emblem

An emblem is a symbol, a pictorial representation of something that allows the mind to make a connection. Spiritually, therefore, it is a way of changing our perception.

Psychological / emotional perspective: In a more technological age an emblem will have less connection with heraldry, a former source of emblems, and more to do with commercial concerns.

A particular emblem or logo in dreams usually has some kind of personal resonance for us.

Material aspects: An emblem, much like the knight’s standard of old, is a rallying point or a call for loyalty. It is also an easily recognized instruction as in road signs. In dreams, once we have sorted out the symbolism, it often performs this function.



Emblem | The Dream Meanings

Keywords of this dream: Emblem

The Language of Dreams

(see Nuts, Seeds, Trees)

Male virility. In ancient times, these were an emblem of the testes, and often carried as amulets for fertility among men.

Potential.

The acorn grows into the mighty oak.

If a woman is eating the acorn, an emblem of abundance and fertility.

Shaking acorns from a tree: Releasing your own potential or making efforts for improved abundance in your life (figurative or literal).

In Native American symbolism, this represents the beginnings of a rigid personality developing in yourself. Take time to correct it by being more open-minded and tolerant.... The Language of Dreams

Christian Dream Symbols

An emblem for the road to poverty, Prov. 23:20... Christian Dream Symbols

The Language of Dreams

(see Spaceship, UFO)

If the alien in the dream acts fidgety or ill at ease, ask yourself how comfortable you are with yourself and your appearance. Do you shy away from mirrors and eye contact or feel self-conscious? Also, are you intimately aware of your own inner nature?

Apprehension toward: Sometimes one must reach out and embrace the unknown to overcome fear. This includes welcoming hidden aspects of self and the Universe.

Traveling with aliens by choice: The need for a new beginning, or a wish to retreat far away from the current situation. Alternatively, someone looking for new friends, hoping to relocate, or just wanting some adventure.

If so, reach for the stars!

In New Age ideology, potentially an emblem of our kinship with all beings within a very large and vastly unknown Universe.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Eating, Nuts)

Generally symbolic of love and fertility. This association probably dates back to when almonds were a maternity charm.

For example, the Greek god Attis was conceived with the aid of a magical almond.

Ancient mid-Eastern: An emblem of femininity and the womb of the world due to its shape. This effectively carried over into many arts wherein the lozenge (an almond shape) is used to represent the fullness of womanhood.

Folklore relates that dreaming of whole almonds foretells wealth, whereas those broken apart indicate problems in obtaining wishes.

Spiritual sweetness that awaits you. Just get beyond the obstacle or armor represented by its shell to savor the reward!... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Crystals, Ge?ns, Jewelry; Stones)

Irritating situations in which the tension is nearly audible. Amber has a natural ability to pick up static when rubbed.

Health concerns. Because of its capacity to trap insects and plant life, the ancients believed this stone could likewise entrap sickness. Look to see what the amber contains for more symbolism.

An alternative solar emblem, believed by the Greeks to have been formed in the setting sun’s tears.

An alternative fire emblem. Germans called this a burning stone because it catches fire (like any resin).

In dream oracles, an omen of forthcoming voyages.

Feeling cornered or captured by circumstances over which you have no control, like the insect in amber resin.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Crystals, Gems, Jeivelry, Stones, Purple)

Maintaining control over yourself and your situation. In the Middle Ages, this stone got the reputation of keeping people from getting drunk because whole goblets were formed from it. When filled with any substance, the effect was like looking at wine.

Religious authority in a specific area of belief. This stone appears in both bishops’ and cardinals’ rings.

Psychic energy and prophetic dreams. Pay particular attention to anything “futuristic” about this dream’s story line.

In dream oracles, an emblem that assures safety from harm, or possibly a turn of events for the better.... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

Hope fulfilled is the general dream interpretation, endorsed by Christian symbolism.

The Japanese hold it as an emblem of security and safety. Inman hints at a dark and dangerous meaning to this symbol, but good usage sanctions the one already given.... The Fabric of Dream

The Language of Dreams

An anchor dragging through water or sand represents things that weigh you down, and hold you back.

An anchor holding firm in a torrential sea speaks of your personal need for security and stability.

If you haven’t reinforced your foundations lately, do so.

Anchors are also connected to the sea and sailing (see Boat, Water). In earlier times when ships carried valuable goods to port, such an arrival was heartily welcomed. So, sailors and things associated with their trade became “lucky.” Perhaps your ship is soon to “come in” and stay for a while!

Safety or improved vitality. In ancient Egypt, an anchor cross became a variation of the ankh, the emblem of life, around 4-5 C.E. This emblem was used frequently as a seafaring amulet.

A ship that lacks an anchor represents being adrift, going from one idea or goal to another without ever accomplishing anything.... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

Prosperity despite obstacles (Raphael) ; an emblem of the primal force (Bayley). ... The Fabric of Dream

The Fabric of Dream

A dream of deceit, treacherous friends and associates (Artemidorus) ; Plato taught that the soul of a bad jester would return as an ape; it is a modern symbol of unclean- ness, lust, cunning, and malice. It was, however, an emblem of wisdom in Egypt and of the god Thoth, patron of the art of writing.... The Fabric of Dream

The Language of Dreams

(see Clothes)

A feminine emblem that pertains to domesticity.

A man wearing a chefs or barbecue apron signals acceptance of certain traits considered feminine, resulting in a more complete person.

Taking off: Breaking the proverbial “apron strings.” This may pertain to your parents, or to any situation that has restricted you to obsolete images and thought patterns.

Turning an apron: Taking your life in hand and making a change for the better.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

Ashes are generally a negative emblem, being all that remains of a devastating. Bitter changes, unsuccessful deals, heated emotions, and nonproductive arguments are all examples of what the ashes may represent.

Victorian: Ashes from one’s hearth could be used to fertilize the land or bring love into the home. What in vour life needs feeding or love?... The Language of Dreams

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- To have our attention drawn in a dream to a badge makes us aware of our right to belong to a group.

2- We have been singled out for particular recognition, possibly because we have certain qualities.

A badge can also have the same meaning as a talisman.

3- A badge signifies an emblem of office. Dreaming of one shows our need to be accepted not just as ourselves, but also as part of a greater whole.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

A badge signifies an emblem or insignia of office, an acknowledgement or reward for effort. Dreaming of such an object shows our need to be accepted, not just as ourselves, but also as part of a greater whole.

A brooch also signifies an acknowledgement of value.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

The Language of Dreams

(see Clothes, Journey, Travel)

If the baggage is overly heavy, you may be earning too great a load physically or emotionally.

If the luggage is very old or worn, likely the burden is one from the past that you have never put down.

Review the size, shape, and color of the suitcase. These may be subtle emblems with deeper meanings.

For example, round suitcases filled to overflowing might symbolize fertility or abundance.

The desire for movement of some kind. Possibly the need for retreat and rest. Lost baggage: Releasing a hardship or responsibility.

Baggage left with you: The feeling that someone dumped her / his obligations on your doorstep.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Dieting, Weight)

How does this tool appear? Is it lopsided? If so, consider if you have been stressing certain things too much in your life, resulting in throwing everything else off kilter.

An alternative emblem for the zodiac sign of Libra, whose name literally means balance.

The counsel of this image is using perspective and fairness to reach a harmonious decision in whatever situation lies heavy on your heart.

The quality of living. In ancient Egypt, the souls of the recendv departed were weighed for worthiness on a scale against Maat’s feather. Maat was the Mother of All Truth. Similarly, in ancient Greece, Hermes weighed souls at the throne of Zeus, and among Christians, the archangel Michael assumed this role.

Equity especially in legal matters. In the Tarot, the Justice card carries a balance to ensure impartiality.

The amount of figurative weight you carry in terms of responsibility, burdens, etc.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

In dream oracles, a negative sign for lovers, probably stemming from the tragic tale of Romeo and Juliet.

Depending on your feelings during this dream, standing alone on a balcony can be an alternative type of desertion dream.

Because of the height and perspective offered, potentially a type of ascension, moan- tain, or stair dream in which you have already reached the precipice.

Due to its location, this may be an emblem of the mind or head, so check the balcony’s condition for more meaning.... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

To see the banner of your native country augurs misfortune to a loved one, a fatal journey (Gypsy). Obvious meaning to military emblem.... The Fabric of Dream

The Language of Dreams

(see Herbs)

Love, especially if seen sitting on a windowsill. This was a way that Italian women welcomed their suitors.

An alternative dragon emblem, full of fire and power, having taken its name from the legendary “basilisk.”

Indian: The observation of sacred offerings and rites. This herb is used regularlv on altars to Krishna and Vishnu.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals, Birds, Flying)

An ability to traverse “darkness” of a figurative nature, but one that may not be recognized. Native Americans believe these creatures are guides because of their uncanny navigation abilities. See where the bat is taking you, and watch closely the path by which you go.

If the bat is you, or you have bat ivings, it’s likely a type of flying dream.

In Babylonia and South Africa, bats are thought to carry souls. So, this might be an Out- of-Body Experience, or a message from a departed person.

In China, an emblem of good luck and happiness.... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

To see one in a dream denotes health; if it be long, gain.

A beard on a woman, however, is a disagreeable omen (Artemidorus). An erotic dream (Freud). The beard symbolizes the male sex (Smith, Sacred Emblems). ... The Fabric of Dream

Christian Dream Symbols

If you are being beaten in dream it can be emblematic of a demonic attack.

If you are being beaten on the back with a rod it can symbolize correction for foolish behavior, Prov. 10:13... Christian Dream Symbols

The Language of Dreams

(see Honey, bisects)

Stinging you: An unpleasant experience that literally left a “stinger” behind, often of an emotional nature.

At the hive: Community and socialization; knowing your place and function within a specific group; harmonious teamwork.

Flying from flower to flower: Gathering life’s nectar, enjoying sweetness wherever it may be found. Alternatively, a fickle nature.

Buzzing: A message; the ancients felt that bees carried missives direct from the gods themselves.

The priestesses of Delphi were called “Melissae,” which means bees, and they were often given honey cakes as an offering in payment for their visionary talents.

Hornet s nest: Trouble just waiting to happen. Don’t aggravate this situation or you will get stung.

In China, dreaming of a bee swarm is a lucky omen.

A ghostly visitor. Both Pliny and Aristotle believed that good souls could reincarnate as a bee.

The spirit of the Muse. In Greece, eloquent people were believed to have been touched on the lips by the Birds of the Muses (bees), including Sophocles, Plato, and Virgil.

Flying down a chimney—omen of death of figurative or literal nature.

In medieval Bestiaries, an emblem of honor.

In the Koran, the symbol of faithfulness, intelligence, and wisdom.

Folkloric: A portent of forthcoming profits, especially in your trade.

Queen bees represent the ancient Mother Goddess, and as such can symbolize your own mother, your maternal instincts, or your feminine nature.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Vegetables)

If you dream of eating beets, this foretells good news soon to follow.

Because of their color, they are an alternative emblem for blood. In fact, beet soup is often a part of Passover rites for this reason.

Long life that is filled with love. Aphrodite, the goddess of love, ate beets to increase her beauty. Also, in folklore, if two people eat from the same beet, they will have love eternal.... The Language of Dreams

Christian Dream Symbols

A person covered in blood is emblematic of killing and death, Hosea 6:8 ... Christian Dream Symbols

Christian Dream Symbols

Emblematic of war, trouble, and woe, Isa. 15:9 ... Christian Dream Symbols

The Language of Dreams

Each part of the body symbolizes something different. Fingers indicate blame or direction, arms stand for effective use of skills, and legs are grounding or support.

The nose reveals your instincts and level of honesty (being able to “smell out” a lie); the mouth indicates communicative ability or more metaphorically, tastes and preferences. Eyes represent your spiritual state (the window of the soul) and perspectives. Ears appear as a reminder to listen and hear, the abdomen has to do with birth, fertility, and nervousness (e.g., “having butterflies in your stomach”), and the back is an emblem of support or strength.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Beverages, Canning)

With a note inside: A message from vour heart, someone close to you, or your Higher Self that you’ve been trying to ignore.

Empty: Feeling drained and depleted of energy, creativity, or compassion.

Jinni in a bottle: From Arabic folklore, a potential ally or terrible adversary, which may also originate within you.

What does the bottle hold? If it is filled with fire, this could symbolize bottled-up anger or passion that’s reaching an explosive state.

Rounded bottles and vases are an alternative emblem of the womb.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Closet, Wrapping Paper)

Unexpected surprises, good or bad.

For example, birthday gifts are usually pleasant, whereas what awaited inside Pandora’s box was not.

Gifts, talents, and abilities that exist within you, but have thus far remained “wrapped up.”

Freudian: An alternative vaginal emblem.

A sense of uncertainty, source of reservation, or seed of doubt. We don’t know what boxes contain until they’re opened, and by that time it’s too late to leave the proverbial wrappings on.

Being contained in a box is an alternative type of cage dream.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Diit, Organizing)

An ancient emblem of womanhood that was later turned into a phallic symbol by the Church.

