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Enormous | The Dream Meanings

Keywords of this dream: Enormous

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dreams often represent learning as an organic pro­cess. Ideas are taken in, digested, then form pan of an organic whole in an integrated system. Seeing something absorbed in a dream may represent the taking in of ideas, or even poison­ous feelings, depending upon what the dream images are.

abyss If feared, fear of losing control, failure; loss of iden­tity; death. Without fear going beyond the boundaries of one’s own limitations, concepts, present experience. Literally it is an entrance into enormous potential, the as yet unformed.

The ability to do this gives tremendous liberation to the dreamer, freeing them from restricting rigid concepts or habits of thinking, responding and relating. See falling. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Considering that our being has emerged from the tiny combination of sperm and ovum, a huge growth has emerged from a tiny beginning. This potential is frequently represented by the acorn or a seed. Even when adult, there is still enormous potential. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Can represent a world of experience human beings have lost and feel sorrow at its absence. In developing self con­sciousness, with its labyrinth of ideas and decisions, humans lost a sense of oneness with life around them. Animals have enormous remembered wisdom; remembered through instincts and complex social codes. This wisdom is still accessible to humans who can listen to the unconscious, and discover the enormous wealth of information they have about such things as social behaviour and body language.

The ape can depict this wisdom, especially if it is white haired. Or it might show the personal folly of trying to let instincts dominate us now we have self awareness. Idioms: he is just aping. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Although the word archetype has a long history, Carl Jung used it to express something he observed in human dreams. He said the archetypes are a tendency or instinctive trend in the human unconscious to represent certain motifs or themes. As our instinctive urge to reproduce may show itself in consciousness as sexual fantasies, so archetypes show themselves as cenain dream, fantasy, or story themes. Just as each individual animal does not create its own instincts, we do not create our own collective thought pattern.

The influ­ence these archetypes have upon our conscious self is varied. Panly they are supportive, as instincts are to an animal.

Some ancient cultures erected a pantheon of gods and god­desses. Many of these gods were expressions of archetypal themes, such as death, rebirth and womanhood.

A sheepdog has in itself, unconsciously, a propensity to herd animals un­der direction. Through the worship of gods, perhaps ancient people touched similar reservoirs of strength and healing. Without such, the individual might find it mcre difficult to face the fact that death waits at the end of their life, or to allow sexuality to emerge into their life at pube ty.

The dream of a girl suffering from anorexia shows her cutting off her own breasts with scissors. Here her developing sexual traits and urges are unacceptable to her. Perhaps she ‘cuts them off’ by not eating, thus preventing her body and psyche from matur­ing. In the past it would have been recommended that she give offerings to a goddess, thus aligning her with an uncon­scious power to adapt and mature.

Some of these archetypal patterns of behaviour, such as territorialism and group identity, are only too obviously be­hind much that occurs in war, and their influence needs to be brought more fully into awareness. But we must be careful in accepting Jung s descnption of the archetypes. In more recent years, through the tremendously amplified access to the un­conscious made possible in psychiatry through such drugs as LSD, a lot more information about unconscious imagery has been made available. It is possible thai certain synthesising aspects of the mind produce images to represent huge areas of collected experience, i.e. the Mystic Mother or Madonna rep­resenting our collected experience of our mother.

Whatever may be the explanation of these archetypal themes, they are imponant because they illustrate how we as individuals, and as human beings collectively, have been able to develop^ur sense of conscious identity amidst enormous forces of unconsciousness, collectivity and external stresses. Below are some common archetypal symbols and their associ­ated images. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dreamers Dictionary

Depth Psychology: The symbol of Aries, the “horned” animal, the ram, represents masculinity and strength, but also enormous will power, courage, a certain toughness, patience—and, if the Aric*> ib a man, sexual vigor. Y’ou either have most of these qualities already or need to practice them. See Mars, Planets.... Dreamers Dictionary

Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

It is good to dream of a banquet. Friends will wait to do you favors.

To dream of yourself, together with many gaily-attired guests, eating from costly plate and drinking wine of fabulous price and age, foretells enormous gain in enterprises of every nature, and happiness among friends.

To see inharmonious influences, strange and grotesque faces or empty tables, is ominous of grave misunderstandings or disappointments. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Depends which skin colour one has.

If white: one’s natural drives, feelings about coloured people; or if per­son is known, what you feel about them.

If black or brown: one’s own cultural feelings; same as any person’ dream.

Example: \ was in a cubicle or small toilet with a very black coloured woman. She told me there was something wrong with her vagina. She was undressed. I rubbed her va­gina and we both felt enormous passion. I then awoke but couldn’t at first remember the dream. I have refrained from sexual intercourse for some weeks, as I always feel shattered/ tired afterwards. Anyway I woke very wet, yet couldn’t re­member any orgasm. I could remember some question of sex as I awoke. Then I remembered the dream and continued it in fantasy. I experienced powerful urges to find a woman to have a non-committed sexual relationship with. But in the end I wanted to share my feelings with my wife, but she seemed deep asleep and unresponsive. When I slept again I dreamt I was in London, had got off one bus, but was not at any desti­nation. I was standing about not making a move to find my direction. Then I began to look’ (Alfred C).

To understand this dream in some depth it is helpful to think of a sexual drive as a flow, like a river. As such it can be blocked, in which case it will seek an alternative route. Sexual energy or flow is not simply a mechanical thing, ihough; it is also deeply feeling in its connection with the most profound sides of hu­man life such as parenthood and the canng and providing for young. In the history of white people a great deal of sexual frustration has arisen out of the ideas of sin and guilt in their religion.

A view arose for the white race that the black races had an easier and less frustrating relationship with the natural —which includes not only sexuality but the body as a whole, and nature also. So when Alfred dreams of the black woman, he is meeting what is natural and flowing in himself, but which he has blocked by his will because he felt shattered after sex.

The pan about the bus shows him trying to find a direction in which his sexual feelings could move satisfyingly in connection with other people.

Unfonunately, as Jung points out in Man and His Symbols, people in modern society, whether black, yellow, brown or white, have lost their sense of nature and the cosmos as being anything other than processes without consciousness or living feeling. Jung says. No river contains a spirit, no tree is the life principle of a man. no snake the embodiment of wisdom. No voice now speaks to man from stones, plants, and animals, nor does he speak to them believing they can hear.’ The im­portance of such dreams as Arthur’s is that it shows the pas­sionate relationship between our personality and the pnmitive and natural.

A black person, born and bred in a modern setting, would most likely dream of a black bushman to depict their own natural drives. See identity and dreams; Africa; sex in dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of a blackberry symbolize forbidden fruit and/or passion that you cannot express in the light of day. Dreams of a phone/organizer/address book represents that you are realizing the enormous power you have in the palm of your hand. See Fruit and World Wide Web.... Strangest Dream Explanations

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Careful research into speech shows that we constantly use a miracle of mental functioning in communi­cating with each other. Each sentence we hear spoken under­goes enormous forms of analysis. Each word is taken and a meaning sought. This is compared with other meanings, de­pending on context in sentence, conversational direction, speaker and speaker’s tone. At unbelievable speed, we formu­late our response, with similar search and comparisons, as well as filters controlling social situation, mood, status of per­son being addressed, and so on. All this takes place with almost no awareness, so we can think of it as a process of the unconscious. Factors which govern subjects spoken of and choice of words are also largely unconscious. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘I keep in touch with an old boyfriend who I have not seen since I was 18, which is 14 years ago. In my dream I was on holiday on a coach which stopped at the crossroads. I met my old boyfriend who had come from the other direction and we walked together. I felt enormous plea­sure being in his company again.

A hearse passed us slowly with a child’s coffin’ (Mrs R). Crossroads represent decisions, as in the example. In trying to decide what direction to take, Mrs R still finds emotions tie her to the past, but the dead child shows she really knows the relationship has ended. Crossroads also have a certain amount of anxiety involved, as with crossing. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

This large, mystical creature may represent large and mystical forces inside of you. In the Far East it is believed that the dragons are spiritual creatures that navigate through the air and through the sky. In the West, dragons are considered to be dangerous creatures that need to be destroyed. As far as dream symbols go, the dragon may represent the enormous power in your unconscious. It could symbolize repressed unconscious material, including fear. However, the dragon in our dreams is generally a positive symbol. It may represent a period of time when the dreamer will confront his fears and empower himself to effectively cope with negative emotions, extreme materialism, and be able to obtain greater inner and outer freedom.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Little Giant Encyclopedia

Enormous event, severe emotional upset; often hinting at self-destructive energies. Sign of general insecurity.

