exhausted

See EXERCISE. In your dream you may not know why you feel Exhausted, but it is always a bad sign unless you recover fully in your dream.

1. A sign that someone has given his/her all.

2. Tired of a particular situation or person.



Exhausted | The Dream Meanings

Keywords of this dream: Exhausted

Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

To dream of ammunition, foretells the undertaking of some work, which promises fruitful completion.

To dream your ammunition is exhausted, denotes fruitless struggles and endeavors. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

The Language of Dreams

(see Weapons)

Gathering ammunition indicates the expectation of battle, or an upcoming undertaking that requires a show of strength (see Fighting).

Exhausted ammunition speaks of fruitless struggles against overwhelming odds.

Taking aim at a specific problem or situation with carefully chosen “tools” that might prove harmful if they aren’t used properly.... The Language of Dreams

Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

To dream of the Baghavad, foretells for you a season of seclusion; also rest to the exhausted faculties.

A pleasant journey for your advancement will be planned by your friends. Little financial advancement is promised in this dream. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

My Dream Interpretation

To see a battery in your dream, symbolizes life energy.

If the battery is dead, then it suggests that you are emotionally exhausted or feeling low.... My Dream Interpretation

My Dream Interpretation

Blood in a dream has many meanings. Some of the most common: To dream that you are bleeding represents a feeling of loss of power. You may be suffering from exhaustion or feeling emotionally drained. It may also denote bitter confrontations between you and your friends. Your past actions may have come back to haunt you. Try to avoid any sort of controversy with friends or relatives.

To stop the bleeding of yourself or others represents a vital, energetic nature. Dreams of blood when you can’t see who is bleeding means you are undergoing a confusing change in your real life.

If you dream of donating blood, or having a blood transfusion, you can expect your troubles to go away soon.

If you see the word “blood” written in your dream, it may refer to some situation in your life that is permanent and cannot be changed.

To dream of getting a blood clot inside you suggests that you are stuck in a difficult situation and feel powerless to make things better.

If you dream of passing a blood clot out of your body, you may have recently experienced a personal loss or disappointment.

A recent experience has left you feeling tired and possibly changed.

To dream of donating blood can mean you are worried about someone. It may also mean you are giving too much of yourself emotionally to others, and should save some time and energy for your own self.

To dream of having green blood suggests that you are jealous of a friend, or you are having friendship conflicts that are leaving you emotionally exhausted.... My Dream Interpretation

Mystic Dream Book

To dream that you are out of Breath, or exhausted, is a warning of coming trouble.... Mystic Dream Book

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Belt; Cincture; Sash; Waistband) In a dream, the broad band worn around the waist, also known as a sash or a cummerbund represents one’s father, mother or paternal uncle. Tying a cummerbund around one’s waist in a dream means that one has exhausted half of his life. Owning many cummerbunds in a dream means longevity.

A cummerbund in a dream also represents one’s son or it could denote a bigman. Ifa ruler offers a cummerbund to someone in a dream, it means that he is appointing him to a high ranking position. Wearing a cummerbund without ornaments in a dream means that one will receive the help of a great and a noble person, including moral and financial support.

If one is rich, then it means that he will have a great friend to support him and whose inner thoughts and intentions are better than what one may think. Ifa poor person ties a cummerbund around his waist in a dream, it means extra earnings or power. Ifthe cummerbund is studded and adorned withjewels in the dream, then such jewels represent one’s helpers, supporters or obedient subjects. Such associates will carryon his commands whether they purport good or evil. Somehow, such a leader will also be unjust and hypocritical.

If the ornaments are made of iron in the dream, it means that his associates are a group of strong people.

If the ornaments are made from copper, then such associates care only for worldly gains. Ifthe ornaments are made from led in the dream, it means that they are weak people.

If the ornaments are made from silver in the dream, it means that the master or leader is a wealthy person and he will be followed by a strong son who will carry the work of his father. Ifone is given a cummerbund, and if he does not wear it in the dream, then it means travels.

A broken cummerbund in a dream means loss ofpower or perhaps one’s death.

If one sees a snake rather than a cummerbund around his waist in a dream, it represents a money belt.