Having a bad case of the cleaning or organizational bug either at home, or toward a specific project or goal. What exactly does the broom sweep away?

Luck and friendship. According to folk beliefs, brooms found in new homes may be used to sweep out bad fortune, and sweep in good energy and warm feelings.

Jumping over a broom handle is a symbol of fertility and transition into a new life. This was part of many rural European and Gypsy wedding rituals.

Flying on a broom: Potentially a sexual dream in which the broom handle equates to the penis.

Woman’s magic. Witches were sometimes called broom amazons in the Middle Ages.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Fairy)

Important information or truth you need to gather up (see Water). Remember, however, that one must go to the well and lower the bucket for it to be useful.

An alternative cup emblem that indicates more profuse quantities.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Animal)

A potent masculine nature evidencing itself. Stubbornness (e.g., being “bull headed”).

Fertility.

The Sumerians believed that the stomping hooves of a bull could bring nourishing rain to the land. Minoans also used bulls as a fertility emblem.

Inventive inception. Zoroastrian priests (the Magi) taught that a slain bull’s soul became the germ of creation.

Leadership skills, or their development. In Egypt, the kings and Pharaohs were often called bulls. Among the ancient Israelites, Yahweh was called the Bull of Israel.

Buddhist: The ego and mortal self.

Taming a bull: Bringing your anger or masculine side under control, or taking control of a situation (e.g., “seize the bull by the horns”).

A situation that was handled clumsily (e.g., a “hull in a china shop”).

Sacrifice of one valued thing in the hopes of obtaining another. Bulls were regularly used as offerings to the gods, like El in Phoenicia, Attis and Mithras in Rome, and the Oak god of the Druids (see Altar, Carcass).... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Bread, Eating)

A favorable sign of accomplishing your goals and having continued good health. Selling butter portends small gains in business (e.g., making your “bread and butter”).

Spreading butter may indicate that you are somehow trying to “butter someone up” instead of taking a more direct tact.

Worship and sacrifice given to the Divine. In Mesopotamia, Tibet, and India, butter is considered a seemly offering.

Among Tibetans, also an emblem of prosperity soon to follow.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Birds)

A very negative emblem, being that this is a scavenger bird. Often it reveals gossip or scandal afoot.

If the bird is sitting nearby, it portends some type of loss caused by an opportunist.

If the buzzard flies away from you, then you will be able to avoid reproach in the matter lying heavily on your mind.

A buzzard picking at a carcass reveals incessant needling from those around you, to the point where the sacredness of self seems lost. Alternatively, some type of violation of your body (see Abuse, Sexual Encounters).

Among certain Arizonian, Mexican, and Californian Indian tribes, the, feathers from this bird create the clothing for their medicine man. In this setting, consider if you are being called to a healing vocation, or perhaps are yourself in need of seeing a “medicine man.”... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Eating, Vegetables)

Because of its color and shape, this is an alternative moon or circle emblem.

Moodiness. In earlier days, eating this item was believed to cause sullenness or irritability. However, the Greeks reversed this concept and claimed eating cabbage could cure this problem.

The rest of the dream will have to delineate which interpretive outlook is correct.

As an omen, this portends decreasing finances. Historically, cabbage was often the food of peasants.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Btiking. Eating, Frosting)

Labors that result in favorable outcomes, especially if the cake rise

Something that’s easy, possibly too easy (e.g., a “piece of cake”).

Eating cake alone can reveal selfishness, or being out of touch with the needs of others (e.g., “let them eat cake”).

Eating cake with others may be a type of initiation, or another sacred ritual. Specially prepared cakes feature predominantly in many such pagan observances.

Birthday cakes are an emblem of celebrations and wishes. This may be an actual memory surfacing, so look to see who else appears in the dream. Count the candles on the cake for numerical significance, and see who is joining in the festivities.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Airplane, Horse, Spaceship)

If you are behind the wheel of the car, this shows self-control and the ability to steer your own fate.

If someone else is steering, and you’re in the passenger seat, consider if you allow other people to manipulate your decisions too much. Alternatively, there may be parts of yourself over which you have little mastery.

Travel, movement, and activity, as common to many vehicle emblems (see Highway).

A literal reflection of your current driving habits.

Parked: Halted momentum, or temporary waylay of plans, usually of your own making, whereas a traffic jam indicates external forces stopping your progress.

Your body’s condition: According to Edgar Cayce, each part of the car may correspond to a body part.

For example, wheels are legs, and therefore a flat tire may indicate regional circulation problems. Note that this is also true of buildings and other vehicles (windows = eyes, paint = skin, roof = hair or head, engine = heart or emotions, etc.). In this case, seeing a mechanic in your dream might be a gentle nudge to go to a doctor.

Speeding: Reacting quickly without real thought. Slow down, then decide the best avenue for approaching this situation.

Slow moving vehicles: The propensity for procrastination or delaying the inevitable.

Driving a standard in your dream shows how well you handle the constant changes that life hands you. Consider whether the gears grind or if the clutch sticks.

If so, get out some elbow grease and work on being more flexible and prepared.

Missing your ride indicates a failed attempt to forward current prospects. It may be necessary to wait a while before trying again (see Bus).... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Games)

A deck of cards: Is the deck complete with 52 cards? If not, you may have fragmentary information about a person or situation.

Playing cards: Consider if you’re gambling on something or someone, or taking an unnecessary risk. Alternatively, having your attention diverted from more legitimate, and worthwhile, endeavors.

Playing an ace: Successfully and confidently making your move, or having an alternative plan of action on which to fall back (e.g., having “an ace in the hole”). In terms of omens and signs, this is considered a very positive dream denoting victory (see One).

Potential mental instability, or lacking thorough information or tools with which to handle a situation (e.g., “not playing with a full deck”).

If the hand you see is filled with jokers, this reflects your own sense of humor. Is it a healthy one, or do you make jokes and laugh to cover up insecurity? Also if you’re the eternal prankster, this dream acts as a gentle warning that someone might get hurt as a result of ill-conceived shenanigans.

Tarot cards in dreams should be interpreted according to their layout and images.

For more information, consult a classical Tarot deck with interpretive guide like the Rider- Waite Tarot.

Business cards may have symbolic words and phrases upon them to consider.

The names and phone numbers can also have interpretive value. Consider each separately, and the card as a whole unit, when trying to understand this emblem.

Greeting cards in dreams reflect matters of communication, particularly those missives coming from other people. Look at the card’s message (see Writing) or its art for more meaning here.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Crystals, Gems, Jewelry, Stones)

Because of its red color, this is an alternative blood emblem.

Among Moslems, a symbol of perfect happiness, effective speech and depression’s abatement.

In ancient Greece, this represented having one’s wishes satisfied. Arabian: Take care, someone is trying to trick or deceive you.

In dream oracles, this stone warns of forthcoming misfortunes for which you should begin to prepare.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals, Lion, Tiger)

With a mouse: The power of good over evil. In ancient Egypt, the great God Ra was sometimes depicted as a cat slaying a make with similar connotations.

The ability to land on your feet, even in difficult circumstances, and remain independent.

An emblem of rebirth and new beginnings. Cats have nine lives, upon which one are you now embarking?

If seen on a sailing vessel, very good luck and health (see Boat). Cats eliminated mice from ships on long journeys, thereby decreasing disease.

Magical or mystical energy.

The cat was a sacred creature to the Greek goddess Hecate, and the Roman goddess Diana, both patronesses of witches. Additionally, it was the most commonly mentioned familiar for witches in old Grimoires, medieval books of practical magic that included spells, herbals, and folk wisdom.

An alternative symbol of feminine, lunar characteristics.

Hissing and scratching: A “catty” nature rearing its ugly head, or withheld aggression toward women.

The Cheshire Cat is an emblem of haughty or arrogant attitudes (see Laughter).... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Darkness, Underground)

The subconscious or hidden nature within.

Archetypal: The womb of the earth—e.g., Earth as our mother who gave all humankind birth and nourishment. Also an emblem for a woman’s womb. In Hebrew tradition, Abraham was born in a sacred cave, as was the Persian savior Mithra.

Fears: If ?>ionsters or other terrible things lurk within the cave, this reveals unresolved phobias and apprehensions.

A retreat, sanctuary, or place of hiding. Many notable figures went to secluded areas to find themselves or the Divine. In this instance, what you seek is probably more intuitive in nature (see Desert).

Damp caves represent fertility.

An archetypal sanctuary eluding to humankind’s earliest dwelling places where communities began to form. Here the subconscious may be relating your need for a safe haven, or joining a friendly group within which you feel comfortable.... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

A dream of high ideals and strivings never to be attained in the flesh (Old Dream Book) ; the emblem of the priestly order and of the Grail.... The Fabric of Dream

The Language of Dreams

(see Abyss, Basket, Beverages by type, Bowl, Circle, Cauldron)

Alternative womb and fertility symbol, especially if filled with liquid (see Milk, Juice, Water, Wine).

Arthurian and Druidical lore identify this emblem as the grail, the cup that signifies humankind’s connection with nature and each other.

Christian: The sacredness of life and the quality of forgiveness (the cup of Christ’s blood). In this case, do you drink freely of what’s offered you, or pour it away?

Unity. In Gypsy, pagan, and Hebrew marriage and courtship rites, people drinking from one cup link their destinies and become as one.

Refusing: Wishing to avert a personal trial that is really unavoidable (note the story of Christ in the garden of Gethsemane). Alternatively, rejecting an opportunity for friendship or camaraderie because of suspicious motivations.

In Eastern philosophy, a cup is shaped by what it contains. What metaphorical beverages do you incorporate into yourself by drinking of this cup?... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Abyss, Balloon, Basket, Bowl, Cauldron, Chalice, Coins, Satellite Dish, Zero)

Wholeness, totality, centering. Halos, for example, symbolize spiritual wholeness and focus (see Light).

Freudian: A vaginal emblem or symbol of femininity due to its shape.

Equality and unity.

The round table of King Arthur’s court gave everyone an equal voice and symbolized the solidarity of Britain.

Protected or sacred space. In the first century B.C.E., magicians were sometimes called “circle drawers” because ritual magic uses this emblem to contain power. Similarly, % fairy ring safeguards its residents from mortals.

Going around in circles: Being trapped in progressively worse cycles, outmoded ideas, or a static lifestyle with little achievement.

A circle with a point in the center is a type of mandala emblem representing personal wholeness, order, harmony, and healing.

God or divine influences and protection. There is a Hindu saying that God is an unbroken circle without a circumference, being nowhere and everywhere.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Ascent, Fog, Rain, Snow)

Storm clouds gathering equate to similarly stormy times, especially on an emotional level.

Dark clouds reveal depression, melancholy, and sadness. Alternatively, dark clouds moving toward you may be some type of warning.

Moods and feelings. Does your cloud have a silver lining?

Obscuration of a situation. Clouds can hide the sun and moon, temporarily removing them from sight. What are your clouds concealing?

Youthful imagination. Remember finding shapes in fluffy white clouds as a child? Try it again and see what meanings those shapes have for you.

In China, an emblem of sexual union and fertility, especially gently pouring rain clouds.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Flowers)

Much depends here on how many petals the clover has, or what color it is in the dream. Two portends love and good partnerships, three is a protective emblem, four means luck and money, five represents prosperity, white clovers safeguard you from negative magic, and red ones indicate lust and passion.... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

A dream auguring suffering and misfortune (Gypsy). Inman and Freud regard it as a phallic symbol, although it denoted strength and power amongst the ancients, bearing no erotic significance; to the Christians it became an emblem of suffering and of martyrdom.... The Fabric of Dream

Mystic Dream Book

Emblematic of the serious illness of some dear friend, perhaps even death, if there is much Black seen.... Mystic Dream Book

The Language of Dreams

(see Bank / Banking, Circle, Gold, Silver)

In the Tarot, the emblem of earthly concerns—e.g., money, jobs, possessions.

An alternative circle symbol due to their shape.

Improved luck or finances. Found pennies, and coins with the date of your birth are tokens of good fortune. Similarly, in Old Europe turning a pocketed coin by the light of a crescent moon or burying a silver coin beneath your doorstep encourages fortuity and prosperity.

A positive change in the weather (literal or figurative). When sailing ships were a predominant mode of transportation, found coins would be tossed on deck or imbedded in the masthead to ensure fair weather and good winds.

Spiritual protection and well-being. Ancient Egyptians placed coins on a mummy’s eyes so that the deceased could pay the ferryman and move safely into the next life.

Each coin may have more than one connotation.

For example, pennies are luck)’, but in modern society they are also regarded as somewhat worthless. So, a dirty old penny bearing the year of your birth being passed by in your dream could expose poor self- images, for example.

Flipping coins: Choices to make, or the interaction of fate and “chance” in your life. ... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

An unfortunate dream (Gypsy) ; Freud regards this dream as bearing a phallic significance. Christians, however, hold the column as an emblem of the passion.... The Fabric of Dream

The Language of Dreams

(see Compute?; Music)

Because of its shape, a compact disc may be interpreted as an alternative circle emblem.