According to Jung, always a blow to one’s point of view or convictions. Something confronting you can only be handled if you totally abandon your old convictions. In that sense, this dream symbol is always a sign of getting another chance and making a new beginning.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of an earthquake represent enormous change and transformation taking place in the foundation of your life. Your belief systems are being rattled, perhaps so that you can find what is truly solid within you. See Breakdown/Breakthrough Dreams... Strangest Dream Explanations

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Satisfying one’s needs or hunger’. This can be any area of need, such as emotional, mental, sexual, depending on dream context. Example: I am putting four of our puppies under the grill and cooking them’ (Maureen). Although Mau­reen hasn’t eaten her puppies yet, her dream illustrates how food is used to represent emotional needs. Maureen is child­less, has a lot of mother love, planned the pregnancy of her bitch, and gets enormous satisfaction from rearing the pup­pies. She is literally hungry for the exchange of love and care she finds in dealing with her puppies.

Occasionally shows information about actual nutritional needs or physical allergies. Also, to eat is to continue involve­ment in the fundamental processes of life, a celebration of interdependence.

To not eat: shows a conflict with the physi­cal reality of one’s body and its needs, an avoidance of growth or change; an attempt to be isolated from others, reality, the whole. Avoiding cenain foods: expression of decision making in dealing with needs; food allergy. Giving food to others: giving of oneself to others, or nunuring some aspect of one­self. Eating objects or repulsive food: meeting objectionable experiences; trying to ‘stomach’ things which make you ‘sick’.

Example: 1 ran into a house and came face to face with a huge stag. I noted the open back door, whereupon he staned eating my leg. I was pushing against his horns and managed to stop him chewing me’ (Jasmine C). Being eaten : the first pan of Jasmine’s dream (not quoted) is obviously sexual. Be­ing eaten therefore suggests she is being consumed by her sexual drive. Being eaten, especially if it is the face, also shows how our identity, or our fragile sense of self, is feeling attacked by emotions or fears, other people, or internal dnves.

The classic story of Jonah illustrates this, and shows how the conscious personality needs to develop a working relationship with the unconscious. Eaten by dogs, maggots: feelings about death. See food. Sec also dog under animals; individuation. Idioms: eaten away; eat din; eat humble pie; eat like a horse; eat one’s hean out, eat one’s words; eat out of one’s hand; eat you out of house and home; what’s eating you?; proof of the pudding is in the eating; dog eat dog. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: I was in a cubicle or small toilet with a very black coloured woman. She told me there was something wrong with her vagina. She was undressed. I rubbed her vagina and we both felt enormous passion. I then woke but couldn’t at first remember the dream. I have re­frained from sexual intercourse for some weeks, as I always feel shattered/tired afterwards. Anyway I awoke very wet, yet couldn’t remember any ejaculation. Then I remembered the dream and continued it in fantasy. I experienced powerful urges to find a woman to have a non-committed sexual rela­tionship with. But in the end I wanted to share my feelings with my wife, but she seemed deep asleep’ (Alan P).

The example shows how our sexual needs attempt to satisfy them­selves even though we may make a conscious attempt to deny them.

The ejaculation, male or female, shows the sexual na­ture of one’s dream, even if the symbols seem to have no obvious connection.

The attitudes in one’s dream also show something of our relationship to sex. This may be mechanical, fearful, loving, etc. Alan sees sex as a problem to be solved, and has difficulties around commitment. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The enormous potential power of life, in growth and activity.

If we run from the elephant we are afraid of our own strength or inner drive. Idioms: white elephant; pink elephants; rogue elephant. See the self under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

From our family we leam most of the positive and negative patterns of relationship and attitudes towards living, which we carry into daily events. Father’s uncertainty in deal­ing with people, or his anxiety in meeting change, may be the roots of our own difficulties in those areas.

If our mother is unable to develop a feeling contact with us, we may lack the confidence to meet our emotions.

Our maturation as a man or woman calls us in some way to meet and integrate our childhood desire, which includes sexual desire for our parent of the opposite sex, and rivalry with, mingled with dependence on, the parent of the same sex. Even a missing parent, the mother or father who died or left, is a potent figure internally.

An absence of a father’s or mother’s love or presence can be as traumatic as any power­fully injuring event. Our parents in our dreams are the image (full of power and feeling) of the formative forces and experi­ences of our identity. They are the ground, the soil, the bloody carnage, out of which our sense of self emerged. But our iden­tity cannot gain any real independence while still dominated by these internal forces of our creation. Heraclitus said we cannot swim in the same river twice; attempting to repeat or compete with the vinues of a parent is a misapprehension of the true nature of our own personality. Sec individuation.

Family group: The whole background of experience which makes up our values and views. This background is made up of thousands of different obvious and subtle things such as social status; amount of books in the home; how parents feel about themselves; how they relate to life outside the family; whether dominant roles are encouraged; what nationality par­ents are; what unconscious social attitudes surround the fam­ily (i.e. the master and servant, or dominating employer and subservient employee, roles which typified England at the turn of the century still colour many attitudes in the UK). Simply put, it is our internal ‘family’ of urges and values; the overall feeling tone of our family life—security, domination, whatever it was, the unconscious coping patterns of the fam­ily.

Parents together in dream: our general wisdom, back­ground of information and experience from which we make important decisions or gain intuitive insights. Parents also de­pict the rules and often irrational disciplinary codes we learnt as a child which still speak to us from within, and perhaps pass on to our own children without reassessment. These in­clude everything from ‘Don’t speak with your mouth full’ to the unspoken Masturbation is unholy/

Dead parent in dream: the beginning of independence from parent; repression of the emotions they engendered in us, our emotions regarding our parent’s death; feelings about death. See dead people dreams.

Example: ‘My father was giving me and another woman some medicine. Something was being forced on us. I started to hit and punch him in the genitals and, when he was facing the other way, in the backside. I seemed to be just the right height to do this and I had a very angry feeling that I wanted to hurt him as he had hurt me’ (Audrey V). Hurting, burying , killing parent: in the example Audrey’s height shows her as a child. She is releasing anger about the attitudes and situations her father forced down her throat’.

To be free of the intro­verted restraints and ready made values gathered from our parents, at some time in our growth we may kill or bury them. Although some people arc shocked by such dreams, they are healthy signs of emerging independence. Old myths of killing the chief so the tribe can have a new leader depict this pro­cess. When father or mother are dead’ in our dream, we can inherit all the power gained from whatever was positive in the relationship. Seeing parent drunk, incapable, foolish: another means of gaining independence from internalised values or stultifying drives to ‘honour’ or admire father or mother.

father

Generally positive: authority; ability in the external world; family or social conventions, how we relate to the ‘doer’ in us; physical strength and protectiveness; the will to be. Generally negative: introvened aggression; dominance by fear of other people’s authority, uncaring sexual drive; feelings of not being loved. See father under archetypes; man.

mother

Generally positive: feelings; ability in relationships; uniting spirit of family; how we relate to feelings in a relation­ship; strength to give of self and nunure; intuition. Generally negative: will based on irrational likes and dislikes; opinion generated by anxiety or jealousy; domination by emotions; lack of bonding. See Great Mother under archetypes; woman.

siblings and children

Whether brother, sister, daughter or son (see below in this entry), the most general use in our dreams is to depict an aspect of ourself. However it is almost universal to believe with great conviction that our dream is about the person in our dream.

A mother seeing a son die in her dream often goes through great anxiety because there lurks in her a sense of it being a precognitive dream. Vinually everyone at some time dreams about members of their close family dying or being killed—lots of mothers dream this, and their chil­dren live till 80. But occasionally children do die. Is the dream then precognitive, or is it coincidental?

Example: ‘I was walking along a rather dusty track carrying my younger son who would be around 10 months old and I was feeling rather tired. Suddenly I met a man who stopped to talk to me and commented I looked rather weary carrying the baby. He said, come with me and look over this wall and you will see such a sight that will gladden your hean. By standing on tiptoe I could just see over the wall and the sight I beheld took my breath away, it was so beautiful’ (Johan E). Here Johan’s son depicts the weight of responsibility she feels.

The beauty is her own resources of strength in motherhood.

Example: ‘I have just given binh to twins and they lay on the floor. We started to care for them. My mother took them to the doctor for his advice while I went to see my married sister who has two children. I met them there with the twins so that my sister could give her opinion on the babies. She had recent experience of childbirth and could tell us if the babies were good specimens’ (Miss E). Miss E has no children of her own, so she is uncertain of her own capacity to have and raise them.

The mother depicts her own mothering abilities, which seek confidence from an authority figure. Her sister is her own nearest experience of childbirth. So out of what she has leamt from observing her sister, she is assessing her own qualities.

Most often the family member depicts the qualities in our­self which we feel are part of the character of the person dreamt of. So the passionate one in the family would depict our passions; the intellectual one our own mind, the anxious one our hesitations. Use the questions in dream processing to define this. Having done this, can you observe what the dream depicts? For Miss E it would be questions regarding mother­hood.

