelot, castle, hero / heroine and quest as well as the information on hero in archetypes in the introduction.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

See Christ under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of a magazine represent education, voyeurism, sensationalism, and that you may be putting someone on a pedestal.

If you dream of seeing your picture in a magazine, then this forecasts status and success.

If this is a tabloid magazine, then you are identifying with the drama of celebrities and the archetypes they represent. Consider whom you are reading about. See Newspaper and Celebrity.... Strangest Dream Explanations

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

If one could produce a graphic image of the whole of human nature, many different forms might be integrated within an overall shape, perhaps a circle or square. Also, if it were possible to have a visual presentation of a person’s inner world of mind, weaknesses, strengths, order, confusion and quality, each person would appear differently. Some would be internally jumbled, divided and ugly, others symmetrical, inte­grated and beautiful.

Because the unconscious produces dreams, and because dreams are imagery which give form to the otherwise abstract elements of internal human nature, there anse in some dreams shapes or patterns which depict an overall view of one s own inner condition. Carl Jung drew attention to the circle and square designs in some dreams, calling them man- dalas, and seeing them as representing the nucleus of the human identity. Although we are, in our everyday life, the magical and mysterious process of life, it is difficult for us actually to answer the question ‘Who am I?’ or ‘What am I?’ with any lasting conviction.

The mysterious essence of ourself is met in dreams as a circular or square object or design, as the sun, a flower, a square garden with a round pond in the middle, or a circle with a square or quartered design within it, a circle with a cross within, a revolving or flying cross-shaped object. Classi­cal symbols from all nations use this theme; and we can find it in the round table of King Arthur, in the centre of which the Holy Grail appeared; the healing sand paintings of the Na- vaho Indians, the zodiac; circle dances; stone circles; the Bud­dhist wheel of birth and death; and so on.

The circle usually symbolises a natural wholeness, our in­ner life as nature has shaped it.

The square shows wholeness we have helped shape by conscious cooperation with our m- neT world. There are two main reasons why one produces this theme in one’s dreams. It occurs in children or people meet­ing internal or external shocks, and produces a strengthening of the vulnerable identity in meeting the vaned influences they face. It arises in people who are meeting and integrating the wider life of their being existing beyond the boundaries of their usual interests, or what they allow themselves to experi­ence.

The contact with the self is then pan of an extending of awareness into what was dark or unknown, not only in our own unconscious, but in external life. In touching the nucleus of one’s being in this way, one becomes aware in some mea­sure of the infinite potential of one’s life. There is often an accompanying sense of existence in eternity and the many different mansions’ or dimensions of experience one has within the eternal. See the self under archetypes; shapes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Language of Dreams

(see Clothes, Costmnes)

Facades. Tilings not being what they seem. Or, the image you present to the world being only a partial truth.

Adapting to difficult circumstances: Ancient people wore masks to help them commune with specific energies. Today, we don figurative masks and temporary per-sonas when faced with new, unfamiliar, or demanding situations. This results in stressing particular characteristics that help us cope in these new settings.

The element of surprise and mystery, like at a costumed dance where you wonder what’s behind the mask.

Emotions or ideas that abide in your subconscious may manifest through a dream mask’s color, shape, or depiction.

For example, a red mask that looks angry can reveal your own outrage that was either subdued or silenced.

Jungian: The dreamer’s connection to the archetypes in the Collective Unconscious, mediating therein between two distinct factions, such as the mundane and the supernatural aspects of self.... The Language of Dreams

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The approach of our individual self to the sense of wholeness, the communal whole or collective mind, or to the Christ. See Christ under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

see Family and Archetypes... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

See archetypes in the introduction, family and mummy (egyptian)... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Also consult the entries for mystic and caring professions in people as well as the information on priestess in archetypes in the introduction.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Also consult the entries for doctor, hospital, ill / illness, medicine / medication and caring professions in people as well as the information on great mother in archetypes in the introduction.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- Nymphs arc personifications of feminine universal productivity. They have an innocent and carefree energy which is naive and clear. They tend to be guardians of sacred spaces such as woods, mountains and lakes. In dreams, therefore, they are connected with a woman’s sense of beauty and her own femininity.

2- Psychologically the nymph most clearly has associations with the princess (see Princess in Archetypes and People). She is the carefree, fun- loving aspect of energy which glories in movement and light. As pure energy, when we work with dreams, the nymph allows us the opportunity to connect to the qualities of purity and grace.

3- Nymphs are Earth spirits that deal with pure energy. Their charm is their vouthfulness, beauty and vitality. Each group of nymphs has their particular own role and guardianship of specific areas, such as forests and lakes, woods and valleys, mountains and grottoes. Dryads, for instance, do not mingle with others nymphs. Their significance spiritually is that they epitomise most of the feminine qualities in their purest states.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Gives gender - specific: In dreams nymphs are connected with a woman’s sense of beauty and her own femininity. Each group of nymphs has their own particular role and guardianship of specific areas, such as forests and lakes, woods and valleys, mountains and grottoes, which has a certain resonance with different aspects of our personality. In a man’s dream nymphs will often represent a perception of innocence. Also consult the entry for fairy as well as the information on princess in archetypes in the introduction and in the people entry.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

see Archetypes... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

see Family and Archetypes... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

See archetypes in the introduction and family in people... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- The people who appear in dreams are the characters with which we write our ‘play’. Often they appear simply as themselves, particularly if they are people we know or have a relationship with in the here and now. We may introduce them in order to highlight a specific quality or characteristic. We may also permit them into our dream scenario as projections of our inner life or stale of being. Finally, they may signify someone who is more important than the dreamer.

2- In order to disentangle the various types of ‘information’ which each character brings to the dreamer, it is often necessary to decide what or who each one makes us think of. That way we will reveal the deeper meanings and connections.

An individual from the past could link us with that period of our lives and with specific memories which may, or may not, be painful.

A neighbour or close associate usually appears in a dream to highlight a particular quality in that person. Somebody else’s mother, father, brother etc. may suggest our own family members or possibly jealousy. Sometimes, rather than trying to decipher the meaning of the dream it is enough to look at what bearing the dream character’s actions have on the dreamer’s everyday life.

To interpret why the dreamer has adopted a particular role we would need to know a little bit more about his lifestyle. When there is some conflict within the dreamer between love and aversion for a particular person, we are more likely to dream about them.

Often in dreams there may be a noted difference between two of the participants to illustrate two sides of the dreamer’s thoughts and feelings. Similarly; there maybe a marked contrast in the way the dreamer handles a situation with two of his dream characters. It is as though two options are being practised. Composite characters As with composite animals, the composite character will emphasise one characteristic or quality in order to draw the dreamer’s attention to it.