A cummerbund in a dream also means work for a jobless person, a wife for an unmarried person, and should it be carrying many ornaments, then it means the added blessing of having several children. (Also see Belt; Cincture; Waistband; Waist belt)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

About Dream Interpretation

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‘one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm’), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‘research workers on dreams’, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‘Les savants ne sont pas curieux’, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‘interpretation of dreams’ is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

About Dream Interpretation

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems

I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‰_÷one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm‰_ª), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‰_÷research workers on dreams‰_ª, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‰_÷Les savants ne sont pas curieux‰_ª, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‰_÷interpretation of dreams‰_ª is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Dreaming of doves mating and building their nests, indicates peacefulness of the world and joyous homes where children render obedience, and mercy is extended to all.

To hear the lonely, mournful voice of a dove, portends sorrow and disappointment through the death of one to whom you looked for aid. Often it portends the death of a father.

To see a dead dove, is ominous of a separation of husband and wife, either through death or infidelity.

To see white doves, denotes bountiful harvests and the utmost confidence in the loyalty of friends.

To dream of seeing a flock of white doves, denotes peaceful, innocent pleasures, and fortunate developments in the future.

If one brings you a letter, tidings of a pleasant nature from absent friends is intimated, also a lovers’ reconciliation is denoted.

If the dove seems exhausted, a note of sadness will pervade the reconciliation, or a sad touch may be given the pleasant tidings by mention of an invalid friend; if of business, a slight drop may follow.

If the letter bears the message that you are doomed, it foretells that a desperate illness, either your own or of a relative, may cause you financial misfortune. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Below are described simple techniques which make it possible to gain information quickly from dreams. They have been put as a series of questions.

What is the background to the dream? The most imponant aspects of your everyday life may have influenced the dream or feature in it. Briefly consider any aspects of your life which connect with what appears in the dream. Example: ‘1 have a plane to catch. I get to the plane but the suitcase is never big enough for my clothing which I have left behind. I am always anxious about stuff left behind. I wake still with the feeling of anxiety’ (Jane). When asked, Jane said plane flights had been a big feature of her life. She had moved home often, travelling to different pans of the world, leaving friends and loved ones behind.

What is the main action in the dream? There is often an over­all activity such as walking, looking, worrying, building some­thing, or trying to escape. Define what it is and consider if it is expressive of something you are doing in waking life. Activi­ties such as walking or building a house need to be seen as generalisations; walking can simply represent taking a direc­tion in life. When you have defined the action, look for fur­ther information under the other headings in this book, such as swimming or sitting.

What is your role in the dream? Are you a friend, lover, sol­dier, dictator, watcher or participant in the dream? Consider this in relationship with your everyday life, especially in con­nection with how the dream presents it. Where possible, look for the entry on the role in this book. See dreamer.

Are you active or passive in the dream? By passive is meant not taking the leading role, being only an observer, being directed by other people and events, If you are passive, consider if you live in a similar attitude in your life. See active/passive.

What do you feel in the dream? Define what is felt emotionally and physically. In the physical sense are you tired, cold, re­laxed or hungry? In the emotional sense do you feel sad, angry, lost, tender or frightened anywhere in the dream? This helps clarify what feeling area the dream is dealing with. It is important also to define whether the feelings in the dream were satisfyingly expressed or whether held back.

If held back they need fuller expression. See emotions and mood.

Is there a because’ factor in the dream? In many dreams something happens, fails to happen, or appears . . . be­cause! For instance, trapped in a room you find a door to escape through. All is dark beyond and you do not go through the door ‘because’ you are frightened of the dark. In this case the ‘because’ factor is fear.

The dream also suggests you are trapped in an unsatisfying life through fear of opportunity or the unknown.

Am I meeting the things I fear in my dream? Because a dream is an entirely inward thing, we create it completely out of our own internal feelings, images, creativity, habits and insights. So even the monsters of our dream are a pan of ourself.

If we run from them it is only aspects of ourself we are avoiding. Through defining what feelings occur in the dream you may be able to clarify what it is you are avoiding. See nightmares; dream as spiritual guide.

