emergence

(See Appearance)



Emergence | The Dream Meanings

Keywords of this dream: Emergence

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Emergence; Manifestation; Visibility) In a dream, if one sees somethingthat is kept away from him as a secret, it means experiencing comfort after suffering from trials, receiving compensation after suffering from injustice, conceiving a child after having given up hope or the like examples.

A revealed secret on time in a dream means fulfillment of a promise, satisfying one’s needs, repayment of one’s debts, arriving of a long awaited person from a journey, release of a prisoner from his jail, and for a woman, it could mean becoming pregnant.

If something emerges at the wrong time in a dream, it means debts.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Lunar months : 1- Muharram; 2- Safar; 3- Rabi-’uIAwal; 4- Rabi’u Thani’; 5-Jamadul Awwal; 6- Jamadu Thani’; 7- Rajab; 8- Sha’ban; 9- Ramadan; 10- ShawwaI; 11- Zul-Qi’dah; 12- Zul-Hiliah) Seeing a dream during the month of Muharram means that the dream is most true as it is seen. Thus, having a dream during the month of Muharram could be even called a vision and it never fails. Such a dream means success, relieffrom difficulties, release from a prison, or recovering from an illness. Ifthe person had retreated from his town, he will return to it. This interpretation is based on the story of God’s prophet Jonah, upon whom be peace, after he emerged from the belly of the whale. Perhaps the person in the dream may face a great spiritual challenge in his life, or it could mean the death of a great man of knowledge or the emergence of such a gnostic or wise man in that city. Ifthe person seeing the dream is a sinner, it means that he will repent of his sins, for GodAlmighty has accepted the repentance ofAdam, upon whom be peace, during that month.

If the person in the dream is one who hopes for a station of honor, he will attain it, because God Almighty has raised the prophet Enoch (Idrls) upon whom be peace, to a high station during that month. Ifa traveller sees a dream during that month, it means that he will safely return home from a longjourney, because it is the month in which the prophet Noah upon whom be peace, was saved with his people, and it is the month in which the arc settle on top of Mount Judiyyi.

If the seer desires a son, then he will beget a righteous son, because it is the month in which God’s prophets Abraham and Jesus, upon both of them be peace, were born. Ifthe person seeing the dream is suffering from tight financial circumstances and ifhe desired a way out, it means that he will see the light or escape from the danger of his enemy, because this is the month in which God’s prophet Abraham was saved from the fire ofNimrod, or perhaps, ifhe had followed a path of innovation and falsehood, he will turn back to God Almighty and repent of his sin, because it is also the month in which God Almighty forgave the prophet David, upon whom be peace. Ifthe person in the dream is impeached from his leadership position or stripped from his status, he will return to his office and regain honor, because it is also the month in which God Almighty returned the prophet Solomon to his kingdom. Ifone is bedridden, it means that he will recover from his illness, because it is the month in which the prophet Job (uwbp) recovered from his illness, or perhaps it could mean that one will be sent as an emissary with a mission, or as an ambassador, because it is during this month that God Almighty spoke to His prophet Moses upon whom be peace. As for the second lunar month, known in Arabic as Safar, having a dream during it could be interpreted as follows : If one is pessimistic about what he saw, then it could mean the opposite. Ifhe is sick, it means recovering from his illness. Ifone is needy, it means that his needs will be satisfied.

If one is suffering from stress and worries, it means that they can cause him no harm.

If one sees his dream during the third lunar month, known in Arabic as Rabt-rul Awwal, and ifhe is a merchant, it means that his business will grow, prosper and that his moneywill be blessed or perhaps he may conceive a child during that month.

If he is under stress and worries, they will be dispelled.

If he is persecuted or treated unjustly, he will end in a triumph, or it could mean that he will hear good news, or he may be appointed as a governor, or he may admonish people to do good and discard evil, for it is the month in which God’s Prophet Muhammad, upon whom be peace, was born to this world. Ifone’s dream takes place during the fourth lunar month, known in Arabic as Rabi’u Thiini, and if it suggests glad tidings, then one may have to wait and exercise patience, but ifit suggests evil, then such happening will come fast. During this month, seeing a dream also means victory over one’s enemy, or it could mean conceiving a blessed son who will grow to become a gnostic, or a hero, for it is during this month that the Imam ‘Ali, may God bless his countenance and be forever pleased with him was born. As for the fifth lunar month, known in Arabic as JamiidulAwwal, seeing a dream during this month means that one should slow down or scrutinize his buying and selling, or it could mean that he may lose his daughter or wife, for it is in this month that the daughter of God’s Messenger, upon whom be peace, Fatima died. May God. be forever pleased with her.