Information crunching. Perhaps you’ve been studying too much, or trying to integrate too much data too quickly.

Technological advances and their influence in your life.

Having a lot of talents or knowledge right at your fingertips—all you need do is access it!... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Metals)

The emblem for copper is the same as that for the planet Venus, giving this metal strong associations with love and passion.

The use of copper wire for electrical purposes endows copper with conductive symbolism. In this case, what shapes it forms and to what it’s connected will provide more clues for interpretation.

Improved balance. This substance is sometimes used in polarity* healing to bring the energy patterns in the body back into symmetry.

An omen of prosperity soon to come. In Victorian days, copper pennies were placed in kitchens for just such a purpose (see Coins).... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

Because of its connection with the sea and water, coral is a fertility emblem.

Mediterranean: Safeguarding your children. Note that this “baby” can be anything to which you creatively give birth, like a piece of art.

If washed to shore in the dream, this represents a treasure from the Mother Goddess of the sea. Look at its color and shape and other elements in the dream for more insight as to Her message.

In dream oracles, coral predicts recovery from sickness or a loss.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Eating, Vegetables)

Gathering corn represents rejoicing in the prosperity of friends and relatives.

A rich harvest of corn speaks of prosperity. Since this was a popular early grain crop, the presence of corn on the land directly reflected the wealth of a farmer. In your dreams, the condition of the corn or how it’s taken to market may hold more significance here.

For example, if the corn is transported via horse and buggy, maybe you need to update your outlooks to experience success.

The cycle of life, death, and rebirth. Egyptian, Christian, and Celtic traditions often draw parallels between corn’s cycle and that of the soul.

A popular pagan song tells of corn and grain, adding that “all that falls shall rise again.”

Passing through a field of corn symbolizes harmony in the home and figurative wealth that comes from having true friends. It may also portend a temporary increase in funds.

A newly planted corn field is an omen of forthcoming success.

Popcorn is an emblem of excitement from an unexpected gift or some good news. Among Native Americans, it may also represent divinatory skills “popping” up.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals)

Red cows appearing in a dream are a positive, hopeful omen of peace and plenty. In Persia, these represented the spirit of dawn, which is filled with renewed vitality and courage.

In Greece, an all-white cow was ail alternative symbol for the moon.

A natural source of nourishment (see Meat).

Among the Celts and people of Scandinavian heritages, an emblem of continued provision.

A sacred animal in India, representative of life itself.

The milk from cows is used to nourish kings and priests, so this dream may represent self-nourishment.

Among ancient Egyptians, Indians, and Scandinavians, the cow was an emblem of the Great iMother, and some psychological schools still ascribe this image as possibly being linked to your own mother (see Women).... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

A dream interpreted as signifying successful love.

The symbol of Isis and of motherhood. In Egypt it is used as an emblem of the Virgin Mary by Christians.... The Fabric of Dream

The Language of Dreams

(see Flowers, Garden)

The daisy got its name as a combination of “day’s eye,” making this an alternative sun emblem.

Innocence and fidelity, especially when covering afield or lawn.

The blissful simplicity of your youth.

If the daisy is worn, it portends love.

is an alternative V Missful siin-... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(See Black, Blindness, Night) Mysteries, the unknown, hidden matters, elusive truths, and the subconscious. Oppressive darkness: Depression, gloom, or despair. Being lost in: Frustration from the lack of di rection, or a fear of death.

An alternative womb emblem (see Abyss, Space).

A light in the darkness: Hope, troubles coming to an end, truth being revealed.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Alley, Corner, Highway, Path)

A futile path, which, if pursued, will only result in wasted energy.

Feeling trapped and unable to move. As such, an alternative type of cage emblem that offers at least one way out, namely, the way by which you came.... The Language of Dreams

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- The diadem or tiara in a dream often acknowledges the power of the feminine, or the ability to use the mental or intellectual abilities to obtain supremacy.

2- There is always a magical feeling or sense of wonder associated with the diadem, and it can be taken to represent the magical and unknown.

3- The diadem is perceived as an emblem of the Queen of Heaven and the circle of continuity. It often has twelve jewels which arc said to represent the Twelve Tribes of Israel.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

The diadem or tiara is perceived as an emblem of the queen of heaven and the circle of continuity. It often has 12 jewels, which are said to represent the 12 tribes of israel.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Mystic Dream Book

This dream depends upon the nature of the soil, for it is emblematic.

If the soil is good and easily worked, your plans will succeed. It concerns money, not personal affairs.... Mystic Dream Book

The Language of Dreams

(see Annuals, Birds)

Someone with gentle, loving words.

Peaceful offerings and reconciliation, as in the Biblical story of Xoah and the Ark.

A common emblem of the Holy Spirit among Christians. Cooing: A Victorian emblem of love or romance.

In Asia Minor, these birds represent the fertile, feminine aspect of our personality or the Universe.

Among Slavic peoples, doves bear the souls of the departed. As such, this may be an alternative ghost dream.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Insects)

If hovering near water, this represents the cooperation between your mental / conscious self and your emotional nature.

Dragonflies are very adaptable, but also territorial. Have you been hovering around your domain too much? Or perhaps you’ve been too flexible in a specific situation.

Dragonflies need warmth and sunlight. On the dream plane, this may represent a similar physical need that manifests as depression or restlessness. Alternatively, it may symbolize the need to be more aware of the conscious, masculine, solar self.

In Japan, these are emblems of happiness and good fortune.

Among Native Americans, the souls of the departed may reside in these creatures. As such, they may be messengers from other realms communicating through your dream (see Ghost).... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Birds)

Chattering: Deceitful conversations.

Flocking: Moving with a group mind toward a common goal.

In China and Japan, an emblem of conjugal joy, and a fortuitous omen for young couples.

Hie seasonal movement of these creatures speaks to us of learning to listen to our instincts for well-being and safety.

Possibly an alternative type of swimming dream.

What are the ducks doing and how safe do they appear in their habitat? If there is a hunter nearby, consider if you have likewise become a proverbial sitting duck for someone’s aim.

If so, then duck!... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals, Birds, Wings)

American: Freedoms and liberties in which everyone deserves to share Soaring with an eagle: A type of flying dream.

Many solar gods are equated with this symbol (see Sim), giving the eagle associations with the lifting ot depression or a more conscious awareness.

Lofty ambitions that require great skill to achieve.

Jungian: Your father or another masculine authority figure.

Leadership skills. Among the Romans, this bird became a kind of totem for the emperor, who was thought to reincarnate as an eagle. Alternatively, this may also symbolize traditionally masculine characteristics like pride and fierceness developing.

An alternative lightning emblem. In ancient Greece, people placed eagles on temple rooftops to protect the building from lightning, as they felt this creature controlled the fire from the sky.

Riding on the back of an eagle represents a spiritual voyage, possibly an astral journey or OBE.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals)

Elephants exhibit many positive attributes, including affection and loyalty. Consider how much of both you have given to yourself, or to those around you, and vice versa.

These creatures also have a strong sense of smell that affords discernment. How does your present situation smell? Is something amiss?

An affinity for nature worship. According to Pliny, this creature worships the sun and stars, and invokes the heavens.

In ancient Rome, this image appeared on coins representing the power of charity. Does someone around you have a need that you’ve overlooked?

Among Hindus, the elephant symbolizes wisdom. Ganesha, the god of sagacity, is an elephant, often portrayed dancing.

Buddhists regard the white elephant as emblematic of compassion, love, kindness, self- restraint, and patient endurance, revealing the emergence of such positive traits within you. Note, however, that Western society transforms this image’s meaning to that of useless decoration (e.g., a “white elephant sale”), which might reflect a lack of self-worth or feeling ineffectual in a specific situation.

Chinese: Prudence and independent authority over self, others, or a situation. Don’t be afraid to take charge!

In modern aphorisms, a pink elephant represents being deluded by your own senses. Such delusion usually comes by your own hand (as happens when one drinks too much alcohol).... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

A dream of pride (Gypsy). A Japanese emblem of authority, power, royalty.... The Fabric of Dream

The Fabric of Dream

White feathers foretell success; dark feathers, the reverse (Artemidorus). A symbol of power, and in Egypt the emblem of truth, goodness and knowledge.... The Fabric of Dream

Mystic Dream Book

It is wise to put no meaning to Feathers in themselves; they should be treated as emblems of colour, such as White, Black, Red, Blue, and so on. See under COLOUR for the meaning.... Mystic Dream Book

The Language of Dreams

(see Herbs)

An alternative emblem for fire. According to Greek mythology, Prometheus bore a burning fennel stalk to earth when presenting humankind with this gift.

Clear vision and defined goals. In folk remedies, this herb is used to aid eyesight.

Folkloric: The natural cycle of death and rebirth that may be allegorical or situational. S? iakes are said to shed their skin after eating this herb.

The ongoing battle between dark and light, good and evil within or without. In the Strega tradition (the Witches of Italy), symbolic battles are fought between good and evil sorcerers using fennel stalks for weapons.

The goal of this enactment is to ward off negativity and ensure a good crop.

Digesting recently received information. Historically, fennel was favored to aid indigestion.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals and Flowers by type, Forest, Trees)

If this is an open meadow, it can represent the open expanses of the mind. Alternatively, it can also represent exposure and unseen hazards that lurk just beyond the peaceful greenery, like a hunter watching for deer.

A field of daisies reflects youthful, innocent, and carefree outlooks.

Consider other fields according to what they contain, like a barren field equating to emotional or spiritual dryness, or one filled with seedlings as emblematic of fresh growth or new beginnings.

(see Fruit, Tree)

Ancient Greeks considered this a fruit that offers strength and endurance during trying times.

In Egypt, the fig was sacred to Thoth, making it an emblem of wisdom, learning, and the moon.

Spiritual awakening. Buddha is said to have been enlightened while meditating beneath this tree.

Dreaming of a fig plant growing in a kitchen is an omen that you will never want for food or, more figuratively, spiritual sustenance.

Fertility. Women used to carry figs to ensure conception. In a figurative sense, this may mean conceiving good ideas or receiving bountiful inspiration that spreads into something remarkable.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Body, Hand, Rings)

Pointing at someone or something represents an accusation. Alternatively, in a magical setting this may symbolize directing power toward an intended goal.

A finger to the lips indicates silence as the best course of action right now. Hold your words and use this time to think things through.

Raising the two central fingers is a protective emblem from classical times, averting the influence of the “evil eye.” Consider from what or whom you feel the need to protect yourself and why.

Clenched fingers reflect tension or anger that has not been directed constructively.

The central finger of the hand is an emblem of the phallus, which actually dates back to Rome when prostitutes used it to beckon their customers. This usage slowly changed to our modern insult. Tlie question here is to whom is the insult directed and why?

Crossed fingers symbolize your wishes and hopes.

Fingernails have several implications. First, they were a common component for magical spells to gain power over another. Second, depending on how they’re used in the dream, these can be a kind of weapon. In addition, fingernails over a blackboard reveal irritations.... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

Much pleasure, and comparative independence (Raphael). A dream of fish denotes gastric disturbances (Manaceine). Originally an emblem of sex and of fecundity it was adopted by the Christians as a symbol of Christ and the church.... The Fabric of Dream

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals, River)

Miracles, especially those of providence, as portrayed in the story of Christ and the loaves and fishes.

Determined procreativity. Some fish, like salmon, fight their way against water currents to mate.

According to Edgar Cayce, ugly fish represent evil. Hooking a fish: Seizing a spiritual or personal quality.

Hindus regard fish as representative of charity and timely rescue, especially from the emotional nature.

The first incarnation of Vishnu was a fish that saved humankind from the flood.

In China, this symbolizes prosperity, renewal, and peace.

The word for fish in Chinese is actually a homophone for abundance.

An alternative icon dream, because fish coincide with many savior figures, including those of ancient Babylonia and India.

Among Buddhists, the symbol of separation from desires and attachments.

In Japan, the carp specifically is an emblem of the masculine nature (see Men).

Potentially a play on words that warns against a “fishy” situation.

Seeing yourself fishing indicates a search. Watch your catch, however, as your hook can snag an old shoe as easily as it might the prize you seek!

Casting nets for fish reveals a person who is liable to accept all received information as truth, without discriminating good information from bad (see Webs).

Each type offish can become a distinct symbol within your dream.

For example, a flounder indicates someone who is constantly wavering and unable to make a decisions (e.g., “floundering around”). On the other hand, a piranha reveals a biting personality, or one that is anxious for success at any cost.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Numbers, Pentagram)

Emotional, mental, spiritual, or physical transitions.

Protection and safety.

The pentacle of the Knights Templar is illustrated as a five-pointed star. This was used regularly to shield people from the evil eye or malicious magic.

Ancient Roman: An emblem of love and commitment.

The Roman marriage rituals featured five burning candles throughout the ceremony.

Islamic: The number of sacred tasks: regular cleansing, offerings, fasting, prayers, and taking a pilgrimage.