The fact that it is not just one person emphasises the many-faceted human being. Every- character who appears in our dreams is a reflection of a facet or part of our own personality and can often be better understood if we put ourselves in the position of that person. Adolescent To dream of oneself as adolescent focuses on our undeveloped side. Dreaming of an adolescent of the opposite sex usually means dealing with a suppressed part of our development.

The emotions associated with adolescence are very raw and clear and such emotions arc accessible often only through dreams. There may be conflict over freedom. Ancestors Our customs, ways of behaving, morality and our religious feelings are all handed down from generation to generation. When we become conscious of our ancestors in a dream we are focusing on our roots. We may- understand ourselves through our relationship with the past. Authority Figures (such as magistrates, teachers etc. also see individual entries) Our concept of authority is first developed through our relationship with our father or father figure. Depending on how we were treated as children, our view of authority will be anything from a benign helper to an exploitative disciplinarian. Most authority figures will ultimately lead us back to what is right for us, although not necessarily what we might consider good for us. Authority figures in dreams initially appear to have power over us, though if worked with properly will generate the power to succeed. Dreaming particularly of police can indicate a kind of social control and a protective element for us as members of society. Often a policeman will appear in dreams as one’s conscience. We may feel that our wilder, more renegade side needs controlling.

Baby To dream about a baby which is our own indicates that we need to recognise those vulnerable feelings over which we have no control. We may be attempting something new.

If the baby is someone else’s in the dream, we need to be aware of that person’s ability to be hurt, or that they may be innocent of something. Psychologically we are in touch with the innocent, curious side of ourselves, with the part which neither wants nor needs responsibility. Dreaming of a baby can indicate that, on a spiritual level, the dreamer has a need for a feeling of purity.

Boy To have a dream about a boy- shows the potential for growth and new experience.

If the boy is known he reflects recognised qualities in the dreamer. Psychologically, we may need to be in touch with ourselves at that age and with the innocent youthfulness and enthusiasm that a boy has. We are contacting our natural drives and ability to face difficulties.

Boyfriend To dream of a boyfriend, whether present or former, connects with the feelings, attachments and sexuality- connected with him.

To dream of having as a boyfriend someone whom you would not anticipate, indicates the need to have a greater understanding of the way you relate to men. Consideration may need to be given to the loving, nurturing side of masculinity. We are still searching for the ideal lover.

Carers such as nurses, nuns etc. This suggests the more compassionate, nurturing side of ourselves. Often it is that side of us which has been ‘called’ or has a vocation. Usually there is, for men, a non-sexual relationship. Child (who could be one of the dreamer’s own children) Dreaming of a child gives us access to our own inner child. We all have parts of ourselves which are still child-like and curious. When we are able to get in touch with that side of ourselves we give ourselves permission to clarify a potential for wholeness which we may not previously have recognised. Crowd Crowds in dreams can indicate how we relate to other people, particularly in a social sense. They may indicate how we can hide ourselves, or indeed how we hide aspects of ourselves and do not single out any one attribute. We may also be attempting to avoid responsibility.

A huge crowd suggests information which we may not be able to handle. Dictators (Hitler, Stalin etc.) If the dreamer has had an overbearing father, a known dictator may appear in dreams as representing that relationship. Emperor or Empress - see

Authority Figures and also King and Queen Ethnic minority Any aspect within ourselves which is out of the ordinary or different can manifest in dreams as a member of another race.

Girl When a girl of any age appears in our dreams we are usually attempting to make contact with the more sensitive, innocent side of ourselves. Those qualities of intuition and perception may be somewhat undeveloped but can be made available.

If the girl is known to us we probably are aware of those qualities, but need to explore them as though we were approaching them from the girl’s point of view.

If she is unknown, we can acknowledge that a fresh approach would be useful.

Girlfriend When a girlfriend or ex-girlfriend appears in a man’s dream there arc usually issues to do with masculinity and femininity involved. There may be fears to do with sexuality.

If a girlfriend appears in a woman’s dream, there can either be a concern about her in the dreamer’s mind, or she (the dreamer) needs to search for and find qualities belonging to the friend in her. Hero or any heroic figure falso see Archetypes) In a man’s dream the figure of the hero can represent all that is good in him, the Higher Self. In a woman’s dream he will suggest the Animus (see Introduction). When the hero is on a quest We are struggling to find a part of ourselves which is at this time unconscious (also see Quest). It is important that the darker forces are vanquished but not killed since they cannot be totally annihilated without harming the Wise Old Man (see Introduction). In other words, our eventual integration still needs the challenge of the negative.

The hero’s failure may be brought about inadvertently We all have a weak point through which we can be attacked.

To have such a dream indicates that we are not paying attention to the details in our lives or to that part of ourselves we tend not to have developed. We may be being warned of an element of self-neglect.

The death of the hero can often suggest the need to develop the more intuitive side of ourselves, to be born again to something new.

A conflict between the hero and any other dream character suggests a basic disharmony between two facets of our own character.

The hero often appears in dreams as an antidote to some hated external figure within the dreamer’s everyday life. High Priest, Astrologer, or anyone with similar esoteric knowledge (also see Archetypes and Authority Figures in this section) Any character within our dreams who appears to have knowledge of magical practices or similar types of knowledge is usually first introduction to the Higher Self. It is as though we can only become privy to this deeper knowledge by meeting our teacher first. Inadequate Person It is a lot easier to confront our own inadequacies in the dream state where we are safe. Often this is the first opportunity we have to meet the Shadow (See Introduction). We ignore this aspect of ourselves at our peril and cannot afford to dismiss such an image when it appears. We must acknowledge this dream figure as a reflection of ourselves in order to deal with a learnt sense of inferiority.

If we do not. we are continually faced in life by our own sense of inferiority.

Intruder (also see individual entry and Burglar) The intruder in a woman’s dream is often a personification of her own Animus (see Introduction). In a man’s dream it characterises his Shadow (see Introduction). In either case it suggests the need for a change in attitude in order for the dreamer to be able to have a full and meaningful relationship with himself. King Almost invariably a king appearing in a dream represents the father or father figure.