If the dream happens during the sixth lunar month, known in Arabic as Jamadu Thaw, and if the dream carries a good meaning, it will come, but slow and one should not contradict it.

If one sees this dream during the seventh lunar month, known in Arabic as Rajab, it means that he will gain honor and status, for it is the month of the prophet’s Ascension (Mi’raj) and his night journey to the seventh heaven.

A dream during the eighth lunar month, known in Arabic as Sha’ban, represents honor and ranks, for during this month, every good deed will be honored. As for the ninth lunar month, known in Arabic as Ramadan, in it, all difficulties will be suspended, evil will be shun and stinginess will be dispelled. During this month all what is good will manifest and bad dream will dissipate to become null and void. During this month, the dreams of a believer may be differently interpreted than the dream of a disbeliever.

If one sees the month of Ramadan in his dream, his dream means blessings, profits, commanding good and forbidding evil. Ifthe person is seeking knowledge, then knowledge will be given to him, for it is during this great month that the Holy Qur’an was revealed.

If the person is inflicted with epilepsy, he will recover from it, for the devils and all evil spirits are shackled and are rendered powerless during this month. As for the tenth lunar month, known in Arabic as Shawwal, if one’s dream suggests a war or a conflict, it means that he will come first in it, and that he will triumph.

If one sees the month of Shawwal in his dream, it means that he will come out of difficulties and finds happiness and devotion, for it is the month during which that God’s House, known as the Ka’aba was built. As for the eleventh lunar month, known in Arabic as Zul-Qi’dah, if one’s dream suggests a trip, then the person should refrain from taking that trip or perhaps he should delay it for the better. He also should guard himselfwhere he lives. Ifthe dream denote stress or worries, then he should avoid whatever may cause them. However, if one’s dream takes place duringthe twelfth lunarmonth, known inArabic as Zul-Hijjahindicates ajourney then one may take it, or if it denotes a good business, one should seek it, for it is a most blessed month and it is the month of festivities and sacrifices.

If one sees this month in his dream or sees himselfoffering sacrifices in it, or ifhe sees himself praying the festival of Sacrifice prayers in it, his dream means paying one’s debts or fulfilling one’s vows, repentance from sin, guidance or perhaps his dream may indicate the death of great people of knowledge, the impeachment of governors, the changing of governments, or it could mean a sudden war.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Behind; Posterior; Rear side) In a dream, the back of a human being represents what people hold for him of praises or blame, acceptance or rejection, honor or humiliation, or it could represents one’s debts. Seeing the back of a human being in a dream also means following his tracks or practices.

If a positive look manifests therein, such as a sweet fragrance or the emergence of a radiant light, or if it turns into iron in the dream, it signifies one’s gratitude regarding his own condition. In a dream, the rear side of the human being represents his outward appearance or what renders the human being acceptable, or it could represent his garment, an ostentatious person, a show of grandeur, pride about one’s social class, a show of being wealthy, the surroundings of one’s house, the outskirts of a town, the outer display of one’s religion or his school of thought.

A broken back in a dream means fear, distress and sorrow.

If one sees his rear side dark in color, black or red in a dream, it means that he may suffer from physical abuse and beating during a fight. Seeing one’s own back in a dream also could mean buying new clothing, or it could mean feeling strong because of one’s knowledge, his son, power, political connections, wealth or property. Seeing one’s back in a dream also could mean to repudiate one’s wife. Ifone’s back is seared or cauterized in a dream, it denotes stinginess, or it could mean that he fails to comply with God’s rights upon him.

If one sees his back bent in a dream, it means a misfortune. Ifone sees the back of his friend in a dream, it means that his friend will turn his back to him at times when he needs him most.

If one sees the back of his enemy in a dream, it means that he will be guarded against his threats.

If one sees the back of an old woman in a dream, it means that the world is turning its back to him. Ifshe is in her middle age in the dream, it means that he is seeking something hard to obtain.

If she is a young woman in the dream, it means that he is expecting something and must be patient to acquire it. One’s back also represents old age. Back pain in a dream means poverty, sickness, debility, imprisonment of one’s boss or the death of a brother. One’s back in a dream also represents one’s dependence on a strong person. Ifone sees himselfcarrying a heavy load on his back in a dream, it means debts, or a vicious neighbor.

A broken back in a dream means losing one’s strength and power, or it could mean one’s death.