Example: ‘My daughter told me the only positive part of my work in a helping profession was with a woman who had turned from it to religion. There followed a long and powerful interchange in which I said she had as yet no mind of her own. She was dominated by her mother’s anxiety, and the medical rationalism of her training. When she had dared to step beyond her own anxieties to integrate the lessons of her own life, then I would listen again’ (Desmond S). Desmond was divorced and struggling with his own pain and guilt about leaving his daughter while still a teenager. His daughter de­picts this conflict between his feelings and his rational self.

brother

Oneself, or the denied pan of self, meeting whatever is met in the dream; feelings of kinship; sense of rivalry, feel­ings about a brother. Woman’s dream, younger brother: out­going but vulnerable self; rivalry. Woman’s dream, older brother, authority, one’s capable outgoing self. Man’s dream, younger brother: vulnerable feelings; oneself at that age. Man’s dream, older brother: experience; authority, feelings of persecution. See boy; man. Idioms: big brother, brothers in arms; blood brother.

sister

Feeling self, or the lesser expressed pan of self; rival; feelings about a sister. Man s dream, younger sister: vulnera­ble emotions; rival for love of parents. Man’s dream, older sister: capable feeling self; feelings of persecution. Woman’s dream , younger sister: one’s experiences at that age; vulnera­ble feelings, rival for parents’ love. Woman’s dream, older sister: capable feeling self. See girl; woman. Idioms: sisters under the skin.

daughter

One’s relationship with the daughter, the daughter, or son, can represent what happens in a marnage between husband and wife.

The child is what has arisen from the bonding, however momentary, of two people. In dreams the child therefore is sometimes used to depict how the relation­ship is faring. So a sick daughter might show the feelings in the relationship being ‘ill’.

In a mother’s dream: often feelings of suppon or compan­ionship; feelings of not being alone in the area of emotional bonds; or one’s feeling area; responsibility; the ties of parent­hood; oneself at that age; one’s own urges, difficulties, hurts, which may still be operative. Also a comparison; the mother might see the daughter’s youth, opportunity, and have feelings about that. So the daughter may represent her sense of lost opportunity and youth—even envy, competition in getting the desire of a man.

In a father’s dream: one’s feeling self, the feelings or diffi­culties about the relationship with daughter; the struggles one’s own feeling self goes through to mature, how the sexual feelings are dealt with in a family—occurs especially when she starts courting; sister, parental responsibility; one’s wife when younger. Someone else’s daughter: feelings about one’s own daughter, feelings about younger women.

Example: 1 am standing outside a supermarket with heavy bags wearing my mac, though the sun is warm. My daughter and two friends are playing music and everyone stops to lis­ten. I start to wnte a song for them, but they pack up and go on a bus whilst I am still writing. I am left alone at the bus stop with my heavy burden of shopping, feeling incredibly unwanted’ (Mrs F). Such dreams of the daughter becoming independent can occur as soon as the child starts school, per­sisting until the mother finds a new attitude. See child; woman.

son

Extroverted self; desires connected with self expression; feelings connected with son; parental responsibility. Mother’s dream: one’s ambitions; potential, hopes; your marriage—see example.

Example: ‘My wife and I were walking out in the country­side. I looked around suddenly and saw my four-year-old son near a hole. He fell in and I raced back.

The hole was narrow but very deep. I could see water at the bottom but no sign of my son. I didn’t know whether I could leap down and save him or whether it was too narrow. Then somehow he was out. His heart was just beating’ (Richard H). Richard had argued with his wife in such a way he feared the stability of their marriage.

The son represents what they had created together —a child, a marriage.

The marriage survived, as his dream self-assessed it would. Death of son: a mother often kills off her son in her dreams as she sees him make moves towards independence. This can happen from the first day of school on. Example: T am on a very high bridge over an extremely wide and deep river with steep banks. My son does a double somersault over the railing, falls into the water. I think he is showing off. I am unable to save him. My son is 18 and has staned a structural engineering course at university’ (Joyce H).

The showing-off suggests Joyce feels her son is doing daring things with his life, and the relationship in its old form dies.

Father’s dream: yourself at that age; what qualities you see in your son; your own possibilities, envy of youth and oppor­tunities; nvalry. Someone else’s son: feelings about one’s own son; feelings about younger men. Dead son: see dead people dreams. Sec boy. See also man; first example in falling.

wife

Depicts how you see the relationship with your wife; your relationship with your sexuality; sexual and emotional desire and pleasure; how you relate to intimacy in body, mind and spirit; your feeling, intuitive nature; habits of relationship developed with one’s mother. Example: ‘My wife was trying to get me out of her life, and out of the house. It was as if she were attempting to push me into a feeling of tension and rejection which would make me leave’ (David P). Out of childhood experience, in which his mother repeatedly threat­ened to give him away, David was finding it difficult to com­mit himself emotionally to his wife. In the dream his wife represents these feelings, so he sees her—his anxiety and pain —pushing him to break up the marriage.

Example: I was standing with my wife at the end of the garden of the house I lived in as a child. We were looking over the fence to the rising meadow beyond. She said, “Look at that bird in the tree there.” On our right, in a small ash tree, an enormous owl perched. It was at least 4 feet high, the biggest bird I have ever seen. I recognised it in the dream as a greater hooded owl, which was not native to our country. I was so excited I ran into the house to telephone someone— zoo, police, newspapers?—to tell them about the bird. I can­not remember contacting anyone, but felt the bird was there in some way to meet me. Also it was hungry and looking at next door’s bantams. So I wondered what I could give it to eat’ (David P). This shows the positive side of David’s rela­tionship with his wife.

The garden is the boundanes which arose from his childhood. But he is growing—the garden— and looking beyond them in connection with his marnage.

The amazing bird is the deep feelings he touches because he has a mate, like any other natural creature. Out of his mating he becomes aware of drives to build a home—nest—and give himself to his mate. These are natural and are a pan of his unconscious or spiritual nature.

The bird is a hooded owl which can see in the dark—the unconscious—because David is realising things he had never seen’ before.

The bird is masked, meaning putting the ego aside, which is a necessity for touching the wider dimension of life or the unconscious.

The hunger of the bird shows an intimate detail of what David has learnt from his wife. She had been working as a waitress and bringing home pieces of chicken for him, saved from her own meal.

The spiritual side of David wants to develop this quality of selfgiving, which his wife’s love had helped him see.

Example: ‘1 have been a widower since January 1979, hav­ing married in October 1941. I continually dream I am in London where my business was. I am walking the streets with my wife and suddenly I see her ahead of me in a yellow raincoat and hat. I call her and try to catch up, but suddenly she vanishes. In spite of calling and searching I cannot find her’ (Douglas G). This is a common theme dreamt by widow­ers or widows, disappearance of spouse. Douglas has ‘lost’ his wife. His dream shows the paradox of love after death of panner. His love is still there, years after her death. He is possibly still trying to love his wife as an externally real per­son. so his feelings can make no connection.

To meet what actually remains of his wife, within himself, he would need to face his own internal grieving, emotions, and all the feelings, memories, angers and beauty which make up the living re­mains of his wife within him. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

One s own potential, often unacknowl­edged, and projected on to dream character; a parent; depend­ing on how you relate to the famous person, your own ability to accept yourself as respected. Sometimes the person may, because of their life or roles, represent a particular quality such as courage, love, ‘ruling’ drives in life, authority, etc. Actor/actress: one is acting a role. Queen: often one s mother, a feeling or drive ruling your life. King: father, thinking.

Example: A film star I admire came and lay beside me in the night. He told me he loved me and would stay with me. I knew he was living with a woman who had borne his child, but he told me he was going to tell her he was leaving her. In the morning we walked along the road where I live, to tell the woman’ (Sharon). Sharon processed her dream and saw the film star as her own strength and determination to further her career as a dancer. Being 18 she was faced with the decision of whether to become a wife and mother—the other woman —or put those urges into her work. In her dream she chose to be fully involved in her dancing.

Famous people can be seen as social guinea pigs. Collec­tively we expose them to enormous amounts of money, sexual opportunity, drugs, alcohol, and tremendous social and com­mercial pressures. Then we examine every part of their life to see how well they cope. Millions then identify with the image they portray of how to deal with reality at its worst.

The fa­mous person in our dream might therefore represent our cop­ing mechanism. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

When Freud, as a qualified doctor and neurologist, became interested in psychology, it was still a branch of philosophy. He gave to it a geography of the human mind, showed the influence the unconscious has upon waking personality, and brought dreams to the attention of the scientific community. His book The Interpretation of Dreams was a turning point in bringing concepts on dreaming from a primitive level to alignment with modem thought. With enormous courage, and against much opposition, he showed the place sexuality has in the development of con­scious self awareness. Freud defined dreams as being:

1- Thoughts in pictures’—a process of thinking while asleep.

2-‘Ego alien’. They have a life and will which often appears to be other than our conscious will. This led older cultures to believe that dreams were sent by spirits or God.

3-‘Hallucinatory’. We believe the reality of the dream while in it.

4-‘Drama’. Dreams are not random images. They are ‘stage managed’ into very definite, sometimes recurring, themes and plots.

5-‘Moral standards’. Dreams have very different moral stan­dards than our waking personality.

6-‘Association of ideas’. In dreaming we have access to in­fant or other memories or experience we would find very difficult to recall while awake.

