dropped

Voided; a mistake which caused failure of purpose



Dropped | The Dream Meanings

Keywords of this dream: Dropped

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: I saw a biplane fly overhead. Its pilot was performing daring new stunts. I ran into a house to tell a man who was in bed to run out and see the plane’ (David R).

The example clearly shows one aspect of what a plane means, being daring in a new area, taking risks in life, braving a new work area or relationship. Sometimes the plane in the sky represents us feeling threatened by something new or un­known, thus one dreamer dreamt of bombs being dropped from a plane when she was offered a new job which would take her into the public eye.

The crashed plane: can be anxi­ety bringing down our ambition or adventurousness; a loss of self confidence or mental equilibrium.

The plane journey: shows a move towards independence; leaving home or friends; success. Being grounded: sense of not getting any­where and frustration.

An attacking aircraft: feeling attacked either by our own doubts and self criticism, or that of others. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dreamers Dictionary

Vision: Antlers—particular in men’s dreams—mean a painful disappointment in a love relationship. Several antlers stand tor unrequited love or being dropped.

Depth Psychology: Antlers are often a sign of marital or partner conflicts. In a man’s dream it usually indicates that he is afraid his partner is having an affair.... Dreamers Dictionary

Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

This type of dream also encompasses jewelry and gems, and predicts social success.

If the beads are being strung or counted in your dream, you will receive money from an unexpected source.

If a bead is lost or dropped in your dream, you will have to cope with small setbacks and disappointments.... Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

My Dream Interpretation

To dream that you are dropping things, suggests that you are letting go of some project, relationship, person, or idea in real life. Also analyze the significance of what is being dropped. Alternatively, this dream may represent your carelessness. Perhaps you regret letting something slip through your fingers.... My Dream Interpretation

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: A fall in a dream outlines the need to be grounded, to take care within a known situation. We may be harmed by being too pedestrian.

To dream of falling shows a lack of confidence in our own ability. We may feel threatened by a lack of security, whether real or imagined. We fear being dropped by friends or colleagues.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Some dream researchers suggest falling is one of the main themes in dreams. In the sample used for this book, the words fall, falls, fell, falling occur 72 times in 1,000 dreams.

The words find, finds, finding, found occur 297 times. And the words connected with looking and seeing occur 1,077 times.

During our development or growth we ‘fall’ from our mother’s womb when ripe; being dropped by a parent must be our earliest sense of insecurity; we fall many times as we learn to stand and walk; as we explore our boundaries in running, climbing, jumping and riding, falling is a big danger, at times it could mean death. Out of this we create the ways falling is used in dreams.

Example: ‘I am sitting in a high window box facing out­wards, with my son and a friend of his on my left. I feel very scared of falling and ask my son and his friend to climb back into the building. I feel too scared to move until they shift’ (Trevor N). At the time of the dream Trevor was working, for the first time in his life, as a full-time freelance journalist. His wife was out of work and his frequency of sales low enough to cause them to be running out of money.

The building behind him in the dream felt like a place he had worked nine to five —security. Falling was failure, getting in debt, dropping into the feelings of self doubt and being incapable.

In general, then, falling represents loss of confidence; threat to usual sources of security such as relationship, source of money, social image, beliefs; tension. Sometimes it is loss of social grace; losing face, moral failure—falling into tempta­tion; coming down to earth from a too lofty attitude, sexual surrender.

Example: ‘I was on a road which led up to the hospital I was put in at three. I felt a sense of an awful past as I looked at the road. Then I was standing on the edge of a precipice or cliff. My wife was about four yards away near the road. I stepped in an area of soft earth. It gave beneath my weight and I sank up to my waist. I realised the cliff edge was unsta­ble and the whole area would fall. I was sinking and shouting to my wife to help me. She was gaily walking about and made light of my call for help. I cried out again. Still she ignored me. I shouted again for her help. She took no notice and I sank deeper, the ground gave way and I fell to my death’ (Barry 1). Through being put in a hospital at three without his mother, Barry had a deep seated fear that any woman he loved could desen him. His fall is the loss of any sense of bonding between him and his wife out of this fear. His death is the dying of his feeling of love and relationship, and the pain it causes. Understanding these fears, Barry was able to leave them behind in later dreams and in life.

By learning to meet our insecurities (perhaps by using the last question in dream processing) we can dare more in life. This is in essence the same as meeting the fear of falling off our bike as we learn to ride.

If we never master the fear we cannot ride. Therefore some dreams take falling into realms beyond fear.

The following examples illustrate this.