If a sick person sees his back broken in a dream, it means that the person who is taking care of him may die shortly, or it could mean that he will suffer from poverty. Carrying burdens over one’s back in a dream means sins. Carrying a coffin or a load ofmerchandise over one’s back in a dream means carrying forgotten debts that will surface at awkward times. Carrying wood over one’s back in a dream means backbiting, slandering people and reporting lies. Carrying a heavy load over one’s back in a dream also means having many children with little money to sustain them. Seeing a hunchbacked person in a dream means prosperity, longevity or having a large family. (Also see Backbone; Backside; Body’)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

It refers to oneself, as in the word sorcxehxty. Al­though it includes the totality of our expenence, it seems to be most pointedly referring to our sense of identity. From this sense of ourself we project meaning on to the rest of the world in some degree. Thus many symbols are stylised body forms.

The cross is a standing figure with arms outstretched, a church’s structure a representation of the body, and the mira­cle of sexual reproduction—the mystery enacted within it; a maypole, the penis. Therefore various things can represent our body or aspects of ourself. Seeds, swallowed teeth can be sperm, anything long and pointed, even a linger, can be the penis; anything hairy, a male; anything receptive like a bottle, bowl or cave, a woman or vagina.

A body, or our body, also represents physical life; material existence; the process which causes growth and aging. This includes all the processes of nature in us.

A dead body: our skin or shape is felt as our boundary, the edge of our universe.

The dead body depicts a whole set of personality traits or attitudes, very often potentials, which have been denied life by us. We have not allowed them expression.

A person hun in love might kill out any feelings towards the opposite sex. This ‘dead pan of them can be shown as a body. May also be the way we meet feelings about death. Sickness in body: can refer to an awareness of illness in pan of body shown. Most often depicts psychological problem symbolised by pan of body— see body pans below. Maggots in body: possible need to cleanse body of toxins or infection, sense of dis-ease emotion­ally in that area of self. Iniunes: huns or events that may lead to emotional scars—see body areas below. See dead people dreams; hiding.

Bodiless: Example: lI felt as if I was going very deep inside myself. It was dark but at first there were noises of the world around me. I seemed to go in much deeper and it was very dark, but with the feeling of great space. Everything was all right until I didn’t hear any noise at all, all that space and no noise was too much and my whole body freaked out and then pulled out very fast before I could stop it’ (Kate P).

The ‘noises’ around us, sensory impressions, other people s ex­pressed feelings and actions, are building bricks for our sense of self. In a real sense we create each other by believing in each other. With prolonged absence of other people and events, and especially if we lose our noises’ and body aware­ness, we feel we—our sense of identity—is dying. Bodiless- ness may therefore show us feeling unrecognised, unnoticed. May also be feelings of loneliness; being cut off from sexuality and body drives. In its positive side it is exploration of the unconscious and void. See identity and dreams.

If you are right handed, the left of the body: represents inner feelings which support outer action, such as confidence, our less used or supportive functions.

If we are an intellectual, the left might depict one’s feelings, and vice versa.

The left may represent our mother’s influence in our life and body.

The right of the body: our outer activity and dominant func­tions; expressed abilities; our father’s influence in life and body.

If father is an anxious man there might be a lot more signs of stress on this side of the body. Top half of body: thinking, feeling. Bottom half: sexuality and instincts. Half a body: if top missing, lack of thinking and higher emotion; if bottom, trauma to, loss or denial of, sexuality and sensuality. Old head on baby body: immature sexuality and emotions; vice versa: immature personality. Dismembered body: emo­tional or mental stress and breakdown; may be followed by emergence of new self.

The areas of our body are sometimes thought of as sense organs. This may seem strange but is very simple. Without language, communication would be difficult. So language en­ables us to sense what another being is communicating.

If we had been castrated or had a hysterectomy prior to adoles­cence, we would never develop sexually. Without that devel­opment we would not understand two kissing people; or what a mother was feeling when she held her baby. Out of the sex drive develops a whole world of feelings and tenderness which enables us to understand many things we see in the world. It is therefore important when reading the particular de­scriptions below to remember that each psychological area of our body gives us some insight into ourself and life around us, which is missing if the area is injured or traumatised. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

New American Dream Dictionary

1. Power, assertiveness.

2. Sexual intercourse.

3. A measure of luck depending on whether or not the target is hit, usually in business affairs.

4. The emergence of love (as in “cu­pid’s arrow”). ... New American Dream Dictionary

My Dream Interpretation

Dreaming of a clone represents a mind that is experiencing conflict between ideas and decisions. You may be feel overly busy and stressed in your real life.

