define

Define, Dream Interpretation


Anything defined in a dream should be researched and taken seriously



Define | Dream Interpretation

Keywords of this dream: Define

The Fabric of Dream

Not mentioned by Artemidorus. Dream-books define this dream as one of comfort, peace of mind, etc.

The symbolism of sanctuary is obvious.... The Fabric of Dream

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

To be aware of vague accusation is a warning to be on your guard against being used by unscrupulous people.

If the accusation was clearly defined and you were able to defend yourself or prove your innocence, it portends trouble which you can overcome.

If you were doing the accusing, it is a warning to reassess your personal relationships as you may be heading for trouble that respect.

To be accused by a woman suggests some upsetting news is on the way, but if the accuser was a man, you will have a business success beyond your expectations. **Accused: By a man means good news. By a woman means bad news. ... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Mystic Dream Book

Obviously, there is not much difference between this and ABUSE, except that the nature of the trouble is more clearly defined. It is a sign of approaching trouble in business, but in this case, if you can prove your innocence, it shows that you will overcome your difficulties. Vague abuse will show undefined troubles or worries, whereas a definite accusation indicates a more serious matter, some special trouble. ... Mystic Dream Book

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Carl Jung several times described a technique for using imagination which allowed the spontane­ous expression of the unconscious. Jung described active imagination as a putting aside of conscious criticism while we allow our irrational to play or fantasise. In relationship to a dream, this technique can be extraordinarily helpful and re­vealing.

A way to learn the technique is to take a dream in which a fairly defined person appears. It can be a child or adult. One then sits in a quiet situation alone, or with a sym­pathetic listener, and imagines or feels oneself back in the dream. One does not need to develop clear images unless these come easily. Just holding the idea of the dream is often sufficient. Then in a playful way develop a conversation with the dream person. Ask them what they are doing; why they appear in your dream; what do they represent of yourself? With a little practice the dream characters can come to life for you if you can let yourself play or free-wheel a little.

As we learn active imagination, it can give us other ways of entering into the life of our dreams. We can imagine ourself as the dream character, or even as the objects or animals, and allow ourself to experience and speak from their viewpoint. We can enter the dream and carry it forward from where it slopped, imagining what would satisfy us, thus becoming more active in dealing with our own inner and outer life. See dream processing. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Born in Vienna, Austria. Stud­ied medicine, later became a disciple of Freud. Diverged from Freud over the sexual impulse being all important in human behaviour. Adler saw people as goal oriented, with an urge toward personal growth and wholeness. He stated that in dreams we can clearly see our aggressive impulses and desire for fulfilment. Dreams can also help the dreamer define two often conflicting aspects of their experience—their image or sense of themselves, and their sense of what is socially accept­able. Because we strive from our earliest years to have some control over ourself and surroundings, we may develop a style of life around a sense of inferiority or lack of power. So a person who feels vulnerable may become aggressive to com­pensate. Adler therefore felt that in our dreams we not only see what we think of ourself, and what our environmental situation is, but also find a definition of our techniques for satisfying our drive to deal with and succeed in the world.... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dreaming of a band as a group of musicians suggests harmony within the self. All parts of the personality are integrated.

If the image of a band is that of a stripe, there is some limitation within your circumstances which needs to be recognized, and you may need to work within well-defined guidelines.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Islamic Dream Interpretation

The element of a good building in a dream represents love, affection, unity, progeny, prosperity, a garment of honor, and girls in one’s family.

A strong edifice means strength and firmness. It also means support, help and a long life. Raising a new edifice in a dream represents either personal or collective material benefits in this world. Ifone sees himselfbuilding an edifice in a dream, it means having intercourse with his spouse. Ifone builds a church, it defines him as Christian.

If he builds a mosque, it defines him as Muslim.

If a man of knowledge sees himselfbuilding a mosque as an offering to please God Almighty in a dream, it means that he will compile a study from which others will benefit or that people will seek his advice in religious matters or interpretations.

If a king, or a ruler sees himselfbuilding a mosque as an offering for God’s pleasure in a dream, it means that he will rule his subjects with justice, command what is lawful and forbid what is unlawful.

If he builds a school, it shows him to be a man of knowledge.

If he builds a hospice in a dream, it means that he is an ascetic.

If a sick person sees himself building a house in a dream, it means that he will recover from his illness and enjoy good health. Seeing buildings in a dream explains one’s determination, it also means one’s wants for himselfwhen he rejoices at finding something suitable for status. Ifone sees his house bigger than it is in reality in a dream, it means expansion in one’s material resources.

If it grows beyond the normal norms in a dream, it means anxiety, or a delegation that hastens to enter that house without permission, announcing a calamity, or it could mean that a wedding will take place in that house. Buildinga house in a dream also means extendingone’s connections, strengthening one’s relationship with his kin, friends, or if the person in question is a general in the army, or a leader, then it means building a strong army. Building a house in a dream also means regaining power, rejoicing or success in one’s business, all of which are relative to the thickness of its walls. On the other hand, demolishing one’s house in a dream means disagreement, disintegration or separation of one’s family, relatives, friends, associates or dissolution of one’s army.

If one sees himself working for some people to renovate an old building in a dream, it means correcting the norms of conduct in that community or reviving old traditions.

For example if one sees himselfreconstructing the house of Pharaoh in a dream, it means that he is reviving or reestablishing Pharaoh’s system of government, or adopting its principals. Erecting a foundation for a building, then completing its structure in a dream means seeking knowledge, wisdom or leadership. Building a house in a different county, town or locality in a dream means a marriage with a woman from that neighborhood. Building an edifice from ceramic in a dream means decorating oneself.

If the building is from clay in the dream, it means lawful earnings.

If one engraves pictures or forms thereon in the dream, it means acquiringknowledge, learning a new craft, a leading position in the government which involves partying, alcohol and mingling with what is unlawful. Building an edifice from plaster or backed bricks encrusted with pictures or forms in a dream means engaging in an unlawful or a deceitful act. Building a house in a dream and strengthening its walls, means to complete the father’s traditions, and to continue working in his trade. (Also see Builder)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Many emotions, anxieties, moods or ideas captivate’ us, or act as means of denying free expression to our own talents, sexuality or well being. Fear of illness might stop us going on holiday, thoughts that only the pnvileged can make it in business might stop us developing ideas we have. In this sense we, or areas of our potential, can be imprisoned or made captive. Using dream processing and the allied methods can help to define what is restraining us and find freedom from such restraints. See imprisoned; wolf under ani­mals; cage, cell; escape; holding; trapped. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Way of Dreams and Visions

General Meaning: A representation of your ministry. Positive: Cars are by far the most common vehicle seen in dreams. In an internal dream, you might dream of an old car you once owned, or even of a car you desire to own.

• A car from the past could represent the circumstances surrounding that time of your life. It could also refer to the old ministry functions’ that you flowed in during that time of your life.

• I remember a lady who shared once how she dreamed that she was trying to drive the car she had when she first got saved.

The car was old and broken, but she was being pressured into driving it.

• The interpretation was clear. She was being pressured to function in a ministry and spiritual capacity she had functioned in, in the past. But she had moved on since then and it was no longer appropriate. It was time for her to move on.

• Dreaming of cars is common. You might dream that you receive a fast sports or racing car.

• This means that the Lord is going to lead you into a different type of ministry that has a bigger realm of influence. It also indicates that this will be a fast move for you.

• If you dream that someone else is driving your car, depending on the character driving your car, the interpretation could vary.

• Your father or husband driving your car could mean that the Lord Jesus is in control of your ministry (depending on your relationship with your father or husband). This would have a good connotation.

• Driving the car yourself could be good. It speaks of being in control and going in the right direction.

Negative:

Someone driving your car that represents the flesh, pride or the world system would have a negative connotation. This would mean that something other than the Lord is in control of your ministry and spiritual life! • Different cars in your dream could represent different ministries.

• Having your car stolen, taken over or stopped, speaks of your ministry being taken from you. This does not have a good connotation.

• Now that you have a general idea, allow the Holy Spirit to define your dream or vision for you.

See also:

Vehicles.... The Way of Dreams and Visions

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Gives gender - specific: In magical work the compass is used to help define the four most powerful directions. In both men’s and women’s dreams a compass may suggest the search for magical power.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Explanations of Astro Center

In ancient societies, a person’s wealth was defined by the number of cattle he or she owned. Cows have also long been a symbol for love, nurturing, kindness, and generosity. Dreaming of a live, happy cow, especially one with a calf, is almost always a positive symbol, and other symbols in the dream will shed more light on exactly what’s going on.

A dead, sick, or ailing cow, however, indicates that future plans may be in jeopardy, and action needs to be taken. See “Bull”, “Calf”.... Dream Explanations of Astro Center

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Few dreams are, by themselves, problem solving or creative.

The few excep­tions are usually very clear. Example: ‘My mother-in-law died of cancer. I had watched the whole progression of her illness, and was very upset by her death. Shortly after she died the relatives gathered and began to sort through her belongings to share them out. That was the climax of my upset and distress, and I didn’t want any part of this sorting and taking her things. That night I dreamt I was in a room with all the relatives. They were sorting her things, and I felt my waking distress. Then my mother-in-law came into the room. She was very real and seemed happy. She said for me not to be upset as she didn’t at all mind her relatives taking her things. When I woke from the dream all the anxiety and upset had disap­peared. It never returned (told to author dunng a talk given to the Housewives Register in Ilfracombe).

Although in any collection of dreams such clearcut prob­lem solving is fairly rare, nevertheless the basic function in dreams appears to be problem solving.

The proof of this lies in research done in dream withdrawal. As explained in the entry science, sleep and dreams, subjects are woken up as they begin to dream, therefore denying them dreams. This quickly leads to disorientation and breakdown of normal functioning, showing that a lot of problem solving occurs in dreams, even though it may not be as obvious as in the exam­ple. This feature of dreaming can be enhanced to a marked degree by processing dreams and arriving at insights into the information they contain. This enables old problems to be cleared up and new information and attitudes to be brought into use more quickly. Through such active work one be­comes aware of the self, which Carl Jung describes as a cen­tre, but which we might think of as a synthesis of all our experience and being. Gaining insight and allowing the self entrance into our waking affairs, as M L. Von Franz says in Man and His Symbols, gradually produces a wider and more mature personality’ which emerges, and by degrees becomes effective and even visible to others’.

The function of dreams may well be described as an effort on the part of our life process to support, augment and help mature waking consciousness.

A study of dreams suggests that the creative forces which are behind the growth of our body are also inextricably connected with psychological develop­ment. In fact, when the process of physical growth stops, the psychological growth continues.

If this is thwarted in any way, it leads to frustration, physical tension and psychosomatic and eventually physical illness.

The integration of experience.

which dreams are always attempting, if successful cannot help but lead to personal growth. But it is often frozen by the individual avoiding the growing pains’, or the discomfon of breaking through old concepts and beliefs.

Where there is any attempt on the pan of our conscious personality to co-operate with this, the creative aspect of dreaming emerges. In fact anything we are deeply involved in, challenged by or attempting, we will dream about in a creative way. Not only have communities like the American Indians used dreams in this manner—to find better hunting, solve community problems, find a sense of personal life direction— but scientists, writers, designers and thousands of lay people have found very real information in dreams After all, through dreams we have personal use of the greatest computer ever produced in the history of the world—the human brain.

1- In Genesis 41, the story of Pharaoh’s dream is told—the seven fat cows and the seven thin cows. This dream was creative in that, with Joseph’s interpretation, it resolved a national problem where famine followed years of plenty. It may very well be an example of gathered information on the history of Egypt being in the mind of Pharaoh, and the dream putting it together in a problem solving way. See dream process as computer.

2- William Blake dreamt his dead brother showed him a new way of engraving copper. Blake used the method success­fully.

3- Otto Leowi dreamt of how to prove that nervous impulses were chemical rather than electncal. This led to his Nobel prize.

4- Friedrich Kekule tned for years to define the structure of benzene. He dreamt of a snake with its tail in its mouth, and woke to realise this explained the molecular forma­tion of the benzene ring. He was so impressed he urged colleagues, ‘Gentlemen, leam to dream.’