In some dream oracles, this number portends the restlessness that accompanies change. Listen to your inner voice, and let it steer you in the right direction.... The Language of Dreams

Christian Dream Symbols

A flag is an emblem of a nation and is given to draw attention to that particular country for prayer.

A flag can also be a symbol of God’s love and protection for an individual, Ps. 60:4... Christian Dream Symbols

The Fabric of Dream

Joy is indicated by dreaming of flowers in season, the dream augurs disappointment, white flowers are but slightly unfortunate; yellow flowers forecast painful difficulties; red flowers indicate death (Gypsy). Freud regards this as a purely erotic dream. In Christian symbolism flowers symbolize immortality; cut flowers, however, are emblematic of death.... The Fabric of Dream

The Language of Dreams

(see by type, Field)

Fulfillment and maturity in yourself, a job, or a relationship.

Research the specific flower for other more detailed associations. Most have correlations with divine beings, historical figures, and folkloric attributes.

For example, the lily is often an emblem of Christ, the rose is often a symbol of Mary, the Mother Goddess, and of England, and lavender portends renewed happiness.

Personal values, morals, and characteristics budding to the forefront.

Appearing as an offering: See Altar, Sacrifice.

Gathering in a garden: A delightful surprise, depending on the flower. Buttercups portend successful business, carnations foretell love, irises predict communication from someone you miss, and primroses are an omen of new friendship.

Dying or wilting: Personality disorders, physical maladies, or decreased energy that erodes inner beauty.

Alchemically, an alternative emblem for the soul, as the petals radiate from the center, like the body around the spirit.

Opening flowers represent potential, hope, and the first evidence of manifestation with regard to your goals.

Victorians used flowers to communicate messages and for a special petaled divination system in which each blossom meant something different. Consider if your words are being directed with flowery sentiments that may or may not be appreciated and understood by the recipient.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals by type, Field, Trees)

Obscureness (e.g., “not seeing the forest for the trees”).

Dark and filled with animals: Personal instincts and drives, reflected in the type of animals or their activities.

Freudian: An emblem of the vaginal region (more specifically, bushes).

A sacred space.

The first temples to the ancient gods and goddesses were groves of trees, often those that formed a natural protective circle in which to worship.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Numbers, Square) An ancient Babylonian and Egyptian emblem for wholeness and fulfillment.

A number representing the divine spark or source. Many languages depict God with a four-letter name, including French, Latin, Greek, and Sanskrit; the cabalistic name for god is YHWH.

The movement of time or changing cycles.

The calendar has four major points: spring, summer, fall, and winter (see Seasons).

In some metaphysical traditions, this number represents physical conditions, so seeing it frequently in dreams may be a signal to take better care of yourself or get a checkup.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

Having too much mental clutter, or scattering attention in too many directions.

In a dump: Feeling literally “dumped on” by others or circumstances. Alternatively, being surrounded by scandal.

A desire for orderliness and organization that’s generated by having your sense of structure dismantled.

Tilings in your life of which you need to rid yourself.

Counsel from your subconscious that you figuratively need to socially, mentally, or physically clean up your act. What exactly needs to be thrown away so that you can grow and change?

A poor self-image that manifests in treating yourself like worthless garbage. Ecological concerns displaying themselves through your dream.

Garbage trucks represent personality types that tend to accumulate possessions to assert their security, instead of developing personal qualities.

Finding something valuable in: An alternative type of treasure dream (“one person’s trash is another’s treasure”). Also, an optimistic outlook.

Compost heaps represent the need to nurture and fertilize your ambitions.

A compost

heap is also an emblem of taking a negative and finding a creative means of making it a

positive (e.g., recycling garbage so that it nourishes the !... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Herbs)

Talmudic: An emblem of increased fecundity. Among Hebrew men, it was customary to eat garlic before intercourse to ensure fertility.

Protection: Garlic was used regularly in spells and charms for safety, especially against spirits and evil creatures like vampires. You may want to consider this dream more metaphorically, like safeguarding yourself against the spirit of the vine, or people who “suck” your energy dry.

Vows, commitments, and promises.

The ancient Egyptians swore oaths on garlic, rather like we swear on the Bible.

Strength during trying times. Ancient Egyptians, Israelites, and Romans ate garlic for this purpose, especially before battle.

The pungent flavor and smell of garlic makes it an alternative fire symbol.

Passing through a field of garlic portends increased prominence and a better financial outlook.

Eating garlic represents having sensible views of life, and well-rounded ideals.

Being able to endure a time of difficulty and still land on your feet. Seamen and mountaineers alike carry fresh garlic to protect them against wreckage and foul weather, respectively.... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

A dream of marriage; a new girdle denotes honor, a broken one damage, a golden girdle gain, a silver one less profit (Artemidorus). In Christian symbolism it is an emblem of righteousness, virtue, truth.... The Fabric of Dream

The Language of Dreams

During the Middle Ages, an emblem of approval and honor.

To take up a glove was to accept a challenge, and giving a glove indicated respect.

Victorian: Propriety’ and manners, especially among women. In this setting, the glove might indicate a refined outlook, gentility, and the graces associated with fine Victorian ladies.

White gloves: Focus on neatness and cleanliness, often in a critical manner. Don’t expect other people to live up to your expectations of what constitutes good housekeeping.

Boxing gloves: Someone who is ready, willing, and able to fight, if need be.

Rubber gloves: Insulating oneself from perceived dangers, especially of a physical nature.... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

Enemies, trials and deceit (Artemidorus). An emblem of lewdness and wickedness in Christian symbolism.... The Fabric of Dream

The Fabric of Dream

To dream of gold embroidered garments, indicates joy and honor, to wear a gold crown signifies royal favor; to gather up gold and silver signifies deceit and loss; to dream of pockets full of gold betokens but little money (Artemidorus). Gold was the emblem of the sun, of the goodness of God.... The Fabric of Dream

The Language of Dreams

(see Colors, Coins, Sun)

Rulership or leadership. Taking control of your life or a situation. Note that this is the predominant metal historically used for crowns. Similarly, in Incan myth the Sun God gave the first created man and woman a golden staff with which to civilize a savage world (see Rods, Wand).

Pvrite (fool’s gold): A disappointing gamble, or something that looks too good to be true.

New life, renewal, and the happiness that follows same.

An alternative emblem for light. In Hindu beliefs this metal is formed underground by trapped sunlight.

Long lasting happiness and love.

The preferred metal for rings at marriage ceremonies is gold because it doesn’t tarnish.

(see Flowers)

(see Clothhig, Hand)... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

A bad dream for a single man auguring a silly and incompetent wife (Raphael). Modern nursery lore represents the goose as an emblem of silliness, despite that fowl’s illustrious reputation in both Rome and Egypt.... The Fabric of Dream

The Language of Dreams

(see Birds, Swan)

The creative principle. In Egypt, a goose laid the cosmic egg from which the Universe sprang.

India: Representative of freedom, eloquence, and learning.

Easter: A bringer of good news, especially for lovers. Geese mate for life.

An alternative wind emblem, having associations with Boreas in Greek mythology, the god of the north wind.

In the form of Mother Goose, an alternative goddess symbol, or reminder of youthful imagination and fancy.

Modernly, a symbol of foolish behavior (e.g., someone acting like a “silly goose”).... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Fruit, Vine, Wine)

Eating grapes is supposed to increase the frequency of oracular dreams. Alternatively, according to folklore, eating grapes or raisins aids concentration and conscious alertness. In a dream this may mean improved prophetic abilities or an increased need to focus on studious matters, respectively.

Fertility.

The abundance of grapes on the vine shows that the positive energy put toward your goals will reap rewards.

Fortitude shared with those around you. In a garden, grapes strengthen the hardiness of most nearby plants.

An emblem equated with Bacchus or Dionysus, both of whom had rather roguish natures, being fond of wine, song, and laughter.

For the dreamer, this can reflect more social times or an improved sense of well-being accompanied by playfulness.

If the grapes are tart, this reflects a similarly caustic attitude (e.g., being full of “sour grapes”).... The Language of Dreams

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: Symbolic of fire and air combined, the griffin is used in everyday life as an emblem, so can appear in dreams in the form of a logo. It will represent the need for intelligent communication.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

The Language of Dreams

(see Nails, Tools)

Stamina and courage during times of conflict. In Teutonic tradition, this was an emblem of Thor, the god of war and thunder, whom warriors called upon for strength.

Building or repairing something, often the self or a relationship (see Nails).

Tempering a situation through diligence, as a smith carefully tempers metal (sec Forge).

Making, or wishing to make, an ardent point (e.g., “hammering it home”).

The desire for security; knowing that everything you have built is going to hold together.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Baking, Cauldron, Fire, Foods by type, Forge)

Focus on, or the condition of, home and familv. Traditionally the hearth was the heart of a bouse in Europe, where all important family activities took place. How does the hearth appear? An evenly burning hearth with good coals indicates consistent love and tending. One that is artificial or bricked up reveals pretense or blocked emotions, respectively.

An alternative type of womb emblem, in which the masculine element (fire) burns.

Fertility, kinship, and love. Old folk spells regularly recommended ashes from the hearth fire as a component for these purposes.

Depending on its configuration, this may be an alternative altar dream, in which the food becomes a kind of sacrifice. In the Orient, especially, there are gods and goddesses who preside over, and are honored in, the kitchen.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Abyss, Cliff, Underground)

Freudian: A vaginal emblem.

Jungian: The subconscious, or an opening to this realm. Aspects of the self that you’ve hidden or fear.

Manholes represent pitfalls and traps that can be plunged into, often without noticing the danger beforehand.

Falling into a hole symbolizes a hazard that was either unforeseen or underestimated. This can also be a descent into the subconscious, or a deepening depression.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Herbs, Trees)

Heroism. In the Druidical alphabet, this bush is represented by the tau cross, often equated with the Tree God, whose strength and endurance stands for all to see.

The red berries of this bush are an alternative blood emblem.

If seen as planted around a home, this represents safety to all who dwell within.

Long lasting results or impressions from your efforts. Ancient people associated this plant with longevity, immortality, and the immutable soul due to its ability to stay green through the winter.

The well-being of a newborn child. This plant got its name from the Teutonic goddess Holle, whose dominion is protecting babies.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Bees, Bread, Eating)

Fertility and productivity. In Egypt, honey was offered to Min, the goddess of productivity and abundance, to help people conceive children. Note, however, that fertility can apply to any project in which you’re currently engaged.

Youthful outlooks and energy. Tlie ancient Greeks ate honey believing it would extend life.

Creative inspiration. In Rome, this was an emblem of poetry and eloquence, especially with words.

For a writer or speaker, this is an excellent omen.

Honey also has strong associations with the sun, having mythologically been formed by the tears of the Egyptian sun god Ra, and therefore represents strength and authority.

Love, romance, and commitment.

The term honeymoon comes from the Teutonic tradition of celebrating marriage with a month of mead drinking; mead is a wine made with a base of honey.... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

A dream of happiness, to dream of riding signifies success (Gypsy). Jung regards this as an erotic dream; courage and generosity are symbolized by the horse, while Swedenborg regards it as the emblem of the “intellectual principle.”... The Fabric of Dream

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals, Farm)

In earlier times, horses equated to movement and transition much as modern vehicles (see Airplane, Bus, Car, Spaceship) do now.

Burdens that come from labors. Horses were often work animals on farms, and were highlv valued. In what condition does the horse appear? If run-down and abused, this represents feeling unappreciated no matter how much you do. On the other hand, if the horse is well fed and groomed, it symbolizes a kind “task master” who really values your efforts.

Ancient Greeks revered the horse as a sacred creature to Artemis, the goddess of the moon and forests. Consequently, this may also be an alternative earth or tree dream.

Spiritual sojourns. Mohammed rode a horse on his mystical journey from Mecca to Jerusalem and then on to heaven.

A stallion: Male virility.

Galloping: Ecstasy, ambition, and the emotional self. Conversely, a tethered horse reveals one of these things being restrained.

Look to see who’s got the reins in this dream—the creature or its rider.

If the creature, it’s time to reclaim your control!

Finding a horseshoe: A nearly universal emblem of good luck.

White horse: In German and English traditions, this is a harbinger of death.

If the horse is happily cavorting, this may be a visual pun for horseplay. Take care that no one accidentally gets hurt by your current jovial outlook.

Psychic powers emerging. Folklorically, horses are said to sense or see spirits and have foreknowledge, similar to dogs.

Seahorses represent being transported into the waters of intuition or the subconscious with significant insight resulting.

Winged horses symbolize fame, eloquence, poetry, and the muse. Let your imagination fly on its wings.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Ascetic, Authority Figures, Parents, Religions)

A god or goddess: Each varies here by the specific visage seen, but ecumenically any such appearance indicates a higher consciousness, morality, and the divine spark within each of us.

Christ: An image of healing, forgiveness, protection, and renewal.

If crucified, an emblem of martyrdom, or giving too much of yourself (see Cross, Sacrifice).

Buddha: Introspection.

The path of positive speech and acting in accord.