The clone symbolizes the emergence of unconscious material and suppressed feelings, while you represent the conscious mind. There may be some real life situation that you are not confronting.... My Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Masochism, guilt; feelings of being a scapegoat; frequently connected with the pains of being bom. Also pans of us may have been killed’ and if they are coming alive again —being felt once more—the pain of their emergence is shown as crucifixion. In some cases the dying of an egocentric self as it gives way to a wider awareness emerging from unity of unconscious and waking self. See religion and dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Day) The dawning of the daylight in a dream means relief from pain, distress and sorrow, or it could mean buying a new garment, marriage, having beautiful children, the emergence of truth, unveiling what is hidden, release from prison or the coming home of a traveller.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

New American Dream Dictionary

1. Reemergence of childhood anxieties or traumas, usu­ally social.

2. A need for moral reassessment of behavior in business or social affairs or intimate relationships.

3. Use cau­tion, reputation is in jeopardy.

4. Unrealistic expectations of others. ... New American Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The things we take for granted which act as the sup­portive background to our life and activities, such as parental love, our own reality as a person, social order, the thousands of things which constitute reality’ for us. Also the ground we stand on’; attitudes and relationships we have taken for granted; everyday life; the past. Soft earth, fields: mother, the fundamental processes of life out of which we have our being and which continually nurture us. Under, swallowed by the earth: the unconscious habits, drives and psychobiologicai processes which existed before our emergence as a conscious self, and in which we might lose self in death. Idioms: down to earth; go to earth; like nothing on earth. See also uncon­scious. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Language of Dreams

(see Clay, Globe)

Being grounded or having solid foundations (e.g., being “down to earth”). Earthly or mundane matters.

The physical plane.

Plowing and planting: Efforts toward acquiring or accentuating positive attributes (see Garden, Farm).

A place of emergence, especially for magical power. In the Middle Ages, it was widely believed that witches gained energy from the earth, and could disappear if they touched soil. Alternatively, this can imply positive energy directed toward developing personal traits and characteristics.

A period of peacefulness. Teutonic tribes would often put down their weapons of war during the season of the Earth Goddess.

Groveling in earth: Debased morals or ideals, or possibly begging for forgiveness.

Mud: Ambiguous circumstances; things getting botched (see Dirt). Alternatively, malicious gossip meant specifically to make a perceived opponent look bad (e.g., “mud slinging).

Among Native Americans, the earth element represents the physical nature, so if the land in your dreams is rich and fruitful, you are likely quite healthy, as is any effort that requires “hands-on” attention.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals)

Elephants exhibit many positive attributes, including affection and loyalty. Consider how much of both you have given to yourself, or to those around you, and vice versa.

These creatures also have a strong sense of smell that affords discernment. How does your present situation smell? Is something amiss?

An affinity for nature worship. According to Pliny, this creature worships the sun and stars, and invokes the heavens.

In ancient Rome, this image appeared on coins representing the power of charity. Does someone around you have a need that you’ve overlooked?

Among Hindus, the elephant symbolizes wisdom. Ganesha, the god of sagacity, is an elephant, often portrayed dancing.

Buddhists regard the white elephant as emblematic of compassion, love, kindness, self- restraint, and patient endurance, revealing the emergence of such positive traits within you. Note, however, that Western society transforms this image’s meaning to that of useless decoration (e.g., a “white elephant sale”), which might reflect a lack of self-worth or feeling ineffectual in a specific situation.

Chinese: Prudence and independent authority over self, others, or a situation. Don’t be afraid to take charge!

In modern aphorisms, a pink elephant represents being deluded by your own senses. Such delusion usually comes by your own hand (as happens when one drinks too much alcohol).... The Language of Dreams

Ariadne's Book of Dream

The arrival of a fire engine may signify that there is a fire to put out at home in order to remedy an out-of-control argument or emotional explosion. It may mention that you need help in letting go of anger It may also appear as a rescue from a friend who could mediate a heated argument. It may point to an emotional emergency that can transform into a spiritual emergence... Ariadne's Book of Dream

New American Dream Dictionary

1. Emergence of repressed memories.

2. Difficulty in under­standing concepts or situations clearly.

3. Softness, comfort and consolation (to touch something fuzzy). ... New American Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

One of Carl Jung s most interesting areas of thought is that of individuation. In a nutshell the word refers to the processes involved in becoming a self-aware human being.

The area of our being we refer to when we say T, ‘me’ or ‘myself’ is our conscious self awareness, our sense of self, which Jung calls the ego.

The autobiography of Helen Keller has helped in understanding what may be the difference be­tween an animal and a human being with self awareness. Helen, made blind and deaf through illness before learning to speak, lived in a dark unconscious world lacking any self awareness until the age of seven, when she was taught the deaf and dumb language. At first her teacher’s fingers touch­ing hers were simply a tactile but meaningless experience. Then, perhaps because she had leamt one word prior to her illness, meaning flooded her darkness. She tells us that ‘noth­ingness was blotted out’. Through language she became a person and developed a sense of self, whereas before there had been nothing.

The journey of individuation is not only that of becoming a person, but also expanding the boundaries of what we can allow ourselves to experience as an ego. As we can see from an observation of our dreams, but mostly from an extensive exploration of their feeling content, our ego is conscious of only a small area of experience.