5- Hilprecht had an amazing dream of the connection be­tween two pieces of agate which enabled him to translate an ancient Babylonian inscription.

6- Elias Howe faced the problem of how to produce an effec­tive sewing machine.

The major difficulty was the needle. He dreamt of natives shaking spears with holes in their points. This led to the invention of the Singer sewing ma­chine.

7- Robert Louis Stevenson claims to have dreamt the plot of many of his stories.

8- Albert Einstein said that during adolescence he dreamt he was riding a sledge. It went faster and faster until it reached the speed of light.

The stars began to change into amazing patterns and colours, dazzling and beautiful. His meditation on that dream throughout the years led to the theory of relativity.

To approach our dreams in order to discover their creativity, first decide what problematic or creative aspect of your life needs ‘dream power’. Define what you have already leamt or know about the problem. Write it down, and from this clarify what it is you want more insight into.

If this breaks down into several issues, choose one at a time. Think about the issue and pursue it as much as you can while awake. Read about it, ask people’s opinions, gather information. This is all data for the dream process.

If the question still needs further insight, be­fore going to sleep imagine you are putting the question to your internal store of wisdom, computer, power centre, or whatever image feels right.

For some people an old being who is neither exclusively man nor woman is a working image.

In the morning note down whatever dream you remember. It does not matter if the dream does not appear to deal with the question; Elias Howe’s native spears were an outlandish image, but nevertheless contained the information he needed. Investigate the dream using the techniques given in the entry dream processing. Some problems take time to define, so use the process until there is a resolution.

If it is a major problem, it may take a year or so; after all, some resolutions need re­structuring of the personality, because the problem cannot disappear while we still have the same attitudes and fears. See secret of the universe dreams; dream processing. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Symbol of christianity; type of cross defines one’s god, i.E. Golden cross is worship of money, etc.... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘1 ran down very dark streets, like a maze, and could not find a way out of them’ (Mrs N). Darkness has many meanings, depending on what else appears in the dream. In the example the feeling is of being lost and trapped in depressing feelings.

What is unknown; not defined by the intellect or conscious self; unconscious; depression; confusing, terrifying; secrets we hide from self or others; things we do under cover of dark­ness’; age; the womb, death.

The following dream depicts particular aspects of darkness. Example: ‘It was a festival in this strange world, in which everything had a rather dark, dilapidated look’ (Tom). Dark here is ancient, things dating from times past. This may refer to our sense of our own child­hood which feels like the ancient past, or to our unconscious knowledge of family and cultural attitudes and experience. In general the ‘strange’ world of the unconscious or sleep.

Example: ‘I was overwhelmed by terror, as if the very dark­ness of the tunnel was a living force of fear which entered and consumed me. I screamed and screamed, writhing in uncon­trollable fit-like contractions. Nevertheless a part of me was observing what was happening and was amazed, realising I had found something of great importance’ (Andrew P). Be­cause the dreamer explored this dream with me, I know the darkness was depicting fear Andrew experienced while a nine year old in hospital. He was given a rectal anaesthetic because he was about to have a nose operation. He fought and begged for the nurses to stop, but to no avail. This led to a very real feeling that humans were terrifyingly dangerous animals who would not respond even if you were on your knees begging. So trauma was the fear in the darkness. Darkness here is the unconscious area of experience.

Example: ‘I am back in time looking at an old cottage. I see the windows, walls and doors, everything about the place. It is dark and old and warm. I see the curtains and bedrooms, all the ornaments and I feel safe and comfortable’ (Mrs R). Here dark is comfortable, perhaps because it is undemanding, one is not in any glare of attention or activity. It is the relaxed quiet of evening. This woman has a relaxed relationship with her unconscious.

Example: ‘I met a woman I know in a long, dark under­ground tunnel. She was waiting for me. We had sexual inter­course. She had a very formed vagina mouth, and a very large clitoris, like a small penis. I masturbated this’ (Norman). Nor­man has no fear of the tunnel. It is his secret desire and pleasure which he admits to no one, often not even to himself. Dark here is one’s secret self.

Dark water: emotions which are felt and powerful but have not been defined or their source understood. Dark colours: feelings emanating from unconscious sources; depressed or unhappy feelings. Idioms: a dark horse; in the dark; keep it dark. See night under day and night. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Symbols and Analysis

To dream about the death of a loved one indicates that you are missing certain traits that your loved one possessed. You should consider what separated this person from you as far as quality and what you enjoyed about him or her. It is usually this aspect that you are missing that is void from your current relationships or situations. This dream may also indicate that the attributes that defined this person have no bearing on your own life.... Dream Symbols and Analysis

About Dream Interpretation

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‘one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm’), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‘research workers on dreams’, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‘Les savants ne sont pas curieux’, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‘interpretation of dreams’ is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

About Dream Interpretation

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems

I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‰_÷one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm‰_ª), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‰_÷research workers on dreams‰_ª, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‰_÷Les savants ne sont pas curieux‰_ª, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‰_÷interpretation of dreams‰_ª is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Bridal dower) Ifone gives a dower for an undefined purpose in his dream, it means that he will fulfill his obligatory duties or comply with a religious injunction.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Sigmund Freud was the founder of modern therapeutic analysis of dreams. Freud encouraged clients to relax on a couch and allow free associations to arise in con­nection with aspects of their dream. In this way he helped the person move from the surface images (manifest content) of the dream to the underlying emotions, fantasies and wishes (latent content), often connected with early childhood. Be­cause dreams use condensation—a mass of different ideas or experiences all represented by one dream image or event— Freud stated that the manifest content was meagre’ compared with the ‘richness and variety’ of latent content.

If one suc­ceeds in touching the feelings and memories usually con­nected with a dream image, this becomes apparent because of the depth of insight and experience which arises. Although ideally the Freudian analyst helps the client discover their own experience of their dream, it can occur that the analyst puts to the client readymade views of the dream. Out of this has occurred the idea of someone else ‘analysing or telling us about our dream.

Carl Jung used a different approach. He applied amplifica­tion (see entry), helped the client explore their associations, used active imagination (see entry) and stuck to the structure of the dream. Because amplification also put to the client the information and experience of the therapist, again the dreamwork can be largely verbal and intellectual, rather than experiential.

In the approach of Fritz Perls (gestalt therapy) and Moreno (psychodrama), dream analysis is almost entirely experiential.

The person exploring the dream acts out or verbalises each role or aspect of the dream.

If one dreamt of a house, in gestalt one might stan by saying I am a house’ and then go on to describe oneself just as one is as the particular house in the dream. It is important, even if the house were one existing externally, not to attempt a description of the external house, but to stay with the house as it was in the dream. This is like amplification, except the client gives all the information. This can be a very dramatic and emotional experience because we begin consciously to touch the immense realms of experience usually hidden behind the image. When successful this leads to personal insights into behaviour and creativity. See dream processing; amplification; gestalt dream work.

dream as a meeting place Any two people, or group of people who share their dreams, particularly if they explore the associated feelings and thoughts connected with the dream images, achieve social intimacy quickly. Whether it is a family sharing their dreams, or two fnends, an environment can be created in which the most profound feelings, painful and wonderful, can be allowed. Such exposure of the usually pri­vate areas of one s feelings and fears often presents new infor­mation to the dreamer, and also allows ventilation of what may never have been consciously expressed before. In doing so a healing release is reached, but also greater self under­standing and the opportunity to think over or reconsider what is discovered.

Herbert Reed, editor of the dream magazine Sundance, and resident in Virginia Beach, Va., initiated group dreaming ex­periments. It started because Reed noticed that in the dream groups he was running, when one of the group aired a prob­lem, other members would subsequently dream about that person’s problem. He went on to suggest the group should attempt this purposely and the resulting dreams shared to see if they helped the person with the problem.

The reported dreams often formed a more detailed view of the person’s situation. In one instance the group experienced many dream images of water. It aided the woman who was seeking help to admit she had a phobia of water and to begin thinking about learning to swim. In another experiment, a woman presented the problem of indecision about what college to transfer to and what to study. Her group subsequently said they were confused because they had not dreamt about school. Several had dreams about illicit sex. though, which led the woman to admit she was having an affair with a married man. She went on to realise that it was the affair which was underlying her indecision. She chose to end the affair and further her career.

Whatever may be underlying the results of Reed’s expen- ments, it is noticeably helpful to use the basic principles he is working with. They can be used by two people equally as well as a group—by a parent and child, wife and husband, busi­nessman and employee. One sets out to dream about each other through mutual agreement. Like any undertaking, the involvement, and therefore the results, are much more pro­nounced if there is an issue of reasonable importance behind the experiment. It helps if one imagines that during sleep you are going to meet each other to consider what is happening between you. Then sleep, and on waking take time to recall any dream. Note it down, even if it seems far removed from what you expected. Then explore its content using the tech­niques in dream processing.

Example: My wife and I decided to attempt to meet in our dreams. I dreamt I was in a room similar to the back bedroom of my previous marnage. My present wife was with me. She asked me to help her move the wardrobe. It reminded me of, but did not look like, the one which had been in that bed­room. I stood with my back to it, and reached my hands up to press on the top, inside. In this way I carried it to another wall. As I put it down the wood broke. I felt it ought to be thrown away’ (Thomas B). Thomas explored the dream and found he connected feelings about his first marriage with the wardrobe and bedroom. In fact the shabby wardrobe was Tom’s feelings of shabbiness at having divorced his first wife. In his first marriage, represented by the bedroom, he always felt he was married for life. In divorcing, he had done some­thing he didn’t like and was carrying it about with him. He says ‘1 am carrying this feeling of shabbiness and second best into my present relationship, and I need to get rid of it.’

dream as a spiritual guide Dreams have always been con­nected with the spiritual side of human experience, even though today many spiritual leaders disagree with consider­ation of dreams. Because dreams put the dreamer in touch with the source of their own internal wisdom and certainty, some conflict has existed between authoritative priesthood and public dreaming.

A lay person finding their own ap­proach to God in a dream might question the authority of the priests. No doubt people frequently made up dreams about God in order to be listened to. Nevertheless, despite opposi­tion, Matthew still dreamt of an angel appearing to him, Jo­seph was still warned by God to move Jesus; Peter still dreamt his dream of the unclean animals.

The modern scientific approach has placed large question marks against the concept of the human spirit. Study of the brain’s functions and biochemical activities have led to a sense of human personality being wholly a series of biological and biochemical events.

The results of this in the relationship between doctor and patient, psychiatrist and client, some­times results in the communication of human personality be­ing of little consequence. It may not be put into words, but the intimation is that if one is depressed it is a biochemical prob­lem or a brain malfunction.

If one is withdrawn or autistic, it is not that there is a vital centre of personality which has for some reason chosen to avoid contact, but that a biochemical or physiological problem is the cause—it’s nothing personal, take this pill (to change the biochemistry, because you are not really a person). Of course we have to accept that human personality must sometimes face the tragedy of biochemical malfunction, but we also need to accept that biochemical and physiological process can be changed by human will and courage.

In attempting to find what the human spirit is by looking at dreams, creativity stands out.

The spiritual nature may not be what we have traditionally considered it to be.

An overview of dreams and how dreamers relate to them suggests one amaz­ing fact. Let us call it the ‘seashell effect’. When we hear sounds in a shell that we hold to our ear, the noises heard seem exterior to oneself, yet they are most likely amplification of sounds created in our own ear, perhaps by the passage of blood. Imagine an electronic arcade machine which the player could sit in and, when running, the player could be engulfed in images, sounds, smell and sensation. At first there is shim­mering darkness, then a sound, and lights move. Is it a face seen, or a creature. Like Rorschach’s ink blots, the person creates figures and scenes out of the shapeless light and sound.

A devil appears which terrifies the player. People, de­mons, animals, God and angels appear and fade. Scenes are clearcut or a maelstrom of movement and ill-defined activity. Events arise showing every and any aspect of human experi­ence. Nothing is impossible.

If, on stepping out, we told the player that what occurred was all their own creation due to unconscious feelings, fears, habits, thoughts and physiological processes occurring within them, like the seashell effect, they might say ‘Good God, is that all it was, and I thought it was real. What a waste of time.’