Freud originally said that one of the main functions of a dream was wish fulfilment, and an expression of the ‘primary process of human thinking’ unaffected by space, time and logic. Later, in considering recurring dreams which re-enact a recent traumatic incident, he agreed that dreams were not only an expression of the ‘pleasure principle’. W.H.R. Rivers, studying dreams connected with war neuroses, saw such dreams as attempts to resolve current emotional problems.

Although there is still controversy regarding whether there can be a valid ‘dream dictionary’, Freud himself saw dream symbols as having consistent meaning so frequently that one could attribute an interpretation to them independently of the dreamer’s associations. See abreaction; Adler, Alfred; birds; dream analysis; displacement; door; Fromm, Erich; halluci­nations and hallucinogens; hypnosis and dreams; Jung, Carl; lucidity; plot of dreams; wordplay and puns; secret of universe dreams; dream as therapist; unconscious. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The deeply unconscious psychobiological life processes which transformed us from a tadpole/sperm into an air- breathing frog/adult.

The enormous information such sym­bols hold if we explore them gives them their power. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Many experiments have been done using hypnosis in connection with dreams. In the early pan of this century Carl Schroetter hypnotised Miss E, a pharmacist, in an attempt to test Freud’s theory of symbol formation. He suggested Miss E would dream of having homosexual inter­course with a female friend, L.

The dream she subsequently reported was ‘1 sit in a small dirty cafe holding a tremendous French newspaper ...

A woman with a strong Yiddish ac­cent—L is Jewish—asks me twice, “Don’t you need any­thing?” I don’t answer . . . she comes a third time . . . I recognise her as my acquaintance. She holds a threadbare suitcase with a sticker on it that reads “For ladies only!” I leave the cafe with her . . . she hangs onto me which I find unpleasant but suffer it . . . Before her house she pulls out an enormous bunch of keys and gives one to me. “1 trust only you with it; it is the key to this case. You might like to use it. Just watch that my husband doesn’t get hold of it.” ‘ The dream contains several of the classical Freudian symbols of sex, such as the suitcase, the key and the phrase For ladies only’. Miss E had not, according to Schroetter, heard or read of Freud’s ideas.

Roffenstein, suspecting Miss E may have known something of Freudian ideas, chose ‘a 28-year-old, totally uneducated nursemaid of lower than average intelligence, who grew up and still lives in an uneducated milieu’. He suggested she dream of intercourse with her father. She reported: ‘I dreamt about my father, as if he had presented me with a great bag and with it he gave me a large key. It was a very large key. It looked like the key to a house. I had a sad feeling. I opened the bag. I snake jumped out against my mouth; I shrieked aloud.

More recent expenments are reponed by Woods and Greenhouse in New Wbrld of Dreams.

The suggestion was made to one subject that as a child she had wet the bed and her mother scolded her. That night she dreamt she fell into a pond in winter and her mother was angry.

An interesting aspect of these experiments is that another subject under hyp­nosis was told the dream and asked what it meant. Without hesitation she said. Oh, that girl must have wet the bed.’ This and other experiments suggest humans have an inherent, al­though perhaps unconscious, ability to understand the lan­guage of dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Such dreams very seldom refer to physical incest, but to the desires we carry from infancy to possess or be in con­trol of the love and body of our parents. As a baby we have a sense that nothing exists outside ourself; therefore everything should obey our desires. That it does not—that parents do other than what we need of them—is a shock which is a part of maturing. Our infant emotions, uncensored by social rules and self consciousness, are enormously powerful, and wher­ever unsatisfied or unresolved are stored unconsciously.

If we are to integrate the potential energy locked in these areas, we must meet some of the incestual desires and transform them into adult love. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

As can be seen from the entry on hypnosis, the dream process is quite amenable to suggestion and conscious influence. It is probably most helpful to think of this action as similar to the process of memory. In seeking information from memory we hold a question or idea in consciousness, the resulting associated memories or information being largely spontaneous.

The question held directs what information is taken from the enormous pool of memory.

A question might even call together scattered pieces of information which are then put together into a new composite, a new realisation. So the process is not only recall of existing memory, but also creative. It may also access skills, such as the ability to sub­tract one number from another. Because of these factors our conscious queries can influence the process of dreaming, causing them to respond. As dreams have access to our full memory, our creative potential as well as learnt skills, such response to concerns or queries are often of great value.

To make use of this, first consider the query as fully as possible while awake. Look at it from as many viewpoints as possible, talk it over with others. Make note of the areas that are already clear, and what still remains to be clarified. Just before going to sleep, use imagery to put your question to your unconscious resources. Imagine standing before a circle of gentle light—a symbol of one’s total self—and ask it for the information sought. Then, as if you have asked a question of a wise friend, create a relaxed state as if listening for the consid­ered reply. In most cases, dreams which follow will in some way be a response to what is sought, though not necessarily in the way imagined. See dream process as computer; creativity and problem solving in dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dreamers Dictionary

Vision: Seeing a lion: a certain friend sometimes looks dangerous. Being attacked by a lion: a warning of danger. Defeating the lion: you are eliminating an opponent. Looking at a caged lion: a powerful enemy has no way of attacking you right now, because you are protected. See Animal, Predator, Tiger.

Depth Psychology: The lion is a symbol of dignity and intensity. It has enormous energy; determination, and aggression toward others.

The dream means you might be afraid of these characteristics (in yourself as well as others) and it is a warning to better control your emotions.... Dreamers Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Sometimes in the practice of deep relaxation, meditation or sensory deprivation, our being enters into a state akin to sleep, yet we maintain a personal waking awareness. This is like a journey into a deep interior world of mind and body where our senses no longer function in their waking manner, where the brain works in a different way, and where awareness is introverted in a degree we do not usually experience. It can be a frightening world, simply because we are not accustomed to it. In a similar way a measure of waking awareness can arise while dreaming. This is called lucid dreaming. During it we can change or wilfully direct what is happening in the dream in a way not usual to the dream state.

Example: 4I had backed my car into a big yard, a commer­cial area. My wife, two of my sons and I got out of the car. As we stood in the yard talking I realised there was a motorbike where my car should be. I said to everyone, “There was a car here a moment ago, now it’s a motorbike. Do you know what that means? It means we are dreaming.” Mark my son was now with us, and my ex-wife. I asked them if they realised they were dreaming. They got very vague and didn’t reply. I asked them again and felt very clearly awake’ (William V). William’s is a fairly typical lucid dream, but there are features which it does not illustrate. During the days or weeks prior to a lucid dream, many people experience an increase in (lying dreams.

The next example shows another common feature.

Example: In many of my dreams I become aware that I am dreaming. Also, if anything unpleasant threatens me in the dream I get away from it by waking myself (Alan). Lucidity often has this feature of enabling the dreamer to avoid un­pleasant elements of the dream.

The decision to avoid any unpleasant internal emotions is a common feature of a per­son’s conscious life, so this aspect of lucidity is simply a way of taking such a decision into the dream. Some writers even suggest it as a way of dealing with frightening dreams. Avoid­ance does not solve the problem, it simply pushes the emo­tion deeper into the unconscious where it can do damage more surreptitiously. Recent findings regarding suppressed gnef and stress, which connects them with a higher incidence of cancer, suggests that suppression is not a healthy way of dealing with feelings.

Another approach to lucidity is that it can be a son of playground where one can walk through walls, jump from high buildings and fly, change the sofa into an attractive lover, and so on. True, the realisation that our dream life is a differ­ent world and that it does have completely different principles at work than our waking world is imponant. Often people introven into their dream life the morals and fears which are only relevant to being awake in physical life.

To avoid a charging bull is cenainly imponant in waking life. In our dream life, though, to meet its charge is to integrate the enor­mous energy which the bull represents, an energy which is our own but which we may have been avoiding or running away’ from previously. Realising such simple differences revolutionises the way we relate to our own internal events and possibilities.

To treat lucid dreams as if they offered no other attainable expenence than to manipulate the dream en­vironment, or avoid an encounter, is to miss an amazing fea­ture of human potential.

Example: ‘In my dream I was watching a fern grow. It was small but opened out very rapidly. As I watched I became aware that the fern was simply an image representing a pro­cess occurring within myself which I grew increasingly aware of as I watched. Then I was fully awake in my dream and realised that my dream, perhaps any dream, was an expres­sion of actual and real events occurring in my body and mind. I felt enormous excitement, as if I were witnessing something of great importance’ (Francis P). It is now acceptable, through the work of Freud, Jung and many others, to consider that within images of the dream lie valuable information about what is occurring within the dreamer, perhaps unconsciously. Strangely, though, it is almost never considered that one can have direct perception into this level of internal ‘events’ with­out the dream. What Francis describes is an experience of being on the cusp of symbols and direct perception. Consider­ing the enormous advantage of such direct information gath­ering, it is surprising it is seldom mentioned except in the writings of Corriere and Han, The Dream Makers.