A personality such as an emperor may- indicate that some of the father’s attitudes arc alien to the dreamer, but should perhaps be accepted. When the king is old or on the point of dying the dreamer will be able to reject outworn or old-fashioned family values. Ministers of all Religions (also see Authority Figures in this section and Archetypes) Ministers of all religions hold a special placc in the dream hierarchy; since their authority is given to them not by man alone, but to all intents and purposes by God or an ultimate power. There is therefore an ‘otherness’ about them. Man Any man appearing in a dream shows an aspcct or facet of the dreamer’s character in a recognisable form. Each of us has a repertoire or portfolio of behaviours, some of which are acceptable and some of which arc not. In dreams those behaviours and characteristics can be magnified so that thev are easily identified, often as personalities. By working with the characteristic, more energy and power becomes av ailable. Even when we are threatened by a negative character trait, we can still access room for improvement.

A man in a dream can identify the Shadow for a man, and the Animus for a woman (see Introduction).

An older man (if the man is white-haired or holy) can represent the innate wisdom we all have. Such a person can also signify the father in dreams. When a large man appears in our dreams we arc usually appreciating the strengths, certainties and protection which our basic beliefs give us.

A man in a woman’s dream signifies the more logical side of her nature. She has, or can develop, all the aspects of the masculine which enable her to function with success in the external world.

If the man is one she knows or loves she may be trying to understand her relationship with him.

An unknown man is generally that part of the dreamer’s personality which is not recognised. In a woman’s dream it is the masculine side of herself, and in a man’s dream it is the Self (see Introduction). Old People (also see Man and Woman) In dreams, old people can represent either our ancestors or grandparents, hence wisdom accrued from experience.

If the old person is male depending on the gender of the dreamer he will stand for either the Self or the Animus (see Introduction).

If female then she will signify the Great Mother or the Anima (see Introduction). .’Ml father figures, or representations of the father, will often appear old as if to highlight their remoteness.

A group of old people often appears in dreams. Usually this signifies the traditions and wisdom of the past - things sacred to the ‘tribe’ or family. Older people usually stand for our parents even though the dream figures may bear no relationship to them. Pirate Dreaming of a pirate suggests there is an aspcct of our personality which destroys our emotional connection with the soul.

Prince (Hero) and Princess (also see Archetypes) These figures represent those parts of ourselves, or others, who exist by right; that is, those aspects which have been brought into conscious awareness and authority. As the hero has taken responsibility for his own journey, so the prince and princess take responsibility for the lives they live.

Queen (Not only the present queen, but a historical one such as Victoria) This usually represents the dreamer’s relationship with his mother, and thus with women in authority generally. Stranger (also see Shadow in Introduction) The stranger in a dream represents that part of ourselves which we do not vet know. There may be a feeling of awe or of conflict with which we need to deal before we can progress. Twins (including the mirror- image of a figure in the dream) (also see individual entry) Twins in a dream can suggest two sides of our personality.

If they arc identical we may be recognising our ambiguous feelings about ourselves.

If not identical they suggest the inner self and the outer reality. Twins may also signify our projections into the world of our own personalities. Woman In a woman’s dream a woman, such as a family member or friend is often representative of an aspect of her own personality, but often one she has not yet fully understood. In a man’s dream such a figure denotes his relationship with his own feelings and with his intuitive side. It mav also show how he relates lo his female partner.

A goddess or holy woman signifies the highest potential for working with the Greater Good that the dreamer has. Oriental women appearing in dreams usually suggest the mysterious side of the feminine. In a man’s dream such a figure will often reveal his attitude to sexuality; while in a woman’s dream it will reveal more about her own intuitive transcendent jx)wers.

An older woman mostly represents the dreamer’s mother and her sense of inherited wisdom.

An unknown woman in dreams will represent either the Anima (see Introduction) in a man’s dream, or the Shadow (see Introduction) in a woman’s. It is the qualities of surprise and intrigue which allow us to explore further the relevance of that figure. We can gain a great deal of information bccausc the figure is unknown.

3- When we begin to work spiritually with ourselves, there is a gargantuan store of knowledge which can be worked on, and with, to enhance our lives.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Psychological / emotional perspective: In order to disentangle the various types of ‘information’ that each character brings to the dreamer, it is often necessary to decide what or who each one makes us think of. That way we will reveal the deeper meanings and connections. Some of the following entries can also be found in the individual letters and we suggest that you consult these entries for extra information. Where archetypes such as the anima, animus, great mother, shadow, self and wise old man are referred to, please consult the relevant section in the introduction.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

The pig is taken in western belief to indicate ignorance, stupidity, selfishness and gluttony. We may be beginning to recognize these unattractive qualities in ourselves; without such recognition there can be no transformation or mastery of them. Ultimately, however, it is the qualities of intelligence and cunning that prevail.

If we dream of pigs and jewels together it shows there is a conflict between the lower, basic urges and higher spiritual values. Perhaps there is a failure to appreciate spiritual values. Big litters of piglets can represent fruitfulness, although sometimes without result, since the sow can depict the destructive mother. Consult the information on archetypes in the introduction for further clarification.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

See archetypes in the introduction, monk, nun and people... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

These figures all hold a special place in the dream hierarchy. Sometimes intermediaries between an ultimate power and man, and sometimes authority figures, their power comes from beyond themselves. There is, therefore, a sense of ‘otherness’ about them, and in dreams it is usually the former function that they perform. Also consult the entries for archetypes in the introduction and authority figures above.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

see Archetypes... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

See archetypes in the introduction, hero / heroine and people... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- The Hero’s Quest is an archetypal image (see Archetypes) which can appear in many guises in dreams.

To be searching for something usually indicates that we arc aware that we must undertake a frightening task in order to progress. Many fairy stories and mythological tales have as their main theme the search for something rare or magical (e.g. Jason and the Argonauts). Such themes can be translated into dreams in a personally applicable way.

2- Often, the trials and tribulations we have to go through in achieving something we feci to be important are translated in dreams into a quest or search.

The way these events are faced is as important as the actual achievement itself.

3- The pursuit of the Spiritual and undertaking a spiritual quest Is a way of developing oneself spiritually.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

In most ancient cultures, consider­ation and even veneration of dreams played a great pan. Some groups felt that dream life was more real and imponant than waking life. Not only were dreams looked to for information about hunting (Eskimo groups), but also for ways of healing physical and psychological ills (Greek dream temples) and insights into the medicinal properties of herbs, barks and clays (African tribal witchdoctors). Common to most of these groups, and evident in the Old Testament, was also the sense that through dreams one had awareness of the transcendental or supersensible. St Peter’s dream of the sheet and unclean animals was a turning point in the history of western socicty —as was Constantine’s dream of his victory if he used the symbol of Christianity.