Whether we can accept it or not, as a species we have created out of our own longings, fears, pain and perhaps vi­sion, God, with many different names—politics, money, dev­ils, nationalism, angels, an, and so on and on. All of it has flowed out of us. Perhaps we even deny we are the authors of the Bible, wars, social environments. Responsibility is diffi­cult. It is easier to believe the source is outside oneself. And if we do take responsibility for our amazing creativity, we may feel ‘is that all it is—me?’ Yet out of such things, such fears, such drives, such unconscious patterns as we shape our dreams with, we shape our life and fonune, we shape our children, we shape the world and our future.

The shadow of fear we create in our dream, the situation of aloneness and anger, becomes a pattern of feelings, real in its world of mind. We create a monster, a Djinn, a devil, which then haunts and influences us. Or with feelings of hope, of purposiveness and love, create other forces in us and the world. But we are the creator. We are in no way separate from the forces which create our existence. We are those creative forces. In the deep­est sense, not just as an ego, we create ourselves, and we go on creating ourselves. We are the God humanity has looked so long for.

The second aspect of the human spirit demonstrated by dreams is consciousness.

The unconscious mind, if its func­tion is not clogged with a backlog of undealt with painful childhood experience and nonfunctional premises, has a pro­pensity to form gestalts. It takes pieces of experience and fits them together to form a whole. This is illustrated by how we form gestalts when viewing newsprint photographs, which are made up of many small dots. Our mind fits them together and sees them as a whole, giving meaning where there are only dots. When the human mind is working well, when the indi­vidual can face a wide range of emotions, from fear and pain to ecstasy, this process of forming gestalts can operate very creatively. This is because it needs conscious involvement, and if the personality is frightened of deep feeling, the uniting of deeply infantile and often disturbing cxpcrience is cut out. Yet these areas are very rich mines of information, containing our most fundamental learning.

If the process is working well, then one’s expenence is gradually transformed into insights which transcend and thereby transform one s personal life.

For instance, we have witnessed our own binh in some manner, we also see many others appeanng as babies. We see people ageing, dying. We see millions of events in our life and in others.

The uncon­scious, deeply versed in imagery, ritual and body language, out of which it creates its dreams, picks up information from music, architecture, traditional rituals, people walking in the street, the unspoken world of parental influence.

The sources are massive, unbelievable. And out of it all our mind creates meaning. Like a process of placing face over face over face until a composite face is formed, a synthesis of all the faces; so the unconscious scans all this information and creates a world view, a concept of life and death.

The archetypes Jung talks of are perhaps the resulting synthesis of our own expenence, reaching points others have met also.

If so, then Chnst might be our impression of humanity as a whole.

If we dare to touch such a synthesis of experience it may be seanng, breathtaking.

It breaks the boundaries of our present personality and con­cepts because it transcends. It shatters us to let the new vision emerge. It reaches, it soars, like an eagle flying above the single events of life. Perhaps because of this the great hawk of ancient Egypt represented the human spirit.

Lastly, humans have always been faced by the impossible.

To a baby, walking and not wetting its pants is impossible, but with many a fall and accident it does the impossible. It is a god in its achievement.

To talk, to fly heavier-than-air planes, to walk on the Moon, were all impossible. Humans challenge the impossible every day. Over and over they fall, back into defeat. Many lie there broken. Yet with the next moment along come youngsters with no more sense than grasshoppers, and because they don’t know what the differ­ence is between right and left, do the impossible. Out of the infinite potential, the great unknown, they draw something new. With hope, with folly, with a wisdom they gain from who knows where, they demand more. And it’s a common everyday son of miracle. Mothers do it constantly for their children—transcending themselves. Lovers go through hell and heaven for each other and flower beyond who they were. You and I grow old on it as our daily bread, yet fail to see how holy it is. And if we turn away from it, it is because it offers no certainties, gives no authority, claims no reward. It is the spir­itual life of people on the street. And our dreams remember, even if we fail.

For this is the body and blood of the human spirit.

dream as a therapist and healer There is a long tradition of using dreams as a base for both physical and psychological healing. One of the earliest recorded incidents of such healing is when Pharaoh’s ‘spirit was troubled, and he sent for all the magicians of Egypt and all its wise men; and Pharaoh told them his dream, but there was none who could interpret it’. Then Joseph revealed the meaning of the dream and so the healing of Pharaoh’s troubled mind took place (Genesis 41).

The Greek Temples of Asclepius were devoted to using dreams as a base for healing of body and mind (see dreams and ancient Greece).

The Iroquois Amerindians used a social form of dream therapy also (see Iroquoian dream cult).

The dream process was used much more widely throughout his­tory in such practices as Pentecostal Christianity, shaktipat yoga in India, and Anton Mesmer’s groups (see sleep move­ments).

Sigmund Freud pioneered the modern approach to the use of dreams in therapy, but many different approaches have developed since his work. Examples of the therapeutic action of gaining insight into dreams are to be found in the entnes on abreaction, recurring dreams, reptiles.

The entry on dream processing gives information about using a dream to gain insight and healing. See also dream as meeting place.

A feature which people who use their dreams as a thera­peutic tool mention again and again is how dreams empower them. Many of us have an unconscious feeling that any impor­tant healing work regarding our body and mind can only be undertaken and directed by an expert, the expert might be a doctor, a psychiatrist, psychotherapist, or osteopath. Witness­ing the result of their own dream process, even if helped by an expert, people feel in touch with a wonderful internal process which is working actively for their own good. One woman, who had worked on her dream with the help of a fnend (non expert), said It gave me great confidence in my own internal process. I realised there was something powerful in myself working for my own good. It was a feeling of cooperating with life.’ One is frequently amazed by one’s own resources of wisdom, penetrating insight and sense of connection with life, as met in dreamwork. This is how dreams play a pan in helping one towards wholeness and balance.

The growing awareness of one’s central view of things, which is so wide, piercing and often humorous, brings developing self respect as the saga of one’s dreams unfolds.

There may be no hint of this, however, if a person simply records their dreams without attempting to find a deeply felt contact with their contents. It is in the searching for associ­ated feelings and ideas that the work of integrating the many strands of one’s life begins. Gradually one weaves, through a co-operative action with the dream process, a greater unifica­tion of the dark and the light, the painful and transcendent in one’s nature.

The result is an extraordinary process of educa­tion. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

DreamPedia

Dream Dictionary - Welcome to DreamAnalytic.com

Dream Interpretation on Dream, changes your perspective.

DreamAnalytic.com is the world’s largest online dream interpretation site with 32 different sources, from the scientifically and also that it as cultural and religious.

Prepared using benefiting different sources, Dream Dictionary contains over 50.000 dream symbols to help you uncover the messages in your dreams.

Dream Meaning

DreamAnalytic.com, you find out how to make sense of your dreams and harness them to increase creativity, solve problems, find life purpose, and obtain accurate personal guidance. Even if you just read the dictionary definitions, you can begin to understand symbology in a much deeper way.

Dreams teach us so much about what’s possible in life. We want your inner dream life to help expand your idea of how big you are, how much knowledge you have to draw from, how much you can accomplish, and how interconnected you are with everything and everyone.

DreamAnalytic.com is designed to help you synchronize your body, emotions, mind, and soul so that you can experience the divine sanity that underlies your life’s unfolding.

Each word has been defined on three levels (physical, emotional, and mental-spiritual) so that you can be precise and holistic when interpreting your dreams. Sometimes symbols pertain to all the levels at once.

The meanings listed in this “Dream Interpretation” are accurate, useful, and modern.

”Dream Interpretation” is a powerful tool containing countless insights into the meaning of your inner and outer life.

To begin the journey of discovering these secrets, start with your most immediate interest. No matter where you enter this “Dream Interpretation, you’ll find something that pertains to your life and leads to the next curiosity.

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What are your dreams trying to tell you?

Dreams are the most honest friend you’ll ever have – they’ll tell you you’ve

just made the worst decision of your life or that you are handling a problem

really badly.

  • What kinds of dreams do you have?
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  • Or are they fantastical?
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  • Do they have a logical progression – or do they spastically leap from place to place without any transitions?

Whichever you experience – that was what was happening in your mind!

Many people believe you should listen to what your dreams are trying to tell

you as they all have meanings.

Find the True Hidden meaning behind your dreams.

Write search in box to find the meaning of the dream. You will find the interpretation of the dream you see absolutely.


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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Below are described simple techniques which make it possible to gain information quickly from dreams. They have been put as a series of questions.

What is the background to the dream? The most imponant aspects of your everyday life may have influenced the dream or feature in it. Briefly consider any aspects of your life which connect with what appears in the dream. Example: ‘1 have a plane to catch. I get to the plane but the suitcase is never big enough for my clothing which I have left behind. I am always anxious about stuff left behind. I wake still with the feeling of anxiety’ (Jane). When asked, Jane said plane flights had been a big feature of her life. She had moved home often, travelling to different pans of the world, leaving friends and loved ones behind.

What is the main action in the dream? There is often an over­all activity such as walking, looking, worrying, building some­thing, or trying to escape. Define what it is and consider if it is expressive of something you are doing in waking life. Activi­ties such as walking or building a house need to be seen as generalisations; walking can simply represent taking a direc­tion in life. When you have defined the action, look for fur­ther information under the other headings in this book, such as swimming or sitting.

What is your role in the dream? Are you a friend, lover, sol­dier, dictator, watcher or participant in the dream? Consider this in relationship with your everyday life, especially in con­nection with how the dream presents it. Where possible, look for the entry on the role in this book. See dreamer.

Are you active or passive in the dream? By passive is meant not taking the leading role, being only an observer, being directed by other people and events, If you are passive, consider if you live in a similar attitude in your life. See active/passive.

What do you feel in the dream? Define what is felt emotionally and physically. In the physical sense are you tired, cold, re­laxed or hungry? In the emotional sense do you feel sad, angry, lost, tender or frightened anywhere in the dream? This helps clarify what feeling area the dream is dealing with. It is important also to define whether the feelings in the dream were satisfyingly expressed or whether held back.

If held back they need fuller expression. See emotions and mood.

Is there a because’ factor in the dream? In many dreams something happens, fails to happen, or appears . . . be­cause! For instance, trapped in a room you find a door to escape through. All is dark beyond and you do not go through the door ‘because’ you are frightened of the dark. In this case the ‘because’ factor is fear.

The dream also suggests you are trapped in an unsatisfying life through fear of opportunity or the unknown.

Am I meeting the things I fear in my dream? Because a dream is an entirely inward thing, we create it completely out of our own internal feelings, images, creativity, habits and insights. So even the monsters of our dream are a pan of ourself.

If we run from them it is only aspects of ourself we are avoiding. Through defining what feelings occur in the dream you may be able to clarify what it is you are avoiding. See nightmares; dream as spiritual guide.

What does the dream mean? We alone create the dream while asleep. Therefore, by looking at each symbol or aspect of the dream, we can discover from what feelings, thoughts or expe­rience, what drive or what insight we have created the drama of the dream. In a playful relaxed way, express whatever you think, feel, remember or fantasise when you hold each symbol in mind. Say or write it all, even the seemingly trivial or dan­gerous’ bits. It helps to act the pan of each thing if you can; for instance as a house you might describe yourself as ‘a bit old, but with open doors for family and friends to come in and out. I feel solid and dependable, but I sense there is something hidden in my cellar’. Such statements portray one­self graphically. Consider whatever information you gather as descriptive of your waking life. Try to summarise it, as this will aid the gaining of insight.

Try amplifying your dream You will need the help of one or two friends to use this method.

The basis is to take the role of each part of the dream, as described above. This may seem strange at first, but persist. Supposing your name is Julia and you dreamt you were carrying an umbrella, but failed to use it even though it was raining, you would talk in the first person present—I am an umbrella. Julia is carrying me but for some reason doesn’t use me.’ Having finished saying what you could about yourself, your friend(s) then ask you questions about yourself as the dream figure or object. These questions need to be simple and directly about the dream symbol. So they could ask Are you an old umbrella?’ Does Julia know she is canying you?’ ‘What is your function as an umbrella? ‘Are you big enough to shelter Julia and someone else?’ And so on.

The aim of the questions is to draw out information about the symbol being explored.