The fundamental life pro­cesses in one’s being may be barely felt. In many contempo­rary women the reproductive drive is talked about as some­thing which has few connections with their personality. Few people have a living, feeling contact with their early child­hood, in fact many people doubt that such can exist. Because of these factors the ego can be said to exist as an encapsulated small area of consciousness, surrounded by huge areas of ex­perience it is unaware of.

In a different degree, there exists in each of us a drive towards the growth of our personal awareness, towards greater power, greater inclusion of the areas of our being which remain unconscious.

A paradox exists here, because the urge is towards integration, yet individuation is also the process of a greater self differentiation. This is a spontaneous process, just as is the growth of a tree from a seed (the tree in dreams often represents this process of self becoming), but our personal responsibility for our process of growth is neces­sary at a certain point, to make conscious what is uncon­scious.

Because dreams are constantly expressing aspects of indi­viduation it is wonh knowing the main areas of the process. Without sticking rigidly to Jungian concepts—which see indi­viduation as occurring from mid-life onwards in a few individuals—aspects of some of the main stages are as fol­lows. Early babyhood—the emergence of self consciousness through the deeply biological, sensual and gestural levels of experience, all deeply felt; the felt responses to emerging from a non-changing world in the womb to the need to reach out for food and make other needs known. Learning how to deal with a changing environment, and otherness in terms of rela­tionship.

Childhood—learning the basics of motor, verbal and social skills, the very basics of physical and emotional indepen­dence. One faces here the finding of strength to escape the domination of mother—difficult, because one is dependent upon the parent in a very real way—and develop in the psyche a satisfying sexual connection. In dream imagery this means, for the male, an easy sexual relationship with female dream figures, and a means of dealing with male figures in competition (father); see sex in dreams.

The dream of the mystic beautiful woman precedes this, a female figure one blends with in an idealistic sense, but who is never sexual.

The conflict with father—really the internal struggle with one’s image of father as more potent than self—when re­solved becomes an acceptance of the power of one’s own manhood. Women face a slightly different situation.

The woman’s first deeply sensual and sexual love object—in a bonded parent-child relationship—was her mother. So be­neath any love she may develop for a man lies the love for a woman. Whereas a man, in sexual love which takes him deeply into his psyche, may realise he is making love to his mother, a woman in the same situation may find her father or her mother as the love object. In the unconscious motivations which lead one to choose a mate, a man is influenced by the relationship he developed with his mother, a woman is influ­enced by both mother and father in her choice. Example: ‘I went across the road to where my mother’s sister lived. I wanted to cuddle her and touch her bare breasts, but we never seemed to manage this. There were always interruptions or blocks.’ (Sid L).

At these deep levels of fantasy and desire, one has to recog­nise that the first sexual experience is—hopefully—at the mother’s breast. This can be transformed into later fantasies/ dreams/desires of penis in the mouth, or penis in the vagina, or penis as breast, mouth as vagina.

For most of us, however, growth towards maturity does not present itself in such primi­tively sexual ways, simply because we are largely unconscious of such factors. In general we face the task of building a self image out of the influences, rich or traumatic, of our experi­ence. We leam to stand, as well as we may, amidst the welter of impressions, ideas, influences and urges, which constitute our life and body. What we inherit, what we experience, and what we do with these creates who we are.

One of the major themes of individuation is the journey from attachment and dependence towards independence and involved detachment. This is an overall theme we mature in all our life. In its widest sense, it pertains to the fact that the origins of our consciousness lie in a non-differentiated state of being in which no sense of T exists. Out of this womb condi­tion we gradually develop an ego and personal choice. In fact we may swing to an extreme of egotism and materialistic feel­ings of independence from others and nature.

The observable beginnings of this move to independence are seen as our at­tempt to become independent of mother and father. But de­pendence has many faces: we may have a dependent relation­ship with husband or wife; we may depend upon our work or social status for our self confidence; our youth and good looks may be the things we depend upon for our sense of who we are, our self image. With the approach of middle and old age we will then face a crisis in which an independence from these factors is necessary for our psychological equilibnum.

The Hindu practice of becoming a sanyassin, leaving behind family, name, social standing, possessions, is one way of meeting the need for inner independence from these in order to meet old age and death in a positive manner. Most people face it in a quieter, less demonstrative way. Indeed, death might be thought of as the greatest challenge to our identifica­tion with body, family, worldly status and the external world as a means to identity. We leave this world naked except for the quality of our own being.

Meeting oneself, and self responsibility, are further themes of individuation.

The fact that our waking self is a small spot­light of awareness amidst a huge ocean of unconscious life processes creates a situation of tension, certainly a threshold or ‘iron curtain’, between the known and unknown.