What does the dream mean? We alone create the dream while asleep. Therefore, by looking at each symbol or aspect of the dream, we can discover from what feelings, thoughts or expe­rience, what drive or what insight we have created the drama of the dream. In a playful relaxed way, express whatever you think, feel, remember or fantasise when you hold each symbol in mind. Say or write it all, even the seemingly trivial or dan­gerous’ bits. It helps to act the pan of each thing if you can; for instance as a house you might describe yourself as ‘a bit old, but with open doors for family and friends to come in and out. I feel solid and dependable, but I sense there is something hidden in my cellar’. Such statements portray one­self graphically. Consider whatever information you gather as descriptive of your waking life. Try to summarise it, as this will aid the gaining of insight.

Try amplifying your dream You will need the help of one or two friends to use this method.

The basis is to take the role of each part of the dream, as described above. This may seem strange at first, but persist. Supposing your name is Julia and you dreamt you were carrying an umbrella, but failed to use it even though it was raining, you would talk in the first person present—I am an umbrella. Julia is carrying me but for some reason doesn’t use me.’ Having finished saying what you could about yourself, your friend(s) then ask you questions about yourself as the dream figure or object. These questions need to be simple and directly about the dream symbol. So they could ask Are you an old umbrella?’ Does Julia know she is canying you?’ ‘What is your function as an umbrella? ‘Are you big enough to shelter Julia and someone else?’ And so on.

The aim of the questions is to draw out information about the symbol being explored.

If it is a known person or object you are in the role of—your father for instance—the replies to the questions need to be answered from the point of view of what happened in the dream, rather than as in real life. Listen to what you are saying about yourself as the dream symbol, and when your questioneKs) has finished, review your statements to see if you can see how they refer to your life and yourself.

If you are asking the questions, even if you have ideas regarding the dream, do not attempt to interpret. Put your ideas into simple questions the dreamer can respond to. Maintain a sense of curiosity and attempt to understand, to make the dream plain in an everyday language sense. Lead the dreamer towards seeing what the dream means through the questions. When you have exhausted your questions ask the dreamer to summarise what they have gathered from their replies. See postures, movements and body language for an example of how to work with body movement to explore a dream meaning.

Can / alter the dream to find greater satisfaction? Imagine yourself in the dream and continue it as a fantasy or day­dream. Alter the dream in any way that satisfies. Experiment with it, play with it, until you find a fuller sense of self expres­sion. It is very imponant to note whether any anger or hostil­ity is in the dream but not fully expressed.

If so, let yourself imagine a full expression of the anger. It may be that as this is practised more anger is openly expressed in subsequent dreams. This is healthy, allowing such feelings to be vented and redirected into satisfying ways, individually and socially. In doing this do not ignore any feelings of resistance, pleasure or anxiety. Satisfaction occurs only as we leam to acknowl­edge and integrate resistances and anxieties into what we ex­press. This is a very important step. It gradually changes those of our habits which trap us in lack of satisfaction, poor cre­ativity or inability to resolve problems.

Summary To summarise effectively gather the essence of what you have said about each symbol and the dream as a whole and express it in everyday language. Imagine you are explaining to someone who knows nothing about yourself or the dream. Bnng the dream out of its symbols into everyday comments about yourself.

A man dreamt about a grey, dull office. When he looked at what he said about the office he realised he was talking about the grey, unimaginative world he grew up in after the Second World War, and how it shaped him.

Further information on using these techniques can be found in Tony Crisp s work The Instant Dream Book, published by C.W. Daniel. See amplification; plot of dream; adventure of the dream world; dreamer; postures, movement and body language; settings; symbols and dreaming; word analysis of dreams; wordplay and puns. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Little Giant Encyclopedia

You are either at the end of your rope, feeling exhausted, as in Blindness, or you have reached your goal.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

Dreamers Dictionary

Symbol: The human foot represents being connected to the earth.

Vision: If you are running barefoot: come back to reality and become more “earthbound,” real, and sensitive. See Going Barefoot.

If your feet are dim*: vou have a bad conscience—unburden yourself. Washing your feet: an uncertain situation is clearing up—the small detour you made was very therapeutic.