Example: After defining why I had not woken in sleep recently, i.e. loss of belief, I had the following experience. I awoke in my sleep and began to see, without any symbols, that my attitudes and sleep movements expressed a feeling of restrained antagonism or irritation to my wife. I could also observe the feelings were arising from my discipline of sexual­ity. Realising I did not want those feelings I altered them and woke enough to turn towards her’ (Francis P). After the first of his direct perception dreams, Francis attempted to use this function again, resulting in the above, and other, such dreams. Just as classic dream interpretation says that the dream symbols represent psychobiological logical processes which might be uncovered by dream processing, what we see in Francis’ lucidity is a direct route to self insight, and through it a rapid personal growth to improved life experience. Such dreams provide not only psychological insight, but very fre­quently a direct perception of processes occurring in the body, as the following example illustrates.

Example: ‘Although deeply asleep I was wide awake with­out any shape or form. I had direct experience, without any pictures, of the action of the energies in my body. I had no awareness of body shape, only of the flow of activities in the organs. I checked over what I could observe, and noticed a tension in my neck was interfering with the flow and ex­change of energies between the head and trunk. It was also obvious from what I could see that the tension was due to an attitude I had to authority, and if the tension remained it could lead to physical ill health’ (Tony C).

An effective way to develop lucidity is frequently to con­sider the events of waking life as if they were a dream. Try to see events as one might see dream symbols. What do they mean in terms of one’s motivations, fears, personal growth? What do they suggest about oneself? For instance a person who works in a photographic darkroom developing films and prints might see they were trying to bnng to consciousness the latent—unconscious—side of themselves.

A banker might feel they were working at how best to deal with their sexual and personal resources. In this way one might actually apply what is said in this dream dictionary to one’s outer circumstances.

The second instruction is, on waking, at a convenient mo­ment, imagine oneself standing within one’s recent dream. As you get a sense of this dream environment, realise that you are taking waking awareness into the dream. From the standpoint of being fully aware of the dream action and events, what will you now do in and with the dream? Re-dream it with con­sciousness.

For example the things you run from in your nor­mal dreaming you could now face. See dream processing for fun her suggestions. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dreamers Dictionary

Vision: Looking at a mast: you have accomplished an enormous task and should be proud of yourself. You can start on a new project now.

If the mast is without sails: you still have hard work ahead before reaching the goal you have set for yourself.

A mast under sail means everything is going well. See Ship, Tree.

Depth Psychology: A mast is either a phallic symbol (and therefore about sexual desire) or a sign of a strong personality. You are walking with your head held high on a straight and narrow path. You won’t bend for anything.... Dreamers Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

This may be represented in a dream by such things as using a pump, beating a drum, or any rhythmic movement.

If there is a tendency to repress the sexual need, it may happen that one masturbates during sleep, in an attempt to release sexual pressure. Because the person has consciously decided not to allow sexuality, this might give rise to a feeling of being possessed by another will. In fact our unconscious will to express our needs has overridden the conscious deci­sion during sleep. Out of such a split in the person, ideas about devils and possession probably arose. Although Chris­tianity at a fundamental level appears to teach the love and acceptance of all sides of human nature—therefore integration through love thy neighbour as thyself, so love thyself—in practice it becomes tight morality which creates devils through rejection and splits in human nature. In many Chris­tians, there are enormous conflicts between sexuality, love, work and spirituality. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Being self responsible for state of mind; listen­ing to intuition and unconscious.

For people involved in any form of personal growth, they occasionally have a dream in which some form of instruction is given as an aid to their unfolding. Such dreams are worth following as the uncon­scious has the ability to sift and consider our collective experi­ence, and present what applies to our need.

Example: ‘While recovering from a major operation and experiencing enormous pain I dreamt my father—dead—ap­peared standing at the end of the bed, and he said in a very matter of fact voice, “Think of five pink bouquets.” My father would never have used those words, so the scene impressed itself on me. I therefore woke and tried to visualise the five bouquets. I managed to get three in a row, four, but I could not manage five until I had formed them into a diamond with one in the middle. When I achieved that my pain subsided, and did so each time I used the image—why I do not know’ (Ken S). Ken’s experience suggests a psychosomatic effect from his dream-proposed meditation. Such meditations often show ways to alter character attitudes or help find strength to make necessary changes in life. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The fundamental, primordial, sensual, slimy basis of life and how we relate to it; emotions which cause us to feel bogged down; past experience which may hold us back, but has enormous growth potential in it; the healing possibilities of our body and its minerals. Body dirty with mud: ill health; one’s life needs ‘cleaning up’ morally. Sinking into mud: sex­ual difficulties; feelings of hopelessness or despair. Idioms: mud slinging, drag somebody through the mud; a name is mud; stick-in-the-mud. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Many dreams lead us to feel an intensity of emotion we may seldom if ever feel in waking life.

If the emotions felt are frightening or disgusting we call the dream a nightmare. One of the common features of a nightmare is that we are desperately trying to get away from the situation; feel stuck in a terrible condition; or on waking feel enormous relief that it was just a dream. Because of the intensity of a nightmare we remember it long after other dreams; even if we seldom ever recall other dreams, even worry about what it means.

As so many dreams have been investigated in depth, using such varied approaches as hypnosis, exploration of associa­tions and emotional content, and LSD psychotherapy, in which the person can explore usually unconscious memories, imagery and feelings, we can be certain we know what night­mares are. They arise from six main causes.

Unconscious memories of intense emotions, such as those arising in a child being left in a hospital without its mother. Example: see second example in dark.

Intense anxiety produced—but not fully released at the time—by external situations such as involvement in war scenes, sexual assault (this applies to males as well as females, as they are frequently assaulted). Example: ‘A THING is marauding around the rather bleak, dark house I am in with a small boy.

To avoid it I lock myself in a room with the boy.

The THING finds the room and tries to break the door down. I frantically try to hold it closed with my hands and one foot pressed against it, my back against a wall for leverage. It was a terrible struggle and I woke myself by screaming’ (Terry F). When Terry allowed the sense of fear to arise in him while awake, he felt as he did when a child—the boy in the dream—during the bombing of the Second World War. His sense of insecurity dating from that time had emerged when he left a secure job, and had arisen in the images of the nightmare. Un­derstanding his fears, he was able to avoid their usual paralysing influence.

Childhood fears, such as loss of parent, being lost or abandoned, fear of attack by stranger or parent, anxiety about own internal drives.

Many nightmares in adults have a similar source, namely fear connected with internal drives such as aggression, sexuality and the process of growth and change, such as encounter with adolescence, loss of sexual characteristics, old age and death. Example: see third example in doors under house, buildings.

Serious illness. Example: ‘I dream night after night that a cat is gnawing at my throat’ (male from Landscapes of the Night).

The dreamer had developing cancer of the throat. These physical illness dreams are not as common as the other classes of nightmare.

Precognition of fateful events. Example: My husband, a pilot in the RAF, had recently lost a friend in an air crash. He woke one morning very troubled—he is usually a very positive person. He told me he had dreamt his friend was flying a black jet, and wanted my husband to fly with him.

Although a simple dream, my husband could not shake off the dark feelings. Shortly afterwards his own jet went down and he was killed in the crash’ (Anon.).

Understanding the causes of nightmares enables us to deal with them.

The things we run from in the nightmare need to be met while we are awake. We can do this by sitting and imagining ourselves back in the dream and facing or meeting what we were frightened of. Terry imagined himself opening the door he was fighting to keep closed. In doing this and remaining quiet he could feel the childhood feelings arising. Once he recognised them for what they were, the terror went out of them.

A young woman told me she had experienced a recurring nightmare of a piece of cloth touching her face. She would scream and scream and wake her family. One night her brother sat with her and made her meet those feelings de­picted by the cloth. When she did so she realised it was her grandmother’s funeral shroud. She cried about the loss of her grandmother, felt her feelings about death, and was never troubled again by the nightmare.

The techniques given in dream processing will help in meeting such feelings. Even the simple act of imagining ourselves back in the nightmare and facing the frightening thing will begin the process of changing our relationship with our internal fears. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dreamers Dictionary

The number Nine is a triple of Three, and therefore, close to creation. It is also the planet Mars. Nine-people are fighters and don’t avoitl conflicts. Willpower, assertiveness, and the desire for independence is the key to their life. On the negative side. Nine-people have a tendency to be domineering, have a violent temper, are often careless, and—in a subordinate position—easily discouraged. Their impulsiveness and thoughdess, sharp words often inflict emotional pain on sensitive people. They have enormous strength—and are passionate and impulsive. Many exceptional traits could be developed, if concentration and a strong will would work together.

In general, the number Nine is a symbol for the end of a certain developmental and growing phase in your life. Nine is the end of the numbers—after that come numbers on a higher plane.

For instance, a pregnancy is completed after the ninth month. See Mars.