At its most fundamental, the human religious sense emerges out of several factors. One is the awareness of ex­isting amidst external and internal forces of nature which cause us to feel vulnerable and perhaps powerless. Such natu­ral processes as illness, death, growth and decay, earthquakes, the seasons, confront us with things which are often beyond our ability to control. Considenng the information and re­sources of the times, one of religion’s main functions in the past was the attempted control of the ‘uncertain’ factors in human life, and help towards psychological adjustment to vali­ne rability. Religions were the first social programmes aiding the human need for help and support towards emotional, mental, physical and social health and maturity. Even if prim­itive, such programmes helped groups of people to gain a common identity and live in reasonable harmony together. Like a computer program which is specific to a particular business, such programmes were specific to a particular group, and so are outdated in today’s need for greater integra­tion with other races. Religions also offered some sort of con­cept of and connection with the roots of being.

Example: ‘For two nights running I have dreamt the same nightmare. I am in a chapel walking down the first flight of several flights of steps when I hear loud noises behind me. I am told to run, being warned of the soldiers who ride the cavalry horses nght down the steps, and who run you over if you are in their way.

The horses are fierce and they absolutely race down the steps at the same time every day, and you literally have to lock yourself away in a nearby room which is a long way down the chapel. I ran into the room hearing the pounding of the horses’ hooves. It was a terrible pandemo­nium in that chapel. In the room were school children the same age as me and some perhaps younger’ (Maria H). Maria, who is 16, in describing her dream says she had recently been confronted with whether to have a sexual relationship with her boyfriend. Religion, represented by the chapel, is Maria’s way of locking out her powerful sexual urges. Many dreams show that religion, as a set of beliefs, is used as a way of avoiding anxiety in the face of life’s uncertainties.

For many people, the rigid belief system helps them to avoid uncertainty in making decisions.

Dreams also portray and define the aspect of human expe­rience in which we sense a kinship with all life forms. This is the side of spiritual expenence through which we find a con­nection with the roots of our being. While awake we might see the birth of a colt and feel the wonder of emergence and newness; the struggle to stand up and survive, the miracle of physical and sexual power which can be accepted or feared. In looking in the faces of fellow men and women we see something of what they have done in this strange and painful wonder we call life. We see whether they have been crushed by the forces confronting them; whether they have become ngid; or whether, through some common miracle, they have been able to carry into their mature years the laughter, the crying, the joy, the ability to feel pain, that are the very signs of life within the human soul. These things are sensed by us all, but seldom organised into a comprehensive view of life, and an extraction of meaning. Often it is only in our dreams, through the ability the unconscious has to draw out the signif­icance of such widely divergent expenences, that we glimpse the unity behind phenomena which is an essential of spiritual life, i.e. we all have a life, we breathe, we have come from a mother, so share a universal experience.

Example: To quote J.B. Priestley from his book Rain Upon Godshill: ‘Just before I went to Amenca, dunng the exhausting weeks when I was busy with my Time Plays, I had such a dream, and I think it left a greater impression on my mind than any experience I had ever known before, awake or in dreams, and said more to me about this life than any book I have ever read.

The setting of the dream was quite simple, and owed something to the fact that not long before my wife had visiied the lighthouse here at St Catherine’s to do some bird ringing. I dreamt I was standing at the top of a very high tower, alone, looking down upon myriads of birds all flying in one direction; every kind of bird was there, all the birds in the world. It was a noble sight, this vast aerial river of birds. But now in some mysterious fashion the gear was changed, and time speeded up, so that I saw generations of birds, watched them break their shells, flutter into life, mate, weaken, falter and die. Wings grew only to crumble; bodies were sleek, and then, in a flash bled and shrivelled; and death struck every­where at every second. What was the use of all this blind struggle towards life, this eager trying of wings, this hurried mating, this flight and surge, all this gigantic meaningless ef­fort? As I stared down, seeming to see every creature’s ignoble little history almost at a glance, I felt sick at heart. It would be better if not one of them, if not one of us, had been bom, if the struggle ceased for ever. I stood on my tower, still alone, desperately unhappy. But now the gear was changed again, and the time went faster still, and it was rushing by at such a rate, that the birds could not show any movement, but were like an enormous plain sown with feathers. But along this plain, flickering through the bodies themselves, there now passed a sort of white flame, trembling, dancing, then hurry­ing on; and as soon as I saw it I knew that this white flame was life itself, the very quintessence of being; and then it came to me, in a rocket burst of ecstasy, that nothing mattered, nothing could ever matter, because nothing else was real but this quivering and hurrying lambency of being. Birds, men and creatures not yet shaped and coloured, all were of no account except so far as this flame of life travelled through them. It left nothing to mourn over behind it, what I had thought was tragedy was mere emptiness or a shadow show; for now all real feeling was caught and purified and danced on ecstatically with the white flame of life. I had never before felt such deep happiness as I knew at the end of my dream of the tower and the birds.’

Some Nonh American Indians developed the totem out of similar processes. In one generation a person might learn to plant a seed and eat the results. Later someone might see that through fertilisation more food was produced. Still later some­one found that by irrigating, still more improvement was made. No one individual was responsible for such vital cul­tural information, and the collective information is bigger than any one person, yet individuals can partake of it and add to it.

The totem represented such subtle realities, as it might in a modem dream; as Christ might in today’s unconscious. That older cultures venerated their collective information, and that modem humans seem largely apathetic to it, shows how our ‘religion’ has degenerated. Yet utilising the power of the unconscious to portray the subtle influences which impinge upon us, and building the information gained into our re­sponse to life, is deeply important.

With the growth of authoritarian structures in western reli­gion, and the dominance of the rational mind over feeling values, dreams have been pushed into the background. With this change has developed the sense that visionary dreams were something which ‘superstitious* cultural groups had in the past. Yet thoroughly modem men and women still meet Christ powerfully in dreams and visions. Christ still appears to them as a living being.

The transcendental, the collective or universal enters their life just as frequently as ever before. Sometimes it enters with insistence and power, because a too rational mind has led to an unbalance in the psyche—a bal­ance in which the waking and rational individuality is one pole, and the feeling, connective awareness of the uncon­scious is the other.

Although it is tempting to think of the transcendent as ethereal or unreal, the religious in dreams is nearly always a symbol for the major processes of maturing in human life. We are the hero/ine who meets the dangers of life outside the womb, who faces growth, ageing and death.

The awe and deep emotions we unconsciously feel about such heroic deeds are depicted by religious emotion.

See angel; Christ, rebirth and Devil under archetypes; church; evil; fish, sea creatures; example in whale under fish, sea creatures; heaven, hell; sweets under food; dream as spiritual guide. See also hero/ine; mass; masturbation; old; paralysis; colours; sheep under animals. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Our basic spinal and lower brain reactions, such as fight or flight, reproduction, attraction or repulsion, sex drive, need for food and reaction to pain. This includes the fundamental evolutionary ability to change and the urge to survive—very powerful and ancient processes. Our relationship with the reptile in our dreams depicts our relat- edness to such forces in us, and how we deal with the im­pulses from the ancient pan of our brain.