Example: ‘Near where I stood in the school gymnasium was a diving board, about 20 ft off the ground. Girls were learning to dive off the board and land flat on their back on the floor.

If they landed flat they didn’t hurt themselves—like falling backwards standing up’ (Barry I).

The school is where we learn. Once we learn to fall ‘flat on our back’, i.e. fail, without being devastated or ‘hurt’ by it, we can be more cre­ative. Going fast to an edge and falling: could mean overwork and danger of breakdown of health.

Example: ‘As I prayed I realised I could fly. I lifted off the ground about 3 feet and found I could completely relax while going higher or falling back down. So it was like free fall. I went into a wonderful surrendered relaxation. My whole body sagging, floating in space. It was a very deep meditative expe­rience (Sarah D). Sarah has found an attitude which enables her to soar/dare or fall/fail without being so afraid of being hurt or dying emotionally. This gives a form of freedom many people never experience. This does not arise from denying or suppressing fears.

Seeing things fall: sense of danger or change in regard to what is represented. Person falling: wish to be rid of them, or anxiety in regard to what they represent; end of a relationship. Child, son falling: see baby; son and daughter under family. House falling down, personal stress; illness; personal change and growth due to letting old habits and attitudes crumble. Example: ‘I was standing outside my mother’s house to the right.

The ground in front had fallen away.

The house was about to cave in. I felt no fear or horror. Instead I was think­ing about new beginnings and the possibility of a new house’ (Helen B). Helen is here becoming more independent and leaving behind attitudes and dependency. See house; abyss; chasm. See also flying. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dreamers Dictionary

Symbol: A bad fall into an abyss often brings an undcfinable feeling of relief.

Vision: For a woman, dreaming about falling is a metaphor for letting herself go. Falling means that you’re stumbling into an unpleasant situation. Feeling the act of falling, physically, is not a cause for alarm. It is simply a case of “getting back into your body”—waking up too quickly It might also be a sign of low blood pressure. Falling into a ditch: your reputation will suffer. Falling over something: a certain matter is made clear to you. Stumbling without falling: things could have been a lot worse. Watching others falling: you’re going to unmask your enemies just in time. See Abyss, Fall.

Depth Psychology: Dreams about falling are a sign of the fear you have of people taking the “reins out of your hand,” of losing control. Have you lost faith in yourself, lost your sense of self-worth? .Are you afraid that others—for whatever reason—are going to “drop” you? Are you losing your good reputation? Or: have you “dropped” an old belief or opinion?... Dreamers Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Over the years many theories to ex­plain the ‘why’ of dreams have been put forward. These range from dreams being messages from spirits; being results of food eaten prior to sleep; the mind freewheeling nonsensi­cally; the garbage disposal system of the mind; suggestions from waking experience; a computer reprogramming for the brain; to Freud’s wish fulfilment and Jung’s compensation theory.

If we do not argue any particular theory, however, then perhaps we see dreams as having a much wider function.

The most primal drives observable are survival, growth and repro­duction. Other urges, such as eating, social position, curiosity, are secondary.

The human animal appears to have survived and reproduced more capably after the development of self awareness, language and reasoning. With or without these, we remain an animal with a psychobiological nature. All ani­mals are known to dream. All animals share a certain situa­tion. They have an internal world out of which arises im­pulses (to eat, to mate, to avoid danger) and feeling reactions (anger, fear, anticipation). And they have an external world which confronts them with real survival dangers, sources of food, a mate, changes in environmental conditions.

A dream lies somewhere between these two worlds.

We can think of the human personality as being like a special son of cavity into which all these influences are dropped or are thrown. Physical sensations, internal drives and emotions, language, social rules, religious ideas; prompts to make decisions; news of war, massive media and advertis­ing information, are all dropped in.

The cavity has to deal with it, but as it is a mixture of things, many of which are in opposition, some sort of balance has to be kept. But how? And it cannot be simply a matter of throwing out all of one sort or aspect of things. Eradicating the memory of criticism might make us more calm, but it would limit the process of psychological growth, which has survival value.

Dreams can be seen to be connected with our survival and self regulating process. Because this involves all aspects of oneself and one’s experience, one cannot give dreams a single definition. They probably have many secondary functions, such as an interface to balance the internal and external influ­ences, to compensate between the inner needs and outer real­ity—a baby may miss its feed so, to cope with this primal need, it may dream of being fed. Traumatic or exterior danger­ous events, which cannot be processed immediately, can be stored and dealt with (experimented with or abreacted) while asleep. In higher mammals, infant traumas can be stored and dealt with in sleep when, or if, a stronger ego develops.

