erection

Erections during a dream are normal, but here we are talking about a dream of erection. Symbolically, this points either to fear of impotence or to the joy of masculine power. This symbol is about willpower and vitality within men and women. It almost always poses the question of how goal-oriented and focused your actions are.

For men as well as for women, this dream can be interpreted as the need for hetero-, auto-, or homosexuality.

According to Freud, women dreaming of erection indicates penis envy.

1. Power, energy.

2. Exercise control.

3. Desire for someone.



Erection | The Dream Meanings

Keywords of this dream: Erection

Little Giant Encyclopedia

Overdramatization or fleeing from a problematic situation. Looking for clarification in difficult situations. Flying and Falling appear in Abyss, Elevator, and Trap, usually in nightmares; or as in: Brook, Leaf, and in part Parachute, during very pleasurable liberation dreams. In case of teenagers: often a sign that too much is being asked of them and that they are being pressured to succeed. These dreams are often like being intoxicated, having a sense of being elevated, and a lightness: like being in love. Many ancient myths show the connection between flying and sexuality, and while flying today has become a commonplace activity, the old interpretations are still true (see Fear of Flying by Erica Jong). Now modern symbolic interpretations of flying include the image of worldliness, expansive ideas, and communications. Flying is also seen as a symbol of creative ideas. This image may also be a warning not to become too aloof and removed from reality through fantasizing.

The dream may also be a challenge for either being too earthbound or taking flight into a greater dimension.

In Egypt, dreams of flying were interpreted as fleeing from difficulties. In ancient Greece and Rome, dreams of flying were seen as passionate love.

According to Freud, they were dreams of sexual desire and erection (Freud dealt with this extensively). He saw dreams of flying exclusively as desire for sex. Some modern dream experts interpret flying dreams exclusively as a desire to get away from problematic sit- uations, or to cross one’s own boundaries. Some researchers believe that in our dreams we go back to preborn states, make contact with the state of birds, and realize our innate ability to fly. Another contemporary dream researcher, Jack Maguire, believes that most dreams about flying are just a sign that we want to recuperate and refresh ourselves.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

Little Giant Encyclopedia

Its obvious meaning concerns sexuality. On the other hand, every actual sexual image points to the present situation of the dreamer. Often other energies, like love or fear, power and money express themselves in the form of sexual symbols. Freud makes a very clear distinction between genital sexuality and general sexuality. On one hand, he took a broader view: “First, sexuality is freed from a much too narrow connection to the genitals and seen in a much wider sense as a pleasure-seeking bodily function, which is only secondarily put to the service of procreation. Secondly,” Freud continues in his Self Portrait, “sexual stirrings are all those merely tender and friendly emotions for which our language coined the many-faceted word 4Love.”’ What this means is that, for Freud, sexuality is pleasure-seeking, all-encompassing, and expressed by the whole body, internally and externally. He was of the opinion that sexual urges and the tender feelings of love are connected and that one part is not to be withheld at the expense of the other. In that sense it is a question of “separating sexuality from the genitals,” of sensuality, of saying goodbye to the notion of “always searching for one part only,” when so much more is worth having. At the same time, Freud emphasizes the difference between general, unorganized sexuality and genital sexuality. It is only in the genital phase that “the full expression” of all drives / urges (and not only part of them) is achieved. See Erection, Intercourse, Sexuality.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

Little Giant Encyclopedia

See Umbrella. Old symbol for power, protection, and keeping your distance.

According to Freud, phallic symbol in the process of erection.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

In 1937 through the use of the electroencephalograph (EEG) measuring tiny electrical brain impulses, Loomis and his associates discovered that the form of brainwaves changes with the onset of sleep.

The next leap forward in understanding came when Aserinsky and Kleitman found rapid eye movements (REM) in 1953. In 1957 the REM were linked with dreaming. This defined sleep into two differ­ent observable states, REM sleep, and NREM (non-rapid eye movement or non-rem) sleep. Within NREM three different stages have been identified. These are defined by the different EEG patterns of electrical activity in the brain. They are mea­sured by the height (amplitude) of the brain waves and fre­quency of up and down movement. There are also electrical changes occurring in the muscles (measured using an electro- myograph or EMG), and in movement of the eyeballs (mea­sured using an electro-oculograph or EOG).