Gandhi: Empowerment that comes from knowing your own mind.

A just cause fought for without violence. Peaceful negotiations.

A guru: Looking for, and dependence upon, spiritual insights from other people. Remember that your own heart is the best guru to guide your life.

Mother Teresa: The highly underestimated power of gentility, kindness, and compassion.

Moses: Redemption that first requires the trying of your beliefs.

A wizard: Mastery over the elements, and the ability to foresee the consequences of actions. Alternatively, a stage magician represents trickery and illusion meant to fool people.

King Arthur: Wise and peaceful leadership. Having a real understanding of equity.

Merlin: A tutorial image from your Higher Self who helps you see things differently, from a more metaphysical perspective.

Kings and queens: People, situations, or ideals in your life that have some authority over you.

The questions to ponder here are how much control do they have and how healthy is it for you? Look at other elements in the dream to determine this. Alternatively, these may be reflections of your own Higher Self, and self-rulership.

Mary: An alternative image of the primordial goddess, who through obedience and faith gave birth to the Messiah.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

Ivy leaves on or near your head reflect being overly intoxicated by an idea or dream without any firm foundations upon which to build.

Ivy is an emblem of striving for notoriety and honor, such as the “ivy leagues.”

Among Druids and the ancient Greeks, this symbolized blessings for a union, specifically used during weddings.

The evergreen nature of ivy implies that your efforts will be long lasting.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Crystals, Gems, Jewelry, Stones)

Your station in life. In China, jade was used to indicate a person s rank,

Love and commitment.

The Chinese also felt jade was the perfect stone for lovers, ensuring their happiness (see Butterfly).

Among the Hopi Indians and Africans, Jade was fashioned into musical instruments, and as such becomes an emblem for harmony and creative use of what’s available.

Jade worn or carried in the dream represents increased mental faculties that also result in good business sense.

If you’ve been pondering a new venture, now’s the time to act.... The Language of Dreams

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Lance; Spear) Seeing it in a dream represents a fight, evil, or disunity, and if it denotes the emblem of a religious man or a scholar, then it means innovation. Holding a javelin in a dream also means strength, power, a strong son, or a profitable business.

If a poor person sees himself carrying a javelin in a dream, it means earnings.

If a rich man sees himself carrying a javelin in a dream, it means increase in his wealth and power, or expansion of his control. (Also see Lance; Lancet)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

The Language of Dreams

(see Crystals, Ge?ns, Jewelry, Stones)

Divine favor, and the God-self within. Kings and queens regularly wore lapis to encourage blessings and as a mark of divine right.

Asserting your independence. In Sumer and other parts of the ancient world, lapis was used as a signature stone not unlike hei’aldic emblems were later, or our modern seals.

The color of lapis makes it a symbol of the psychic nature, peace, and uplifting emotions.

If worn by lovers in a dream, this portends devotion and fidelity.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Eating, Garden, Vegetables)

The white juice of this vegetable is equated with mother’s milk or semen, thereby symbolizing fertility or productivity.

Among the Greeks, lettuce was used to reflect the fragile nature of life, parts of which can be lost or taken away. On the dream plane, this may equate to losing your pep.

Astrologically, this is a lunar food, and as such may be an alternative moon emblem.

The green color of lettuce and its consistency give it some correlations with money.

For example, if something is nibbling up all the lettuce in your dream, perhaps you feel that someone or something is likewise eating up your cash on the material plane.

If the lettuce is being eaten in the dream, this reveals a decrease in sexual appetite.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Flowers, Garden)

In Christianity, a symbol for Christ (see Icons).

Domestic happiness and duties. In China, this flower is used regularly to honor the Kitchen God.

Driving away your sadness by replacing it with beauty. In Japan, the Festival of the Cleansing Lily is performed to similarly drive away excess rain.

If the lily is growing in a garden, this symbolizes a desire to keep unwanted visitors out of your private space.

In France, this is an emblem of luck and serendipity.

Among the Mexicans, lilies portend reasons for celebration.

Chinese: An emblem that shows welcome and hospitality toward people or ideas.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals, Dragon, Snake)

Because of its primitive origins, many psychologists view this as an emblem of the Collective Unconscious or wild nature within.

In Egypt and Greece, an omen of luck.

African: Transformation and the ability to adapt to your surroundings. Here the lizard is regarded as a shape-shifter.

Lizards are very sensitive to land vibrations, and have very good hearing and keen eyesight, making them symbolic of awareness, especially psychically.

Impartiality and the ability to break away from various situations. When a predator pounces on a lizard’s tail, it is surprised to discover that the tail breaks off, leaving the lizard free and alive to grow a new one!... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Flowers)

Among Hindus, a golden lotus represents the preexistent matter of the Universe. On the dream plane, this symbolizes untapped potential just waiting for your attention.

An alternative emblem for the sun. In Egypt, the Mother Goddess was called the lotus who gave birth to the sun.

In China, a golden lotus embodies a soul’s mystical quest, which is very similar to the more Western idea of the quest for the holy grail.

In India, this flower is sacred to Lakshmi, the goddess of good fortune. As such, it foretells better luck on the horizon.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Animal, Wolf)

Changing into any animal form reflects moving backward into more primal ways of thinking and behaving.

The type of creature portrayed in the dream will help you to determine what aspect of your personality is returning to this wildness.

Communion with the astral realm. Shamans often transform into animals to travel in the spirit world.

Because folklore portrays this as a lunar phenomenon, this may be an alternative emblem of the moon.

Taking after your family in ways that are not necessarily complimentary.

The ancients often believed that lycanthropy was hereditary.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

An image or symbol usually featured within a circle or oval shape as a map of the cosmos used for meditation. In dreams, this is usually more personal, being an emblematic expression of your feelings or a growing awareness. Here, the circle represents a natural cycle or possibly fate’s web, within which you’re presently operating.

The emblem contained therein becomes the prevalent dream key.... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

A dream of comfort and a happy life (Gypsy). The national emblem of Canada, connoting goodness, service, etc.... The Fabric of Dream

The Language of Dreams

The lunar, feminine, water aspect of the Universe.

An influence that causes odd behavior, such as the full moon or a blue moon are purported to do.

If being covered by a cloud, a type of eclipse dream.

Each phase of the moon has slightly different associations.

The waxing crescent symbolizes new beginnings and growth.

A full moon indicates maturity, especially of a more maternal disposition, and a waning moon is the emblem of decline and old age. Note, however, that your ways of thinking can be metaphorically old without physical age.

Howling at the moon: A release of animal instincts and energies. Also possibly a sign of a superstitious person.

Something that is rare, and should be enjoyed while it lasts (e.g., “once in a blue moon”).... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals)

Frugality and resourcefulness. Saving and recycling even minute things effectively.

Someone overly soft in voice or who lacks backbone (e.g., being “mousy”).

The size of this creature may reflect an underdeveloped sense of self-worth.

Aesop s Fables portray the mouse as an emblem that makes weaknesses into strengths.

A secret, well-hidden adversary of whom you should become aware. Note too that this enemy may be within.

Mousetraps have become an emblem of ingenuity and tackling a difficult problem with creative insight (e.g., “building a better mousetrap”). They may also be regarded as an alternative cage emblem, where you get caught by, or caught up in, technology.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

Matters of communication and self-expression.

If you dream of being gagged, for example, this represents either swallowing your words, or having your speech repressed by societal or situational standards.

An overexaggerated mouth can reveal a propensity to gossip or to dominate a

conversation with your own ideas.

Freudian: An alternative vaginal emblem.

With an extended tongue, the mouth becomes an emblem for gender unification, and therefore potent speech that affects all who listen. It is only in recent years that this symbolism transposed into an insult. Depending on the remainder of the dream, this might reflect the need to watch your words, being certain they carry the intended meaning for the most powerful impact on the listener.

A mouth with a forked tongue represents lies, and purposeful misrepresentations with an aim of personal gain or profit.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Vegetables)

Eating mushrooms among ancient Egyptians was a sign of rulership, as only the Pharaohs received this treat.

In Rome, an emblem of strength.

Metaphysics and / or the psychic nature coming to the forefront of your awareness. Shamans and medicine people have long known that some mushrooms produce visionary experiences. Additionally, they grow in dark, damp regions, equating with the fertile subconscious or Collective Unconscious.

The lunar aspects of the mushroom combine with fiery energy. Mushrooms are considered the child of lightning in folk tales. This provides a unique balance between conscious / logical thinking and the intuitive self. Consider if you have been heeding both voices equally of late.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Connecting Devices, Fabric, Sewing) An alternative symbol of male sexuality, sometimes in a derogatory sense.

If attached to a thread, the emblem of repair, alteration, and reconnecting. Perhaps a relationship has been torn asunder and needs mending. Or, maybe there is an aspect of self that needs healing or other important adjustments.

Conducting fruitless searches or participating in unproductive worrying (e.g., looking for a “needle in a haystack”).

Tilings, people, or situations that bother you to the point of distraction (e.g., “what’s needling you”).

Knitting needles can represent manipulating circumstances so that they come out a specific way. Alternatively, this may be a type of networking dream in which the fibers of a situation are carefully knit back together.

Embroidery indicates an intense attention to embellishing basic details and making sure everything has finishing touches that reflect your personality.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Eating, Trees by type)

An emblem of male sexuality and virility, equated with the testes. Europeans used to eat nuts at the end of the meal to ensure continued fecundity (that’s how we came by the expression “from soup to nuts”).

If eaten by a woman, a symbol of fertility or pregnancy.

Cracking open: Seeing or revealing the core of the self.

As a play on words, this dream can relate to something that is literally driving you “nuts.”

If eaten (or given) as part of a wedding or other gathering, the symbolism changes to providence and joy.

Among the Scots, nuts were favored for love divinations, and as such may speak of an increasing love in your current relationship, or a new partner. Much here will depend on the rest of the dream’s contents.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Forest, Leaves, Trees)

In northern Europe, this tree is strongly affiliated with god figures, including Jupiter, Thor, and Zeus, giving it a masculine overtone, with the acorn becoming an emblem of fertility.

Strength, firm foundations, and longevity. In folk beliefs, the oak’s roots delve as far into the earth as its branches reach toward the sky.

An oak filled with acorns portends a promotion and financial increases.

Braver}’ and charity that benefits others. In Rome, any hero who saved the life of a citizen was crowned with a wreath of oak leaves and acorns.... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

To dream of gathering them, peace, delight, happiness to all conditions; eating olives, a rise in circumstance (Gypsy). The emblem of peace and plenty.... The Fabric of Dream

The Language of Dreams

(see Eating, Garden, Vegetables)

Onions have a power similar to garlic in overcoming evil, specifically our own shadows.

The shape and color of the onion makes it an alternative emblem for the moon or wholeness.

The layered skin of this vegetable represents having to probe to find the truth. Alternatively, it can represent layers of personal armor that you hide behind.

Strength. Alexander the Great fed his troops this vegetable along with garlic to ensure their vitality.

Peeling onions in a dream foretells of tears that come from vour own actions. .... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Eating, Fruit, Juice, Trees)

Because of its high vitamin content, this symbolizes good health or things that are good for you.

An emblem of the triune nature of humankind (body-mind-soul), because the tree bears flowers, leaves, and fruit simultaneously.

Buying oranges portends prosperity. In the Middle Ages, oranges were a highly valued and expensive commodity.

In the East, dreaming of oranges represents extending good wishes for joy and abundance to those you care about.

Controlling an unruly nature. Orange slices were originally put in drinks, believing they would prevent drunkenness. In this case, stopping the “inebriation” becomes a metaphor for self-regulation.

Russia: Faithfulness. Orange flowers were sometimes part of a brides bouquet for this reason.... The Language of Dreams

The Complete Dream Book

To dream of orchards, gardens, and flowery places is an emblem of pleasure; and if you dream that they abound with good fruit, it signifies abundance of riches and plenty; and if you dream also of many fountains in them, [hey signify pleasure and delight, with great store of wit.

If you dream the trees be barren, it signifies the contrary.... The Complete Dream Book

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Angel of death; Bone-breaker; Eagle) In a dream, an osprey represents a powerful and a mighty warrior, and a merciless man whom no one trusts. Ifone sees an osprey over his roof, or inside his house, or standing over his head in a dream, it represents the angel of death. Catching an osprey in a dream means frequenting a ruler and remainingconstantly wary ofhim whether one obeys him, or opposes him in opinion.

If an osprey scratches someone with his claws in a dream, it means depression and financial losses. Eating the flesh of an osprey in a dream represents a demanding person.

An osprey in a dream also represents a ruler about whom people speak very scarcely, but who is the direct cause of the falling of many neighboring rulers. Seeing an osprey in a tree means profits, favors and blessings.

A flying osprey in a dream means victory in one’s life.

An osprey standing on top of a mountain or a rock, or on a cliff in a dream means success for the one who is starting a new job or a new business. However, it also could mean bad news if one is afraid of something, or ifhe is travelling. As for rich and noble people, riding an osprey in a dream means death, while for poor people it means profits and success that will benefit their families and neighbors.

