bluebird

Bluebird, Dream Interpretation


Order, obedience, Jer. 8:7

To dream about a bluebird is a symbol or contentment as well as distress. It also represents cleansing of thoughts, and solutions to your dilemmas.



Bluebird | Dream Interpretation

Keywords of this dream: Bluebird

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘I was standing outside the house of my teens, with my mother. She had a very young bird on a long ribbon and the bird was flying very high in the sky’ (Pauline).

The life cycle of a bird has so many similarities with impor­tant human stages of maturity we frequently use it to represent oneself, as in the example. Pauline uses the bird to depict her own urge to be independent of her mother’s influence, opin­ions, likes, dislikes and decisions. Later in the dream her mother hands Pauline the ribbon to hold, suggesting an offer of independence. As soon as she lets go of the ribbon, a huge black bird attacks the ribboned one.

The ribbons are a refer­ence to Pauline’s own girlhood. When she lets go of her girl­hood, moving towards independent womanhood, she feels threatened by the internalised negative side of her mother, such as her possessiveness—the black bird. Internalised means all the standards, self controls she learned from her life with her mother, which she now carries within her even if absent from her mother.

General: Imagination; intuition, the mind; thoughts, our spiritual longings; expanded awareness—in this form, per­haps a large bird which can fly high. Because wider—or spiri­tual—awareness means looking beyond the usual boundaries of what we see, this may be painful. Hatching from the egg; our birth and infancy.

The nest: home; family environment; security, even the womb. Leaving the nest: gaining indepen­dence. Making a nest: home building; parental urges. Flying: rising above something; independence; freedom; self expres­sion.

Freud said the bird represents the male phallus, and flying means the sexual act. Many languages use the word bird’ to mean woman. In Italy it alludes to penis.

The bird is also used to denote the sense of death and survival. Bluebird: especially represents the spint or soul after death. Baby bird: our own childhood, as in the following example.

The old lady is once more reference to the mother, to whom the bird is first con­nected before moving on to the difficulty of independence. Example: An old lady made room for me to sit at the end of one of the three seats of a bus. As we drove away a very large chicken-size baby bird flew in. It had short stubby wings and yellow down, but flew expenly. I believe it first landed on the lady and chirped squeakily. But in its squeaks it actually spoke, saying it had lost its mother. It sounded as if it were crying (Andrew). Idioms: charm the birds from the trees; a bird told me; bird has flown; bird in the hand, bird of ill omen; free as a bird, odd bird. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Language of Dreams

(see by type, Nest, Flying, Wings)

A type of flying dream, especially if you have sprouted wings.

If the bird is carrying something to you, or away from you, what it bears is significant to meaning.

For example, a bird carrying an olive branch would traditionally symbolize forgiveness and peace.

If the birds are scavengers preying on something (see Buzzard, Carcass), this indicates that you, or someone you know, have taken unfair advantage of a situation. Alternatively, if the birds are picking relentlessly, this may reveal inner trauma over teasing from those in your peer group.

According to Edgar Cayce, transcendental joy and beauty, especially if a bluebird. Parakeets equate to relationships on the same level. However, if the bird is confined, this is another type of cage dream that can reveal an inability to freely verbalize your thoughts, or a relationship in which you feel confined.

Love birds in a cage reveal a love that isn’t totally mature or trusting, so it resorts to manipulation to keep the two parties together.

A bird singing sweetly reveals pleasure, honor, and success. Alternatively, it can indicate someone who always has something nice to say.

Birds chattering represent matters of communication, especially gossip or secrets (e.g., “a little bird told me”).... The Language of Dreams

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: We climbed this tree, the baby as well, to see what was at the top.

The baby fell out of the tree. We climbed down and took the baby to a room and lay it on a bed. It seemed to be asleep and didn’t wake up. Later we went back to the room to see the baby but it had gone. In its place was a bluebird. As we looked the bluebird (lew away’ (dream of a nine-year-old girl).

The example shows a com­mon use of climb—to see what is there, beyond, above, out of sight.