Nine-people have birthdays on the 9th, 18di, and 27th day of the month.... Dreamers Dictionary

Dream Symbols and Analysis

To dream of oats being fed to a horse symbolizes extravagance and comfort entering your life. Alternately, the dream of oats being rejected by the animal suggests wrong decisions pertaining to financial assets or living situations.

To dream of seeing decayed oats hints of deficiencies or lurking enormous grief.... Dream Symbols and Analysis

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Several people in dream: not feeling lonely; involve­ment of many aspects of oneself in what is being dreamt about; social ability. Large crowds: enormous involvement of self in issue, one’s relationship or feelings about the social environment one lives in; in groups we have a feeling of being looked at or on view—how we relate to that may be depicted by what we are doing in the dream group. See party; roles.

Example: ‘I was outdoors with a group of people acting as leader. We were in the middle of a war situation with bullets playing around us. Maybe aeroplanes were also attacking. I was leading the group from cover to cover, avoiding the bul­lets’ (Paul W). Despite feeling attacked, either by external events, or from inner conflicts, Paul is using leadership skills to deal with his own fears and tendencies.

If a friend told us he had just had an argument with his wife and was going to leave her, we might sit down and counsel them by listening and helping them to son out the hun feelings from their long- term wishes. We might point out they had felt this way before, but it passed—in other words give feedback they had missed. In a similar way, our various emotions and drives often need this son of skill employed by ourself. This unifies us, leading to coping skills as in Paul’s dream.

Example: Walking alone through a small town. I was heading for a place that a group of people, in a street parallel to mine, were also heading for.

A person from the group tried to persuade me that the right way to get to the place was along the street the group was walking. I knew the street did not matter, only the general direction.

The person was quite dis­turbed by my independence. It made him or her feel uncenain co have their leader apparently questioned. I felt uncenain too for a moment’ (Ivor S).

A group of people, as in Ivor’s dream, can also depict how one meets the pressure of social norms. As social relationship is one of the most imponant factors outside personal survival—and survival depends upon it— such dreams help us to clarify our individual contact with society. Human beings have an unconscious but highly devel­oped sense of the psychological social environment. Ivor’s dream shows something we are all involved in—how we are relating to humans collectively. Are we in conflict with group behaviour and direction? Do we conform, but perhaps have conflict with our individual drives? Do we find a way between the opposites? Much of our response is laid down in child­hood and remains unconscious unless we review it.

In some dreams, a group of people represent what is meant by the word God. This may sound unlikely, but the uncon­scious, because it is highly capable of synthesis, often looks at humanity as a whole. Collectively humanity has vast creative and destructive powers which intimately affect us as individu­als. Collectively it has performed miracles which, looked at as an individual, appear impossible. How could a little human being build the Great Pyramid, or a space shuttle? The Bible echoes this concept in such phrases as Whatever you do to the least of one of these, you do to me. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Symbols and Analysis

To dream of a plague bodes of an enormous concern in your waking life.

An example of this may be a cherished relationship or career situation.... Dream Symbols and Analysis

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Depends on what the ‘game’ is. Whatever we ‘play’ at in a dream might just be fun or suggest great seriousness. As humans we use an enormous number of strategies to gain our ends, as explained in the book Games People Play.

The idioms define some of these ‘games’. Idioms: come into play; foul play; make a play for, make play of; play a pan in; play along with, play at; play cat and mouse; play dead/possum; play down; played out; play fair; play false, play for time; play hard to get; play it cool; play no pan in it; play on words; play safe; play people off against each other, play something down, play the field; play up; play upon a weakness/fear; play up to someone; the state of play; play somebody at their own game; child’s play; play ball with; play it by ear, play fast and loose; play gooseberry, play havoc with, play merry hell; play into their hands; play one’s ace; play one’s cards right, play second fiddle; play the fool; play the game; play the white man; play to the gallery; play with fire; two can play at that game. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dreamers Dictionary

Depth Psychology: This planet—the ruler of the unconscious—stands for death and rebirth, destruction and rebuilding. “Die and be born again” is a constant process. Pluto supports emotional- psychic changes and metamorphosis. Its enormous motive power is the driving force for far-reaching changes. See Planets, Signs of the Zodiac.... Dreamers Dictionary

Little Giant Encyclopedia

According to Jung, the graves of kings who were honored as gods are a symbol of the idea of resurrection. Egypt is not the only place with pyramids; they have also been found in Mexico and in China, where the idea of resurrection is expressed through the choice of the place where they were built, between mountain and valley.

A pyramid stands between heaven and earth. Pyramids also refer to wanderlust and travel experiences. Also, they are signposts.

The pyramids served as enormous mirrors, due to their polished surfaces, making them a source of light. Given their foundation, they are also a physical mandala. Know your own light—your strengths and talents.

The pyramid stands for those who elevate their own fire and light, growing beyond their personal world. See Square, Triangle.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

In most ancient cultures, consider­ation and even veneration of dreams played a great pan. Some groups felt that dream life was more real and imponant than waking life. Not only were dreams looked to for information about hunting (Eskimo groups), but also for ways of healing physical and psychological ills (Greek dream temples) and insights into the medicinal properties of herbs, barks and clays (African tribal witchdoctors). Common to most of these groups, and evident in the Old Testament, was also the sense that through dreams one had awareness of the transcendental or supersensible. St Peter’s dream of the sheet and unclean animals was a turning point in the history of western socicty —as was Constantine’s dream of his victory if he used the symbol of Christianity.

At its most fundamental, the human religious sense emerges out of several factors. One is the awareness of ex­isting amidst external and internal forces of nature which cause us to feel vulnerable and perhaps powerless. Such natu­ral processes as illness, death, growth and decay, earthquakes, the seasons, confront us with things which are often beyond our ability to control. Considenng the information and re­sources of the times, one of religion’s main functions in the past was the attempted control of the ‘uncertain’ factors in human life, and help towards psychological adjustment to vali­ne rability. Religions were the first social programmes aiding the human need for help and support towards emotional, mental, physical and social health and maturity. Even if prim­itive, such programmes helped groups of people to gain a common identity and live in reasonable harmony together. Like a computer program which is specific to a particular business, such programmes were specific to a particular group, and so are outdated in today’s need for greater integra­tion with other races. Religions also offered some sort of con­cept of and connection with the roots of being.

Example: ‘For two nights running I have dreamt the same nightmare. I am in a chapel walking down the first flight of several flights of steps when I hear loud noises behind me. I am told to run, being warned of the soldiers who ride the cavalry horses nght down the steps, and who run you over if you are in their way.

The horses are fierce and they absolutely race down the steps at the same time every day, and you literally have to lock yourself away in a nearby room which is a long way down the chapel. I ran into the room hearing the pounding of the horses’ hooves. It was a terrible pandemo­nium in that chapel. In the room were school children the same age as me and some perhaps younger’ (Maria H). Maria, who is 16, in describing her dream says she had recently been confronted with whether to have a sexual relationship with her boyfriend. Religion, represented by the chapel, is Maria’s way of locking out her powerful sexual urges. Many dreams show that religion, as a set of beliefs, is used as a way of avoiding anxiety in the face of life’s uncertainties.

For many people, the rigid belief system helps them to avoid uncertainty in making decisions.

Dreams also portray and define the aspect of human expe­rience in which we sense a kinship with all life forms. This is the side of spiritual expenence through which we find a con­nection with the roots of our being. While awake we might see the birth of a colt and feel the wonder of emergence and newness; the struggle to stand up and survive, the miracle of physical and sexual power which can be accepted or feared. In looking in the faces of fellow men and women we see something of what they have done in this strange and painful wonder we call life. We see whether they have been crushed by the forces confronting them; whether they have become ngid; or whether, through some common miracle, they have been able to carry into their mature years the laughter, the crying, the joy, the ability to feel pain, that are the very signs of life within the human soul. These things are sensed by us all, but seldom organised into a comprehensive view of life, and an extraction of meaning. Often it is only in our dreams, through the ability the unconscious has to draw out the signif­icance of such widely divergent expenences, that we glimpse the unity behind phenomena which is an essential of spiritual life, i.e. we all have a life, we breathe, we have come from a mother, so share a universal experience.

Example: To quote J.B. Priestley from his book Rain Upon Godshill: ‘Just before I went to Amenca, dunng the exhausting weeks when I was busy with my Time Plays, I had such a dream, and I think it left a greater impression on my mind than any experience I had ever known before, awake or in dreams, and said more to me about this life than any book I have ever read.