If it is a known person or object you are in the role of—your father for instance—the replies to the questions need to be answered from the point of view of what happened in the dream, rather than as in real life. Listen to what you are saying about yourself as the dream symbol, and when your questioneKs) has finished, review your statements to see if you can see how they refer to your life and yourself.

If you are asking the questions, even if you have ideas regarding the dream, do not attempt to interpret. Put your ideas into simple questions the dreamer can respond to. Maintain a sense of curiosity and attempt to understand, to make the dream plain in an everyday language sense. Lead the dreamer towards seeing what the dream means through the questions. When you have exhausted your questions ask the dreamer to summarise what they have gathered from their replies. See postures, movements and body language for an example of how to work with body movement to explore a dream meaning.

Can / alter the dream to find greater satisfaction? Imagine yourself in the dream and continue it as a fantasy or day­dream. Alter the dream in any way that satisfies. Experiment with it, play with it, until you find a fuller sense of self expres­sion. It is very imponant to note whether any anger or hostil­ity is in the dream but not fully expressed.

If so, let yourself imagine a full expression of the anger. It may be that as this is practised more anger is openly expressed in subsequent dreams. This is healthy, allowing such feelings to be vented and redirected into satisfying ways, individually and socially. In doing this do not ignore any feelings of resistance, pleasure or anxiety. Satisfaction occurs only as we leam to acknowl­edge and integrate resistances and anxieties into what we ex­press. This is a very important step. It gradually changes those of our habits which trap us in lack of satisfaction, poor cre­ativity or inability to resolve problems.

Summary To summarise effectively gather the essence of what you have said about each symbol and the dream as a whole and express it in everyday language. Imagine you are explaining to someone who knows nothing about yourself or the dream. Bnng the dream out of its symbols into everyday comments about yourself.

A man dreamt about a grey, dull office. When he looked at what he said about the office he realised he was talking about the grey, unimaginative world he grew up in after the Second World War, and how it shaped him.

Further information on using these techniques can be found in Tony Crisp s work The Instant Dream Book, published by C.W. Daniel. See amplification; plot of dream; adventure of the dream world; dreamer; postures, movement and body language; settings; symbols and dreaming; word analysis of dreams; wordplay and puns. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Our current ‘self image’ is displayed by what we do in our dreams.

If we are the active and central character in our dreams, then we have a positive, confident image of our­self.

The role we place ourself in is also the one we feel at home with, or one which is habitual to us.

If we are con­stantly a victim in our dreams, we need to consider whether we are living such a role in everyday life. Dreams may help us look at our self image from a more detached viewpoint. We can look back on what we do in a dream more easily than we can on our everyday waking behaviour. This helps us under­stand our attitudes or stance, a very growth-promoting experi­ence. It is important to understand the viewpoint of the other dream characters also; although they depict secondary views, they enlarge us through acquaintance. See identity and dreams.

What we ourself are doing in our dreams is an expression of how we see ourselves at the time of the dream, our stance or attitude to life, or what could be generalised as our self image. It typifies what aspects of our nature we identify with most strongly.

Example: My husband and I are at some sort of social club.

The people there are ex-workmates of mine and I am having a wonderful time and am very popular. My husband is enjoying my enjoyment’ (quoted from article by the author in She magazine).

The dreamer describes herself as ‘a mature 41- year old’.

The dream, and her description of it, sum up her image of herself in just a few words. She sees herself as attrac­tive, sociable, liked, happily married. She is probably good looking and healthy. But the dream carries on. She and her husband ‘are travelling down a country lane in an open horse drawn carriage. It is very dark and is in the areas we used to live. We come to a hump-backed bridge, and as we amve at the brow of the bridge a voice says, “Fair lady, come to me.” My body is suddenly lying flat and starts to rise. I float and everything is black, warm and peaceful. Then great fear comes over me and I cry out my husband’s name over and over. I get colder and slip in and out of the blackness. I wake. Even with the light on I feel the presence of great evil. From a very positive sense of self, she has moved to a feeling which horri­fies her. How can such a confident, socially capable woman, one who has succeeded professionally as well as in her mar­riage, have such feelings? The answer probably lies in the statement of her age. At 41 she is facing the menopause and great physical change.

The image of herself she has lived with depended, or developed out of, having a firm sexually attrac­tive body, and being capable of having children. Losing what­ever it is that makes one sexually desirable must change the image others have of one, and that one has of oneself.

The hump of the bridge represents this peak of her life, from whence she will start to go downhill towards death, certainly towards retirement. So she is facing midlife crisis in which a new image of herself will need to be forged.

To define what self image is portrayed in your dreams, consider just what situation you have created for yourself in the dream, and what environment and people you are with. Example: I am a shy 16 year old and am worried about my dream. In it I am walking along the school’s main corridor. I try to cover myself with my hands as a few pei pie go by, not noticing me. Then a group of boys pass, pointing and laugh­ing at me—one boy I used to fancy.

A teacher then gives me clothes. They are too big but I wear them because I have nothing else’ (HM). Adolescence is a time of great change anyway, when a lot is developing as far as self image is con­cerned. Her nakedness shows how vulnerable she feels, and how she has a fear that other people must be able to see her developing sexuality and womanhood. It is new to her and still embarrassing, particularly with boys she feels something for. She tries to cover up her feelings, and uses attitudes she has learnt from parents and teachers, but these are not suit­able. So we might summarise by saying that the situation she places herself in within the dream shows her present uncer­tainty and sense of needing clothes—attitudes or confidence —of her own. See identity in dreams; individuation. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Encyclopedia of Dreams

Seeing an elephant in your dream is defined more by the animals attitude and occupation.

If the elephant is pleasant and friendly you will have good luck in what you are undertaking to do, and if you are riding on the beast you will have much success.

If you see an elephant performing, as in a circus, you will be surrounded by happy, loving people, and if you see the elephant doing a job you will have success above your wildest dreams. Another meaning of the elephant dream has to do with whether or not you are seeking answers, or go to sleep with a particular problem on your mind, in which case the elephant denotes the key to knowledge and truth, and after sight of the elephant you will be told the answer.... Encyclopedia of Dreams

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

There is a level of human experience which is typified by intense emotional and physical response to life. Such emotions and bodily drives may remain almost entirely unconscious until touched by exploring our dream content in the right setting. When such feelings and bodily movements arise, as they do in dreams, we may be amazed at their power and clarity. See dream processing; sleep move­ments.

If we take away the images and events occurring in a dream and simply look to see what feelings or emotions are evident, the dream is often more understandable than if we try to interpret the symbols. Feelings in dreams are nearly always undistoned. We therefore do not need to interpret them, sim­ply to acknowledge them and see if we can recognise where they occur in waking life.

The images in a dream may be the way we unconsciously pictorialise our flux of feelings and the play of internal energy flows.

For instance love or sexual drive can give rise to physical movement—as in sexual intercourse. Repression of sex or love also represses such physical move­ments, leading to tension and conflict, which might be pre­sented in the drama of a dream.

Example: ‘I was with my wife, walking along a street, on holiday with her. But I felt awful tension. It was the son of stress I feel when I have turned off my sexual flow—as I have at the moment’ (Brian V). Brian can easily see the connection between the dream feelings and his everyday life, although sometimes we need to practise this. But the situation could as easily be expressed as a dream image of a blocked river.

The underlying feelings would then be less easy to grasp.

Example: ‘I was in a very ancient crumbling building, con­fronted by a large stone door, deeply engraved with many designs and creatures. I began to open the door and felt high feelings of anxiety. I realised this was an initiation and I must calm my feelings in order to pass beyond the door, i.e. if I were controlled by my feelings I would run away’ (Derek F). How we meet the emotions in our dreams illustrates our ha­bitual method of dealing with them.

The feelings of anxiety in Derek’s dream were met and moved beyond, but this is un­usual. This is because most of us change our direction as soon as there is a hint of fear.

The amount of nicotine and alcohol human beings consume suggests how poorly we meet anxiety. Going beyond fear or pain is an initiation which opens doors for us. We might now apply for the job, ask for the date, raise the issue, express the creativity, make the journey abroad, which anxiety previously kept us from. We see this in the next example: I had a ring on my marriage finger. It was a thin band of gold. I woke up frightened’ (Angela). Angela is not married and feels anxiety about the commitment.

Dreams give us a safe area to express emotions which might be difficult or dangerous to release socially. Anger in a dream may be expressing what we failed to express in a wak­ing encounter, or it might be our habitual response. It may also be directed against ourself. Dreams also contain many positive emotions. Sometimes they present a new aspect of feeling which is life enhancing.

A person who habitually felt at odds with her father and relatives experienced a dream in which she felt forgiveness for the first time. This was entirely new for her and led to a reconciliation with her family.

Some feeling states in a dream are subtle, and may be more evident in terms of the symbols than the feelings.

A grey drear environment suggests depression and lack of pleasure.

A sunny light environment with flowers and colour shows plea­sure and good feelings.

A country landscape depicts quite a different feeling state to a smoky busy city street. We can define these for ourself using the techniques described under dream processing.

Whatever feelings or emotions we meet in our dreams, many of them are bound to be habitual responses we have to life. Where these habits are negative we can begin to change them by working with the dream images as described in the last question under dream processing. See love; hostility. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

From our family we leam most of the positive and negative patterns of relationship and attitudes towards living, which we carry into daily events. Father’s uncertainty in deal­ing with people, or his anxiety in meeting change, may be the roots of our own difficulties in those areas.

If our mother is unable to develop a feeling contact with us, we may lack the confidence to meet our emotions.

Our maturation as a man or woman calls us in some way to meet and integrate our childhood desire, which includes sexual desire for our parent of the opposite sex, and rivalry with, mingled with dependence on, the parent of the same sex. Even a missing parent, the mother or father who died or left, is a potent figure internally.

An absence of a father’s or mother’s love or presence can be as traumatic as any power­fully injuring event. Our parents in our dreams are the image (full of power and feeling) of the formative forces and experi­ences of our identity. They are the ground, the soil, the bloody carnage, out of which our sense of self emerged. But our iden­tity cannot gain any real independence while still dominated by these internal forces of our creation. Heraclitus said we cannot swim in the same river twice; attempting to repeat or compete with the vinues of a parent is a misapprehension of the true nature of our own personality. Sec individuation.

Family group: The whole background of experience which makes up our values and views. This background is made up of thousands of different obvious and subtle things such as social status; amount of books in the home; how parents feel about themselves; how they relate to life outside the family; whether dominant roles are encouraged; what nationality par­ents are; what unconscious social attitudes surround the fam­ily (i.e. the master and servant, or dominating employer and subservient employee, roles which typified England at the turn of the century still colour many attitudes in the UK). Simply put, it is our internal ‘family’ of urges and values; the overall feeling tone of our family life—security, domination, whatever it was, the unconscious coping patterns of the fam­ily.

Parents together in dream: our general wisdom, back­ground of information and experience from which we make important decisions or gain intuitive insights. Parents also de­pict the rules and often irrational disciplinary codes we learnt as a child which still speak to us from within, and perhaps pass on to our own children without reassessment. These in­clude everything from ‘Don’t speak with your mouth full’ to the unspoken Masturbation is unholy/

Dead parent in dream: the beginning of independence from parent; repression of the emotions they engendered in us, our emotions regarding our parent’s death; feelings about death. See dead people dreams.

Example: ‘My father was giving me and another woman some medicine. Something was being forced on us. I started to hit and punch him in the genitals and, when he was facing the other way, in the backside. I seemed to be just the right height to do this and I had a very angry feeling that I wanted to hurt him as he had hurt me’ (Audrey V). Hurting, burying , killing parent: in the example Audrey’s height shows her as a child. She is releasing anger about the attitudes and situations her father forced down her throat’.