An osprey in a dream also means returning from ajourney. It is also glad tidings of success and profits if an osprey comes near someone in a dream and talks to him.

If a pregnant woman begets an osprey in her dream, it means that she will give birth to a son who will grow to be a courageous soldier or a leader in his community.

A dead osprey in a dream means death.

If thieves or robbers see an osprey in a dream, it means that they will suffer the consequences of their evildoing.

If an osprey caries someone in the air in a dream, it means rising in station and honor. Fighting an osprey in a dream means fighting people in authority. Carrying the emblem of an osprey in a dream means winning victory over one’s enemy.

A female osprey in a dream represents homeless women who are driven into prostitution, while osprey chicks in a dream represent children born from adultery.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

The Fabric of Dream

A dream foretelling success and prosperity, to a woman children, to a maid marriage (Artemidorus). The Christian emblem of victory.... The Fabric of Dream

The Fabric of Dream

This dream foretells a constant sweetheart, but great poverty; the emblem of remembrance and kind thought.... The Fabric of Dream

The Language of Dreams

(see Birds, Feathers, Wings)

Mirroring habits, characteristics, or ways that are not necessarily reflective of who you really are.

Repetition of cycles or patterns in your life, some of which may not be positive.

Among Pueblo Indians, an alternative emblem of the sun, which also embodies the power of color and light.

If the parrot is in the air, possibly a type of flying dream.

A “yes” person who accepts everything she / he is told to do or believe without real scrutiny.

Mockery or gossip.

In a cage, the parrot embodies the inability to integrate the lessons you see reflected through other people’s words and actions.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Fruit, Trees)

Generally an emblem of wisdom, except in the East where peaches are given the additional attributes of a happy marriage and long life.

In China, the flowers that bear peaches are used within the home to avert negativity.

If tensions have been high with your family lately, now’s the time to begin the healing process.

Among Taoists, a source that offers productive energy, especially in a sexual sense. This idea seemed to hold true in other cultures too, as the Greeks attributed this fruit to the rule of Venus, and Albertus Magnus recommended eating peaches as an aphrodisiac.

A sarcastic visual pun that indicates a situation or person you find less than “peachy.” ... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Bird, Feathers, Wings)

Outward displays of vanity or conceit.

Expressing yourself in a manner that others see as boastful.

Pride, dignity, or self-respect (e.g., being “proud as a peacock”).

In Babylonia and Persia, an emblem of regality. Similarly in the East, peacocks represent rank and having obtained the favor of powerful people.

Buddhist: Compassion and fidelity. It was believed that Kwan Yin, the protectress of children and mothers, took this form, and that peacocks would die of loneliness if their mate passed away.

A warning that bragging will eventually bring sadness. This bird foretells rainfall by its dancing.... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

A dream denoting sickness (Raphael). It was held as an emblem of the human heart (Bayley). ... The Fabric of Dream

The Language of Dreams

(see Eating, Garden, Vegetables, Vines)

An alternative emblem of the male testicles, especially when dreamt of in pairs. Black-eyed peas appearing in dreams portend improved good luck.

Comfortable companionship, relationships, or partnerships (e.g., “like two peas in a pod”).... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Five, Star)

This pictograph was used widely in the ancient world as a protective amulet, specifically to ward off the evil eye and malicious magic. On the dream plane, this may indicate that you sense some type of psychic or mundane threat to your well-being for which you should take proper precautions.

An emblem of the esoteric mysteries, and possibly the development of specific occult or magical abilities within. Note that the pentacle was often also called a wizard’s star or witch’s cross in the Middle Ages.

Among Gypsies and some earth-centered religions, the pentacle was an emblem of health and long life. This probably developed due to the natural pentacle formed by seeds when an apple is sliced in half.... The Language of Dreams

Little Giant Encyclopedia

The pheasant was brought to Europe during the Middle Ages, where over a period of time it became wild. It is a symbol for the power of nature and beauty (similar to the astrological sign of Leo), but also of the inability to make decisions. It has been considered a reluctant and decidedly stupid bird.

Do you have trouble making decisions, thinking that all possibilities will always be available? Are you afraid to follow your own desires and needs and, for that reason, are you dismissing many possibilities right from the beginning? What if you took a chance and followed your feelings? In China, the pheasant is a symbol of wealth. It was the emblem of the Emperor Yii. In Japan, the pheasant is the female symbol of mother-love and protection.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

Dream Meanings of Versatile

A mythical bird of great beauty, the phoenix is often an emblem of immortality or of resurrected idealism and hope.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

The Language of Dreams

Contemplation about your past. Look to see if any theme develops in the pictures envisioned, or if they have a central object or character. This item or theme will help your interpretation.

Memories that may have gotten pushed aside, but need to surface now to help you better understand or cope with a specific situation or individual.

[f the photograph itself isn’t familiar, look to see what it contains and review those emblems herein. In this case, it may be a snapshot from the subconscious or I Iigher Self of something that you need to know and remember in the days ahead.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

By definition, pictographs are picture-like symbols used to communicate specific concepts. On the dream plane, these can be very potent keys for unlocking deeper meanings.

A comprehensive listing of pictographs is a subject worthy of a complete book, but for the purpose of illustration, here are a few examples:

Pictograph Name Meaning(s)

= Equal sign The need for symmetry and equity.

O Circle An alternative lunar or solar emblem.

Completeness and cycles. Enclosure and protection.

Square The four elements in balance.

A pictorial pun

for someone who is socially awkward. Truthfulness (e.g., a “square deal”).

Pictograph Name Meaning(s)

Plat Feeling as if life has lost its flavor.

A project

that fizzled out. Something that has gotten slightly off-key and needs tuning for harmonious interaction.

Male

An emphasis on the masculine nature and associated characteristics.

The rune of the warrior showing strong convictions and the willingness to fight for a just cause.

Triangle Tlie triune nature, balance, and an alternative fire emblem.

Circle / wheel The winds, the four directions, and a type of cross emblem. Infinity Something that has longevity, or that goes on seemingly forever. Heart

Matters of love or emotions.

Check mark Correctness or incorrectness, red check marks denoting the latter.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Eating, Fruit or Nuts by type) An alternative circle emblem.

A sliced pie reflects your ability to judge things fairly and equitably. How even are the slices? Is someone getting the lion’s share?

Dreaming of mince pies foretells the fulfillment of wishes and improved luck.

Birds or other unexpected items coming out of a pie symbolize the need to look at a person or situation more closely. Something here is not what it seems, and will surprise you.... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

A dream both good and bad, false friends, but a faithful lover (Gypsy). Chinese lucky symbol, but regarded as an emblem of greediness.... The Fabric of Dream

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals, Farm)

Figuratively, someone who is always “hamming it up.”

Among the Celts, an emblem of success and overcoming the odds. Pig was the favored food for Celtic victory feasts (see Eating, Meat).

Norse: Rebirth, honor, and new beginnings. In Valhalla, Valkyries feast on a reborn sow.... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

A dream of loyalty and devotion (Gypsy). The universal emblem of stability.... The Fabric of Dream

The Language of Dreams

(see Garden, Farm, Vegetables) An alternative earth emblem.

Because of its broad ranging use in folk remedies, a symbol for the return to health, usually in a physical sense.

Provision and the staples of life. Potatoes were an essential crop to many communities.

In a more negative sense, sitting on the side lines of life, getting sucked in by non-active pastimes (e.g., “being a couch potato”).... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(See Authority Figures, Church, Temple, Monastery)

An emblem of religious law, prohibitions, or taboos. In this case, the priest’s or priestess’s attitude in the dream will be very revealing (see Religions).

The Higher Self or a spiritual guide who may convey a message of a moral nature, or act as the voice of your conscience (see Angel, Icons).

What ritual or service is the priest or priestess performing? This might prove even more important to the dream’s meaning.

For example, if this person is setting up the altar, you may likewise be starting to settle on specific spiritual precepts.

If the priest or priestess is performing a baptism, this might reflect a new beginning for you, in which your slate is wiped clean for a fresh start.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Eating, Garden)

A caned pumpkin often represents the specific emotions in the depicted face, so consider if it is happy, sad, angry, frightened, or whatever.

Traditionally an emblem of protection because of its use on Halloween to scare away mischievous spirits.

Made into bread or pie, this represents a positive transformation in either your finances or ability- to act justly, respectively.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Landmarks, Locations)

Esoteric wisdom shared from the Collective Unconscious.

A good omen that portends achievement and financial gains.

Precision is needed in your evaluations to assure success. Scientists have shown the tremendous accuracy used in designing and building these great edifices; no less care should be taken with things you value.

In India, an alternative fire emblem. Similarly, in ancient Greece the pictograph of a pyramid could represent an idea or spirit that had fiery characteristics.

Mesopotamian: The meeting place between the gods and mortals. Edifices similar to pyramids were seen in Babylon at the core of the city around 3500 B.C.E. These buildings were called the Gate of the Gods. In your dream, such structures may represent a personally designed astral temple, where you can commune with your subconscious, your Higher Self, or the Divine.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Birds, Feathers, Flying, Wings)

In the Middle Ages, quails were characterized as having amorous personalities, and were given the symbolism of erotic energy.

Courage and victory in battle. In Rome, these were fighting birds.

In a cage, the quail came to represent the embodied soul that seeks freedom.

Transmuting any poisons that threaten your physical, mental, or spiritual health. Aristotle believed that quails could safely eat toxins like hemlock that normally killed humans.

Unexpected blessing.

The ancient Hebrews received quails as a miraculous feast (Ex. 16:11-12).

Among Hindus, the quail symbolizes spring and the returning sun. Similarly in Russia, this was an emblem of the dawn, a time of hope and new beginnings (see Time).... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Eating)

In Eastern lands, the emblem of providence and prosperity 7 . Alternatively, this indicates the development of patience, as experienced when trying to pick up a single grain of rice with chopsticks.

If tossed at newlyweds in a dream, the symbolism is abundant joy and fertility (see Wedding).... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Crystals, Gems, Gold, Jewelry, Metals, Silver, Stones)

An alternative circle emblem denoting eternity, repeated cycles, or longevity.

Binding relationships. In written history, wedding rings were exchanged as early as ancient Rome, and probablv before.

If depicted as a nose ring, this relationship may be very manipulative.

A symbol of authority or belonging.

For example, high school rings indicate your place among that group, whereas a bishop’s ring denotes a position of leadership.

A brass ring speaks of goals and hopes (e.g., “reaching for the brass ring”). Consider where this ring appears in your dream to see how close you are to obtaining those desires.

An acrobat on a set of rings reveals someone who has an excellent grip on a difficult situation in which thev’re in the spotlight.

A ring appearing around the collar of a shirt either indicates that you are paying too much attention to superficial, or that you need to clean up your act (probably the way you talk considering where a collar lies).... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Birds, Feathers, Wings)

As a harbinger of spring, the robin nearly universally represents renewed hope, fresh beginnings, reversals in negative attitudes, and a dawning light being shed on difficult situations.

In England, an emblem of fertility, especially if one comes pecking at a window.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Divination, Sticks, Trees, Wand)

Traditionally an emblem of discipline, being applied to the backsides of ill-behaved children.

If you have been acting childish lately, or found yourself lacking real restraint, this dream comes to make you more aware of how these things appear to, and affect, others.

Biblically: A divine tool that offers serenity (e.g., “thy rod and thy staff, they comfort me”).

A fishing rod represents an augmented ability to use what’s at your disposal to begin reaching a goal.

Authority (e.g., “the rod of rulership”).... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Flowers, Gardens)

The loveliness of nature, or life itself.

A nearly timeless symbol of love, passion, and the spirit of beauty in all its many forms, having been originally associated with the goddess Venus.

The color of the rose here provides more meaning.

For example, purple roses are exotic emotions, red is for passionate love, and yellow is for friendship.

Thorny roses speak of the difficulties in all relationships. Native American shamans believe that nature hides its greatest treasures beneath such painful traps so that we have to work to receive the prize.

A rose with its bud just opening represents the blossoming of your highest conscious awareness.

Alchemically, the rose symbolizes wisdom; blue roses represent impossible tasks, and gold ones are an emblem for achievement.

Jung believed that in dreams a rose became a mandala representing an integrated person and wholeness.

In Babylonia and ancient Arabia, the rose became an alternative emblem for Paradise with strong sexual connotations of this also equating to a woman’s vulva. Consequently, this can be a dream figure for women, and your feelings toward women.... The Language of Dreams

The Complete Dream Book

To dream of eating a sack-posset signifies to women much gossiping; and to a man that he shall obtain his sweetheart, of whom a sack-posset is the emblem.... The Complete Dream Book

Christian Dream Symbols

Emblematic of being full of life, Ps. 92:14... Christian Dream Symbols

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals, Fables)

Depicted as having the head of a man and the lower body of a goat, this creature represents the untamed nature within, especially procreative instincts.

Animalistic impulses and humankind s greater connection to the animal kingdom.