If one imagines the spotlighted area of self as a place one is standing in, then individuation is the process of extending the bound­ary of awareness, or even turning the spotlight occasionally into the surrounding gloom. In this way one places together impressions of what the light had revealed of the landscape in which we stand, clues to how we got to be where we are, and how we relate to these. But one may remain, or choose to remain, largely unconscious of self.

The iron curtain may be defended with our desire not to know what really motivates us, what past hurts and angers we hide. It may be easier for us to live with an exterior God or authority than to recognise the ultimate need for self responsibility and self cultivation.

To hide from this, humanity has developed innumerable escape routes—extenonsed religious practice, making scapegoats of other minority groups or individuals, rigid belief in a political system or philosophy, search for samadhi or God as a final solution, suicide. This aspect of our matunng process shows itself as a paradox (common to maturity) of becoming more sceptical, and yet finding a deeper sense of self in its connec­tions with the cosmos. We lose God and the beliefs of humanity’s childhood, yet realise we are the God we searched for. This meeting with self, in all its deep feeling of connec­tion, its uncertainty, its vulnerable power, is not without pain and joy. Example: ‘On the railway platform milled hundreds of people, all men I think. They were all ragged, thin, dirty and unshaven. I knew I was among them. I looked up at the mountainside and there was a guard watching us. He was cruel looking, oriental, in green fatigues. On his peaked cap was a red star. He carried a machine gun. Then I looked at the men around me and I realised they were all me. Each one had my face. I was looking at myself. Then I felt fear and terror’ (Anon).

The last of the great themes of individuation is summed up in William Blake’s words ‘1 must Create a System, or be en- slav’d by another Man’s; I will not Reason and Compare: my business is to Create.’ A function observable in dreams is that of scanning our massive life experience (even a child’s life experience has millions of bits of information) to see what it says of life and survival. Out of this we unconsciously create a working philosophy of what life means to us. It is made up not only of what we have experienced and learnt in the gen­eral sense, but also from the hidden information in the cul­tural riches we have inherited from literature, music, art, the­atre and architecture.

The word hidden” is used because the unconscious ‘reads’ the symbolised information in these sources. It is, after all, the master of imagery in dreams. But unless we expand the boundaries of our awareness we may not know this inner philosopher.

If we do get to know it through dreams, we will be amazed by the beauty of its in­sight into everyday human life.

In connection with this there is an urge to be, and perhaps to procreate oneself in the world. Sometimes this is experi­enced as a sense of frustration—that there is more of us than we have been able to express, or to make real. While physical procreation can be seen as a physical survival urge, this drive to create in other spheres may be an urge to survive death as an identity. Dreams frequently present the idea that our sur­vival of death only comes about from what we have given of ourself to others. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

New American Dream Dictionary

1. Disgust about something or someone.

2. Emergence of innermost feelings or anger. ... New American Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

In most ancient cultures, consider­ation and even veneration of dreams played a great pan. Some groups felt that dream life was more real and imponant than waking life. Not only were dreams looked to for information about hunting (Eskimo groups), but also for ways of healing physical and psychological ills (Greek dream temples) and insights into the medicinal properties of herbs, barks and clays (African tribal witchdoctors). Common to most of these groups, and evident in the Old Testament, was also the sense that through dreams one had awareness of the transcendental or supersensible. St Peter’s dream of the sheet and unclean animals was a turning point in the history of western socicty —as was Constantine’s dream of his victory if he used the symbol of Christianity.

At its most fundamental, the human religious sense emerges out of several factors. One is the awareness of ex­isting amidst external and internal forces of nature which cause us to feel vulnerable and perhaps powerless. Such natu­ral processes as illness, death, growth and decay, earthquakes, the seasons, confront us with things which are often beyond our ability to control. Considenng the information and re­sources of the times, one of religion’s main functions in the past was the attempted control of the ‘uncertain’ factors in human life, and help towards psychological adjustment to vali­ne rability. Religions were the first social programmes aiding the human need for help and support towards emotional, mental, physical and social health and maturity. Even if prim­itive, such programmes helped groups of people to gain a common identity and live in reasonable harmony together. Like a computer program which is specific to a particular business, such programmes were specific to a particular group, and so are outdated in today’s need for greater integra­tion with other races. Religions also offered some sort of con­cept of and connection with the roots of being.

Example: ‘For two nights running I have dreamt the same nightmare. I am in a chapel walking down the first flight of several flights of steps when I hear loud noises behind me. I am told to run, being warned of the soldiers who ride the cavalry horses nght down the steps, and who run you over if you are in their way.