To be free of the intro­verted restraints and ready made values gathered from our parents, at some time in our growth we may kill or bury them. Although some people arc shocked by such dreams, they are healthy signs of emerging independence. Old myths of killing the chief so the tribe can have a new leader depict this pro­cess. When father or mother are dead’ in our dream, we can inherit all the power gained from whatever was positive in the relationship. Seeing parent drunk, incapable, foolish: another means of gaining independence from internalised values or stultifying drives to ‘honour’ or admire father or mother.

father

Generally positive: authority; ability in the external world; family or social conventions, how we relate to the ‘doer’ in us; physical strength and protectiveness; the will to be. Generally negative: introvened aggression; dominance by fear of other people’s authority, uncaring sexual drive; feelings of not being loved. See father under archetypes; man.

mother

Generally positive: feelings; ability in relationships; uniting spirit of family; how we relate to feelings in a relation­ship; strength to give of self and nunure; intuition. Generally negative: will based on irrational likes and dislikes; opinion generated by anxiety or jealousy; domination by emotions; lack of bonding. See Great Mother under archetypes; woman.

siblings and children

Whether brother, sister, daughter or son (see below in this entry), the most general use in our dreams is to depict an aspect of ourself. However it is almost universal to believe with great conviction that our dream is about the person in our dream.

A mother seeing a son die in her dream often goes through great anxiety because there lurks in her a sense of it being a precognitive dream. Vinually everyone at some time dreams about members of their close family dying or being killed—lots of mothers dream this, and their chil­dren live till 80. But occasionally children do die. Is the dream then precognitive, or is it coincidental?

Example: ‘I was walking along a rather dusty track carrying my younger son who would be around 10 months old and I was feeling rather tired. Suddenly I met a man who stopped to talk to me and commented I looked rather weary carrying the baby. He said, come with me and look over this wall and you will see such a sight that will gladden your hean. By standing on tiptoe I could just see over the wall and the sight I beheld took my breath away, it was so beautiful’ (Johan E). Here Johan’s son depicts the weight of responsibility she feels.

The beauty is her own resources of strength in motherhood.

Example: ‘I have just given binh to twins and they lay on the floor. We started to care for them. My mother took them to the doctor for his advice while I went to see my married sister who has two children. I met them there with the twins so that my sister could give her opinion on the babies. She had recent experience of childbirth and could tell us if the babies were good specimens’ (Miss E). Miss E has no children of her own, so she is uncertain of her own capacity to have and raise them.

The mother depicts her own mothering abilities, which seek confidence from an authority figure. Her sister is her own nearest experience of childbirth. So out of what she has leamt from observing her sister, she is assessing her own qualities.

Most often the family member depicts the qualities in our­self which we feel are part of the character of the person dreamt of. So the passionate one in the family would depict our passions; the intellectual one our own mind, the anxious one our hesitations. Use the questions in dream processing to define this. Having done this, can you observe what the dream depicts? For Miss E it would be questions regarding mother­hood.

Example: ‘My daughter told me the only positive part of my work in a helping profession was with a woman who had turned from it to religion. There followed a long and powerful interchange in which I said she had as yet no mind of her own. She was dominated by her mother’s anxiety, and the medical rationalism of her training. When she had dared to step beyond her own anxieties to integrate the lessons of her own life, then I would listen again’ (Desmond S). Desmond was divorced and struggling with his own pain and guilt about leaving his daughter while still a teenager. His daughter de­picts this conflict between his feelings and his rational self.

brother

Oneself, or the denied pan of self, meeting whatever is met in the dream; feelings of kinship; sense of rivalry, feel­ings about a brother. Woman’s dream, younger brother: out­going but vulnerable self; rivalry. Woman’s dream, older brother, authority, one’s capable outgoing self. Man’s dream, younger brother: vulnerable feelings; oneself at that age. Man’s dream, older brother: experience; authority, feelings of persecution. See boy; man. Idioms: big brother, brothers in arms; blood brother.

sister

Feeling self, or the lesser expressed pan of self; rival; feelings about a sister. Man s dream, younger sister: vulnera­ble emotions; rival for love of parents. Man’s dream, older sister: capable feeling self; feelings of persecution. Woman’s dream , younger sister: one’s experiences at that age; vulnera­ble feelings, rival for parents’ love. Woman’s dream, older sister: capable feeling self. See girl; woman. Idioms: sisters under the skin.

daughter

One’s relationship with the daughter, the daughter, or son, can represent what happens in a marnage between husband and wife.

The child is what has arisen from the bonding, however momentary, of two people. In dreams the child therefore is sometimes used to depict how the relation­ship is faring. So a sick daughter might show the feelings in the relationship being ‘ill’.

In a mother’s dream: often feelings of suppon or compan­ionship; feelings of not being alone in the area of emotional bonds; or one’s feeling area; responsibility; the ties of parent­hood; oneself at that age; one’s own urges, difficulties, hurts, which may still be operative. Also a comparison; the mother might see the daughter’s youth, opportunity, and have feelings about that. So the daughter may represent her sense of lost opportunity and youth—even envy, competition in getting the desire of a man.

In a father’s dream: one’s feeling self, the feelings or diffi­culties about the relationship with daughter; the struggles one’s own feeling self goes through to mature, how the sexual feelings are dealt with in a family—occurs especially when she starts courting; sister, parental responsibility; one’s wife when younger. Someone else’s daughter: feelings about one’s own daughter, feelings about younger women.

Example: 1 am standing outside a supermarket with heavy bags wearing my mac, though the sun is warm. My daughter and two friends are playing music and everyone stops to lis­ten. I start to wnte a song for them, but they pack up and go on a bus whilst I am still writing. I am left alone at the bus stop with my heavy burden of shopping, feeling incredibly unwanted’ (Mrs F). Such dreams of the daughter becoming independent can occur as soon as the child starts school, per­sisting until the mother finds a new attitude. See child; woman.

son

Extroverted self; desires connected with self expression; feelings connected with son; parental responsibility. Mother’s dream: one’s ambitions; potential, hopes; your marriage—see example.

Example: ‘My wife and I were walking out in the country­side. I looked around suddenly and saw my four-year-old son near a hole. He fell in and I raced back.

The hole was narrow but very deep. I could see water at the bottom but no sign of my son. I didn’t know whether I could leap down and save him or whether it was too narrow. Then somehow he was out. His heart was just beating’ (Richard H). Richard had argued with his wife in such a way he feared the stability of their marriage.

The son represents what they had created together —a child, a marriage.

The marriage survived, as his dream self-assessed it would. Death of son: a mother often kills off her son in her dreams as she sees him make moves towards independence. This can happen from the first day of school on. Example: T am on a very high bridge over an extremely wide and deep river with steep banks. My son does a double somersault over the railing, falls into the water. I think he is showing off. I am unable to save him. My son is 18 and has staned a structural engineering course at university’ (Joyce H).

The showing-off suggests Joyce feels her son is doing daring things with his life, and the relationship in its old form dies.

Father’s dream: yourself at that age; what qualities you see in your son; your own possibilities, envy of youth and oppor­tunities; nvalry. Someone else’s son: feelings about one’s own son; feelings about younger men. Dead son: see dead people dreams. Sec boy. See also man; first example in falling.

wife

Depicts how you see the relationship with your wife; your relationship with your sexuality; sexual and emotional desire and pleasure; how you relate to intimacy in body, mind and spirit; your feeling, intuitive nature; habits of relationship developed with one’s mother. Example: ‘My wife was trying to get me out of her life, and out of the house. It was as if she were attempting to push me into a feeling of tension and rejection which would make me leave’ (David P). Out of childhood experience, in which his mother repeatedly threat­ened to give him away, David was finding it difficult to com­mit himself emotionally to his wife. In the dream his wife represents these feelings, so he sees her—his anxiety and pain —pushing him to break up the marriage.

Example: I was standing with my wife at the end of the garden of the house I lived in as a child. We were looking over the fence to the rising meadow beyond. She said, “Look at that bird in the tree there.” On our right, in a small ash tree, an enormous owl perched. It was at least 4 feet high, the biggest bird I have ever seen. I recognised it in the dream as a greater hooded owl, which was not native to our country. I was so excited I ran into the house to telephone someone— zoo, police, newspapers?—to tell them about the bird. I can­not remember contacting anyone, but felt the bird was there in some way to meet me. Also it was hungry and looking at next door’s bantams. So I wondered what I could give it to eat’ (David P). This shows the positive side of David’s rela­tionship with his wife.

The garden is the boundanes which arose from his childhood. But he is growing—the garden— and looking beyond them in connection with his marnage.

The amazing bird is the deep feelings he touches because he has a mate, like any other natural creature. Out of his mating he becomes aware of drives to build a home—nest—and give himself to his mate. These are natural and are a pan of his unconscious or spiritual nature.

The bird is a hooded owl which can see in the dark—the unconscious—because David is realising things he had never seen’ before.

The bird is masked, meaning putting the ego aside, which is a necessity for touching the wider dimension of life or the unconscious.

The hunger of the bird shows an intimate detail of what David has learnt from his wife. She had been working as a waitress and bringing home pieces of chicken for him, saved from her own meal.

The spiritual side of David wants to develop this quality of selfgiving, which his wife’s love had helped him see.

Example: ‘1 have been a widower since January 1979, hav­ing married in October 1941. I continually dream I am in London where my business was. I am walking the streets with my wife and suddenly I see her ahead of me in a yellow raincoat and hat. I call her and try to catch up, but suddenly she vanishes. In spite of calling and searching I cannot find her’ (Douglas G). This is a common theme dreamt by widow­ers or widows, disappearance of spouse. Douglas has ‘lost’ his wife. His dream shows the paradox of love after death of panner. His love is still there, years after her death. He is possibly still trying to love his wife as an externally real per­son. so his feelings can make no connection.

To meet what actually remains of his wife, within himself, he would need to face his own internal grieving, emotions, and all the feelings, memories, angers and beauty which make up the living re­mains of his wife within him. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Encyclopedia of Dreams

A dream of a fence is a straight out obstacle dream and can only be used in the interpretation as action and content define. It is a symbol of being hemmed in, confined, restrained and otherwise prevented from going where one would want to go. It also a symbol of protection of property, self, and possession.

A fence between you and another person could be saying to that person, “this far and no further”.... Encyclopedia of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Herbs)

An alternative emblem for fire. According to Greek mythology, Prometheus bore a burning fennel stalk to earth when presenting humankind with this gift.

Clear vision and defined goals. In folk remedies, this herb is used to aid eyesight.

Folkloric: The natural cycle of death and rebirth that may be allegorical or situational. S? iakes are said to shed their skin after eating this herb.

The ongoing battle between dark and light, good and evil within or without. In the Strega tradition (the Witches of Italy), symbolic battles are fought between good and evil sorcerers using fennel stalks for weapons.

The goal of this enactment is to ward off negativity and ensure a good crop.

Digesting recently received information. Historically, fennel was favored to aid indigestion.... The Language of Dreams

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘I went into a cellar. It was rather cavelike. I had to scramble to get into it.

The entrance was difficult to find, but I had discovered it many years before and been in lots of times. I found objects in the cellar and was looking for something’ (Tony C). Usually, as in the example, to discover, realise, become aware of some aspect of oneself and gain access to or use of. One might be living with con­stant resentments about one’s past or present situation, and then ‘find’ release from this for a day, yet not be conscious how it was achieved.

The dream might attempt to define this. Or it might be a new idea you realise unconsciously in sleep.

Example: Then I was with my father (dead) and was showing him a handful of exotic banknotes I had found in the building. They were £100 notes. I wasn’t sure if the money was legal tender or not.

The notes had an unusual design’ (Andy). Andy has found a sense of his own value—the money —but is not sure if other people also value him.

The dream illustrates the attempt to ‘find a place* in society.

The effort to search and find is frequently to do with one’s own identity, and what one is searching through is one’s experience, as in Tony’s cellar above, or this example: l was looking into the crowd in the film to find me and it was like looking at a snapshot, it felt very important that I find me, I saw my green slacks just showing, right at the back of the crowd’ (Trudy K). See look; see. Idioms: find oneself; find fault; find out; find one’s bearings. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: Frames give a defined border to objects, making us aware of limitations and restrictions. Within the workaday world these are often not of our own making but put in place by others.

An inappropriate frame will highlight a restriction on our creativity. Being ‘framed’ for an activity we have not done suggests that we are conscious of an injustice in waking life. Consult the entries for border and edge for more ideas.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

When Freud, as a qualified doctor and neurologist, became interested in psychology, it was still a branch of philosophy. He gave to it a geography of the human mind, showed the influence the unconscious has upon waking personality, and brought dreams to the attention of the scientific community. His book The Interpretation of Dreams was a turning point in bringing concepts on dreaming from a primitive level to alignment with modem thought. With enormous courage, and against much opposition, he showed the place sexuality has in the development of con­scious self awareness. Freud defined dreams as being:

1- Thoughts in pictures’—a process of thinking while asleep.