To meet the loneliness and isolation of consciousness’ or fears of death, the dream can link the waking self with its unconscious sense of unity or God.

To meet survival needs of primitive human beings prior to rational thought, the dream probably acted as a computer, synthesising experience and information, giving rise to creative solutions to hunting or social situations, presented as sleeping or waking imagery. This may explain why many pnmitive people say skills such as farming, weav­ing, writing, were told them by a vision of a god or goddess.

If we realise that the dream is an end product of a process which produces it, it enables us to see that the process’ (the survival function which regulates, compensates, links, prob­lem solves) can be accessed without meeting the dream. See sleep movements; dream process as computer; Adler; Freud; Jung. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Protection, as in wearing rubber gloves; keeping one’s hands clean’, as in the sense of avoiding ‘dirty busi­ness”; being out of touch. Can also represent someone’s hand —holding their glove would be holding their hand. Picking up a dropped glove: similar to picking up a handkerchief dropped by a woman—an invitation to a relationship. Idioms: hand in glove; iron fist in velvet glove; with kid gloves; with the gloves off. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Gypsy Dream Dictionary

If your lover gives you a handkerchief, it is a sign of faithfulness.

To pick up a handkerchief that has been dropped is to pick up someone else’s troubles.

To blow your nose with a handkerchief means there will be news of sickness in the family.... Gypsy Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: As planning is such an integral part of business life today, the image or idea will surface in dreams quite frequently. When a plan or plans are dropped in a dream the significance is obvious.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Our basic spinal and lower brain reactions, such as fight or flight, reproduction, attraction or repulsion, sex drive, need for food and reaction to pain. This includes the fundamental evolutionary ability to change and the urge to survive—very powerful and ancient processes. Our relationship with the reptile in our dreams depicts our relat- edness to such forces in us, and how we deal with the im­pulses from the ancient pan of our brain.

Modern humans face the difficulty of developing an inde­pendent identity and yet keeping a working relationship with the primitive, thus maturing/bringing the primitive into an efficiently functioning connection with the present social world.

The survival urge at base might be kill or run, but it can be transformed into the ambition which helps, say, an opera singer meet difficulties in her career. Also the very primitive has in itself the promise of the future, of new aspects of human consciousness. This is because many extraordinary human functions take place unconsciously, in the realm of the reptile/spine/lower brain/right brain/autonomic nervous sys­tem. Being unconscious they are less amenable to our waking will. They function fully only in some fight or flight, survive or die, situations.

If we begin to touch these with consciousness, as we do in dreams, new functions are added to conscious­ness. See The dream as extended perception under ESP and dreams.

frog

Unconscious life or growth processes which can lead to transformation (the frog/prince story); the growth from child­hood vulnerability—tadpole to frog—therefore the process of life in general and its wisdom. Frogspawn: sperm, ovum and reproduction.

lizard

Example: ‘My wife and I saw a large lizard on the wall near a banana. It was there to catch the flies.

The lizard turned so it was facing away from us—head up the wall. We then were able to see it had large wing-like flaps which spread from its head in an invened V. With amazement we saw on these flaps wonderful pictures, in full colour, of birds. In fleet­ing thoughts I wondered if the bird “paintings” were to attract birds, or were some form of camouflage. But I felt cenain the lizard had “painted” these wonderful pictures with its uncon­scious an’ (David T). Generally, a lizard is very much the same as a snake, except it lacks the poisonous aspect; aware­ness of unconscious or instinctive drives, functions and pro­cesses. In the above dream, the banana is both David’s plea­sure and sexuality, while the lizard is the creativity emerging from his unconscious through the attention he is giving it—he is looking at the lizard. Chameleon: either one’s desire to fade into the background, or adaptability.

snake

Example: A small snake about a foot long had dropped down my shirt neck. I could feel it on the left side of my neck Fearing it was poisonous and might bite me, I moved very slowly. At one point I put my head on the ground, hoping the snake would wish to crawl away. It did not. Then I was near an elephant I loved, and hoped it would remove the snake. It did not. Even as I slept I felt the snake was an expression of the attitude of not shanng myself with anybody except family’ (David T).

For months prior to the above dream David had experienced a great deal of neck pain. After dis­cussing the dream with his wife, and realising much of his thinking and feeling was intumed, the pain disappeared. So the snake was both poisoner’ and ‘healer’. This may be why snakes are used as a symbol of the medical profession.

The Hebrew word for the serpent in the Garden of Eden is Nahash, which can be translated as blind impulsive urges, such as our instinctive drives.