Biblically: An emblem of destruction and barrenness (Is 13:21), probably due to the connection between this image and various frolicsome pagan deities, including Faunus and Pan.... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

The loss of a friend through death (Gypsy). Mediaeval emblem of death.... The Fabric of Dream

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals, Wool)

A symbolic representation for a passive, shy, or docile person.

A sign that you, or someone you know, are too easily led astray by strong or charismatic people.

Black sheep represent the shadow, or feelings of isolation and rejection. Alternatively, this may reveal you are unafraid to pursue your own way, despite others’ opinions.

Among Christians, an emblem of those saved by grace.

Hebraic: Wealth, purity, and innocence. This was the only creature acceptable for the Passover observance.... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

A dream auguring unsuspected revelation (Gypsy). Silver is the emblem of knowledge (Bayley). ... The Fabric of Dream

The Language of Dreams

(see Colors, Metals, Moon)

Depending on what is seen as silver, this may be an alternative type of coin or money dream.

An emblem of the feminine, lunar, intuitive nature.

Something within vourself that you treasure. See what shape the silver takes for more interpretive value.

For example, seeing a silver heart may reveal that you consider a loving nature very 7 valuable, and an essential part of your being.

Tarnished silver shows disuse or poor upkeep. What is it that’s being neglected?... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Directions)

Not realizing that you’re retreating from the real world, or a situation, only to be in worse trouble.

In quicksand: Losing your identity to a group, corporation, or set of circumstances. Alternatively, having your mobility or normal escape mechanisms impeded by a person or situation.

Feeling hopelessly swallowed up by problems, emotions, or a relationship.

If this is not a frightening or uncomfortable sensation, it may be that you are traveling into your own subconscious, the animal nature, or Super Ego, and integrating the content.

If a boat is sinking, this can symbolize the end of a relationship, partnership, or other joint efforts, particularly profitable ones.

(see Numbers)

In mainstream religions, six is often associated with evil, such as the number of the Beast (666) in the Book of Revelation.

Protection. Tlie six-pointed Star of David, the emblem of Judaism, was frequently used as a protective talisman, bearing specific potency against evil.

An alternative type of crystal symbol, as many natural crystals have a hexagonal form.

May also be considered a number of completeness, as creation took six days, with God resting on the seventh (see Seven).

Among some Native .American tribes, this is the number of mental or emotional strength.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals, Dragon, Lizard)

In the Old Testament, the emblem of temptation and evil.

Greco-Roman: A symbol of renewed health and well-being. Note that the caduceus, a symbol of physicians, appears as two snakes entwined on a staff.

Transformation and development.

The snake sheds its old skin to make room to grow.

Being bitten by a snake is not a bad omen, as it might seem initially. Instead, because of the snake’s regenerative power, it represents a new awareness developing within.

A phallic symbol that sometimes comes to women upon conception, or when the dreamer is figuratively pregnant with creative ideas and psychic impressions.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Air-plane / Airport, Alien. Flying, UFO)

As a symbol of the future, this ship may take you forward in time to see where your current course of action leads.

Because of its otherworldly nature, this may represent the Universal Mind, and missives from same.

If approached expectantly, this dream expresses a strong desire for travel and adventure, especially to exotic places.

Like other vehicles, an emblem denoting movement, transition, and change (see Airplane, Bus, Car, Horse).

It the vision makes you apprehensive, this reveals some anxiety over experiencing new things, unfamiliar circumstances or places, and rapid change.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Darkness, Sky, Space)

Your unrealized wishes.

The tradition of wishing on stars is very ancient, going back to Northern peoples who wished on the first star (Venus) as a type of supplication to that goddess. This custom also tied into astrology and the belief that the heavens influence life on earth (see Zodiac Signs).

Being overly romantic or idealistic (e.g., “starry eyed”).

WTiat constellation or portrait do the stars form? Draw the pattern that you saw in the dream, then play connect the dots and see what appears. Use this image to help interpret the dream further.

Dreams, hopes, and goals (e.g., “reaching for the stars”).

Deliverance or help in a time of great need.

A star heralded Christ’s birth, and the Good Fairy of fables carries a powerful magic wand topped with a star.

Falling stars and comets are usually some type of warning or announcement (see Meteorite). Historicallv people believed thev presaged important events or disasters.

The direction the star is moving, if or where it lands, and other scenery in this dream may qualify it more for you.

Sxaxfish dramatically reflect the New Age precept of “as above, so below.” Nothing exists in the heavens that is not likewise on the Earth or within you. They are also an alternative pentode emblem.

Your soul, or matters of spirit. In ancient times, people often believed that their soul was tied to a specific star, and when that star was low in the sky it represented peril to their life.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Trees, Rods, Wand)

Depending on its size and shape, this can be an emblem of leadership (e.g., “speak softy and carry a big stick”).

Freudian: An alternative phallic symbol.

A metaphorical message to perk up and stop being a “stick-in-the-mud.”

The type of wood, its shape, and how it is used or seen in the dream will further delineate this image for you.

For example, a piece of hazel wood with a forked end may symbolize improved divinatory talents or the ability to empathically “douse” out a situation (see Divination), as this wood was traditionally used for water- witching.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Crystals, Excavation, Gems, Jewelry, Mine, Minerals)

The central self; the core of your being.

Being hard-hearted or having a stony disposition.

A place of origin; beginnings with foundation. Ancient beliefs contended that humankind was born of stone, which is one of the reasons why uniquely shaped stones or those with unusual markings were worshipped as goddesses.

A rolling stone: By gathering no moss, the stone (representative of self) keeps progressing along its path. Hie caution here is not moving so fast that valuable lessons get left by the wayside.

Standing stones: Indicative of nature worship and earth religions. This may reveal an interest in same, or an urge to get closer to the land. This can also be an alternative circle, cross, or wheel emblem, depending on the stones’ configuration.

Holed stones formed from water are considered harbingers of improved luck. Similarly, small stones called saivo in Finland were carried as talismans, being gathered from the same region as the standing stones.

Throwing stones: Casting aspersions that may or may not be accurate. Placing the blame on others without seeing your own faults.

Birth stones: Dreaming of your own birth stone is very serendipitous.

Boulders: An alternative type of obstacle dream, where going around this issue is not the answer. You must find a way to clear this path, or go over the boulder instead of avoiding the issues. Alternatively, the boulder may block your path for a good reason, such as one balanced at the edge of an abyss.

Geodes: A hidden treasure. Don’t always judge a book by its cover alone—look a little further than the superficial in this situation.

The effort will yield life’s intangible riches, all of which are well worth your time.

Fossils: Evolutionary states in ourselves, others, or situations. Alternatively, a historical connection with the greater chronicles of earth and humankind.

Patience. In the East, wise people will often instruct their students to learn diligence by watching rocks grow.

Skipping stones: A kind of childhood release that allows the mind to wander. Count the number of times the stone skips and consider its numerological value. Or, take this as a simple treat from your inner child, that gently reminds us that leisure does not have to equate to being lazy.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Birds, Feathers, Wings)

The dance of a stork represents the ability to make the right moves to ensure your success.

Due to children’s stories, this is an emblem of fertility, especially physical.

Maternal instincts toward people or special projects and goals. Storks are fiercely dedicated to their young.... The Language of Dreams

Christian Dream Symbols

The sun is a reference to someone’s father or Jesus.

A bright shining sun is symbolic of God’s goodness and fullness of life.

A dark red, raging, or darkened sun is emblematic of the apocalypse.

The sun can also symbolize endurance, Ps. 89:36... Christian Dream Symbols

The Language of Dreams

(see Birds, Feathers, Wings)

A recognition of finality and ending (e.g., “singing one’s swan song”).

Among Hindus, this bird is interchangeable with the goose, representing creative origination and the breath of life.

The Celts regarded the swan as a solar bird that was beneficent and a shape-shifter. In a dream, this can relate to your ability to adapt to a new situation gracefully.

Native American: An emblem of trust and forgiveness.

Swans are also representative of love interests, being sacred to Aphrodite, Venus, and Zeus, the latter of whom changed himself into a swan to pursue the affection of Leda.

Dreaming of two swans together portends very devoted relationships. Swans mate for life.

Because of the story of the Ugly Duckling, swans also represent positive transformations in self-image. It can also reflect spending time with the wrong groups of people who engender lower self-esteem.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Knife, Weapons)

Jung felt that this represented the conscious ego seeking freedom and singularity, separate from one’s place of origin or core group.

A tool that can help or harm. Just as the sword Excalibur could inflict wounds or keep a nation strong, swords represent all the things we have at our disposal—talents, knowledge, resources—that we have the responsibility to use wisely.

Truthfulness. Edged weapons cut through deceit in our dreams to the heart of any situation, even those things in which we deceive ourselves.

Feudal Japan: The emblem of a warrior’s soul.

The Katana is a long sword that represents a samurai’s soul and will, while the Wagasahi was shorter and the implement of honor and defense.

Honorably fighting for a just cause, often taking an integral leadership role in that fight (e.g., “taking up a sword”). Note that kings used a sword to bestow knighthood, and knights in turn regularly swore oaths upon swords.

A masculine emblem and alternative phallus. In pagan Europe, swords were owned by men, and often buried with them, whereas women held the house and land.

Breaking or misplacing a sword reflects the loss of authority or heroic mettle, or falling from an honored position in the eyes of those you respect.

An ancient emblem of the Sacred King, which may equate to your own masculine nature or the God aspect of the universe (see Men).

In the Tarot, an emblem of trouble and conflict.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Church, Holy Ground, Monastay, Sanctaaiy)

Temples have connections with ancient ideas, history, sacred beliefs, and rituals. While similar in meaning to a church, the theme indicated by a temple is not one linked to Christian ideals. What type of temple appears in your dream? A Japanese shrine, for example, has strong ties with Buddhist teachings regarding proper speech and action.

A Grecian temple, on the other hand, might relate to the development of oracular senses.

According to both Edgar Cayce and Carl Jung, this building, like other structures, may be an emblem for your body. Take special notice of the condition of each portion of the building for more interpretive information on your physical condition.

Esoterically, this edifice represents a personal astral temple, a place of safety, and learning on a higher plane.

The Templars, older Masonic mysteries, and other similar teachings tell of developing or finding such a place through meditation.... The Language of Dreams

Dream Meanings of Versatile

The thistle can represent our spiritual defiance in the face of physical adversity and difficult conditions. This is one of the reasons why it became the emblem of scotland. Magically it is a fire herb and, therefore, represents courage.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals, Cat, Lion)

In India, an emblem of divine wrath being unleashed.

China: The Lord of Animals, who embodies the attributes of authority, courage, passion, adventure, and prowess. Similar symbolism exists in Japan where the tiger represents heroic energy and self-regulation.

Riding a tiger: Confronting dangerous elemental powers that might get quickly out of control without constant monitoring.

Learning patience and the value of silence in achieving your goals. Tigers are slow, meticulous, and silent hunters.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Cemetery, Death)

An emblem of rebirth, especially if empty. Besides the Christian stories of Christ’s victor \ r over death, the ancient Celts buried people in tombs to await their next existence.

Is something inside the tomb? If so, consider what it represents of yourself that you may

have buried or recentlv uncovered.

Tombs can also represent the collective past of humankind and our link with archetypal ancestors. Have you honored this connection in some manner recendy? If not, this dream may be calling you to a figurative graveyard visit where you can explore your past as a member of humanity.

The portions of the self, the suhconscious , or the Collective Unconscious that have heen ignored so long as to be figuratively dead and buried.

An alternative womb emblem if rounded in shape.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Animal)

A tortoise that withdraws into its shell is protecting itself (see Armor). From what do you feel the need to hide?

In Chinese and Hindu mythology, the tortoise carries the world on its back, and personifies endurance. What burdens are you earning for which you need support?

In Taoism, this is the symbol of cosmic and prophetic power. As such, a tortoise appearing in your dream may presage some positive spiritual developments.

From the story of the Hare and the Tortoise, this creature may become an emblem of persistence in your dreams (see Rabbit).

Japanese: A messenger from the gods of the sea, which equates to a bulletin from your subconscious, intuitive self. Watch and listen closely!... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

Freedom, especially in regard to instinctive drives.

Freudian: An emblem of the male penis, primarily when combined with tunnel imagery.

Similar to other vehicles in terms of movement and transitions (see Bus, Car, Horse).

Each car of the train may represent aspects of yourself, including hidden talents, knowledge, fears, hopes, and memories. So, exploring the train symbolizes introspection and integration of some of these portions.

For example, searching the caboose may symbolize routing out your feelings about death or endings.... The Language of Dreams

Islamic Dream Interpretation

An apple tree in a dream represents a good man who serves and cares about his community.

A crack in a tree in a dream represents members of one’s family who will brace against him.

A palmyra tree in a dream represents a wise man, a poet, or an astronomer. Seeing one, or sitting under it in a dream means meeting such a person.

An oak tree in a dream means profits, prosperity, honor, associating with heedless people who live in the mountains, or perhaps it could’ mean visiting righteous people or a renunciate who lives in the wilderness or in uninhabited ruins.