2-‘Ego alien’. They have a life and will which often appears to be other than our conscious will. This led older cultures to believe that dreams were sent by spirits or God.

3-‘Hallucinatory’. We believe the reality of the dream while in it.

4-‘Drama’. Dreams are not random images. They are ‘stage managed’ into very definite, sometimes recurring, themes and plots.

5-‘Moral standards’. Dreams have very different moral stan­dards than our waking personality.

6-‘Association of ideas’. In dreaming we have access to in­fant or other memories or experience we would find very difficult to recall while awake.

Freud originally said that one of the main functions of a dream was wish fulfilment, and an expression of the ‘primary process of human thinking’ unaffected by space, time and logic. Later, in considering recurring dreams which re-enact a recent traumatic incident, he agreed that dreams were not only an expression of the ‘pleasure principle’. W.H.R. Rivers, studying dreams connected with war neuroses, saw such dreams as attempts to resolve current emotional problems.

Although there is still controversy regarding whether there can be a valid ‘dream dictionary’, Freud himself saw dream symbols as having consistent meaning so frequently that one could attribute an interpretation to them independently of the dreamer’s associations. See abreaction; Adler, Alfred; birds; dream analysis; displacement; door; Fromm, Erich; halluci­nations and hallucinogens; hypnosis and dreams; Jung, Carl; lucidity; plot of dreams; wordplay and puns; secret of universe dreams; dream as therapist; unconscious. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Relatedness; the son of exchange or give and take which goes on in a relationship, even the internal relationship with oneself, or the environment. One can give afTection, sup­port, sex, ideas, as well as wounds. One needs to see what the interaction is by looking at what is given. Receiving: consider what is received to define what you are accepting or rejecting in oneself or from others.

The idioms show the many ways this action can be used: don’t give me that, give and take; give as good as one gets; give away or give-away; give oneself away, give somebody away; don’t give a brass farthing; give place; give a piece of one’s mind, give them enough rope; give someone the evil or glad eye; give someone the elbow; give one’s notice. See gift. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Little Giant Encyclopedia

The color of something as yet unconscious and undefined, a color-less mixture where light emerges from the dark. Blending contradictions, as in Wedding, where it mixes black (female) and white (male), so it is archetypal. Gray stands on the border between day and night, light and dark, and—in a dream—asks us to draw clear distinctions. Gray here may represent the unassuming; on the other hand, the inconspicuous gray may also point to the conspicuous, the essential, and the real in life. See Mouse, Shadow.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Defines one’s title of/or responsibility, i.E.

A son who takes his dad’s place, wears his hat... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

In some dreams we find ourselves in the past, with the feeling of those times. This nearly always depicts, not a past life, but our own feelings. So a cowboy scene might de­pict our pioneering spirit or sense of adventure. We need to define what feelings we derive from reading about or seeing films about such periods of history. Also our past; the person we were at some period in our life. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A house nearly always refers to oneself, depicting one’s body and attributes of personality. Thus if we take a large house with its many functional rooms, the library would represent the mind, the bathroom cleansing or renewal of good feelings, the bedrooms one’s sexuality or intimacy, the roof one’s protectiveness or ‘coping mechanisms’. Large pub­lic buildings such as hospitals, factories, blocks of flats, depict particular functions suggested by their nature. But of course, if the house or building has a personal connection—the house you live in, or place you have worked—then you need to define what are the essential feelings about such. Or see dream processing.

If a house or building has a quality of some other type of construction, such as a library feeling like a factory, or a house a church, both aspects should be ac­cepted as important. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The cleaning out of non-functional, negative attitudes, thoughts and experience; keeping our internal house in order, perhaps by taking time to clarify or define motives, opinions and feelings about others. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Indigenous people might be defined as those who belong to a particular area of the earth and have over many centuries developed their own spiritual michelle grieco practices in order to ensure survival. These practices often resonate in dreams.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- Actually becoming invisible in a dream disappearing - would indicate cither that we are not ready to face the knowledge that understanding would bring us, or that there is something we would rather forget.

2- When we are conscious that something is invisible in a dream, it indicates that we simply need to be aware of the image’s presence, without necessarily having lo interpret it immediately. Sometimes a figure (either a man or woman) seeming to be invisible can represent the Shadow (see Introduction).

3- Spiritually, the invisible is the Undefined. Often described as God Unmanifest, it is invisible because it is not experienced by sight alone.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- If we find ourselves being kidnapped within a dream, we are conscious of the fact that our own fears and doubts can make us victims. We are being overcome by our own “demons’, which have ganged up on us and caused us to become insecure.

2- In dreams we mav find ourselves trying to kidnap someone else and this would indicate, at its simplest level, that we are trying to influence someone else. It may also suggest that we are trying to absorb some quality from the other person which is not freely available.

3- Some sort of psychic theft may be symbolised here, or on a darker level a thread of spiritual vampirism may be running through the dreamer’s subconscious. It is up to the dreamer thoroughly to define this image.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

One function of dreams is to bring aspects of our thinking or feeling, which may be ill defined, towards clarification. Foreign or strange language may therefore illustrate something which is being communi­cated to us from within, but is still not clear.

The uncon­scious, as in speaking in tongues—glossolalia—and of course in dreams, frequently moves towards clear awareness in stages.

The strange language is a halfway house, as is a dream.

If we bring focused attention to these, as explained in dream processing, the next step, clear verbal expression, can be reached. Speaking in language we are learning: the language is becoming habitual, making it possible to think in it. See speaking. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The play of subtle feelings and forces in our being; realisations difficult to define; the influence of wider aware­ness in our life. Playing music: self expression; expressing our essential self which might be overlooked in general activities. Idioms: music to one’s ears; face the music. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Explanations of Astro Center

A symbol with many possible meanings, depending on the perception of the dreamer. 1.If you dream of a well-shaped and well-defined nose, something that has been obscured will suddenly become clear to you - “as plain as the nose on your face.”

A long, thin, perhaps twitching nose is a warning that someone around you is “nosing” into your affairs - “sticking their nose where it doesn’t belong.”

A stuffed-up nose indicates obstacles and blockages, but blowing your nose signifies that obstacles will be overcome.

A nosebleed indicates financial trouble ahead, and also is a warning not to lend anyone any money right now - or they’ll “bleed you dry.”

Dreaming of a large or swollen nose, however, is a portent of prosperity.... Dream Explanations of Astro Center

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Depicts something which causes uncertainty or withdrawal of enthusiasm, creativity or love. Such might be produced by someone’s criticism which evokes our own self doubts; indecision; our own inhibitions or anxieties; maybe even a hidden form of not wanting to succeed because it would confront us with the new—we might fail.

Example: ‘I have this recurring nightmare. I see my mother standing by my bedroom door, blocking it as if I am being trapped and stopped from getting out. I often call to her “Let me out Mum” but she just stands there staring with no ex­pression on her face at all. I end up getting out of bed and switching my bedroom light on and then she disappears. Sometimes I will see her standing by my wardrobe. It seems as if she is always standing by a door and trying to trap me’ (Natalie S). Natalie is 14 and the obstacle she faces in choos­ing her own clothes—the wardrobe—and making her own decisions—her mother—is her own dependence upon her mother, and the need to develop a new relationship with her.

Example: ‘As I was driving along I turned my car over. I wasn’t hurt but could not now get to my destination. I didn’t feel at all upset about the car being damaged’ (Tim K).

The example shows a subtle and self-made obstacle, the damaged car. In fact Tim admitted ruining his own work opportunities —the car—because he was frightened of failure.

The obstacle, obstruction, barner or interference can be a person, wall, river, animal—or it might be an internal thing like paralysis or a lump in the throat. Refer to the entry on the appropriate subject to define what it is acting as an obstacle. See first example in failure; fence; wall. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Little Giant Encyclopedia

Points to boredom or undefined sexuality. This insight is only the beginning of the process of forming your own erotic sexuality.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

The Language of Dreams

(see Alley, Comer, Dead End, Highway)

Spiritual directions and focus. Taoism, for example, translated from the Chinese, means “the way” or “path.” Buddhism teaches the eightfold path to enlightenment. Christ spoke of the path of righteousness.

A guideline, edict, or idea that you are following now, or plan to follow in the future. Paths have defined borders that set them apart from the accompanying countryside, showing the way to go.

A sign of fahy mischief or presence. In European and rural American folklore, bright green lines of grass were called fairy paths, and believed to be created by the passage of these elemental beings.

Meandering: Varying from your destiny or taking temporary detours away from a previously specified goal.

Divergent: A decision must be made, but both options appear equal. See if your dream reveals something about this choice that you have not seen yet, such as one path exhibiting weeds that might entangle you.

Well-worn: Either being in a rut, or staying so constrained to one way of thinking and living that the same old routes get walked again and again.

Straight: Staying true to your ideals, lifestyle, and / or goals.... The Language of Dreams

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

For a man the penis represents more than simply his sexual appetite. It depicts the whole drive of life through his glandular system which develops the body type he has, pre­disposes his body towards male sexual characteristics; brings a cenain creative explosiveness to his personality, creates urges towards fatherhood and loving his woman, with con­nected desires to supply the needs of family if he is emotion­ally healthy.

The positive aspect of the penis/masculinity is for him to demand his woman meets his maleness, his canng aggression, his sexual desire, with her own fiery energy and strength. In general, direct reference to sexual feelings, fears, or problems. As these can be quite complex several examples are given below.

Example: ‘So for the third time I held the woman and made love.

The woman’s vagina was like a (lower, I don’t mean to look at, but in physical sensation. My penis felt like it was penetrating petals of flesh and touching with great plea­sure a central receptive area I was left with the feeling of being able to make love again and again without any negative effects. It was a very positive and healthy feeling’ (John T). John is feeling confident about his sexual drive. Although a powerful drive, subtle feelings and fears have an intense influ­ence not only on the pleasure of sex, but also the response of the physical organs.

The relationship with the penis and sex act in one s dream shows what fears, hurts or attitudes are influencing the sexual flow. See castration.

In a woman’s dream, one’s relationship with, desire for, a mate; relationship with one’s own male self—ambition, work capability, aggression, intellect; depicts the relationship with, genital sexuality with, one’s panner. As with Sally in the next example, the events in the dream define the problem or rela­tionship. Example: ‘My lover Terry, myself and another woman are all on our bed.

The other woman seemed very sure of herself and kissed Terry in a very intimate way, he doing the same to her as I lay very near to both of them. Then Terry stuck his bottom in the air and staned to lick my chest and breast. I found myself licking around the penis, felt I was under some kind of pressure from both the other two to do so but didn’t feel too shattered as I did it with love for Terry, but I had a bitter taste in my mouth’ (Sally P). In talking about this dream Sally said she often struggled with what she wanted and what her panner wanted in sex. She might go along with his needs, but not find it palatable. Even if she did do it with some love, it might have a bad taste in her mouth*.

Example: T felt as if I were as one with Terry and I realised he was trying to make a journey into his mother s vagina, as his penis. Her vagina looked like a long dark tunnel and was threatening to him. I said, “You haven’t given your mother satisfaction and you say you will not.” Then he was really smashed up in body. Withdrawing into a garden with a high green hedge. I took a leaf from the hedge and began to pull it apan with my hands. Terry said, “Look what you are doing, teasing me.” I felt withdrawal wasn’t the way and staned to follow him, walking alongside the hedge. I said, “It feels like you are strangling me, so why don’t you do it and kill me?” (We have been going through a lot of sexual withdrawal, Terry saying his sexuality was his to do with as he wanted.)’ (Sally P). This second dream of Sally’s is a shrewd summing up of Terry’s sexual fears. In fact Terry suffered a great deal of anxi­ety about sex, and later uncovered the son of fear and desire to avoid giving his mother satisfaction in becoming a full blooded man shown in the dream. Our unconscious is a very capable psychologist, and while Terry in Sally’s dream repre­sents her insights regarding him—and must not be seen as a statement of fact about Terry—such insights are often enor­mously useful in dealing with relationship difficulties.