Modern humans face the difficulty of developing an inde­pendent identity and yet keeping a working relationship with the primitive, thus maturing/bringing the primitive into an efficiently functioning connection with the present social world.

The survival urge at base might be kill or run, but it can be transformed into the ambition which helps, say, an opera singer meet difficulties in her career. Also the very primitive has in itself the promise of the future, of new aspects of human consciousness. This is because many extraordinary human functions take place unconsciously, in the realm of the reptile/spine/lower brain/right brain/autonomic nervous sys­tem. Being unconscious they are less amenable to our waking will. They function fully only in some fight or flight, survive or die, situations.

If we begin to touch these with consciousness, as we do in dreams, new functions are added to conscious­ness. See The dream as extended perception under ESP and dreams.

frog

Unconscious life or growth processes which can lead to transformation (the frog/prince story); the growth from child­hood vulnerability—tadpole to frog—therefore the process of life in general and its wisdom. Frogspawn: sperm, ovum and reproduction.

lizard

Example: ‘My wife and I saw a large lizard on the wall near a banana. It was there to catch the flies.

The lizard turned so it was facing away from us—head up the wall. We then were able to see it had large wing-like flaps which spread from its head in an invened V. With amazement we saw on these flaps wonderful pictures, in full colour, of birds. In fleet­ing thoughts I wondered if the bird “paintings” were to attract birds, or were some form of camouflage. But I felt cenain the lizard had “painted” these wonderful pictures with its uncon­scious an’ (David T). Generally, a lizard is very much the same as a snake, except it lacks the poisonous aspect; aware­ness of unconscious or instinctive drives, functions and pro­cesses. In the above dream, the banana is both David’s plea­sure and sexuality, while the lizard is the creativity emerging from his unconscious through the attention he is giving it—he is looking at the lizard. Chameleon: either one’s desire to fade into the background, or adaptability.

snake

Example: A small snake about a foot long had dropped down my shirt neck. I could feel it on the left side of my neck Fearing it was poisonous and might bite me, I moved very slowly. At one point I put my head on the ground, hoping the snake would wish to crawl away. It did not. Then I was near an elephant I loved, and hoped it would remove the snake. It did not. Even as I slept I felt the snake was an expression of the attitude of not shanng myself with anybody except family’ (David T).

For months prior to the above dream David had experienced a great deal of neck pain. After dis­cussing the dream with his wife, and realising much of his thinking and feeling was intumed, the pain disappeared. So the snake was both poisoner’ and ‘healer’. This may be why snakes are used as a symbol of the medical profession.

The Hebrew word for the serpent in the Garden of Eden is Nahash, which can be translated as blind impulsive urges, such as our instinctive drives.

So, generally, snakes depict many different things, but usu­ally the life process.

If we think of a person’s life from con­ception to death, we see a flowing moving event, similar in many ways to the speeded up films of a seed growing into a plant, flowering and dying.

The snake depicts the force or energy behind that movement and purposiveness—the force of life which leads us both to growth and death. That energy —like electricity in a house, which can be heat, power, sound and vision—lies behind all our functions. So in some dreams the snake expresses our sexuality, in others the rising of that energy up our body to express itself as digestion—the intesti­nal snake; as the healing or poisonous energy of our emotions and thoughts.

Example: ‘I was in a huge cathedral, the mother church. I wanted to go to the toilet/gents. As I held my penis to urinate it became a snake and reached down to the urinal to drink. It was thirsty. I struggled with it, pulling it away from the un­clean liquid. Still holding it I walked to a basin and gave it pure water to drink’ (Bill A). Here the connection between snake and sexuality is obvious. But the snake is not just Bill’s penis. It is the direction his sexual urges take him he is strug­gling with. Out of his sense of love and connection with life— the cathedral—he wants to lift his drive towards something which will not leave him with a sense of uncleanness. Snake in connection with any hole: sexual relatedness.

A snake biting us: unconscious worries about our health, frustrated sexual impulse, our emotions turned against our­selves as internalised aggression, can poison us and cause very real illness, so may be shown as the biting snake. Snake biting others: biting remarks, a poisonous tongue.

A crowned or light-encircled snake: when our ‘blind impulses’ or instinctive or unconscious urges and functions are in some measure inte­grated with our conscious will and insight, this is seen as the crowned snake or even winged snake. It shows real self awareness and maturity. In coils of snake: feeling bound in the ‘blind impulses’ or habitual drives and feeling responses. Instincts and habits can be redirected, as illustrated by Hercu­les’ labours. Snake with tail in mouth: sense of the circle of life—binh, growth, reproduction, aging, death, rebirth; the eternal. Snake coiling up tree, pole, cross: the blind instinctive forces of life emerging into conscious experience—in other words the essence of human expenence with its involvement in pain, pleasure, time and eternity; the process of personal growth or evolution; healing because personal growth often moves us beyond old attitudes or situations which led to inner tension or even sickness. Snake in grass: sense or intuition of talk behind your back; danger, sneakiness. Colours: green, our internal life process directed, perhaps through satisfied feelings, love and creativity, into a healing process or one which leads to our personal growth and positive change; white, eternal aspect of our life process, or becoming con­scious of it; blue, religious feelings or coldness in relations. See colours; anxiety dreams; death and rebirth, the self under archetypes; dreams and Ancient Greece; cellar under house, buildings; hypnosis and dreams; jungle; paralysis. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- Most people have a rather antiquated idea of the sailor. It is this image that usually appears in dreams. He represents freedom, both of movement and of spirit, and is a representation of the Tramp (see Archetypes). He suggests someone who is totally in control of his own destiny.

A modern- day sailor would have the added benefit of being in control of his own environment.

2- If a sailor does appear in a dream, particularly in a woman’s, he is usually a somewhat romanticised figure and can represent the Hero (see Archetypes). In a man’s dream he represents the part of himself which seeks freedom, but that needs to be given permission or authority to take that freedom.

3- Spiritually; the sailor can signify communication.

The aspect of freedom links with a quality of Mercury who, having been given a task, then forgets what it is.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The things in self, or in the world, which we feel frightened of, or feel we cannot control; the influence of dry intellectualism or materialism. See devil under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dreamers Dictionary

Vision: If the sea is calm and the sky is clear: peaceful days are ahead.