A mimosa tree in a dream represents stinginess, evil, or pursuing the actions of the dwellers of hell-fire.

A buckthorn tree that grows datelike fruit in a dream represents a noble and a generous woman, or it could represent a noble and a generous man.

The greener is its color, the greater is the person. Seeing this tree in a dream means that one will rise in station, acquire knowledge, and grow in piety. Eating its fruit in a dream means an illness. Climbing this tree in a dream means stress and difficulties.

If one acknowledges the condition of a specific tree in wakefulness then sees the same in his dream, it means that such condition will last. In general, trees in a dream represent women or men of different tempers or personalities. Trees in a dream also represent fights. Unknown trees mean distress, worries, adversities and fears, particularly if one sees them in the dark in his dream. Sitting under the shade of a tree in a dream means profits and money, or it could mean dependence on people in authority, or befriending rich people for their money. As for one who is pursuing the path of innovation, it means that he will repent and follow the path of righteousness ifit is a fruit-bearing tree. Takingshelter under a tree that bears no fruit in the dream means pursuing something that will bear no comfort or benefits. Fragrant trees, flowering trees, a Moringa tree, or a henna plant in a dream represent people of knowledge, religious scholars, teachers or preachers who teach what they do not practice. As for citrus trees in a dream, they represent righteous people, wise men and people of inner and outer awareness who practice what they preach. Palm trees, walnut trees, or the like trees in a dream represent people of the upper social class from whom no one can get anything, or no one will even attempts to ask them for anything. As for the poplar trees, the evergreen cypress trees, or the saint trees in a dream, they represent stinginess and avariciousness. In a dream, any kind of maple or other trees that renew their leaves annually represent poverty, richness, memorizing things, forgetfulness, celebrations, or sadness. In a dream, any kind of large trees that do not shed their leaves in the winter represent longevity, richness, jealousy, or steadfastness in one’s religion. Climbing a tree in a dream means escaping from danger, or carefully avoiding something worrisome. Seeing an unknown tree inside one’s house in a dream means that fire may consume such a house, or that a fight may break the family apart. Common types of trees and city trees in a dream represent enemies, or men seeking lawful earnings. Planting a seedling in a dream means getting married to a girI from a renowned family and gaining rank.

A plane tree, a sycamore, or the like trees in a dream represent great, strong and famous men who have no wealth, nor do they benefit anyone.

A thorny tree in a dream represents a perplexed man. Ifone cuts a tree in a dream, it may mean the death of his wife, or that he will infringe upon a contract, or break a covenant.

If a tree dries out in a dream, it means that a traveller may die in an accident, or that a sick person may die from his illness.

If one sees a king or a man in authority carving some emblems on the trunk of a tree in a dream, it means that he is designing a plan to destroy someone.

If he cuts it down with a scythe or a sickle in the dream, it means that he is demanding something, the other party cannot deliver. Ifone takes money from a tree in his dream, it means that he will earn lawful and blessed money from people who deal with the same type of trees, or that he will live in their vicinity. Planting trees in one’s garden in a dream means bearing children.

A plane tree represents longevity. Peach or plum trees in a dream represent a short life. Seeing a group of trees surrounded with aromatic plants in a dream means that a group of men will gather to mourn someone, or to lament a loss. Tree leaves in a dream represent money.

A tree outside one’s house in a dream represents one’s clan or servants.

A female tree inside a house represents a woman, and a male tree represents a man. It is a bad omen to see the forbidden tree in a dream. In a dream, to see the tree near which God Almighty spoke to Moses, upon whom be peace, means nearness to God Almighty.

A dead tree in a dream represents guidance and wealth, for it is a source offuel. Sittingunder the shade of a tree along with a group of people, praising and glorifying God’s attributes in a dream means receiving God’s blessings in this world and in the hereafter. Seeing the heavenly TUba tree in a dream means a good end, or living an ascetic life, or it could mean helping others. Seeing mountain trees in a dream means performing supererogatory devotion, work, or receiving unexpected profits.

A palm tree in a dream represents a good word and a true one. It also represents... Islamic Dream Interpretation

The Language of Dreams

(see Three, Water, Weapons)

Ancient: The union of the God aspect with that of the triune Goddess. Out of this union, tremendous creative power is born.

Alchemical: An alternative emblem for water. Note that the Greek and Roman gods Poseidon and Neptune are frequently pictured holding a trident representing their dominion over the waters and all that dwells within. Therefore, this dream may symbolize a new sense of control over your emotions.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

If a light appears at the end of the tunnel, this symbolizes hope.

A voyage toward self-discovery

Freudian: A sexual dream, especially it a train is traveling through the tunnel.

Because tunnels often appear inside a mountain or the earth, they may he an alternative womb emblem, in which the birth process equates to personal transformation.... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

A dream of righteousness (Gypsy). Ancient emblem of purity.... The Fabric of Dream

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals, Fables)

Traditionally an emblem of purity. In fairy tales, the unicorn becomes a mount to only chaste maidens, and befriends only those who are pure in spirit.

The horn of this creature is an alternative phallic emblem. It is also considered the most potently magical part of the animal—the “magic” in this sense being the seed of life (sperm).

If the horn of the creature is dipped into water, this represents the purging of some type of poison, be it emotional, physical, or spiritual.

In Greece, an alternative emblem for the moon goddess, and as such reflects a predominance of the intuitive nature in your decisions and interactions.

In China, this is a most beneficent dream. Here, the unicorn symbolizes the perfect balance between Yin and Yang, and all five elements in harmony (earth-air-firewater- ether / void). Seeing one indicates goodwill and kindness toward you from others, as well as the presence of gentle, wise companions.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see by type, Eating, Garden)

If this is a play on words, your subconscious is saying that for some reason you have begun to feel as productive as an inanimate, uprooted vegetable. Get up and become an active participant in life again!

Each vegetable in a dream has a different interpretive value.

For example, a carrot is a masculine emblem that also represents vision and luck. Additionally, as an omen, carrots symbolize forthcoming wealth, health, and happy marriages. Dreaming of eating celery is an omen of love and affection. Cauliflower growing in a garden foretells increased business prospects, corn might depict a “corny” personality or the promise of improved finances, and beans carry a magical overtone thanks to the story of “Jack and the Beanstalk.”

Root vegetables denote grounding, a connection to your family, and the staples of both spiritual and mundane life.

Jungian: Because vegetables get nourished by all the elements, they represent the depths of the subconscious, the deepest roots, and the fundamental self.

Societal, cultural, or religious limitations. Many vegetables have been shunned because of one of these contexts, such as tomatoes being thought poisonous, or potatoes not being eaten by Puritans because they are not in the Bible.

Eating vegetables in a dream is a portent of odd luck and coincidence on the horizon.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Divination. Rods. Stick)

An emblem of rulership over yourself, or being put in a place of respected leadership for a group, as shown by a king’s scepter.

A blossoming wand represents figurative or literal fertilitv and productivity.

A phallic symbol that combines with an orb or star at the top, thereby illustrating the union of male / female, or YinA*ang energies, for potent personal transformations. Xote that a fairy’s wand is topped in a star to show that a magical creature possesses it.... The Language of Dreams

The Fabric of Dream

A dream forecasting friendship for malicious persons (Gypsy). “An emblem of malice.”... The Fabric of Dream

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals, Fish, Water)

A difficult journey to transformation and enlightenment as in the story of Jonah and the whale. Similar whale myths appear in other cultures too, all of which equate this creature’s belly to a cauldron of change and rebirth, or an initiation.

A whale swimming in deep waters often represents your own search for deeper awareness about yourself or the Universe.

A whale spout is a type of air or wind dream, in which you seek out the breath of life, and perhaps a break from being emotionally or empathically immersed. .Alternatively, this may represent the liberation of positive ideas and energy.

A symbol reflective of the regenerative power of water to refresh your ideas, bring peace and healing, and smooth out the rough spots in life.

Among the Norse, whales have magical power all their own, and would sometimes earn* witches to their destination. So, a whale surfacing from the ocean depths may indicate a surfacing interest in, or ability with, the occult arts.

WTiales have sonar like that of dolphins, making them an emblem of “sounding things out” and knowing your direction in life.

The humpback whale, specifically, reflects finding your own song; a harmony that mirrors your soul, especially with regard to the way you interact in relationships.

The song of the humpback changes every breeding season, reflecting the environmental changes that surround it (see Music).... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Forest, Rods, Stick, Trees, Wand)

Symbolic of flexibility and tolerance because of its supple branches.

Wishes and magic.

An ancient willow wand, topped in a star, and carried by the Greek goddess Helice was a cosmic emblem connected strongly with the moon, divination, and the Mystery traditions.

Pain’s abate. Herbally, willow bark is a substitute for aspirin.

The weeping willow represents personal mourning or sadness. Remember the lesson of the willow, however, that also shows us how to bend without breaking. Do not let grief break your spirit.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Air, Fan, Whistle)

Strong winds or storm winds reveal powerful forces at work in your life, some of which may cause confusion about your direction and path.

Change and movement, which often meets with some turbulence before positive transformations occur.

A sign of latent psychic abilities developing.

In Christian theology, the presence of the Holy Spirit.

Angry winds are often considered a sign of evil or negativity. Note that Lucifer is called the Prince of the Power of the Air, and in the Koran, demons control stormv winds (see Monsters).

Howling winds: In folklore, this portends either trouble on the horizon, or an unsettled spirit (see Ghost).

Anciently an emblem of the masc uline nature, with the four directions becoming a natural wheel or cross that later became the weather vane.

Weather vanes that show which way the wind blows are an alternative emblem for both a wheel and a cross, indicating the originating source of energy or problems.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Beverages, Fruit by type)

Drinking fully of life’s nectar; living each moment to its fullest.

Celebration, and reasons for same. Also, hospitality being offered and accepted.

In ancient Greece, wine and the god Bacchus were one and the same. Bacchus was somewhat of a mischievous and randy figure, who may represent unrepressed sexuality, liberation, and the power of nature.

Red wine is an alternative blood emblem, as seen in Christian communion rites.

The spirit ot truth, or as the Romans said, “in vino Veritas.” It is interesting to note that in Mesopotamia the goddess Saki personified the vine and epitomized the revelation of truths.

Among the Norse, an emblem of taking care of things that you value.

The deceased had to drink all the wine they had spilled before being allowed to enter Valhalla, their version of paradise.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals, Lycanthropy)

Tilings that you fear about yourself, a situation, or others, and have been unwilling to face directly.

Some type of obscured threat (e.g., the “wolf in sheep’s clothing”). In Freudian analysis, this threat is construed as sexual intimacy.

The loss of innocence and naive outlooks.

In fables, the emblem of evil craftiness that threatens to devour all goodness.

AJchemically, a symbol of duality; the light and dark aspects of all things.

Howling at the moon: Discovering and announcing a secret alliance or treacherous plan. Alternatively, acknowledging the lunar / feminine aspect of self.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

Three appearing together: During the 1100s and before, writings from Norway, Sweden, and Iceland tell of the Vanir Cult. This was a group of Germanic people who followed fertility goddesses. From writings entitled Flateyjarbok, it seems the manifestation for these goddesses often came through dreams. Specifically, the women would appear as protectors, luck-bringers, and counselors. They were also associated with the ancestors and the Three Fates of Greek mythology.

Mother figures: The maternal aspect, and attachments to same. Feeling toward the feminine side of self. Alternatively, the spirit of earth (earth as our mother).

Wife: The literal wish for a wife, or someone in your life who would act as a companion and helpmate (see Bride).

The archetypal Goddess who is maiden, mother, and crone combined (see Icons).

An old woman: An emblem of folksy, time-honored wisdom, especially in matters of love and health (this may also be true of an old man). Alternatively, an emblem of the ancestors who act as guides in important life decisions.

Maids represent neatness and an attention to appearances either for yourself, in a situation, or in your home.

Nuns reflect religious dedication and lifelong devotion to an ideal.

For those who attended Catholic school, a nun may also be an authority figure stressing the need for discipline.

Waitresses symbolize service to others (see Servant). Do you feel as if people appreciate your time and efforts (for example, does the waitress in the dream receive an acceptable tip)? Are you giving too much of yourself?... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Birds, Feathers, Trees, Wings)

An alternative emblem of the drum because of its rhythmic pecking.

Among the English, Babylonians, and ancient Greeks, this bird was a weather prophet. What’s gathering on the horizon for you?

Among Native Americans, the woodpecker represents the sacred rhythms of the earth, to which you are learning to listen.

Discrimination in what one accepts as truth.

The woodpecker uses its sharp bill to carefully reach the specific foods it wants and needs.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals, Diit)

An alternative emblem for dragons and serpents, but on a smaller scale.

Because the worm has no eyes, an alternative type of blindness dream in which you navigate the depths of self or earth with little to guide your way.

A visual pun for someone who cannot be trusted, or whose actions are routinely crass.

Something that appears worm-ridden represents ideas, plans, or beliefs that have bugs which need to be worked out before proceeding further.... The Language of Dreams