Example: ‘Was in a house with my wife. Outside the door was something which wanted to come into her—an invisible being. We were frightened and it said “Do not be afraid, I want you to put your penis in your wife and wait for me to activate you. In that way you will form a body for me.” I woke and realised the dream was moving me to parenthood. Al­ready having three children I realised this would mean an­other 20 years of responsibility. Nevertheless my wife and I made love. Two weeks later I dreamt my wife was pregnant with a son. In fact nine months later she bore a son’ (Nigel I). In this interesting dream sequence the penis is Nigel’s drive to be a father. See castrate; bed; knob; pole; reptiles; sausage; examples in flower and tunnel. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Depends on what the ‘game’ is. Whatever we ‘play’ at in a dream might just be fun or suggest great seriousness. As humans we use an enormous number of strategies to gain our ends, as explained in the book Games People Play.

The idioms define some of these ‘games’. Idioms: come into play; foul play; make a play for, make play of; play a pan in; play along with, play at; play cat and mouse; play dead/possum; play down; played out; play fair; play false, play for time; play hard to get; play it cool; play no pan in it; play on words; play safe; play people off against each other, play something down, play the field; play up; play upon a weakness/fear; play up to someone; the state of play; play somebody at their own game; child’s play; play ball with; play it by ear, play fast and loose; play gooseberry, play havoc with, play merry hell; play into their hands; play one’s ace; play one’s cards right, play second fiddle; play the fool; play the game; play the white man; play to the gallery; play with fire; two can play at that game. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Even in everyday life, the way we hold and position our body, the inclination of chest and head, the movement of hands, are a means of com­munication.

The apparently intuitive information in some dreams, when investigated, can be traced to an unconscious insight into the language of the living body. We all have this ability to understand body language, but it seems to be some­thing which is inherited from past times before verbal lan­guage. It therefore remains a largely unconscious ability. In our dreams, however, it is a major factor in how the dream is structured.

If you cannot find a satisfying description below, imagine yourself making the movement or posture in the dream to see if you can define what the feeling quality is, or what you are saying non-verbally. It can often be of value to make the movement or take up the posture physically instead of in the imagination. By comparing the movement/posture with an­other one, it can help to clarify its quality.

Example: Marilyn was expenencing emotional pain con­nected with her impending divorce. Marilyn had dreamt of seeing a dinosaur standing in her path, devounng all who approached it. We explored it by having Marilyn find a body posture and movements which for her expressed the feeling of the dinosaur. In doing so Marilyn did not sense anger or aggression, but she did feel like a predator which always had to take to gain her own needs. This feeling immediately re­minded her of her family life as a child. She remembered when she was sent shopping as a very young child of three or four; as well as buying what she had been asked, she pur­chased some sweets for herself. When she arrived home she was treated as if she had done a terrible thing, and that was where she began to feel like a predator. It seemed to her as if her own needs were always gained at the expense of someone else.

‘With this awareness, she could now see that the dinosaur standing iti her path clearly related to her present situation. Bargaining to gain a realistic share of the house and property jointly owned by her husband and herself, felt to her as if she were gaining her needs at his expense, like a predator. That made her feel so awful, she was almost ready to allow her husband to take all, leaving her without house or money to start again. Her awareness of where the feelings arose from, and the unrealistic pan they played in her life, allowed her to relate to the situation with less pain and more wisdom’ (from Mind and Movement, Tony Crisp). ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dr Ernest Hartmann carried out studies in connection with people who have stable sleep pat­terns. His aim was to define whether waking events influ­enced people’s need for sleep.

For instance, a loss of boy­friend or stress caused many young women to have an increased need for sleep. Some people who had undergone successful psychotherapy for their emotional difficulties, and some meditators, found their sleep need was decreased.

Wanting to know more about why these situations changed sleep need, Hartmann went on to study dream sleep in a group of women who suffered premenstrual tension (PMT). This group were prone to depression and irritability during PMT—records show there is an unusually high rate of mur­der, suicide and admission to psychiatric hospitals during this time. Although Hartmann found this group needed a little more sleep time than a control group, the main feature of change was their increased need for dreaming. Their length of time spent in dreaming increased in relationship to their de­pression.

The conclusion reached was that one of the func­tions of dreaming is to help deal with difficult states of emo­tion or anxiety. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Present view or opinion of ourself. Because few of us define how we really see ourself, the self image may be largely unconscious, therefore shown as a face which might be different to what we are used to seeing, how we feel others see us; may also be aspects of ourself the unconscious is showing us which we may not have been aware of. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

In most ancient cultures, consider­ation and even veneration of dreams played a great pan. Some groups felt that dream life was more real and imponant than waking life. Not only were dreams looked to for information about hunting (Eskimo groups), but also for ways of healing physical and psychological ills (Greek dream temples) and insights into the medicinal properties of herbs, barks and clays (African tribal witchdoctors). Common to most of these groups, and evident in the Old Testament, was also the sense that through dreams one had awareness of the transcendental or supersensible. St Peter’s dream of the sheet and unclean animals was a turning point in the history of western socicty —as was Constantine’s dream of his victory if he used the symbol of Christianity.

At its most fundamental, the human religious sense emerges out of several factors. One is the awareness of ex­isting amidst external and internal forces of nature which cause us to feel vulnerable and perhaps powerless. Such natu­ral processes as illness, death, growth and decay, earthquakes, the seasons, confront us with things which are often beyond our ability to control. Considenng the information and re­sources of the times, one of religion’s main functions in the past was the attempted control of the ‘uncertain’ factors in human life, and help towards psychological adjustment to vali­ne rability. Religions were the first social programmes aiding the human need for help and support towards emotional, mental, physical and social health and maturity. Even if prim­itive, such programmes helped groups of people to gain a common identity and live in reasonable harmony together. Like a computer program which is specific to a particular business, such programmes were specific to a particular group, and so are outdated in today’s need for greater integra­tion with other races. Religions also offered some sort of con­cept of and connection with the roots of being.

Example: ‘For two nights running I have dreamt the same nightmare. I am in a chapel walking down the first flight of several flights of steps when I hear loud noises behind me. I am told to run, being warned of the soldiers who ride the cavalry horses nght down the steps, and who run you over if you are in their way.

The horses are fierce and they absolutely race down the steps at the same time every day, and you literally have to lock yourself away in a nearby room which is a long way down the chapel. I ran into the room hearing the pounding of the horses’ hooves. It was a terrible pandemo­nium in that chapel. In the room were school children the same age as me and some perhaps younger’ (Maria H). Maria, who is 16, in describing her dream says she had recently been confronted with whether to have a sexual relationship with her boyfriend. Religion, represented by the chapel, is Maria’s way of locking out her powerful sexual urges. Many dreams show that religion, as a set of beliefs, is used as a way of avoiding anxiety in the face of life’s uncertainties.

For many people, the rigid belief system helps them to avoid uncertainty in making decisions.

Dreams also portray and define the aspect of human expe­rience in which we sense a kinship with all life forms. This is the side of spiritual expenence through which we find a con­nection with the roots of our being. While awake we might see the birth of a colt and feel the wonder of emergence and newness; the struggle to stand up and survive, the miracle of physical and sexual power which can be accepted or feared. In looking in the faces of fellow men and women we see something of what they have done in this strange and painful wonder we call life. We see whether they have been crushed by the forces confronting them; whether they have become ngid; or whether, through some common miracle, they have been able to carry into their mature years the laughter, the crying, the joy, the ability to feel pain, that are the very signs of life within the human soul. These things are sensed by us all, but seldom organised into a comprehensive view of life, and an extraction of meaning. Often it is only in our dreams, through the ability the unconscious has to draw out the signif­icance of such widely divergent expenences, that we glimpse the unity behind phenomena which is an essential of spiritual life, i.e. we all have a life, we breathe, we have come from a mother, so share a universal experience.

Example: To quote J.B. Priestley from his book Rain Upon Godshill: ‘Just before I went to Amenca, dunng the exhausting weeks when I was busy with my Time Plays, I had such a dream, and I think it left a greater impression on my mind than any experience I had ever known before, awake or in dreams, and said more to me about this life than any book I have ever read.

The setting of the dream was quite simple, and owed something to the fact that not long before my wife had visiied the lighthouse here at St Catherine’s to do some bird ringing. I dreamt I was standing at the top of a very high tower, alone, looking down upon myriads of birds all flying in one direction; every kind of bird was there, all the birds in the world. It was a noble sight, this vast aerial river of birds. But now in some mysterious fashion the gear was changed, and time speeded up, so that I saw generations of birds, watched them break their shells, flutter into life, mate, weaken, falter and die. Wings grew only to crumble; bodies were sleek, and then, in a flash bled and shrivelled; and death struck every­where at every second. What was the use of all this blind struggle towards life, this eager trying of wings, this hurried mating, this flight and surge, all this gigantic meaningless ef­fort? As I stared down, seeming to see every creature’s ignoble little history almost at a glance, I felt sick at heart. It would be better if not one of them, if not one of us, had been bom, if the struggle ceased for ever. I stood on my tower, still alone, desperately unhappy. But now the gear was changed again, and the time went faster still, and it was rushing by at such a rate, that the birds could not show any movement, but were like an enormous plain sown with feathers. But along this plain, flickering through the bodies themselves, there now passed a sort of white flame, trembling, dancing, then hurry­ing on; and as soon as I saw it I knew that this white flame was life itself, the very quintessence of being; and then it came to me, in a rocket burst of ecstasy, that nothing mattered, nothing could ever matter, because nothing else was real but this quivering and hurrying lambency of being. Birds, men and creatures not yet shaped and coloured, all were of no account except so far as this flame of life travelled through them. It left nothing to mourn over behind it, what I had thought was tragedy was mere emptiness or a shadow show; for now all real feeling was caught and purified and danced on ecstatically with the white flame of life. I had never before felt such deep happiness as I knew at the end of my dream of the tower and the birds.’

Some Nonh American Indians developed the totem out of similar processes. In one generation a person might learn to plant a seed and eat the results. Later someone might see that through fertilisation more food was produced. Still later some­one found that by irrigating, still more improvement was made. No one individual was responsible for such vital cul­tural information, and the collective information is bigger than any one person, yet individuals can partake of it and add to it.

The totem represented such subtle realities, as it might in a modem dream; as Christ might in today’s unconscious. That older cultures venerated their collective information, and that modem humans seem largely apathetic to it, shows how our ‘religion’ has degenerated. Yet utilising the power of the unconscious to portray the subtle influences which impinge upon us, and building the information gained into our re­sponse to life, is deeply important.

With the growth of authoritarian structures in western reli­gion, and the dominance of the rational mind over feeling values, dreams have been pushed into the background. With this change has developed the sense that visionary dreams were something which ‘superstitious* cultural groups had in the past. Yet thoroughly modem men and women still meet Christ powerfully in dreams and visions. Christ still appears to them as a living being.

The transcendental, the collective or universal enters their life just as frequently as ever before. Sometimes it enters with insistence and power, because a too rational mind has led to an unbalance in the psyche—a bal­ance in which the waking and rational individuality is one pole, and the feeling, connective awareness of the uncon­scious is the other.

Although it is tempting to think of the transcendent as ethereal or unreal, the religious in dreams is nearly always a symbol for the major processes of maturing in human life. We are the hero/ine who meets the dangers of life outside the womb, who faces growth, ageing and death.

The awe and deep emotions we unconsciously feel about such heroic deeds are depicted by religious emotion.

See angel; Christ, rebirth and Devil under archetypes; church; evil; fish, sea creatures; example in whale under fish, sea creatures; heaven, hell; sweets under food; dream as spiritual guide. See also hero/ine; mass; masturbation; old; paralysis; colours; sheep under animals. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Symbols and Analysis

To dream of seeing or participating in a riot embodies an undefined personality. You seem to be busying yourself with matters and concerns that may cause you harm. It is the right time to assert your rights and opinions on issues.... Dream Symbols and Analysis

The Language of Dreams

(see Acrobatics, \ larathon, Olympics) Something that’s gotten out of control circumstantially or personally.