If you have fractured your foot: unexpected obstacles and misadventures are blocking your progress. Dreaming of having very big feet: you might buy a house—but be careful with your money. Dreaming of having very narrow feet: life is difficult, you are exhausted.

Depth Psychology: Dreaming about moving feet (walking, running, etc.): you are determined not to walk away from life’s difficulties. Feet always symbolize the “foundation” of your life: your convictions, principles, and values. It is important in which direction the feet are running—Left (the feminine, intuitive, irrational, emotional) way, or Right (the everyday life, logical, “right”) way, or if either foot is missing.... Dreamers Dictionary

Dream Symbols and Analysis

The harpy represents an attacking female in a dream. In Greek mythology, the harpy’s large claws swoop in and snatch away life sustaining food.

A woman in your life may be tormenting you by attacking your emotional core. You feel exhausted by repeated small attacks which are slowly draining you.... Dream Symbols and Analysis

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Depicts how you see the relationship with your husband; your relationship with your sexuality; sexual and emotional desire and pleasure; how you relate to intimacy in body, mind and spirit; habits of relationship developed with one’s father.

Example: ‘My recurring dream—some disaster is happen­ing. I try to contact the police or my husband. Can never contact either. I try ringing 999 again and again and can feel terror, and sometimes dreadful anger or complete panic. I cry, I scream and shout and never get through! Recently I have stopped trying to contact my husband. I managed once to reach him but he said he was too busy and I would have to deal with it myself. I woke in a furious temper with him and kicked him while he was still asleep’ (Mrs GS).

The husband here depicts Mrs S’s feelings of not being able to get through’ to her man. This is a common female dream theme, possibly arising from the husband not daring to express emotion or meet his panner with his own feelings.

For Mrs S this is an emergency. Although the dream dramatises it, there is still real frustration, anger, and a break in marital communica­tions.

Example: There were three of us. My husband, a male friend and 1, all nding small white enamel bikes. My husband proceeded slowly, first, with his back to us. Then my friend followed. Suddenly my friend ahead of me turned and gazed fully at me. He gave a glonous smile which lit up the whole of his face. I felt a great sense of well-being surge through me’ (Joan B).

The triangle: the example shows typical (low of feeling towards another male.

The other male here depicts

Joan’s desire to be attractive to other men. This is a danger signal unless one fully acknowledges ihe impulse.

Example: ‘I was with my husband and our three children. About 2 or 3 yards to our right stood my husband’s first wife —she died about a year before I first met him. I remember feeling she no longer minded me being with him, so I put my arms around him from the back, and felt more secure and comfortable with him’ (Mrs NS).

The first wife: the dreamer is now feeling easier about her husband’s first relationship.

The first wife represents her sense of competing for her husband’s affections, even though his ‘first woman’ was dead.

Example: ‘My dead husband came into my bedroom and got into bed with me to make love to me. I was not afraid. But owing to his sexual appetites during my married life with him I was horrified, and resisted him with all my might. On wak­ing I felt weak and exhausted.

The last time he came to me I responded to him and he never came back again. This hap­pened three times.

The last time I don’t think it was a dream. I was not asleep. I think it was his ghost’ (GL). Dead hus­band: in any experience of an apparently psychic nature, we must always remember the unconscious is a great dramatist. It can create the drama of a dream in moments. In doing so it makes our inner feelings into apparently real people and ob­jects outside us. While asleep we lightly dismiss this amazing process as a dream’. When it happens while our eyes are open or we are near waking, for some reason we call it a ghost or psychic event. Yet the dream process is obviously capable of creating total body sensations, emotions, full visual impres­sions, vocalisation—what else is a dream? On the other hand, the dream process is not dealing in pointless imaginations. Many women tend to believe they have little sexual drive, so it is easier for GL to see her drive in the form of her husband. But of course, her husband may also depict how she felt about sex in connection with his ‘sexual appetites’. It is a general rule, however, that our dream process will dramatise into a past life, or a psychic’ experience, emotions linked with trauma or sexual drive which we find difficult to meet in the present.