The horses are fierce and they absolutely race down the steps at the same time every day, and you literally have to lock yourself away in a nearby room which is a long way down the chapel. I ran into the room hearing the pounding of the horses’ hooves. It was a terrible pandemo­nium in that chapel. In the room were school children the same age as me and some perhaps younger’ (Maria H). Maria, who is 16, in describing her dream says she had recently been confronted with whether to have a sexual relationship with her boyfriend. Religion, represented by the chapel, is Maria’s way of locking out her powerful sexual urges. Many dreams show that religion, as a set of beliefs, is used as a way of avoiding anxiety in the face of life’s uncertainties.

For many people, the rigid belief system helps them to avoid uncertainty in making decisions.

Dreams also portray and define the aspect of human expe­rience in which we sense a kinship with all life forms. This is the side of spiritual expenence through which we find a con­nection with the roots of our being. While awake we might see the birth of a colt and feel the wonder of emergence and newness; the struggle to stand up and survive, the miracle of physical and sexual power which can be accepted or feared. In looking in the faces of fellow men and women we see something of what they have done in this strange and painful wonder we call life. We see whether they have been crushed by the forces confronting them; whether they have become ngid; or whether, through some common miracle, they have been able to carry into their mature years the laughter, the crying, the joy, the ability to feel pain, that are the very signs of life within the human soul. These things are sensed by us all, but seldom organised into a comprehensive view of life, and an extraction of meaning. Often it is only in our dreams, through the ability the unconscious has to draw out the signif­icance of such widely divergent expenences, that we glimpse the unity behind phenomena which is an essential of spiritual life, i.e. we all have a life, we breathe, we have come from a mother, so share a universal experience.

Example: To quote J.B. Priestley from his book Rain Upon Godshill: ‘Just before I went to Amenca, dunng the exhausting weeks when I was busy with my Time Plays, I had such a dream, and I think it left a greater impression on my mind than any experience I had ever known before, awake or in dreams, and said more to me about this life than any book I have ever read.

The setting of the dream was quite simple, and owed something to the fact that not long before my wife had visiied the lighthouse here at St Catherine’s to do some bird ringing. I dreamt I was standing at the top of a very high tower, alone, looking down upon myriads of birds all flying in one direction; every kind of bird was there, all the birds in the world. It was a noble sight, this vast aerial river of birds. But now in some mysterious fashion the gear was changed, and time speeded up, so that I saw generations of birds, watched them break their shells, flutter into life, mate, weaken, falter and die. Wings grew only to crumble; bodies were sleek, and then, in a flash bled and shrivelled; and death struck every­where at every second. What was the use of all this blind struggle towards life, this eager trying of wings, this hurried mating, this flight and surge, all this gigantic meaningless ef­fort? As I stared down, seeming to see every creature’s ignoble little history almost at a glance, I felt sick at heart. It would be better if not one of them, if not one of us, had been bom, if the struggle ceased for ever. I stood on my tower, still alone, desperately unhappy. But now the gear was changed again, and the time went faster still, and it was rushing by at such a rate, that the birds could not show any movement, but were like an enormous plain sown with feathers. But along this plain, flickering through the bodies themselves, there now passed a sort of white flame, trembling, dancing, then hurry­ing on; and as soon as I saw it I knew that this white flame was life itself, the very quintessence of being; and then it came to me, in a rocket burst of ecstasy, that nothing mattered, nothing could ever matter, because nothing else was real but this quivering and hurrying lambency of being. Birds, men and creatures not yet shaped and coloured, all were of no account except so far as this flame of life travelled through them. It left nothing to mourn over behind it, what I had thought was tragedy was mere emptiness or a shadow show; for now all real feeling was caught and purified and danced on ecstatically with the white flame of life. I had never before felt such deep happiness as I knew at the end of my dream of the tower and the birds.’

Some Nonh American Indians developed the totem out of similar processes. In one generation a person might learn to plant a seed and eat the results. Later someone might see that through fertilisation more food was produced. Still later some­one found that by irrigating, still more improvement was made. No one individual was responsible for such vital cul­tural information, and the collective information is bigger than any one person, yet individuals can partake of it and add to it.

The totem represented such subtle realities, as it might in a modem dream; as Christ might in today’s unconscious. That older cultures venerated their collective information, and that modem humans seem largely apathetic to it, shows how our ‘religion’ has degenerated. Yet utilising the power of the unconscious to portray the subtle influences which impinge upon us, and building the information gained into our re­sponse to life, is deeply important.

With the growth of authoritarian structures in western reli­gion, and the dominance of the rational mind over feeling values, dreams have been pushed into the background. With this change has developed the sense that visionary dreams were something which ‘superstitious* cultural groups had in the past. Yet thoroughly modem men and women still meet Christ powerfully in dreams and visions. Christ still appears to them as a living being.