If the seas are stormy and the waves high: you feel threatened and are afraid of “stormy” times. You are swim- ming: friendly, if invisible, energies are carrying you right now. Falling into the water: a tragic event. Drowning: a harmful situation has been avoided, because you are discovering the substance of your being. Emerging from the sea: a new beginning, one that is in harmony with your very essence.

A man dreaming of standing on a beach means he wants to be free and independent.

Depth Psychology: The sea is a symbol of the collective unconscious; you can trust it to carry you. It may also be a symbol of your feminine, motherly side—all life originated in the sea. Unconscious thoughts, feelings, perceptions, and hopes are at home here and are now beginning to surface and become conscious. This is the sea on which the boat of your life is sailing. See Archetypes, River, Ship, Water.... Dreamers Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

See archetypes in the introduction... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: A shadow thing came very quickly up the stairs, along our corridor and into the bed­room, over to the bed to bend over me. I felt fear as I never felt it before and I started to make a noise. It was also the shadow making the noise and it was frightened, and moved towards the window. I felt sorry it was frightened too, but then it was too late as it had gone. I woke up making a howling noise, my husband said, he felt the fear in the room strongly too’ (Gloria F). In the example, Gloria is meeting her own feeling of fear. This is obvious because the shadowy thing felt the fear also. In fact it is the feeling of fear. Such shadowy figures are our own rejected emotions or potentials. See the Shadow under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Psychological / emotional perspective: The number of sides a shape has will be significant, as will the colours. Considerable symbology has grown up around shape. You might also like to consult the entries for archetypes, colours, globe, labyrinth and numbers, as well as the information on spiritual imagery and symbols in the introduction. You might also like to consult the entries for archetypes, colours, globe, labyrinth and numbers, as well as the information on spiritual imagery and symbols in the introduction.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Being in contact with instinctive or feeling reac­tions in self; the Self. See farmer within this entry; Christ under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Meanings of Versatile

In spiritual development the shield appears as a symbol of a particular stage of growth. It is at this point that we need to appreciate that we have control over our own destiny. This symbol often first appears in dreams representing this stage of development. Consult the entries for barrier and warrior as well as the information on amazon in archetypes in the introduction for further clarification.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Archetypes

1- To hear a siren as in an ambulance or fire engine - is to be warned of danger.

For those old enough to remember, such a siren will evoke memories of war and destruction. In particular, the ‘all clear’ will serve to relieve anxiety.

2- Archctypally, the Siren suggests deception and distraction of man from his purpose. In dreams this is usually sexually oriented and difficult to handle. In a woman’s dream, if she is not in touch with the siren within her, she can appear to be destructive. In psychological terms she is temptation and often appears in Greek or Roman attire, as if to enhancc the erotic image. She can often be pictured in dreams sat by water, since she works with the emotions. In some cases she is a man’s Anima (see Introduction).

3- It is only when it is understood spiritually that the Siren can ultimately restore man to himself, that the Siren becomes acceptable and can be worked with. After having rejected her enchantment, he is free to become whole.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

As an archetype, it is only when it is understood spiritually that the siren can ultimately restore man to himself that she becomes acceptable and can be worked with. After having rejected her enchantment, we are free to become whole. You might also like to consult the entries for emotions, war and water as well as the information on siren in archetypes in the introduction.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

A skeleton in dreams alerts us to our attitude to the macabre. We are aware that the physical must ‘die’ or change, but that there is still a framework left.

The skull in dreams can sometimes represent major changes such as death and all the adjustments necessary. Also consult the entry for death and the information on the head in the body entry as well as the information on tramp in archetypes and spirits in spiritual imagery in the introduction.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Wholeness; an all round’ view or a rounded character. Ball: interaction between two people, sexual and otherwise (the ball’ is in your court), in that throwing the ball may show someone trying to get one’s attention and response. Ball games, being thrown a ball: challenges, prowess, compe­tition in the game of life; having and letting go; sex play; masturbation; a man’s ‘balls’; wholeness. Idioms: have a ball, ball at one s feet; one’s eye on the ball; start the ball rolling; new ball game, play ball with someone; he has/hasn’t the balls. See the self under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Spiritually the spider represents the great mother in her role as the weaver of life. She weaves destiny from the body of her self and is, therefore, the creator. In coming to terms with this aspect, we become weavers of our own destiny. Consult the entries for insects, mandala and web as well as the information on great mother and destructive mother in archetypes in the introduction.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Feelings or intuitions about the dead or death; fears concerning one’s own unconscious memories or feelings; in­tuitions arising from one’s own mind and awareness, as it exists beyond the preconceptions and boundaries of prejudice or fear. Idioms: be with someone in spirit; high/low spirits, public spirit; spirit away; spirit is willing. See ghosts. See also devil under archetypes; masturbation; sex while asleep. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Warmth; vitality; conscious awareness; the self or source of one s life energy. Sunlight: being aware; warmth; positive feelings in body and mind; health. Sunbathing: al­lowing the flow of inner energies to give pleasure. Sunrise: realisation; a new start, childhood; hope and energy to grow. M idday: maturity; middle life; time to be working at one s life. Sunset: old age; death; return to latent period prior to a new binh. See time; rebirth under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- Sometimes when we arc confused in everyday life, we may dream of an object being entangled with something else. Often the way that we untangle the object indicates action we should take in waking moments.

2- When something like hair is tangled, we need to be aware that our self-image or projection is coming across to other people as distorted.

3- Cutting through a tangle of trees or undergrowth in a dream is part of the Hero’s Journey (see Hero in Archetypes).... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreaming about the tarot deck symbolizes your desire for -understanding, a peek into your future, and that you are realizing the power of cycles of your life and the roles/archetypes you represent. Perhaps you are seeking direction from an outside source, and this dream is giving you the message that your answers lie within. Consider the card(s) you pull.... Strangest Dream Explanations

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Tattoos portray archetypes with which you may identify. They may act as metaphors for what is deeply imprinted within the soul, whether devil or angel. Tattoos may make a strong statement about another’s identity. Some people, such as the Hawaiians, wear tattoos that connect them with an ancestral lineage and with their spirit guides, called Amakua.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Dream Meanings of Versatile