The setting of the dream was quite simple, and owed something to the fact that not long before my wife had visiied the lighthouse here at St Catherine’s to do some bird ringing. I dreamt I was standing at the top of a very high tower, alone, looking down upon myriads of birds all flying in one direction; every kind of bird was there, all the birds in the world. It was a noble sight, this vast aerial river of birds. But now in some mysterious fashion the gear was changed, and time speeded up, so that I saw generations of birds, watched them break their shells, flutter into life, mate, weaken, falter and die. Wings grew only to crumble; bodies were sleek, and then, in a flash bled and shrivelled; and death struck every­where at every second. What was the use of all this blind struggle towards life, this eager trying of wings, this hurried mating, this flight and surge, all this gigantic meaningless ef­fort? As I stared down, seeming to see every creature’s ignoble little history almost at a glance, I felt sick at heart. It would be better if not one of them, if not one of us, had been bom, if the struggle ceased for ever. I stood on my tower, still alone, desperately unhappy. But now the gear was changed again, and the time went faster still, and it was rushing by at such a rate, that the birds could not show any movement, but were like an enormous plain sown with feathers. But along this plain, flickering through the bodies themselves, there now passed a sort of white flame, trembling, dancing, then hurry­ing on; and as soon as I saw it I knew that this white flame was life itself, the very quintessence of being; and then it came to me, in a rocket burst of ecstasy, that nothing mattered, nothing could ever matter, because nothing else was real but this quivering and hurrying lambency of being. Birds, men and creatures not yet shaped and coloured, all were of no account except so far as this flame of life travelled through them. It left nothing to mourn over behind it, what I had thought was tragedy was mere emptiness or a shadow show; for now all real feeling was caught and purified and danced on ecstatically with the white flame of life. I had never before felt such deep happiness as I knew at the end of my dream of the tower and the birds.’

Some Nonh American Indians developed the totem out of similar processes. In one generation a person might learn to plant a seed and eat the results. Later someone might see that through fertilisation more food was produced. Still later some­one found that by irrigating, still more improvement was made. No one individual was responsible for such vital cul­tural information, and the collective information is bigger than any one person, yet individuals can partake of it and add to it.

The totem represented such subtle realities, as it might in a modem dream; as Christ might in today’s unconscious. That older cultures venerated their collective information, and that modem humans seem largely apathetic to it, shows how our ‘religion’ has degenerated. Yet utilising the power of the unconscious to portray the subtle influences which impinge upon us, and building the information gained into our re­sponse to life, is deeply important.

With the growth of authoritarian structures in western reli­gion, and the dominance of the rational mind over feeling values, dreams have been pushed into the background. With this change has developed the sense that visionary dreams were something which ‘superstitious* cultural groups had in the past. Yet thoroughly modem men and women still meet Christ powerfully in dreams and visions. Christ still appears to them as a living being.

The transcendental, the collective or universal enters their life just as frequently as ever before. Sometimes it enters with insistence and power, because a too rational mind has led to an unbalance in the psyche—a bal­ance in which the waking and rational individuality is one pole, and the feeling, connective awareness of the uncon­scious is the other.

Although it is tempting to think of the transcendent as ethereal or unreal, the religious in dreams is nearly always a symbol for the major processes of maturing in human life. We are the hero/ine who meets the dangers of life outside the womb, who faces growth, ageing and death.

The awe and deep emotions we unconsciously feel about such heroic deeds are depicted by religious emotion.

See angel; Christ, rebirth and Devil under archetypes; church; evil; fish, sea creatures; example in whale under fish, sea creatures; heaven, hell; sweets under food; dream as spiritual guide. See also hero/ine; mass; masturbation; old; paralysis; colours; sheep under animals. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Most activities which underlie our physical and mental life are beyond our awareness. Occasionally something—an ache in the chest, a strange emotion which unsettles us—may emerge into consciousness, then disappear.

The sea, with its surface and hidden depths, lends itself to depicting this hu­man experience of known and unknown regarding self.

The enormity of the sea is also a visible image of the enormity of our own inner world, most of it unknown, and also the rela­tionship we have with the universe, which we exist in yet know so little about.

The sea holds vast treasures, curiosities, and our history—not simply because life emerged from the sea. or our blood is as salt as the ancient sea, but because so many ships and shorelines are now beneath the waves. Some­times these can be recovered, and this depicts our remember­ing or making conscious.

Example: ‘My husband and I were standing looking at the sea’s surface. It was just falling night. I saw a mass of dark shapes, thought it would be a school of fish. Then we were looking at water birds, maybe ducks, again dark shapes as the light had almost gone. Then there was a hole in the sea, like a belly button, I was wondering what it was, how was it being made, was there something under the water? Something very big was coming up to the surface very close to me. It shot me to wake (Ginny Q). Ginny and her husband had been explor­ing the content of their dreams.

The image of the sea shows Ginny sensing there are enormous depths to her own being, and something big—a previously unconscious complex of in­sights and feelings—is becoming conscious.

So, generally the sea represents the boundary between un­conscious and conscious; our processes of life and the ongins of our life; the wisdom, still unverbalised because locked in process rather than insight, of our existence; source of the huge life drives, such as that which urges us towards indepen­dence, mating and parenthood, a symbol of infinite energy or consciousness, in which human existence is only a tiny pan. Example: A small speed boat was at sea. But the sea dis­solved anybody who fell in. One man fell in but held himself together as a blob of water and jumped back to the speedboat. I remember the words “The sea is a great solvent” (Tim P). Tim is aware of his unconscious sense of being a pan of the huge sea of life or energy. In it one might lose one’s sense of identity. In the end, identity is ‘held together’ by one’s own belief in oneself.

Going under the sea: bringing internal contents to con­sciousness; remembering the womb expenence; letting our ego surrender a little, looking at death.

If there is a sense of hugeness, depth: going beyond the boundaries of experience usually set up by our conscious self or ego. Waves: impulses, feelings and emotions, such as sexuality, anxiety, anger. Tide: rising and falling of feelings such as love, pleasure or sexual­ity; may refer to aging when going out; tide in our affairs. Example: *l am either standing at the edge of the sea or near, when suddenly enormous tidal waves appear in the distance and are coming closer. I know they will engulf me, I turn and run away. Sometimes they do overtake me, other times I wake up’ (Mrs AV). We can run from pleasure and wider insight, just as much as from pain or fear. Idioms: all at sea, plenty more fish in the sea, lost at sea. See beach; fish, sea crea­tures. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

of the universe dreams Writers commonly quote the experience of William James who, while under anaesthetic, dreamt he found the secret of the universe. What he was left with was the doggerel ‘Higamus Hogumus women are mo­nogamous—Hogumus Higamus, men are polygamous’ The conclusion is that dreams cannot be truly revelatory. While it may be true to say that some such dreams contain little which adds to the dreamer’s understanding, some dreams give in­sights which profoundly alter the dreamer’s future attitudes or actions.

Revelatory dreams are more common to men than women. This may be because more men concern themselves with questions of what the universe is.

If the dreamer creates a mental or emotional tension in themselves through the inten­sity with which they pursue such questions—and we need to accept that often such intensity anses out of anxiety regarding death and one’s identity—then the self-regulatory process of dreaming might well produce an apparent revelation to ease the tension. On the opposite tack, research into mental func­tioning during dreaming, or in a dreamlike state as in research using LSD, shows that there is an enormously increased abil­ity to access associated ideas, allow feeling responses and achieve novel viewpoints. Freud pointed out that dreams have access to greater memory resources and associated ideas. P H. Stafford and B.H. Golightly, in their book dealing with LSD as an aid to problem solving, say that this dreamlike state en­ables subjects to ‘form and keep in mind a much broader picture . . . imagine what is needed—for the problem—or not possible . . . diminish fear of making mistakes*. One subject says ‘1 had almost total recall of a course I did in thermodynamics; something I had not given any thought to in years.’

Although humans have such power to scan enormous blocks of information or experience, look at it from new an­gles, sift it with particular questions in mind and so discover new connections in old information, there are problems, oth­erwise we would all be doing it.

The nature of dream con­sciousness, and the faculties described, is fundamentally dif­ferent to waking awareness, which limits, edits, looks for specifics, avoids views conflicting with its accepted norm, and uses verbalisation.

A nonverbal, symbolic scan of massive in­formation is largely lost when translated to waking conscious­ness.

My experience is that the content of revelatory dreams is almost wholly lost on waking.

If the individual explores the dream while awake, however, and dares to take consciousness into the realm of the dream, then the enormous waves of emotional impact, the massive collection of details, the per­sonality changing influence of major new insights, can be met.

The reason most of us do not touch this creative process is in fact the same reason most of us do not attempt other daring activities—it takes guts. See creativity and problem solving in dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

This is one of the major aspects of dreaming. Unless we are born blind, virtually every dream shows us looking at, seeing or viewing the events, objects, environment and people of the dream. In a word count from a sample of 1,000 dreams, the words see, saw, look, looking occurred 1,077 times. This is the highest occurrence of any words in the sample. Next were feel, feelings, felt with a score of 855, and house, houses with 412.

This suggests that dreams are almost entirely about giving attention to, being aware of, being confronted by, considering or realising some aspect of the enormously wide range of experience which human consciousness meets. Therefore, whatever appears in the dream shows we are giving some thought to, feeling or confronting what is depicted. During each day we meet, in sensory impressions, in memory, in emotion, in thought, a huge variety of things. It is therefore of great interest what comparatively few subjects our spontane­ous dream response chooses to give attention to out of all the range. It seems likely these chosen areas are important to us.