Example: ‘I dreamt many times I lost my husband, such as not being able to find the car park where he was waiting, and seeing him go off in the distance. I wake in a panic to find him next to me in bed. These dreams persisted, and then he died quite suddenly. He was perfectly healthy at the time of the dreams and I wonder if it was a premonition of me really losing him’ (Mrs AD). Cannot find husband: many middle aged women dream of ‘losing’ their husband while out with him, perhaps shopping, or walking in a town somewhere. Sometimes the dream ponrays him actually killed. Mrs AD wonders if her dream was a premonition. It is more likely a form of practising the loss, so it does not come as such a shock.

The greatest shocks occur when we have never even considered the event—such as a young child losing its mother, an event it has never practised, not even in fantasy, so has no inbuilt shock absorbers. As most of us know, men tend to die before women, and this information is in the mind of middle-aged married women. Mrs AD may have uncon­sciously observed slight changes in her husband’s body and behaviour, and therefore readied herself.

Other woman’s husband: one’s own husband, feelings about that man, desire for a non-committed relationship with less responsibility. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Islamic Dream Interpretation

Seeing oneself as weeping will be interpreted as joy and happiness as long as such weeping is not done with sound, screaming or tearing one’s collar to pieces as when mourning. One the contrary joy, happiness, merry-making, laughter, dancing etc. will be interpreted as grief and sorrow

Similarly, if two persons are seen fighting in the dream then the one who loses the battle will be the one to gain victory.

Similarly, if a person sees himself being cupped it means he will be compelled to fulfill certain conditions in an agreement or contract. Or if a person sees himself being made to agree on certain conditions, it means he will get cupped.

The reason being that in Arabic the word shart (condition) is sometimes used to mean “cupping*”

*Cupping: The use of a cupping glass from which the air has been exhausted, to draw blood to the surface of the skin-Collins).... Islamic Dream Interpretation

Islamic Dream Interpretation

Seeing oneself as weeping will be interpreted as joy and happiness as long as such weeping is not done with sound, screaming or tearing one’s collar to pieces as when mourning. One the contrary joy, happiness, merry-making, laughter, dancing etc. will be interpreted as grief and sorrow

Similarly, if two persons are seen fighting in the dream then the one who loses the battle will be the one to gain victory.

Similarly, if a person sees himself being cupped it means he will be compelled to fulfill certain conditions in an agreement or contract. Or if a person sees himself being made to agree on certain conditions, it means he will get cupped.

The reason being that in Arabic the word shart (condition) is sometimes used to mean “cupping*”

*Cupping: The use of a cupping glass from which the air has been exhausted, to draw blood to the surface of the skin-Collins).... Islamic Dream Interpretation

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

A precious gem, overworked until exhausted... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

For a young woman to dream of crossing a mountain in company with her cousin and dead brother, who was smiling, denotes she will have a distinctive change in her life for the better, but there are warnings against allurements and deceitfulness of friends.

If she becomes exhausted and refuses to go further, she will be slightly disappointed in not gaining quite so exalted a position as was hoped for by her.

If you ascend a mountain in your dreams, and the way is pleasant and verdant, you will rise swiftly to wealth and prominence.

If the mountain is rugged, and you fail to reach the top, you may expect reverses in your life, and should strive to overcome all weakness in your nature.

To awaken when you are at a dangerous point in ascending, denotes that you will find affairs taking a flattering turn when they appear gloomy. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Dream Symbols and Analysis

A dream set in New York symbolizes a busy lifestyle. You may not be getting a truly restful sleep and wake up feeling exhausted. Alternatively, a dream about New York may represent your aspirations to big city success. You envision yourself on top of the world, in the middle of it all.... Dream Symbols and Analysis

Dreamers Dictionary

Symbol: A rock is a symbol of rigidity but also strength. Rocks serve as a warning: don’t set your sights too high.

Vision: It you are rock climbing: hard work at your job will pay off handsomely. Falling off a boulder: you are overextended and exhausted. Pay more attention to your health. Looking up at a tall rock: an extraordinary project or task will come your way. Climbing down from a rock with great effort: relatives or friends are withdrawing from you, or your hopes are dashed.