A spiritual teacher usually appears either in dreams or in person when the individual is ready to progress. There is a saying in the hindu religion, ‘when the chela (pupil) is ready, the teacher will come.’ Often that teacher will not appear as a wise old man or woman, but as a person appropriate to the level of our understanding. Consult the entries for education, school and authority figures in people, as well as the information on animus, anima and wise old man in archetypes in the introduction.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: Dream images connected with television drama series and ‘soaps’ where we are able to follow a story are much to do with our ability to recognize archetypes that we can relate to, or situations that have resonance with us in our work or personal life. Consult the entries for celebrity, fame, famous people and media as well as the information on archetypes in the introduction for further information.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Temptation is one of the biggest spiritual barriers we must overcome. Often it is a conflict between the self and the ego. Consult the entry for siren and also the information on ego, self and siren in archetypes in the introduction for further information.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Psychological / emotional perspective: If we follow up the idea of a tenant being someone with whom we have a commercial relationship, then we will have some insights into how we handle such transactions. As more people invest in buy-to-let property to give themselves security, a tenant in dreams will simply represent a means to an end. You might also like to consult the entries for home and rent as well as the information on anima and animus in archetypes in the introduction.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

The biblical and nomadic image of being able to pack up one’s tent and steal away is the spiritual meaning here. We are not tied to any one place, but can move to where we need to be at short notice, thus satisfying the requirements of the wanderer and the ascetic. You might also like to consult the entries for ascetic and wanderer / wandering as well as the information for temporary buildings in buildings and tramp in archetypes in the introduction.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

A spiritual threat is one that forces us to reassess our beliefs. Most often it will contain options of action that lead to a degree of inevitability either way. Once on that particular path we have no choice but to continue. In dreams the image of a divided path or road will often occur at this time, or of going up or down. You might also like to consult the entry for path as well as the information on archetypes, anxiety dreams and nightmares in the introduction.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Our vulnerable feelings or huns which hide be­hind a defensive shell, perhaps of shyness, introversion or withdrawal—could be anger. See also crab; shell; snail; ex­ample of the unofficial Christ in Christ under archetypes; shellfish under fish, sea creatures. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Archetypes

1- To dream of a tramp in the sense of a decrepit old wanderer links us back to the part of ourselves which is not expressed fully in real life. It is Lhe ‘drop-out’ or gypsy within us.

We may be conscious of our need for irresponsibility.

2- The tramp personifies in us the wanderer, the freedom lover. In dreams he will often appear at a time when we need freedom, but can also show that that need can bring difficulty and sadness. He can also appear in dreams as the jester or fool. There is a part in all of us that is anarchical, and the tramp represents this side.

3- Spiritually; although this image starts out as negative, if we are prepared to work with it, it can have great positivity since ultimately he is always in the right place at the right time for the right reasons.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

In a spiritual sense transport is being carried from one state of consciousness to another. This change in consciousness is not necessarily by our own volition. Riding either a horse or a vehicle suggests that we are happy to have the changes take place.

The lift in mood can just as easily be due to external circumstances such as a beautiful day or extreme emotion and this can be reflected in dreams. You might also like to consult the individual entry for aeroplane and the section on archetypes in the introduction for further information.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The tree depicts the living structure of our inner self. Its roots show our connection with our physical body and the earth, its trunk the way we direct the energies of our being— growth, sex, thought, emotion.

The branches are the abilities, directions and many facets we develop in life—varied and yet all connected in the common life process of our being.

The tree can also symbolise new growth, stages of life and death, with its spring leaves and blossom, then the falling leaves.

The top of the tree, or the ends of the branches, are our aspirations, the growing vulnerable tip of our personal growth and spiritual realisation.

The leaves may represent our per­sonal life which may fall off the tree of life (die) but what gave it life continues to exist.

The tree is our whole life, the evolu­tionary urge which pushes us into being and growth. It de­picts the force or process which is behind all other life forms —but seen as it expresses in our personal existence.

In some old manuscripts pictures show a man lying on the ground and his penis growing into a tree, with fruits, birds, and perhaps people in its protective shade. This illustrates how one’s personal life energy can branch out from its source in the basic drives, and become creativity, fruitfulness, some- thing given to others.

The tree can also represent the spine, and the different levels of human experience—physical, sen­sual, sexual, hungers, emotions, relatedness, communication, thought, awareness.

Example: ‘I was about eight years old when I had this dream. In it I was sitting in a large garden. I believe there was a big house nearby which was our family house—not our real house. With me were other members of my family, and there was a baby boy too. Nearby was a laige tree. We climbed this tree, the baby as well, to see what was at the top.

The baby fell out of the tree. We climbed down and took the baby to a room and lay it on a bed. It seemed to be asleep and didn’t wake up. Later we went back to the room to see the baby but it had gone. In its place was a bluebird. As we looked the bluebird flew away’ (told to author on LBC radio programme).

The tree in this dream depicts the child’s sense of her life as it might develop or grow in the future. Climbing it shows her exploring what it might be like to grow up. At about eight most children unconsciously develop a philosophy which en­ables them to meet the difficulties of meeting the growth of self awareness, which includes the knowledge of death at the end of life.

The dreamer looks at this by having the baby fall out of the tree. Death is seen as the bluebird which flies away.

Example: ‘I flew low over small trees which were just com­ing into leaf. They had beautiful soft green leaves. I knew it was autumn and the leaves were only just coming out because it had been a cloudy, overcast summer. I felt the leaves would have time to mature because the sun would be out in the autumn, and the trees would not die’ (Colin C). Colin dreamt this in his early 50s, at a time when he felt frustrated by not being able to achieve a regular source of income or, more important, feel satisfied with what he had achieved in life.

The flying shows him taking an overview of his situation.

The poor summer is his feelings that the years of his life which should have been most productive had been poor—literally, the sun had not shone on his endeavours. But he feels encouraged because he senses that his personal ‘summer’ is still to come, and his many endeavours—the trees—would not prove un­productive.

A wood, collection of trees: the natural forces in one’s own being, therefore one’s connection with or awareness of the unconscious, other people’s personal growth and connection with self. Dead tree: past way of life; something which was full of life for you in the past, but is now dead; dead relative. Falling tree: sense of threat to one’s identity, loss of relative. Christmas tree, other evergreen: the eternal aspect of our tran­sitory experience. Human, animal hung on tree: personal sac­rifice; the death of some part of self so further growth can occur—death of dependence so independence can arise; the pains and struggles, the sense of crucifixion occurring in the maturing process. Oak: strength, masculinity. Flowering tree: fertility, femininity. Idioms: top of the tree; family tree; bark up the wrong tree. See death and rebirth and the self under archetypes; second example in wife under family; fifth exam­ple in flying. See also individuation. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Vidian in Archetypes

1- In dreams, the trickster is literally that part of ourselves which can create havoc in our lives. When under stress this personage can present himself in dreams as the character who points one in the wrong direction, answers questions with the wrong answers etc.

2- Psychologically, if we have been too rigid in our attitude to life for instance, struggling to be good the whole time or always taking a moral stance, the trickster can appear in dreams as a counter-balance.