The child is exploring growth, to see what maturity and death have in store. We also climb to avoid something; to get away, to climb out of some mess we are in, in which case it expressed effort on our pan, we climb to get something, to reach it, so this can be ambition or motivation. Climbing has risks though. Attaining new heights in work or a relationship we reach the new and face anxiety, so may have a fear of failing/falling. Climbing may also depict the first half of life, and going downhill middle or old age. Idioms: climb down; social climber. See hill; mountain. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The tree depicts the living structure of our inner self. Its roots show our connection with our physical body and the earth, its trunk the way we direct the energies of our being— growth, sex, thought, emotion.

The branches are the abilities, directions and many facets we develop in life—varied and yet all connected in the common life process of our being.

The tree can also symbolise new growth, stages of life and death, with its spring leaves and blossom, then the falling leaves.

The top of the tree, or the ends of the branches, are our aspirations, the growing vulnerable tip of our personal growth and spiritual realisation.

The leaves may represent our per­sonal life which may fall off the tree of life (die) but what gave it life continues to exist.

The tree is our whole life, the evolu­tionary urge which pushes us into being and growth. It de­picts the force or process which is behind all other life forms —but seen as it expresses in our personal existence.

In some old manuscripts pictures show a man lying on the ground and his penis growing into a tree, with fruits, birds, and perhaps people in its protective shade. This illustrates how one’s personal life energy can branch out from its source in the basic drives, and become creativity, fruitfulness, some- thing given to others.

The tree can also represent the spine, and the different levels of human experience—physical, sen­sual, sexual, hungers, emotions, relatedness, communication, thought, awareness.

Example: ‘I was about eight years old when I had this dream. In it I was sitting in a large garden. I believe there was a big house nearby which was our family house—not our real house. With me were other members of my family, and there was a baby boy too. Nearby was a laige tree. We climbed this tree, the baby as well, to see what was at the top.

The baby fell out of the tree. We climbed down and took the baby to a room and lay it on a bed. It seemed to be asleep and didn’t wake up. Later we went back to the room to see the baby but it had gone. In its place was a bluebird. As we looked the bluebird flew away’ (told to author on LBC radio programme).

The tree in this dream depicts the child’s sense of her life as it might develop or grow in the future. Climbing it shows her exploring what it might be like to grow up. At about eight most children unconsciously develop a philosophy which en­ables them to meet the difficulties of meeting the growth of self awareness, which includes the knowledge of death at the end of life.

The dreamer looks at this by having the baby fall out of the tree. Death is seen as the bluebird which flies away.

Example: ‘I flew low over small trees which were just com­ing into leaf. They had beautiful soft green leaves. I knew it was autumn and the leaves were only just coming out because it had been a cloudy, overcast summer. I felt the leaves would have time to mature because the sun would be out in the autumn, and the trees would not die’ (Colin C). Colin dreamt this in his early 50s, at a time when he felt frustrated by not being able to achieve a regular source of income or, more important, feel satisfied with what he had achieved in life.

The flying shows him taking an overview of his situation.

The poor summer is his feelings that the years of his life which should have been most productive had been poor—literally, the sun had not shone on his endeavours. But he feels encouraged because he senses that his personal ‘summer’ is still to come, and his many endeavours—the trees—would not prove un­productive.

A wood, collection of trees: the natural forces in one’s own being, therefore one’s connection with or awareness of the unconscious, other people’s personal growth and connection with self. Dead tree: past way of life; something which was full of life for you in the past, but is now dead; dead relative. Falling tree: sense of threat to one’s identity, loss of relative. Christmas tree, other evergreen: the eternal aspect of our tran­sitory experience. Human, animal hung on tree: personal sac­rifice; the death of some part of self so further growth can occur—death of dependence so independence can arise; the pains and struggles, the sense of crucifixion occurring in the maturing process. Oak: strength, masculinity. Flowering tree: fertility, femininity. Idioms: top of the tree; family tree; bark up the wrong tree. See death and rebirth and the self under archetypes; second example in wife under family; fifth exam­ple in flying. See also individuation. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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