So, generally, snakes depict many different things, but usu­ally the life process.

If we think of a person’s life from con­ception to death, we see a flowing moving event, similar in many ways to the speeded up films of a seed growing into a plant, flowering and dying.

The snake depicts the force or energy behind that movement and purposiveness—the force of life which leads us both to growth and death. That energy —like electricity in a house, which can be heat, power, sound and vision—lies behind all our functions. So in some dreams the snake expresses our sexuality, in others the rising of that energy up our body to express itself as digestion—the intesti­nal snake; as the healing or poisonous energy of our emotions and thoughts.

Example: ‘I was in a huge cathedral, the mother church. I wanted to go to the toilet/gents. As I held my penis to urinate it became a snake and reached down to the urinal to drink. It was thirsty. I struggled with it, pulling it away from the un­clean liquid. Still holding it I walked to a basin and gave it pure water to drink’ (Bill A). Here the connection between snake and sexuality is obvious. But the snake is not just Bill’s penis. It is the direction his sexual urges take him he is strug­gling with. Out of his sense of love and connection with life— the cathedral—he wants to lift his drive towards something which will not leave him with a sense of uncleanness. Snake in connection with any hole: sexual relatedness.

A snake biting us: unconscious worries about our health, frustrated sexual impulse, our emotions turned against our­selves as internalised aggression, can poison us and cause very real illness, so may be shown as the biting snake. Snake biting others: biting remarks, a poisonous tongue.

A crowned or light-encircled snake: when our ‘blind impulses’ or instinctive or unconscious urges and functions are in some measure inte­grated with our conscious will and insight, this is seen as the crowned snake or even winged snake. It shows real self awareness and maturity. In coils of snake: feeling bound in the ‘blind impulses’ or habitual drives and feeling responses. Instincts and habits can be redirected, as illustrated by Hercu­les’ labours. Snake with tail in mouth: sense of the circle of life—binh, growth, reproduction, aging, death, rebirth; the eternal. Snake coiling up tree, pole, cross: the blind instinctive forces of life emerging into conscious experience—in other words the essence of human expenence with its involvement in pain, pleasure, time and eternity; the process of personal growth or evolution; healing because personal growth often moves us beyond old attitudes or situations which led to inner tension or even sickness. Snake in grass: sense or intuition of talk behind your back; danger, sneakiness. Colours: green, our internal life process directed, perhaps through satisfied feelings, love and creativity, into a healing process or one which leads to our personal growth and positive change; white, eternal aspect of our life process, or becoming con­scious of it; blue, religious feelings or coldness in relations. See colours; anxiety dreams; death and rebirth, the self under archetypes; dreams and Ancient Greece; cellar under house, buildings; hypnosis and dreams; jungle; paralysis. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of starvation signify that you have been depriving yourself, neglecting your needs and that you are lacking -nurturing. Also, this dream could represent that you are literally hungry, and that your blood sugar has dropped. This dream is giving you the message to get back into balance and honor the urges of your body temple and the urges of your soul.... Strangest Dream Explanations

Islamic Dream - Cafer-i Sadik

interpreted with the two crossings upon 8 sides: Caliph & authority, leader, great scholar, justice, vow & wife, bright matter / affair. Whoever sees that the sun is rising over his two feet without his body, it is [interpreted as] wealth [he is granted] from the earth’s plants of either wheat or dates which he prepares by his feet, and he expands it. It is halal unless he exhausts himself in it just as Adam (pbuh) had exhausted himself. Whoever sees as if the sun darkened, dropped or blackened [then] adversity will happen in the world from a scholar’s death or a just authority or supporting affliction or someone of his fatherly side dies thus he crosses over depending on the dreamer’s situation / condition.... Islamic Dream - Cafer-i Sadik

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘A flying saucer dropped a man on our lawn. He was 7 feet tall and stood in a ring of light.

The sky was vivid pink and a peculiar aeroplane flew over. It was the shape of a cross’ (Mrs A).

The circle, the light, the shape of the cross and the big man, are all symbols of the Self. Our mind has the ability to view our experience as a whole, rather than in pans. What we sense unconsciously in this way is presented to the conscious mind as images such as UFOs or circles of light.

The ball of light or fire, this is a common waking experi­ence as well as a dream image, which occurs when the person touches their sense of wholeness as described above. We see this mentioned in the description of Pentecost—the flame on top of the head—and may account for cases of people seeing flying saucers. See hallucinations, hallucinogens; satellite; dream as spiritual guide; unconscious. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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