3- This is the spiritually irresponsible part of our nature. We have not yet put ourselves on the correct spiritual path and need to do so.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

This is the spiritually irresponsible part of our nature. We have not yet put ourselves on the correct spiritual path and need to do so. Consult the entries for chaos and joke / joker as well as the information on villain in archetypes.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Pathways you have created into your unconscious; ways you have evolved to deal with innermost feelings and memories; vagina or being in the womb; strategies developed to reach our inner resources and bring them to the surface. See last example in death and rebirth under archetypes; sec­ond example in penis under body; corridor; examples in dark; enclosed, end; swimming. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Meanings of Versatile

The great mother in all her glory is represented. Symbolically any hollow vessel has been taken to represent feminine spiritual qualities. You might like to consult the information for great mother in archetypes in the introduction and the entries for flowers, jar and urn.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Priest in Archetypes

1- Just as the priest was given spiritual authority over many; and was often a figure to be feared, so the vicar is also given this authority. He is perhaps less feared than the priest. In dreams he is often the authority figure to whom we have given control.

2- When a vicar appears in a dream, we are usually aware of the more spiritual, knowledgeable side of ourselves.

3- A vicar is a man of God and the dreamer may need to acknowl- edge that there is much to learn on a physical as well as spiritual level.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

A vicar is a man of god and spiritually has authority over us. He is often the authority figure to whom we have given control. Also consult the entries for priest in the archetypes section in the introduction and in the people section.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of a vulture signify your associations with victim/perpetrator archetypes. You dream may be showing you that you have been taking advantage of and preying on those less fortunate than you, or helping you to release feeling vulnerable to the attacks of people that are in a greater position of powers than you.... Strangest Dream Explanations

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Wandering as a spiritual concept means going wherever life’s path takes us. It is particularly recognized in the taoist religion and signifies going with the flow. You might also like to consult the entries for hermit and tramp as well as the information on tramp in archetypes in the introduction.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Internal conflicts. There might be a bloody battle be­tween one’s moral code and sexual needs, for instance; or between what we allow ourselves to feel and the self healing process which attempts to release childhood pain; or between intellect and body needs or emotions. Idioms : in the wars; on the warpath; war of nerves; declare war. See attack; fight; soldier under roles; bomb; air raid; unofficial Christ in Christ under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Water is such a life giving force that it symbolizes the flow of life energy itself. It is a rather mysterious substance, given that it has the ability to flow through, over and round objects. It has the quality of being able to wear away anything that gets in its way. It can symbolize spiritual rebirth. In baptism, water is a cleanser of previously held ‘sins’, often also those inherited from the family. You might also like to consult the entries for boat / ship, drowning, emotions, lagoon / lake and swimming as well as the information on great mother and shadow in archetypes in the introduction.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Gives gender - specific: Depending on whether the dreamer is masculine or feminine, a wild woman will represent the anima or the shadow. Also consult the entries for animals, flowers, tame and weeds, as well as the information on anima and shadow in archetypes in the introduction.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Father, the self; what we have leamt from our active experience. See the self under archetypes; example in cliff. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

see Archetypes... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Spiritually a witch is someone who has come to understand the intrinsic power they have and learnt to use it properly. Because this power, which is based in strongly held beliefs and codes of behaviour, is perceived as dangerous there are many ideas as to the protection necessary, such as hanging garlic. Consult the entries for magic / magician, wand and wizard as well as the information on witch in archetypes in the introduction.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

The figure of a wizard in dreams is he who has learned to use his powers of manifestation in a dispassionate manner. He is merlin, the sorcerer and the magician. As a stage on the journey to wise old man, he is a recognizable archetype. Consult the entries for alchemy, magic / magician, wand and witch as well as the information on sorcerer in archetypes in the introduction.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: 41 gave birth to a baby girl I named Char­lotte. I had mixed emotions about this, uncertainty, excite­ment. I wanted to share the news with my friends. I phoned one, a woman in Australia. I told her with enthusiasm, but she listened quietly and remained silent. I felt uneasy, then she said “We lost Luke”—her son—”the week before.” I then woke with muddled feelings’ (Mo).

A woman in a woman’s dream: an aspect of herself, but often a facet of herself she is not immediately identifying with.

The above example helps make this plain. Mo explored her feelings about the dream characters. It all fell into place when she asked herself what she had ‘lost’ recently. She had left a lover of some years’ standing. This gave her a lot more free­dom and new opportunity, depicted by the baby, but also muddled feelings of loss. Her Australian friend represents her feelings of grieving for the death’ of her relationship. Her muddled feelings arise because she both loves the new life which opens up, but grieves for the death of her romance.

A woman’s sister, female children: particularly used to rep­resent herself.

The character of the dream woman, loving, angry, businesslike, lazy, sexual, gives a clue to what pan of the dreamer it is referring to.

If the dream woman is a person known well, the above can still be the case, but the woman may represent what the dreamer feels about that person.

A woman younger than the dreamer oneself at that age.

An older woman: could be the dreamer’s mother, her feelings about aging, her sense of inherited wisdom. Two women and the dreamer, conflicting feelings or drives. One woman, one man: behaviour patterns arising from parental relationship.

A goddess or holy woman, the dreamer’s highest potential; what she is capable of but may not yet have lived.

Man dreaming of a woman

Example: ‘On a raised mobile platform a goddess stood. I loved her and (lew to her, skim­ming above the heads of the people. I calked to her. She told me the only love I could receive from her was that which I gave to a human woman. Inasmuch as I gave love to a human female, she would love me. She was all women’ (Andrew P).

The example shows Andrew meeting his archetypal concep­tion of a woman, his ideal. But he understands that you can­not love an ideal. His love must find a real woman. Through a real love he would call love from out of himself, out of his unconscious reserve.

In a man’s dream: his present relationship with his own feelings and intuitive self; his sensitivity and contact with his unconscious through receptivity; or how he is relating to his female partner.

The latter is especially so if the woman in the dream is his partner, how capable he is of loving a woman.

An old woman, usually the dreamer’s mother.

The woman, because she is his feelings, is obviously also his sexual desires and how he meets them.

A younger woman: can depict his desires for a woman of that age, or his more vulnerable emo­tions. Two women and the dreamer: an ‘eternal triangle’; con­flicting feelings.

If one woman and one man: pattern of be­haviour developed in relationship with parents.

The conditions or situations of the woman, see under ap­propriate entries, such as illness; murder, swimming; etc. See anima and the Great Mother under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

see Archetypes... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

See archetypes and people... Dream Meanings of Versatile
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