Looking at something implies our attitudes or response to what is seen. Being looked at by someone else in the dream suggests seeing oneself from a viewpoint which is not our norm. By actually attempting to stand in the role of the other person, as described in dream processing, we can become conscious of this different viewpoint. By standing in our own role in the dream, and actually taking time to consider what it is we are ‘seeing, and the impressions involved, we can ‘see’ or become aware of what the dream is getting us to look at regarding ourself. Idioms: from the look of things; look after, look askance at; look at; look before you leap; look blue, look down on; look for, look forward to; look into; look out, look over something; look small; look the other way; look up to; look for a fight; not like the look of; as far as I can see; as I see it; do you see what I mean; I’ll see about that; I see, see over something; overseer; see eye to eye; see life; see red; see which way the wind blows; catch sight of; get out of my sight, in sight of; lose sight of; out of sight, out of mind, second sight; at first sight. See searching. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: Many times in my adult life I have woken to find I have made love to my wife while asleep. Or I wake to discover myself in the middle of the sexual act. At such times I have usually been avoiding my sexual drive and it has burst through to fulfil itself while I was asleep or under the sway of dreams.

For instance most times this hap­pened I have been in the middle of a dream in which there is a sense of absolute imperative that I must make love/have sex.

It is like being lost in a storm of glamour and fantasy or vision in which I am totally involved.

The whirl of the “dream” is towards the wonder, totality of the need to have sex. As this imperative is expressed in my still spontaneous, dreaming physical action, the experience of sex is also visionary and enormous’ (Charles W).

This fairly common dreaming experience demonstrates powerfully how dreams are an expression of a self regulatory or compensatory action in the psyche and body. Charles says that he had been restraining his sexual activity. This shows the enormous gulf which can exist between what we will to do as a conscious personality, and what our being needs to do or wishes to do outside conscious decision making.

The ‘glamour and fantasy’ Charles describes are regular features of how these deeper needs make themselves known, or attempt to coerce the conscious mind, into fulfilling the need.

If we reject the fantasy, the unconscious processes will attempt a more radical approach, as in actual physical movement while we sleep. This may have given rise to ideas about possession or devils in past ages, when it was not understood that we can split our mind by such conflicts. Fear of the possessing’ influ­ence actually heightens its power through suggestion. It is much better to understand what one’s needs are, and seek an acceptable fulfilment. See abreaction. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

For a woman to dream that a dead snake is biting her, foretells she will suffer from malice of a pretended friend.

To dream of snakes, is a foreboding of evil in its various forms and stages.

To see them wriggling and falling over others, foretells struggles with fortune and remorse.

To kill them, you will feel that you have used every opportunity of advancing your own interests, or respecting that of others. You will enjoy victory over enemies.

To walk over them, you will live in constant fear of sickness, and selfish persons will seek to usurp your place in your companion’s life.

If they bite you, you will succumb to evil influences, and enemies will injure your business.

To dream that a common spotted snake approaches you from green herbs, and you quickly step aside as it passes you, and after you had forgotten the incident to again see it approaching and growing in dimensions as it nears you, finally taking on the form of an enormous serpent; if you then, after frantic efforts, succeed in escaping its attack, and altogether lose sight of it, it foretells that you will soon imagine you are being disobeyed and slighted, and things will go on from bad to worse. Sickness, uneasiness and unkindness will increase to frightful proportions in your mind; but they will adjust themselves to a normal basis, and by the putting aside of imaginary trouble, and masterfully shouldering duties, you will be contented and repaid.

To dream that a snake coils itself around you and darts its tongue out at you, is a sign that you will be placed in a position where you will be powerless in the hands of enemies, and you will be attacked with sickness.

To handle them, you will use strategy to aid in overthrowing opposition.

To see hairs turn into snakes, foretells that seeming insignificant incidents will make distressing cares for you.

If snakes turn into unnatural shapes, you will have troubles which will be dispelled if treated with indifference, calmness and will power.

To see or step on snakes while wading or bathing, denotes that there will be trouble where unalloyed pleasure was anticipated.

To see them bite others, foretells that some friend will be injured and criticised by you.

To see little snakes, denotes you will entertain persons with friendly hospitality who will secretly defame you and work to overthrow your growing prospects.

To see children playing with them, is a sign that you will be nonplussed to distinguish your friends from your enemies.

For a woman to think a child places one on the back of her head, and she hears the snake’s hisses, foretells that she will be persuaded to yield up some possession seemingly for her good, but she will find out later that she has been inveigled into an intrigue in which enemies will tantalize her.

To see snakes raising up their heads in a path just behind your friend, denotes that you will discover a conspiracy which has been formed to injure your friend and also yourself.

To think your friend has them under control, denotes that some powerful agency will be employed in your favor to ward off evil influences.

For a woman to hypnotize a snake, denotes your rights will be assailed, but you will be protected by law and influential friends. See Serpents and Reptiles. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

As a species, humans have cer­tain norms of behaviour, many of which we share with other animals. We tend to find a partner of the opposite sex and produce children. We care for our children. We have strong feelings about territory. In groups this becomes nationalism and, like ants or some group animals, we fight to defend our territory. We elect leaders, and have complicated rituals re­garding group status or personal ‘face*. We seek outward signs of our status, and wherever possible show them.

Talking to individuals, these drives are often hardly recog­nised. Yet they are powerful enough when manipulated to gather huge armies of people who then march to their death. They are behind enormous hostility between neighbours and nations. Although irrational, and not in our best interest to be influenced by, millions of us are moved by them as if we had little will of our own.

The feelings behind them, although seldom acknowledged directly by our conscious self, are often raised to religious status.

The procreative drive, the election of leaders, the parental and child raising urges, are all to be seen in the Christian religion as the bones behind the robes and rituals. Why does Catholicism ban the condom and divorce, make a giant figure out of the Pope, worship a woman with a baby in her arms, if it is not based on these mighty urges and biological drives?

Dreams reveal that much of human life arises out of these patterns.

The patterns are in us unconsciously. We often ven­erate the norm’ of these patterns and raise them, religiously or politically, to a level of tremendous importance.

The prob­lem is that many of these patterns are no longer serving us well. They are habits developed through thousands or mil­lions of years of repetition. While they remain unconscious we find it difficult to redirect them or even admit to their influence in our life.

Thereare, of course, many other aspects of the uncon­scious, such as memories of childhood trauma, the dream process, the image formation process and sensory apparatus. It is enough to begin with if we recognise that a lot of ourself and our potential remains unknown to us because it remains unconscious, or a pan of our unconscious processes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The riches of the self—the wonder, wisdom or value of our own life in its wholeness; something we have had to face difficulties to gain, such as personal achievement, ma­ture love, self realisation, wholeness; something which is enormously valuable in bringing wholeness and health to oneself—such as a balancing of dry intellectual achievement with deeply felt love, or an introvened personality with out­ward activity. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of a Tsunami represent that you are in need of an enormous emotional catharsis. You are undergoing massive, radical and quantum change, physically, mentally and spiritually. See Water, Ocean, Tidal Wave, Venting Dreams, and Breakdown/Breakthrough Dreams.... Strangest Dream Explanations

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams where you have compassion and/or you deeply understand another person who heretofore you judged as inadequate, inferior, or unlovable, can be deeply healing and transforming. When you dream of having compassion for how another person feels or thinks, you can then transfer that understanding into your waking state, and experience enormous breakthroughs in your relationships and in your life in general. See Integration Dreams.... Strangest Dream Explanations

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The powerful evolutionary drive involved in reproduc­tion, which lies behind individual male or femaleness.

Example: ‘I was leaning over the settee with my hands cupped under my chin looking out of the window.

The view was spectacular, in that it was as if the house was situated on top of a cliff overlooking a huge bay, shaped like a horseshoe, with the house in the middle. From the sea suddenly coming into the bay I could see three enormous whales making their way towards me. As I was staring in amazement they began to transform themselves and come up out of the water as three giant Viking-like figures. They were so huge that the water came up only to their knees and everything was moving so slowly, as they waded towards me. It was the most awe inspir­ing thing I had ever seen in my life’ (Sue B).

The bay, the beautiful sea, the (sperm?) whales/men show Sue touching the most primordial yet inspiring aspects of her own wom­anhood and urge to love. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of a whale represent that you are in touch with your enormous, oceanic power, intuition and reproductive drive. Grand scale opportunities are flowing to you as you prepare for a whale of a time. This may be a message for you to use your power discriminately and take responsibility for your largess.... Strangest Dream Explanations

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Nanve to Australia, this large marsupial burrows a home in the din. W&ddling forward on short legs, it looks pretty silly but it displays an enormous ability to hold on for dear life. Wombats come to bnng the message of the power of the element of eanh as a home, which can protect you as long as you are grounded. Wombats may be saying to you, “Make your home here on eanh. It’s a safe shelter.” In other words, get grounded on the planet.... Ariadne's Book of Dream