Depth Psychology: A rock in a dream means vou have to overcome some- thing, but must do so gently. It is also a challenge: be steadfast, like “the rock of Gibraltar.’’ Sometimes the rock refers to a tombstone or marker, or it may be a phallic symbol. See Altar, Mountain.... Dreamers Dictionary

Islamic Dream Interpretation

Dreaming of oneself as having shaved one’s head during the month of Hajj is a glad tiding that one will proceed for Hajj. But if such a dream is seen during any other month besides Hajj it means that his capital (in monetary terms) will become exhausted. (This will be discussed in greater detail in this book).... Islamic Dream Interpretation

Islamic Dream - Cafer-i Sadik

interpreted with the two crossings upon 8 sides: Caliph & authority, leader, great scholar, justice, vow & wife, bright matter / affair. Whoever sees that the sun is rising over his two feet without his body, it is [interpreted as] wealth [he is granted] from the earth’s plants of either wheat or dates which he prepares by his feet, and he expands it. It is halal unless he exhausts himself in it just as Adam (pbuh) had exhausted himself. Whoever sees as if the sun darkened, dropped or blackened [then] adversity will happen in the world from a scholar’s death or a just authority or supporting affliction or someone of his fatherly side dies thus he crosses over depending on the dreamer’s situation / condition.... Islamic Dream - Cafer-i Sadik

New American Dream Dictionary

1. Worry that one might die soon.

2. Longing for a more noble ending.

3. One is feeling exhausted, “dead tired.” ... New American Dream Dictionary

Dreamers Dictionary

Vision: Dreaming about a vacation: you are sick of your job, or you do need a break, but the boss is not eager to see you go. Dreaming about going on vacation: you were looking forward to a fun event, but can’t take part.

Depth Psychology: The dream is a sign that you really need a break—it is high time you stopped putting in so much overtime. You are exhausted! See Park.... Dreamers Dictionary

Dream Symbols and Analysis

To dream of a vampire is a representation of many things. It represents your sexual nature as well as death and fear. It combines civility with violence. Consider who in your life wears these two faces. Someone in your waking life, who possesses a great deal of charm, may eventually turn hurtful and violent towards you and your feelings. You are most likely very aware of this possibility, but feel you cannot help but spend time with them. Vampires may also be a physical representation of the decision to have sex for the first time. Conversely, the vampire may indicate that you are exhausted, whether physically or emotionally, in your waking life. Otherwise, you may suffer from a debilitating addiction to alcohol, drugs, or sex.

To dream that you yourself are a vampire represents how you use those around you. You are using everything you have to further your own goals.... Dream Symbols and Analysis

Islamic Dream Interpretation

If a person dreams that he has dug a well in his house or he merely dreams of a well present in his house and such a well swells with water it means that Allah will grant him much barakah in his wealth and such wealth will become a means of earning him increased livelihood without much toil and hard work.

In the above case if the well is seen sending froth all its water until it becomes exhausted, it means he will lose much of his wealth with very little remaining.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Author; Book; Letter; Scribe; Secretary; Starling; Write) A writer in a dream represents a dishonest, cunning, deceitful and a fraudulent person.

If a writer sees himself unlettered in a dream, it means that he will forget his pranks, or lose his mind, or waste his religion, or develop a weak spiritual standing, or become poor.

If one sees himself as an unlettered person, then if he suddenly becomes a writer in a dream, it means that he will develop pranks and deceive his opponent or enemy. Discovering oneself as a writer in a dream means that one will attend to the comfort of others rather than to his own comfort. Consequently he will get exhausted from such exercise and find that he gained nothing from it. Ifa sick person sees such a dream, it means, his death.

If a worker sees that dream, then it connotes his honesty and loyalty, or it could mean that he will be promoted, or get a raise from his employer.

A writer in a dream also represents a tailor, a farmer, or a locomotive engineer. Seeing a scribe, or the secretary of managerial people, or someone in authority in a dream means that one may become one of them, or it could mean that he will rise in station, or improve his life. (Also see Paper; Write)... Islamic Dream Interpretation