brian

Brian, Dream Interpretation


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Brian | Dream Interpretation

Keywords of this dream: Brian

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

See “brian”... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

There is a level of human experience which is typified by intense emotional and physical response to life. Such emotions and bodily drives may remain almost entirely unconscious until touched by exploring our dream content in the right setting. When such feelings and bodily movements arise, as they do in dreams, we may be amazed at their power and clarity. See dream processing; sleep move­ments.

If we take away the images and events occurring in a dream and simply look to see what feelings or emotions are evident, the dream is often more understandable than if we try to interpret the symbols. Feelings in dreams are nearly always undistoned. We therefore do not need to interpret them, sim­ply to acknowledge them and see if we can recognise where they occur in waking life.

The images in a dream may be the way we unconsciously pictorialise our flux of feelings and the play of internal energy flows.

For instance love or sexual drive can give rise to physical movement—as in sexual intercourse. Repression of sex or love also represses such physical move­ments, leading to tension and conflict, which might be pre­sented in the drama of a dream.

Example: ‘I was with my wife, walking along a street, on holiday with her. But I felt awful tension. It was the son of stress I feel when I have turned off my sexual flow—as I have at the moment’ (Brian V). Brian can easily see the connection between the dream feelings and his everyday life, although sometimes we need to practise this. But the situation could as easily be expressed as a dream image of a blocked river.

The underlying feelings would then be less easy to grasp.

Example: ‘I was in a very ancient crumbling building, con­fronted by a large stone door, deeply engraved with many designs and creatures. I began to open the door and felt high feelings of anxiety. I realised this was an initiation and I must calm my feelings in order to pass beyond the door, i.e. if I were controlled by my feelings I would run away’ (Derek F). How we meet the emotions in our dreams illustrates our ha­bitual method of dealing with them.

The feelings of anxiety in Derek’s dream were met and moved beyond, but this is un­usual. This is because most of us change our direction as soon as there is a hint of fear.

The amount of nicotine and alcohol human beings consume suggests how poorly we meet anxiety. Going beyond fear or pain is an initiation which opens doors for us. We might now apply for the job, ask for the date, raise the issue, express the creativity, make the journey abroad, which anxiety previously kept us from. We see this in the next example: I had a ring on my marriage finger. It was a thin band of gold. I woke up frightened’ (Angela). Angela is not married and feels anxiety about the commitment.

Dreams give us a safe area to express emotions which might be difficult or dangerous to release socially. Anger in a dream may be expressing what we failed to express in a wak­ing encounter, or it might be our habitual response. It may also be directed against ourself. Dreams also contain many positive emotions. Sometimes they present a new aspect of feeling which is life enhancing.

A person who habitually felt at odds with her father and relatives experienced a dream in which she felt forgiveness for the first time. This was entirely new for her and led to a reconciliation with her family.

Some feeling states in a dream are subtle, and may be more evident in terms of the symbols than the feelings.

A grey drear environment suggests depression and lack of pleasure.

A sunny light environment with flowers and colour shows plea­sure and good feelings.

A country landscape depicts quite a different feeling state to a smoky busy city street. We can define these for ourself using the techniques described under dream processing.

Whatever feelings or emotions we meet in our dreams, many of them are bound to be habitual responses we have to life. Where these habits are negative we can begin to change them by working with the dream images as described in the last question under dream processing. See love; hostility. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Alcohol;Beer; Brewery; Cocaine; Drugs; Hashish; Injection; Inebriant; Marijuana; Opium; Sedatives; Spirits; Wine) In a dream, all intoxicants signify suspicions, apprehension and doubt about one’s resources, or the lawfulness of his earnings, the legitimacy of his children, or the religious legality of his marriage. Drinking alcohol in a dream means losing a fight. Using drugs or intoxicants in a contemptible way in a dream signifies apostasy, loss of honor, negation of the truth, corruption of one’s wife, or it could mean profanity. This is because the raw material and herbs used in the preparation of such drugs and herbs are sacred in their intrinsic state. Once mixed and taken to induce inebriety in a dream, they will produce the reverse effects. (Also see Drunkenness; Marijuana)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘I am at a wedding at which we are being served a celebratory chicken lunch. Whilst my back is turned for a moment one of the other guests on the table (who is female but whom I do not know) removed my plate and sub­stitutes it with a plate of food which doesn’t contain chicken. When I challenge this, I am told that there is no more. At this I rather petulantly decide to leave the wedding’ (Brian Y). Brian uses a plate of food to represent the good things he feels are rightfully his in life, but his negative emotions in a rela­tionship with a female rob him of this.

If food on plate: what one has a sense of ownership about; what one has received or hopes to receive from others, or from one’s own efforts, what you have created and now face. Communal plate: what is available to you but you may have to compete for or share—in work, relationship, life. Empty plate: one’s needs, appetites; receptivity; perhaps status, as in the past only the rich had plates. Idioms: handed to one on a plate; on one’s plate. See food. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Sheep depict the way we might be led into situations, sometimes awful, by conforming to prevailing attitudes and social pressures. Example: ‘1 walked past a married couple who were walking up the hill too. As I passed I heard them say something about a shepherd. Looking up the hill I saw the sheep, then The Shepherd.

A beautiful aura of many colours surrounded The Shepherd. I looked and felt joy and exuber­ance rise in me, and I ran to the couple saying it was The Shepherd’ (Brian C). In the example Brian is not only aware of the sheep, but also The Shepherd.

The sheep is his sense of being one of the crowd and The Shepherd is his sense of his own unique potential or love transforming his ordinariness. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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