What’s chasing you, or from what are you trying to escape? Perhaps the past or an unpleasant experience?

Hurrying, without necessarily having a defined goal. ... The Language of Dreams

Little Giant Encyclopedia

See Devil. Symbol for logic, but without a soul. Also undefined nature.

An archetypal symbol for darkness, but also a symbol of creativity and resistance.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

In 1937 through the use of the electroencephalograph (EEG) measuring tiny electrical brain impulses, Loomis and his associates discovered that the form of brainwaves changes with the onset of sleep.

The next leap forward in understanding came when Aserinsky and Kleitman found rapid eye movements (REM) in 1953. In 1957 the REM were linked with dreaming. This defined sleep into two differ­ent observable states, REM sleep, and NREM (non-rapid eye movement or non-rem) sleep. Within NREM three different stages have been identified. These are defined by the different EEG patterns of electrical activity in the brain. They are mea­sured by the height (amplitude) of the brain waves and fre­quency of up and down movement. There are also electrical changes occurring in the muscles (measured using an electro- myograph or EMG), and in movement of the eyeballs (mea­sured using an electro-oculograph or EOG).

While awake the height is low and frequency fast. As we relax prior to sleep the EEG shifts to what are called alpha waves, at 8 to 12 cps (cycles per second). Stage one of sleep is the transition between this drowsy state of alpha waves to sleeping, in which theta waves occur, at 3 to 7 cps. In this first stage we experience random images and thoughts. This lasts about 10 minutes, followed by stage two, in which ‘sleep spindles’ occur which have 12 to 14 cps on the EEG. These last from 1/2 to 2 seconds, with K complexes following, which are slow large EEG waves. About half our sleep period is spent in this second stage of sleep. Deep sleep is reached when our brain exhibits delta waves, with 1/2 to 2 cps.

After approximately an hour and a half from falling into deep sleep, an exciting change occurs. We return to level two and REM occur. Suddenly the brain is alert and active, though the person is asleep and difficult to wake. This level has been called paradoxical sleep because of this fact. Voluntary mus­cular activity is suppressed and the body is essentially paralysed. Morrison has pointed out that, although the brain is transmitting full muscular activity messages, these are usu­ally suppressed by an area of the brain in the pons. But bursts of short actions occur, such as rapid eyeball jerks, twitches of the muscles, changes in the size of the pupil, contractions in the middle ear, and erection of the penis. It may be that similar excitation occurs in the vagina. Also, autonomic storms’ occur dunng which large erratic changes occur in heart rate, blood pressure, breathing rate and in other auto­nomic nervous system functions. These are the changes ac­companying our dreams.

If we slept for eight hours, a typical pattern would be to pass into delta sleep, stay there for about 70 to 90 minutes, then return to stage two and dream for about five minutes. We then move back into delta sleep, stay for a short period and shift back to level two, but without dreaming, then back into level three.

The next return to stage two is longer, almost an hour, with a period of dreaming lasting about 19 minutes, and also a short period of return to waking. There is only one short period of return to stage three sleep which occurs nearly four hours after falling asleep. From there on we remain in level two sleep, with three or four lengthening periods of dreaming, and returns to brief wakefulness.

The average amount of body shifting is once every 15 minutes.

1- In undergoing 205 hours of sleep deprivation, four healthy males showed various physiological and psychological changes. Some of these were headache, lack of concentra­tion, hallucination, memory loss, tremor and, in some, paranoia. In all cases one night’s sleep restored normal functioning.

2- One in ten people who complain of excessive daytime drowsiness suffer from sleep apnoea, which is a stoppage of breathing while asleep.

3- A condition called narcolepsy causes sufferers to fall asleep at inappropriate times—while making love, walk­ing, playing tennis, working.

4- As we age we usually sleep less. Our REM sleep in partic­ular decreases sharply. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dreamers Dictionary

Depth Psychology: Seeing a picture of yourself: you believe that your actions, words, and conduct define who you are. Seeing a portrait of vourself: vou haven’t been honest with yourself lately and are overimpressed with your own opinions and talents. See Picture.... Dreamers Dictionary

Dreamers Dictionary

Vision: Billowing steam means that the goals you have set for yourself are ill defined and the dream symbolizes your insecurities and Aggression. Your work may have been all for naught and worthless.

The steam of a locomotive is a promise of great projects to come your way. Steam from a boiling pot on the stove; pay attention—family differences are about to surface.

Depth Psychology: Steam represents the amount of energy you invest in what you do; it also might be symbolic of anger you have repressed. Maybe you invested more energy in a project than was called for? The dream is a warning to release stress and tension to prevent the “pot” firom boiling over or exploding. See Fire, Water.... Dreamers Dictionary

The Language of Dreams

(see Sports, Water)

Water represents the intuitive nature and the subconscious.

The movement through this liquid indicates either a willingness to traverse hidden portions of the self, or focusing on a defined aspect of subconsciousness as the goal of your swim.

Success in a situation in which you were asked effectively to “sink or swim.”

Regulation of the feminine aspects of self so that instincts or emotions do not overcome rationality.

A balance between the spiritual and mundane, leaning slightly more toward spiritual matters depending on the amount of the body shown as immersed.... The Language of Dreams

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Our conscious self or ego is only a tiny pan of our totality, as is obvious when we consider how much of our memory or experience we can hold in mind at any one time.

The self, as defined by Jung, is both what we are consciously aware of, and the massive potential remaining unconscious.

The self has no known boundaries, for we do not yet know the end of what the mind is capable of, or what consciousness touches out of sight of waking.

The mass of experience and awareness which lies in the background of our waking aware­ness is like an inner guiding factor which, apart from express­ing precise pieces in the form of remembered facts and events, guides us, if we listen, through intuition, feeling states, dreams or illumination. Its symbols are: a ring, a square area, a great tree, Christ, a shining being or animal, a talking animal, a strange stone or rock, symbols like the cross or mandala, a round table, God, a guru, an elephant, a crowned or shining snake. Here are some examples of the self in dreams.

Example: ‘1 am climbing a tree to get a stone. This stone has special powers that flower. I’m nearly there when I look down and notice that there aren’t any branches on the left side of the tree. This causes me to consider the possibility of falling and that in turn leads to a fear of climbing any higher. I wake with my heart beating strongly, but little feeling of fear.’ Example: 41 lopk into the third square, it was filled with an iridescent blue colour, shining and beautiful to look at, a beautiful substance. I felt it had to do with religion, but I couldn’t quite grasp it.1 Example: ‘I was in a small town with a group of men. We were standing in a small square praying. As I prayed I realised I could fly.’

Awareness of what the self holds is important. It contains what is our own personal wisdom and insight regarding life in general and particular. It is not full of creeds and dogmas and conflict as are organised attempts to express the spiritual. But it does have its dark side.

To grasp the stone with special powers, understand the significance of the iridescent blue square, or find real uplift in prayer as these dreams depict, we need a clear rational mind which allows intuition and feeling but is not relinquished or lost in the immensity of the self. Touching the vastness of our being we may feel ourself to be vast, all knowing, a guru. In this state, Jung says, a person loses all sense of humour and drops ordinary human contacts. Functionally what happens is that as a defence against meet­ing our pain and childhood trauma as we enter this vast store­house of our being, as a way of escaping the self responsibility for our condition, one might fly off into feelings of loving all things, of knowing the mystery of it all, of being the Buddha.

The problem is that while it might be true we are in essence the Christ, or have wisdom, these realisations are distorted by the undealt-with childhood traumas and longings. See aura; mandala. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Little Giant Encyclopedia

Romance, a transitional period. One is standing between two worlds and is not quite sure. Twilight indicates a moment of transition, in which everything seems undefined and undecided. Dusk is connected to fears, but in part it is also a symbol for new beginnings, curiosity (what does the new day have in store?) and openness. Morning sunrise and evening sunset are times of pleasure. See Red.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

As dreams apparently emerge from what has been named the unconscious, it is helpful to understand ideas regarding it, and something of its nature.

In ancient cultures we occasionally find hints regarding the unconscious, but not definite statements as were presented by Freud. In the dream theories worked out by the Iroquois American Indians, they believed that through dreams the hid­den or unconscious area of the psyche makes its desires known (see Iroquoian dream cult).

The Greek stories of the Underworld also clearly depict common unconscious activi­ties.

In general, however, many ancient peoples developed con­cepts of exterior agents such as devils, angels, spirits and God to account for phenomena which today we connect with the unconscious.

The first philosopher to talk clearly of an aspect of the mind being unconscious was Leibnitz. He observed that one often recalled at a later date some detail of experience which at the time one was unaware of. One must therefore have observed it unconsciously. So in general the word means anything we are not generally aware of in our being.

Freud’s concept of an unconscious element of human na­ture which influenced conscious behavior was strongly re­sisted. It was disturbing to many people and questioned the idea of humans being the ‘captain of their soul’.

The Freudian slip has become one of the popular examples of the influence of the unconscious. Saying to guests arriving at one’s house, Tm so sorry—I mean glad—you could come’ suggests one’s real feeling was sorrow at their arrival, not gladness. There is a story of a faculty member of Oxford University who asked the guests at a function to toast the queen, but his actual words were ‘Let us toast our queer dean.’ However such slips might be seen as attempts to conceal our real feelings, rather than evidence of unconscious motivations.

Taking into account not only Freudian and Jungian ap­proaches to the unconscious, but something of more recent research, the term unconscious must be taken to represent many functions and aspects of self, rather than something we can neatly define. Therefore, we might think of the term as being like the word ‘body’, which means a whole spectrum of organs, functions, chemical processes, neurological events, systems, cell activities, as well as one’s experience of these. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Wanting is a primal drive which, through social­isation, we may crush and thereby lose contact with what we want from our own feelings and needs. In doing so we may also lose much of our decisiveness and creativity.

Example: ‘1 still want him all to myself. We never touch or kiss or anything in the dreams, and I want him to, but would never let on I wanted this. I am a bit coy in my dreams’ (Pauline B). Pauline is dreaming about a past lover whom she has tried to forget, but when we pick out the wants’ we see how strong her feelings are. Looking at dreams in this way helps us define what our desires are.

Example: The older man still wanted something from me. I didn’t want to be involved with him at all and yet had to be polite, etc., so he wouldn’t hit out at me/us. We needed some kind of contact with this man, I lent forward and kissed him on his face and drew back quickly as I didn’t want to give any more than that, I had a fear that he would want more’ (Sandra O). Sandra had divorced an older husband, and was living with a younger man.

The complication of her wants’ is shown in the dream. When it is a ‘don’t want’ in the dream, it is helpful to change it to a positive. ‘I didn’t want to go with my mother’ could become ‘I wanted to do my own thing.’

Because what we want is complex and often in conflict, our dream characters may want something which we oppose, as in the following example. Example: To escape from a man chasing me, I decided I must get a taxi home. Got in one driven by a woman who wanted to take me to the man who was chasing me. Woke up sweating’ (Ann G).

The urge to integrate the male pan of herself, seen as the taxi driver, is in conflict with Ann’s fear of it. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Guns, rockets, knives, spears, etc., depict our de­sire to hurt someone or, if we are being shot or hurt in the dream, how we have internalised our own aggression or past hurts or fear of being hurt; also defence against fears or being hurt.

If we shoot or stab someone or something, we need to consider what part of ourself we are turning our aggression upon.

If we kill or injure a recognisable person, we may be harbouring the desire to hurt or kill that person, even if only in reputation. All weapons can represent male sexual drive or aggressive sexuality.

The situation in which the action takes place: defines what the weapon expresses. Ineffective weap­ons: feelings of inadequacy.

A work tool used as a weapon: our skill or authority turned against ourself or someone else, as might happen if a doctor got sexual favours through his position. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Whenever we say yes to a person or situation in a dream, we are opening to the influence of that aspect of our­self. It is important to define what leads us to agreement in the dream. Is it that one says yes because of feelings that one ought, one should, or it was expected? Was the yes out of anxiety? Was it said because that was what you agreed with, or was it the most useful response? See no. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Little Giant Encyclopedia

Contradictions in life need to be better integrated or more clearly defined.

Folklore: Differences among friends.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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