The transcendental, the collective or universal enters their life just as frequently as ever before. Sometimes it enters with insistence and power, because a too rational mind has led to an unbalance in the psyche—a bal­ance in which the waking and rational individuality is one pole, and the feeling, connective awareness of the uncon­scious is the other.

Although it is tempting to think of the transcendent as ethereal or unreal, the religious in dreams is nearly always a symbol for the major processes of maturing in human life. We are the hero/ine who meets the dangers of life outside the womb, who faces growth, ageing and death.

The awe and deep emotions we unconsciously feel about such heroic deeds are depicted by religious emotion.

See angel; Christ, rebirth and Devil under archetypes; church; evil; fish, sea creatures; example in whale under fish, sea creatures; heaven, hell; sweets under food; dream as spiritual guide. See also hero/ine; mass; masturbation; old; paralysis; colours; sheep under animals. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Day of Reckoning; Day of Resurrection; Last Day; Reckoning; Rising of the dead; Trumpet of Resurrection) Seeing the Day of Resurrection, or Doomsday in a dream is a serious warning for a sinner, or it could represent a warning for someone who is contemplating a sinful act. Seeing the Day of Resurrection in a dream also denotes justice. Being the only person resurrected on such a day means one’s death. Standing up awaiting one’s judgement on the Day of Resurrection in a dream means travels.

If one sees himself and his wife being the only people who are brought for judgement of the grand Day of Gathering in a dream, it means that he is being unjust. Ifa warrior sees the Day of Resurrection in a dream, it means that by God’s decree, the aggressor shall be defeated.

The land of the grand gathering in a dream represents a chaste woman or a noble man.

The blowing of the Trumpet of Resurrection in a dream represents the salvation of the righteous ones. Seeing any of the great extraordinary events or signs that shall precede the Dayof resurrection in a dream means glad tidings for a believer who does good, and a warning for a disbeliever to correct himself and repent for his sins before its coming. Seeing the Day of Resurrection in a dream also denotes that some of the major signs are actually taking place, such as blood shedding, spread of evil, belligerence of atheism, pride about wealth, ruling of the working class, building high rises, the end of the era of kings on earth, or it could remind the person of the prophesied signs, such as the rising of the sun from the West, the emergence of a beast that will speak with a human tongue, the rising of the Imposter (arb. Dajjiil, Antichrist), etcetera. Seeing the Day of Resurrection in a dream also represents the spread of evil, the presence of an extended police force, and the ruling of large armies and dictatorships around the world. Thus, seeing the Day of Resurrection in a dream is a reminder and a warning to the one who sees it. Ifone sees the graves splitting open, dead people resurrected back to life and are walking out of them accompanied with their angels in a dream, it means that justice will prevail in that land.

If one experiences the resurrection in a dream, then discovers that the world went back to continue its prior course, it means that justice will dominate that land for a while, then it will be followed by a tyranny that will be carried by people who are not even suspected to be of such character. Such a dream also could be interpreted to suit a person who is seeking the impossible, or one who is adamant at pursuing the path of wrongdoing, falsehood and lies. Recognizing the eminent final signs of the Day of Reckoning in a dream means that one is unaware of his heedlessness and such dream constitutes a warning. Ifone’s reckoning is easy in a dream, it denotes his wife’s piety, compassion and love for him.

If one’s reckoning is detailed and painful in a dream, then it represents major losses.

If one’s good deeds weigh heavier than his bad deeds in the dream, it means that his devotion is true and that his reward will be greater. Ifone sees himselfcarrying the scale to weigh his own deeds in a dream, it denotes his righteousness and correctness.

If one sees an angel handing him his records and telling him to read his own book in the dream, it also means that he is on the right path. Walking on the bridge of the Day of Judgment, carrying one’s own records and crying in a dream means that one is praying for God’s forgiveness and to ease his reckoning.

If one sees the Doomsday in a dream, it means that he will escape from dangerous enemies, or that perhaps a major trial will befall the dwellers of that place.

If one crosses the Bridge of Judgement in a dream, it means that he will escape a major trial, or perhaps it could represent a major hurdle one may have to cross in this life.

If one sees himself carrying his book of records in his right hand in a dream, it means that he will win righteousness, wealth and honor. Ifone sees himselfcarrying his book of records in his left hand in a dream, it means that he will fall into sin and the consequent poverty and need of others, for wealth and adultery do not mix. Ifone witnesses the emergence of the Imposter (Antichrist) in a dream, it signifies new trends, innovations and masses straying from the straight path. (Also see Intercession; Reckoning; Rising of the dead; Trumpet of Resurrection)... Islamic Dream Interpretation