While awake the height is low and frequency fast. As we relax prior to sleep the EEG shifts to what are called alpha waves, at 8 to 12 cps (cycles per second). Stage one of sleep is the transition between this drowsy state of alpha waves to sleeping, in which theta waves occur, at 3 to 7 cps. In this first stage we experience random images and thoughts. This lasts about 10 minutes, followed by stage two, in which ‘sleep spindles’ occur which have 12 to 14 cps on the EEG. These last from 1/2 to 2 seconds, with K complexes following, which are slow large EEG waves. About half our sleep period is spent in this second stage of sleep. Deep sleep is reached when our brain exhibits delta waves, with 1/2 to 2 cps.

After approximately an hour and a half from falling into deep sleep, an exciting change occurs. We return to level two and REM occur. Suddenly the brain is alert and active, though the person is asleep and difficult to wake. This level has been called paradoxical sleep because of this fact. Voluntary mus­cular activity is suppressed and the body is essentially paralysed. Morrison has pointed out that, although the brain is transmitting full muscular activity messages, these are usu­ally suppressed by an area of the brain in the pons. But bursts of short actions occur, such as rapid eyeball jerks, twitches of the muscles, changes in the size of the pupil, contractions in the middle ear, and erection of the penis. It may be that similar excitation occurs in the vagina. Also, autonomic storms’ occur dunng which large erratic changes occur in heart rate, blood pressure, breathing rate and in other auto­nomic nervous system functions. These are the changes ac­companying our dreams.

If we slept for eight hours, a typical pattern would be to pass into delta sleep, stay there for about 70 to 90 minutes, then return to stage two and dream for about five minutes. We then move back into delta sleep, stay for a short period and shift back to level two, but without dreaming, then back into level three.

The next return to stage two is longer, almost an hour, with a period of dreaming lasting about 19 minutes, and also a short period of return to waking. There is only one short period of return to stage three sleep which occurs nearly four hours after falling asleep. From there on we remain in level two sleep, with three or four lengthening periods of dreaming, and returns to brief wakefulness.

The average amount of body shifting is once every 15 minutes.

1- In undergoing 205 hours of sleep deprivation, four healthy males showed various physiological and psychological changes. Some of these were headache, lack of concentra­tion, hallucination, memory loss, tremor and, in some, paranoia. In all cases one night’s sleep restored normal functioning.

2- One in ten people who complain of excessive daytime drowsiness suffer from sleep apnoea, which is a stoppage of breathing while asleep.

3- A condition called narcolepsy causes sufferers to fall asleep at inappropriate times—while making love, walk­ing, playing tennis, working.

4- As we age we usually sleep less. Our REM sleep in partic­ular decreases sharply. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Because it often has a cross as a handle, has mixed meanings. Erection; social power, justice; spiritual strength. Sword hanging by a thread: threats hanging over one. When sheathed: the soul or self in the body. Heirloom: a hentage of attitudes from one’s family; willpower or discrimination. Con­sider background of dream for meaning. Idioms: cross swords with someone; double-edged sword; sword of Damocles. See cross; fight; attack; war. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Something we have built or created in our life. As such it can be an outer achievement or erection of inner atti­tudes such as defensiveness, isolation, insularity, or an at­tempt to reach the heights of awareness or recognition. Also male sexuality and drive which may not be expressed satisfac­torily, and thus be the source of aggression towards females and society. This also has the elements of insularity and de­fence. Occasionally heightened awareness, as in the light­house dream of Priestley in the entry religion and dreams.

Example: ‘The Devil was trying to force me to make love to a girl. I wanted to leap off the tower and fly away, but it was high, and I was frightened I would fall’ (Quentin C). Quentin is 15 and facing his emerging drive of love and sex.

The woman in the tower is here his idealised relationship with the opposite sex. Actual intimacy is threatening and he wants to ‘fly’ from it but feels this would be failure.

The Devil is his own life pushing to grow, but felt as threatening. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences