exterior

The surface appearance, if inconsistent with the interior, is superficial



Exterior | The Dream Meanings

Keywords of this dream: Exterior

Strangest Dream Explanations

Because of its husk, dreams of an almond represent the substance hidden behind a rough exterior, as in the fact that your ego that might be obscuring your open and loving heart and soul. You are realizing that you cannot judge a book by its cover, but that you must look beyond the surface to discover the treasure within. See Nuts.... Strangest Dream Explanations

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The female within the male, shown as a woman in a man’s dream. Physically a man is predominantly male, but also has nipples and produces some female hormones. Psy­chologically, we may only express pan of our potential in everyday life. In a man, the more feeling and caring side may be given little expression. Apart from this, some functions, such as intuition and unconscious creativity, may also be held in latency. These secondary or latent characteristics are de­picted by the female in male dreams. In general we can say the woman represents the man’s emotions, his nurturing and caring quality. It also holds in it an expression of his complex of feelings about women, gained as experience mostly from his mother—or lack of mother—but also from a synthesis of all his female contacts. So the whole realm of his experience of the female can be represented by the woman in his dream, and is accessible through the image.

Good relationship with or marrying, the woman: shows the man integrating his own real emotions, sensitivity and intu­ition. This makes him more whole, balancing his exterior male qualities. It also shows the man meeting his experience of his mother in a healing way. This enables the man to have a realistic relationship with an actual woman. It also brings a sense of connectedness between his conscious self and what he senses as Life or, as Buckminster Fuller calls it. Universe. See Great Mother in this entry.

To be in conflict with the woman, or unable to make real physical and pleasurable contact with her: suggests difficulty in meeting what may have been a painful or threatening expe­rience of mother. This can lead to becoming an intellectual but emotionally barren man. Or being possessed in a negative way by the female traits, becoming emotionally unstable, opinionated and illogical. Actual relations with women will be difficult. Actual emotional or intimate merging with a woman is threatening because it bnngs the man close to the pain or fear connected with mother. Sex may be possible but not close feeling union. See woman. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

The body represents the individual and is his outward physical manifestation of all that he is. In dreams, the body often represents the Ego (see Introduction). Since being ‘physical’ is the baby’s first experience of itself, the body- forms the prime source of information.

Psychologically, most experience is translated into bodily feeling, and therefore becomes a rich source of symbolism in dreams. When emotions cannot be faccd in ordinary everyday life, they very often become distorted dream symbols.

Physical manifestation of an inner spirituality.

Different aspects of the body can have various meanings in dreams.

For example:

To dream of the upper part of the body is to link with the mind and the spiritual aspects of the charactcr, while the lower part of the body represents the instincts and emotional aspects of a character.

An adult’s head on an immature body, or a child’s head on an adult body is an indication that the dreamer needs to recognise the difference between mature thought and emotion.

If there is conflict between the upper and lower part, it indicates that there is disharmony between the mental faculties and instinctive behaviour.

The right side or hand being especially noticeable in dreams signifies we should take note of the logical side of our personality, whereas the left side or left hand indicates we need to be aware of our intuitive, creative side.

Body parts can have relevance as follows:

Abdomen, stomach, belly When the dream appears to concentrate on the abdomen, there is a need to focus 011 emotions and repressed feelings. Anus also see Excrement.

The young child’s first experience of control is as he or she gains control over bodilv functions. In dreams, the mind returns to that experience as a symbol of self- realisation and self-reliance and. more negatively, of suppression and defence. Such a dream therefore is indicating an aspect of childish behaviour or egotism. Arms We use our arms in all sorts of different ways. In dreams we may be defending ourselves, fighting or being held. We may also be showing passionate commitment. Back Dreaming of seeing someone else’s back suggests we should identify the more private elements in our characters. We should also be aware that other people may not at this present time - wish to share their thoughts with us. We may also find that we are vulnerable to the unexpected.

If we dream of turning our backs, we arc rejecting the particular feeling being experienced in the dream. Backbone If the backbone is particularly noticeable in a dream, we should consider the main support structure in our lives. Intellectually; we need to consider our firmness of character. Blood also see individual entry and Menstruation in M Dreaming of blood can have one of two meanings. It can signify that the dreamer feels on some level that a sacrifice is being made. This links into the ancient belief that the blood somehow contained the life of the spirit, and therefore spilt blood was sacred. It can also represent renewal of life through its connection with menstruation. Many- people fear blood, and thus a dream about blood can highlight the need to come to terms with these fears. On a more spiritual level it represents the blood of Christ.

Breasts also see individual entry Usually; to be conscious of breasts in dreams, indicates our connection with the mother figure and our need for nurturing. Such a dream can also indicate a wish to return to being an infant without responsibilities.

Constipation (in life as well as in dreams) Retention signifies an inability to let go of the past or of previous patterns of behaviour, literally to be uptight. Excrement I he dreamer may not have progressed on a subconscious level beyond a feeling that anything to do with bodily functions is dirtv and self-centred.

There may be an element of rebellion in the dreamer’s waking life. Playing with excrement can represent money and value, so playing with it in a dream can highlight anxiety about money, as well as fear of responsibility.

If the excrement is transformed into living animals, maybe rats, the dreamer is coming to terms with the fact that he is responsible for managing his own impulses. Excrement in its more spiritual meaning belongs to the realm of feelings and we may simply be trying to get rid of bad feelings. Those bad feelings can be turned into something worthwhile. Evacuation of the bowel usually highlights our need to be free of worry and responsibility, or possibly the need to learn how to be uninhibited. It can also signify the sexual act.

Eye Any dream to do with the eye is to do with observation and discrimination. It is indicative of enlightenment and wisdom, protection and stability. It has a connection with the power of light and, in ancient times, of the sun- gods. Through its connection with Egyptian symbolism, the eye is also a talisman. Loss of eyesight signifies the loss of clarity and, depending on which eye, can be either the loss of logic (right eye) or the loss of intuition (left eye). Regaining the eyesight can indicate a return to the innocence and clear-sightedness of the child. Fat To dream of becoming fat is to recognise the need to widen the scope of our activities in some way.

If the dreamer is uncomfortable with his or her size it would indicate fear possibly of taking on too much responsibility or of not being adequate for a task. Hair The hair represents strength and virility. In dreams to be combing the hair is to be attempting to untangle a particular attitude we mav have.

To be having our hair cut is to be trying to create order in our lives.

To be cutting someone else’s hair may be to be curtailing an activity (it is possible that there may be some fear or doubt connected with sexuality).

To be bald in a dream is to perhaps recognise one’s own intelligence. Hand The hands are one of the most expressive parts of the body and signify power and creativity.

The two hands contrasted with each other, a different object in each hand There may be some conflict in the dreamer between his belief and his feelings.

A hand on the breast signifies submission. Clasped hands indicate union or friendship, while clenched hands suggest a threat. Folded hands suggest deep repose, or a state of rest.

The hands covering the eyes generally represent shame or horror, while hands crossed at the wrists suggest that one is being bound.

The open hand represents justice and the laying on of hands signifies healing and blessing particularly if the hand is placed on the neck.

The hands placed together is an indication of dcfencclessness, while placed in someone else’s is an indication of a pledge of service. When the hands are raised this can indicate either adoration, prayer or surrender; if the palms are turned outwards a blessing is being given, while when they are raised to the head the dreamer should give a great deal of thought and care to his situation. Washing the hands suggests innocence or rejection of guilt, while wringing the hands signifies grief.

A huge hand, particularly from the sky suggests that one has been ‘specially chosen’.

The right hand is the ‘power’ hand, while the left is passive and receptive. Sometimes in dreams the left hand can represent cheating. Head The head is considered to be the principle part of the body. Because it is the scat of the life force, it denotes power and wisdom. Dreaming of the head suggests that we should look very carefully at the way we deal with both intelligence and folly.

To dream of the head being bowed suggests supplication. When the head is covered we may be covering up our own intelligence or acknowledging somebody else’s superiority.

A blow to the head in a dream can indicate that we should reconsider our actions in a particular situation. Heart The heart is the centre of the being and represents ‘feeling’ wisdom rather than intellectual wisdom. It is also representative of compassion and understanding. Heel This suggests the part of ourselves which is strong but, at the same time, vulnerable. Jaw The jaw often is representative of our self-expression. It also, on a more esoteric level, suggests the opening to the underworld. Kidneys The kidneys are organs of elimination, therefore to dream of them is to be aware of the need for cleansing.

Knees The knees are symbolic of prayer and supplication, and of emotional commitment. Limbs Whether it is partly to do with some kind of cellular memory and the growth process that takes place is uncertain, but in dreams anv limb can be taken to mean sexuality and fears associated with gender issues. Being dismembered can be taken in its literal sense - we are being torn apart. Sometimes this can suggest the need to restructure our lives and begin again. At other times it can indicate that there is a way in which we arc being threatened to the very core of our existence. Liver The liver is representative of irritability and suppressed anger.

Lungs In Chinese medicine the lungs represent grief. They are also involved in decision-making. Spiritually, the lungs are the seat of righteousness, and the source of thoughts concerning the Self. Mouth The mouth represents the devouring, demanding part of ourselves. It can also stand for the receptive side.

The circumstances of the dream may give a clue to the correct interpretation. Sometimes the mouth can svmbolisc the feminine side of our nature. Nose The nose in dreams can stand for curiosity, and also for intuition.

Penis Dreaming of a penis either one’s own or someone else’s usually highlights the attitude to penetrative sex.

Skin Skin in a dream stands for our persona or the facade we create for others. Hard, tough skin shows we have crcatcd a tough exterior, and are trying to protect ourselves.

Stomach -see Abdomen in this section Teeth Popularly, teeth are supposed to stand for aggressive sexuality although more properly they signify the growth process towards sexual maturity. Teeth falling or coming out easily indicates we arc aware of going through some form of transition, similar to that from childhood to maturity, or from maturity to old age and helplessness.

If one is anxious about teeth dropping out il suggests there is a fear of getting old and undesirable, or an anxiety about maturing. In a woman’s dream, if the teeth are swallowed this can signify pregnancy.

Throat Dreaming of the throat denotes awareness of our vulnerability and also of the need for self-expression.

Thumb Dreaming of a thumb suggests awareness of how powerful we are.

The thumb pointing upwards represents beneficial energy, poiting downwards is negative. This latter was used as the death signal for Roman gladiators. Tongue The tongue in dreams often signifies our ability to know- when to speak and when to remain silent. It may also be to do with our own understanding of information that we wish to pass on to other people. We may have deeply felt beliefs we wish to share. Another explanation that is much more basic is that of the symbolism of the serpent and the phallus, and hence sexuality. Urine Urine in a dream often indicates our feelings about emotional control. We may either yield to emotion or bottle it up. How we deal with urine often also tells us a great deal about our own sexuality.

Vagina Most often, dreams of the vagina are to do with one’s self image. In a woman’s dream, il highlights her receptivity. In a man’s dream it suggests his need to be penetrative, both mentally and physically. Womb The womb represents a return to the beginning. We all have need of basic security and shelter, and perhaps to do away with responsibility. Dreams of the womb can signify our need to satisfy those requirements. On a slightly more esoteric level the womb represents our connection with the Great Mother or Mother Earth (see Introduction). Dreams of returning to the womb suggest our need to reconnect with the passive, more yielding side of our nature. We may need a period of self-healing and recuperation.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Desire to be married or find a panner. Female dream: feelings about marriage or getting married; integration with intellect and exterior capability. Male dream: feelings about marriage; attempt to integrate conscious and uncon­scious. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Buildings in dreams represent the constructions we make in our lives. They are attitudes and beliefs we have built from our experience, perception, and often from our family habits and customs. Where in real life we can learn a lot about a person from his personal environment, so in dreams a building can also reflect the dreamer’s character hopes and concerns.

The features of the building mirror the features of the dreamer’s personality. Buildings in dreams can become composite, and therefore confusing. In understanding the dream, we should interpret the main appearance of the building first, as its main function, and the secondary appearance as qualities to be recognised. Various buildings have distinct meanings:

Boarding house or Hotel - also see individual entry in

To dream of a boarding house or hotel indicates that we may not feci secure within our living conditions.

Castle, Fortress, Citadel

The symbolism of the castlc or fortress is that of the defended spacc and therefore can be taken to represent the feminine or the Great Mother.

Courtyard

In dreams, the courtyard is a place of safety and often the shape will be relevant (see Shapes).

Church, temple etc. also see Church Buildings in C and Church in Religious Imagery As an environment for us to consider our system of belief, any religious building will suggest a place of sanctuary and refuge. Although we may not consciously adhere to any particular religion, most of us have principles by which we live, which will surface in dreams in recognisable images.

House

If we are aware that the house is not empty - that there is something in it (e.g. furnishings) it shows some aspect of the dreamer. Someone else in the house suggests that the dreamer may be feeling threatened by an aspect of his own personality.

If there are different activities going on it indicates there is a conflict between two parts of our personality, possibly the creative and the intellectual.

The front of the house portrays the front we show to the outside world.

Going into/out of the house

We may- have to decide whether we need at that time to be more introverted or more extroverted.

An impressive, awe-inspiring house In a dream like this we are conscious of the Self or the Soul.

Moving to a larger house

There is need for a change in our lives, perhaps to achieve a more open way of life, or even for more space. Being outside the house The more public side of ourselves is being depicted.

A small house, or the house where the dreamer was born

The dreamer is seeking security, or perhaps the safety of babyhood, without responsibility.

If the smallness of the house is constricting

We are being trapped by our responsibilities, and may need to escape.

Work on the house; cementing, repairing, etc.

Relationships may need to be worked on or repaired, or perhaps we need to look at health matters. We may need to take note of the damage or decay that has occurred in our lives.

Igloo - also see individual entry Because of its shape, the igloo stands for completeness and sanctuary. It is warm on the inside and cold on the outside and therefore signifies the difference between the internal and the external.

Pyramid The pyramid is considered to be a focus for power, so for one to appear in a dream is to be concentrating on the power within.

Temple - see Church Buildings in C and Church in Religious Imagery

Tower (obelisk, steeple, lighthouse, etc.)

Any image of a tower is representing the personality, and the Soul within. While there are obvious connotations that conncct it with masculinity, it is more corrcct to perceive it as the Self within a wider context. When thought of in this way attention can then be paid to other attributes of the tower, such as where windows, doors and staircases are placed. This leads to a greater understanding of the Spiritual Self.

Warehouse

The warehouse being primarily a storage place has the symbolism of being a repository either for spiritual energy or for spiritual rubbish.

Components of buildings Balcony (or ledge, sill, etc.)

We all have need for support within our lives and a balcony indicates both support and protec- tiveness. It can also represent the Mother in her protective aspect. Construction or demolition of a building. We all have the abil- itv within us to construct successful lives and equally an ability to self- dcstruct.

A dream that highlights construction or demolition gives us access to those qualities and abilities within ourselves. Doors also see individual entry Doors refer to the openings of the body and therefore, by default, one’s scxualitv.

The front door and back door signifies the vagina and the anus respectively. Breaking down the door can be taken to indicate an inhibition over sex and an unwillingness to face the issues. It can also represent rape or abuse.

Opening and closing the door

While often taken to stand for intercourse. this can show the dreamer’s attitude to sex.

Refusing to open the door

Although the dreamer may not technically be a virgin, for this to occur represents an innocent approach to their scxualitv.

A door between the outer and inner rooms shows there mav be a conflict between the conscious and the unconscious. Barring the door This highlights the dreamer’s need for self- protection.

If an animal or person forces his way in and destroys the lock

Our own protective mechanisms have let us clown. Escaping by another door indicates the dreamer needs to find a new solution to the one he thought of to solve a problem.

Someone knocking on the door signifies that the dreamer’s attention is being drawn to an external situation.

Hall/Passages

Any passage can stand for the passages within the body; for instance the vagina or the anus. Equally; on a psychological level, it signifies how we allow our personal space to be penetrated. Passages also represent the transitions between the various stages of our lives.

Lift A lift usually indicates how we deal with information.

For instance, a lift going down would suggest going down into the subconscious, while a lift going up would be moving towards the spiritual. It is believed that in the sleep state we leave our bodies. Thus, descending in a lift and getting stuck represents the entrapment of the spiritual by the physical body.

Rooms in a dream can describe various parts of our personalities or levels of understanding, but often signify either the womb or the mother figure. Thus the kitchen would be the home- making part of us whereas a sitting room would be the more relaxed, comfortable side.

A small room with only one door or a basement with water in it is a direct representation of the womb, and may indicate a return to the womb-like state.

A series of rooms

This refers to the various aspects of femininity and often to the whole soul. Anything in an upstairs room An upstairs room usually signifies mental or spiritual attributes, so any object will represent an idea or concept.

The basement or cellar This meaning can be ambivalent, since a cellar can represent the parts of ourselves that we have chosen to suppress. It can also represent family beliefs and habits, particularly if the basement is that of the parents. Leaving one room and going into another If this is a deliberate action in the dream, then it represents a change of state and of leaving something behind. Empty rooms Something, such as comfort or support, is lacking in our lives. Stairs Stairs are often an indication of the steps we must take in order to achieve a goal. Climbing the stairs is indicative of the effort that we must make in order to have access to the more mystical, spiritual side of our being. It can more simply be the exertion we practise in our everyday life. Going downstairs Conversely, in order to have access to the hidden unconscious side of ourselves, we need to ‘go down’ into the unconscious.

A golden staircase

This is such a basic image, with so many interpretations, that particular attention needs to be paid both to other aspects of the dream, and also the dreamers spiritual state at that specific time. Largely it represents a ‘death’, but not necessarily a physical death. It is more the realisation that we no longer need to be trapped within the physical, but can move towards a more fulfilling life. It is a way out of the mundane.

Walls A wall signifies a block to progress a difficulty we have or will come up against. Often the nature of the wall will give some clue as to what the block is.

For instance, a wall which looks old will signify an old problem, whereas a glass wall would indicate some difficulties with perception. Walls closing in could describe the remembered feelings of birth, but is more likely to represent a feeling of being trapped by the lifestyle we have.

A brick wall, rampart or dividing wall all signify the difference between two states of reality often the inner psychological state and the exterior everyday world.

Windows Windows will describe the means by which we appreciate the world we live in, the way we perceive reality. Dreaming that we arc looking outwards through a window can suggest that we have a more extrovert view of ourselves and will tend to look at external circumstances. Looking inwards through a window indicates we are looking inwards at our own personality, and perhaps at our own motivation. Opening a window The interpretation depends on whether we are opening the window from the inside or the outside.

If the former, we are dealing with our inner feelings which we may need to escape; the latter shows our attitude to outside opinion.

Breaking through a window (or glass door)

This can suggest the first sexual experience.

Stained glass windows

Because of the connection with churches, stained glass can be accepted as religious belief (also see Colour).... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of a cactus symbolize your egoic exterior that keeps people and opportunities at bay. Your subconscious mind is giving you the message that when your spiky edges are revealed, you have an opportunity for a breakthrough in intimacy. Intimacy and love are meant to bring up everything unlike itself.

The cactus can also represent good karma and your ability to survive extreme circumstances. See Boundary and Desert.... Strangest Dream Explanations

Ariadne's Book of Dream

A bag of Diamond nuts may mention that your radiance will be discovered once your hard shell has been cracked open. You may need to crack open your hard exterior to discover the meat or wisdom you really may have to offer others.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Sigmund Freud was the founder of modern therapeutic analysis of dreams. Freud encouraged clients to relax on a couch and allow free associations to arise in con­nection with aspects of their dream. In this way he helped the person move from the surface images (manifest content) of the dream to the underlying emotions, fantasies and wishes (latent content), often connected with early childhood. Be­cause dreams use condensation—a mass of different ideas or experiences all represented by one dream image or event— Freud stated that the manifest content was meagre’ compared with the ‘richness and variety’ of latent content.

If one suc­ceeds in touching the feelings and memories usually con­nected with a dream image, this becomes apparent because of the depth of insight and experience which arises. Although ideally the Freudian analyst helps the client discover their own experience of their dream, it can occur that the analyst puts to the client readymade views of the dream. Out of this has occurred the idea of someone else ‘analysing or telling us about our dream.

Carl Jung used a different approach. He applied amplifica­tion (see entry), helped the client explore their associations, used active imagination (see entry) and stuck to the structure of the dream. Because amplification also put to the client the information and experience of the therapist, again the dreamwork can be largely verbal and intellectual, rather than experiential.

In the approach of Fritz Perls (gestalt therapy) and Moreno (psychodrama), dream analysis is almost entirely experiential.

The person exploring the dream acts out or verbalises each role or aspect of the dream.

If one dreamt of a house, in gestalt one might stan by saying I am a house’ and then go on to describe oneself just as one is as the particular house in the dream. It is important, even if the house were one existing externally, not to attempt a description of the external house, but to stay with the house as it was in the dream. This is like amplification, except the client gives all the information. This can be a very dramatic and emotional experience because we begin consciously to touch the immense realms of experience usually hidden behind the image. When successful this leads to personal insights into behaviour and creativity. See dream processing; amplification; gestalt dream work.

dream as a meeting place Any two people, or group of people who share their dreams, particularly if they explore the associated feelings and thoughts connected with the dream images, achieve social intimacy quickly. Whether it is a family sharing their dreams, or two fnends, an environment can be created in which the most profound feelings, painful and wonderful, can be allowed. Such exposure of the usually pri­vate areas of one s feelings and fears often presents new infor­mation to the dreamer, and also allows ventilation of what may never have been consciously expressed before. In doing so a healing release is reached, but also greater self under­standing and the opportunity to think over or reconsider what is discovered.

Herbert Reed, editor of the dream magazine Sundance, and resident in Virginia Beach, Va., initiated group dreaming ex­periments. It started because Reed noticed that in the dream groups he was running, when one of the group aired a prob­lem, other members would subsequently dream about that person’s problem. He went on to suggest the group should attempt this purposely and the resulting dreams shared to see if they helped the person with the problem.

The reported dreams often formed a more detailed view of the person’s situation. In one instance the group experienced many dream images of water. It aided the woman who was seeking help to admit she had a phobia of water and to begin thinking about learning to swim. In another experiment, a woman presented the problem of indecision about what college to transfer to and what to study. Her group subsequently said they were confused because they had not dreamt about school. Several had dreams about illicit sex. though, which led the woman to admit she was having an affair with a married man. She went on to realise that it was the affair which was underlying her indecision. She chose to end the affair and further her career.

Whatever may be underlying the results of Reed’s expen- ments, it is noticeably helpful to use the basic principles he is working with. They can be used by two people equally as well as a group—by a parent and child, wife and husband, busi­nessman and employee. One sets out to dream about each other through mutual agreement. Like any undertaking, the involvement, and therefore the results, are much more pro­nounced if there is an issue of reasonable importance behind the experiment. It helps if one imagines that during sleep you are going to meet each other to consider what is happening between you. Then sleep, and on waking take time to recall any dream. Note it down, even if it seems far removed from what you expected. Then explore its content using the tech­niques in dream processing.

Example: My wife and I decided to attempt to meet in our dreams. I dreamt I was in a room similar to the back bedroom of my previous marnage. My present wife was with me. She asked me to help her move the wardrobe. It reminded me of, but did not look like, the one which had been in that bed­room. I stood with my back to it, and reached my hands up to press on the top, inside. In this way I carried it to another wall. As I put it down the wood broke. I felt it ought to be thrown away’ (Thomas B). Thomas explored the dream and found he connected feelings about his first marriage with the wardrobe and bedroom. In fact the shabby wardrobe was Tom’s feelings of shabbiness at having divorced his first wife. In his first marriage, represented by the bedroom, he always felt he was married for life. In divorcing, he had done some­thing he didn’t like and was carrying it about with him. He says ‘1 am carrying this feeling of shabbiness and second best into my present relationship, and I need to get rid of it.’

dream as a spiritual guide Dreams have always been con­nected with the spiritual side of human experience, even though today many spiritual leaders disagree with consider­ation of dreams. Because dreams put the dreamer in touch with the source of their own internal wisdom and certainty, some conflict has existed between authoritative priesthood and public dreaming.

A lay person finding their own ap­proach to God in a dream might question the authority of the priests. No doubt people frequently made up dreams about God in order to be listened to. Nevertheless, despite opposi­tion, Matthew still dreamt of an angel appearing to him, Jo­seph was still warned by God to move Jesus; Peter still dreamt his dream of the unclean animals.

The modern scientific approach has placed large question marks against the concept of the human spirit. Study of the brain’s functions and biochemical activities have led to a sense of human personality being wholly a series of biological and biochemical events.

The results of this in the relationship between doctor and patient, psychiatrist and client, some­times results in the communication of human personality be­ing of little consequence. It may not be put into words, but the intimation is that if one is depressed it is a biochemical prob­lem or a brain malfunction.

If one is withdrawn or autistic, it is not that there is a vital centre of personality which has for some reason chosen to avoid contact, but that a biochemical or physiological problem is the cause—it’s nothing personal, take this pill (to change the biochemistry, because you are not really a person). Of course we have to accept that human personality must sometimes face the tragedy of biochemical malfunction, but we also need to accept that biochemical and physiological process can be changed by human will and courage.

In attempting to find what the human spirit is by looking at dreams, creativity stands out.

The spiritual nature may not be what we have traditionally considered it to be.

An overview of dreams and how dreamers relate to them suggests one amaz­ing fact. Let us call it the ‘seashell effect’. When we hear sounds in a shell that we hold to our ear, the noises heard seem exterior to oneself, yet they are most likely amplification of sounds created in our own ear, perhaps by the passage of blood. Imagine an electronic arcade machine which the player could sit in and, when running, the player could be engulfed in images, sounds, smell and sensation. At first there is shim­mering darkness, then a sound, and lights move. Is it a face seen, or a creature. Like Rorschach’s ink blots, the person creates figures and scenes out of the shapeless light and sound.

A devil appears which terrifies the player. People, de­mons, animals, God and angels appear and fade. Scenes are clearcut or a maelstrom of movement and ill-defined activity. Events arise showing every and any aspect of human experi­ence. Nothing is impossible.

If, on stepping out, we told the player that what occurred was all their own creation due to unconscious feelings, fears, habits, thoughts and physiological processes occurring within them, like the seashell effect, they might say ‘Good God, is that all it was, and I thought it was real. What a waste of time.’

Whether we can accept it or not, as a species we have created out of our own longings, fears, pain and perhaps vi­sion, God, with many different names—politics, money, dev­ils, nationalism, angels, an, and so on and on. All of it has flowed out of us. Perhaps we even deny we are the authors of the Bible, wars, social environments. Responsibility is diffi­cult. It is easier to believe the source is outside oneself. And if we do take responsibility for our amazing creativity, we may feel ‘is that all it is—me?’ Yet out of such things, such fears, such drives, such unconscious patterns as we shape our dreams with, we shape our life and fonune, we shape our children, we shape the world and our future.

The shadow of fear we create in our dream, the situation of aloneness and anger, becomes a pattern of feelings, real in its world of mind. We create a monster, a Djinn, a devil, which then haunts and influences us. Or with feelings of hope, of purposiveness and love, create other forces in us and the world. But we are the creator. We are in no way separate from the forces which create our existence. We are those creative forces. In the deep­est sense, not just as an ego, we create ourselves, and we go on creating ourselves. We are the God humanity has looked so long for.

The second aspect of the human spirit demonstrated by dreams is consciousness.

The unconscious mind, if its func­tion is not clogged with a backlog of undealt with painful childhood experience and nonfunctional premises, has a pro­pensity to form gestalts. It takes pieces of experience and fits them together to form a whole. This is illustrated by how we form gestalts when viewing newsprint photographs, which are made up of many small dots. Our mind fits them together and sees them as a whole, giving meaning where there are only dots. When the human mind is working well, when the indi­vidual can face a wide range of emotions, from fear and pain to ecstasy, this process of forming gestalts can operate very creatively. This is because it needs conscious involvement, and if the personality is frightened of deep feeling, the uniting of deeply infantile and often disturbing cxpcrience is cut out. Yet these areas are very rich mines of information, containing our most fundamental learning.

If the process is working well, then one’s expenence is gradually transformed into insights which transcend and thereby transform one s personal life.

For instance, we have witnessed our own binh in some manner, we also see many others appeanng as babies. We see people ageing, dying. We see millions of events in our life and in others.

The uncon­scious, deeply versed in imagery, ritual and body language, out of which it creates its dreams, picks up information from music, architecture, traditional rituals, people walking in the street, the unspoken world of parental influence.

The sources are massive, unbelievable. And out of it all our mind creates meaning. Like a process of placing face over face over face until a composite face is formed, a synthesis of all the faces; so the unconscious scans all this information and creates a world view, a concept of life and death.

The archetypes Jung talks of are perhaps the resulting synthesis of our own expenence, reaching points others have met also.

If so, then Chnst might be our impression of humanity as a whole.

If we dare to touch such a synthesis of experience it may be seanng, breathtaking.

It breaks the boundaries of our present personality and con­cepts because it transcends. It shatters us to let the new vision emerge. It reaches, it soars, like an eagle flying above the single events of life. Perhaps because of this the great hawk of ancient Egypt represented the human spirit.

Lastly, humans have always been faced by the impossible.

To a baby, walking and not wetting its pants is impossible, but with many a fall and accident it does the impossible. It is a god in its achievement.

To talk, to fly heavier-than-air planes, to walk on the Moon, were all impossible. Humans challenge the impossible every day. Over and over they fall, back into defeat. Many lie there broken. Yet with the next moment along come youngsters with no more sense than grasshoppers, and because they don’t know what the differ­ence is between right and left, do the impossible. Out of the infinite potential, the great unknown, they draw something new. With hope, with folly, with a wisdom they gain from who knows where, they demand more. And it’s a common everyday son of miracle. Mothers do it constantly for their children—transcending themselves. Lovers go through hell and heaven for each other and flower beyond who they were. You and I grow old on it as our daily bread, yet fail to see how holy it is. And if we turn away from it, it is because it offers no certainties, gives no authority, claims no reward. It is the spir­itual life of people on the street. And our dreams remember, even if we fail.

For this is the body and blood of the human spirit.

dream as a therapist and healer There is a long tradition of using dreams as a base for both physical and psychological healing. One of the earliest recorded incidents of such healing is when Pharaoh’s ‘spirit was troubled, and he sent for all the magicians of Egypt and all its wise men; and Pharaoh told them his dream, but there was none who could interpret it’. Then Joseph revealed the meaning of the dream and so the healing of Pharaoh’s troubled mind took place (Genesis 41).

The Greek Temples of Asclepius were devoted to using dreams as a base for healing of body and mind (see dreams and ancient Greece).

The Iroquois Amerindians used a social form of dream therapy also (see Iroquoian dream cult).

The dream process was used much more widely throughout his­tory in such practices as Pentecostal Christianity, shaktipat yoga in India, and Anton Mesmer’s groups (see sleep move­ments).

Sigmund Freud pioneered the modern approach to the use of dreams in therapy, but many different approaches have developed since his work. Examples of the therapeutic action of gaining insight into dreams are to be found in the entnes on abreaction, recurring dreams, reptiles.

The entry on dream processing gives information about using a dream to gain insight and healing. See also dream as meeting place.

A feature which people who use their dreams as a thera­peutic tool mention again and again is how dreams empower them. Many of us have an unconscious feeling that any impor­tant healing work regarding our body and mind can only be undertaken and directed by an expert, the expert might be a doctor, a psychiatrist, psychotherapist, or osteopath. Witness­ing the result of their own dream process, even if helped by an expert, people feel in touch with a wonderful internal process which is working actively for their own good. One woman, who had worked on her dream with the help of a fnend (non expert), said It gave me great confidence in my own internal process. I realised there was something powerful in myself working for my own good. It was a feeling of cooperating with life.’ One is frequently amazed by one’s own resources of wisdom, penetrating insight and sense of connection with life, as met in dreamwork. This is how dreams play a pan in helping one towards wholeness and balance.

The growing awareness of one’s central view of things, which is so wide, piercing and often humorous, brings developing self respect as the saga of one’s dreams unfolds.

There may be no hint of this, however, if a person simply records their dreams without attempting to find a deeply felt contact with their contents. It is in the searching for associ­ated feelings and ideas that the work of integrating the many strands of one’s life begins. Gradually one weaves, through a co-operative action with the dream process, a greater unifica­tion of the dark and the light, the painful and transcendent in one’s nature.

The result is an extraordinary process of educa­tion. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Femininity; exteriorisation of feelings. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of getting dressed symbolize that you are suiting up and showing up in life, preparing to present yourself in a way that represents the image you show to the world. You are covering up your nakedness and authenticity with a socially acceptable exterior.

The clothes you chose to wear are significant and say a lot about how you want the world/your peers to see you.

If you dream of getting “dressed up”, then you are preparing yourself energetically to make an impression. This dream may be a symbol that good news is forthcoming and will be worth celebrating. See Clothes.

If you dream of dressing for a salad, see Salad Dressing.... Strangest Dream Explanations

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Over the years many theories to ex­plain the ‘why’ of dreams have been put forward. These range from dreams being messages from spirits; being results of food eaten prior to sleep; the mind freewheeling nonsensi­cally; the garbage disposal system of the mind; suggestions from waking experience; a computer reprogramming for the brain; to Freud’s wish fulfilment and Jung’s compensation theory.

If we do not argue any particular theory, however, then perhaps we see dreams as having a much wider function.

The most primal drives observable are survival, growth and repro­duction. Other urges, such as eating, social position, curiosity, are secondary.

The human animal appears to have survived and reproduced more capably after the development of self awareness, language and reasoning. With or without these, we remain an animal with a psychobiological nature. All ani­mals are known to dream. All animals share a certain situa­tion. They have an internal world out of which arises im­pulses (to eat, to mate, to avoid danger) and feeling reactions (anger, fear, anticipation). And they have an external world which confronts them with real survival dangers, sources of food, a mate, changes in environmental conditions.

A dream lies somewhere between these two worlds.

We can think of the human personality as being like a special son of cavity into which all these influences are dropped or are thrown. Physical sensations, internal drives and emotions, language, social rules, religious ideas; prompts to make decisions; news of war, massive media and advertis­ing information, are all dropped in.

The cavity has to deal with it, but as it is a mixture of things, many of which are in opposition, some sort of balance has to be kept. But how? And it cannot be simply a matter of throwing out all of one sort or aspect of things. Eradicating the memory of criticism might make us more calm, but it would limit the process of psychological growth, which has survival value.

Dreams can be seen to be connected with our survival and self regulating process. Because this involves all aspects of oneself and one’s experience, one cannot give dreams a single definition. They probably have many secondary functions, such as an interface to balance the internal and external influ­ences, to compensate between the inner needs and outer real­ity—a baby may miss its feed so, to cope with this primal need, it may dream of being fed. Traumatic or exterior danger­ous events, which cannot be processed immediately, can be stored and dealt with (experimented with or abreacted) while asleep. In higher mammals, infant traumas can be stored and dealt with in sleep when, or if, a stronger ego develops.

To meet the loneliness and isolation of consciousness’ or fears of death, the dream can link the waking self with its unconscious sense of unity or God.

To meet survival needs of primitive human beings prior to rational thought, the dream probably acted as a computer, synthesising experience and information, giving rise to creative solutions to hunting or social situations, presented as sleeping or waking imagery. This may explain why many pnmitive people say skills such as farming, weav­ing, writing, were told them by a vision of a god or goddess.

If we realise that the dream is an end product of a process which produces it, it enables us to see that the process’ (the survival function which regulates, compensates, links, prob­lem solves) can be accessed without meeting the dream. See sleep movements; dream process as computer; Adler; Freud; Jung. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘1 dream insects are dropping either on me from the ceiling of our bedroom, or crawling over my pillow. My long-suffering husband is always woken when I sit bolt upright in bed, my eyes wide open and my arm pointing at the ceiling. I try to brush them off. I can still see them—spiders or woodlice. I am now well aware it is a dream. But no matter how hard I stare the insects are there in perfect detail. I am not frightened, but wish it would go away’ (Sue D). Sue’s dream only became a hallucination when she opened her eyes and continued to see the insects in per­fect clarity.

A hallucination can be experienced through any of the senses singly, or all of them together. So one might have a hallucinatory smell or sound.

To understand hallucinations, which are quite common without any use of drugs such as alcohol, LSD or cannabis, one must remember that everyone has the natural ability to produce such images. One of the definitions of a dream according to Freud is its hallucinatory quality. While asleep we can create full sensory, vocal, motor and emotional expenence in our dream. While dreaming we usually accept what we experience as real.

A hallucination is an experience of the function which produces dreams’ occur­ring while we have our eyes open.

The voices heard, people seen, smells smelt, although appearing to be outside us, are no more exterior than the things and images of our dreams. With this information one can understand that much classed as psychic phenomena and religious experience is an encoun­ter with the dream process. That does not, of course, deny its imponance.

There are probably many reasons why Sue should experi­ence a hallucination and her husband not. One might be that powerful drives and emotions might be pushing for attention in her life. Some of the primary drives are the reproductive drive, urge towards independence, pressure to meet uncon­scious emotions and past trauma and fears, any of which, in order to achieve their ends, can produce hallucinations.

A hallucination is therefore not an ‘illusion’ but a means of giving information from deeper levels of self. Given such names as mediumship or mystical insight, in some cultures or individuals the ability to hallucinate is often rewarded so­cially.

Drugs such as LSD, cannabis, psilocybin, mescaline, pey- ote and opium can produce hallucinations. This is sometimes because they allow the dream process to break through into consciousness with less intervention.

If this occurs without warning it can be very disturbing.

The very real dangers are that unconscious content, which in ordinary dreaming breaks through a threshold in a regu­lated way, emerges with little regulation. Fears, paranoid feel­ings, past traumas, can emerge into the consciousness of an individual who has no skill in handling such dangerous forces. Because the propensity of the unconscious is to create images, an area of emotion might emerge in an image such as the devil. Such images, and the power they contain, not being integrated in a proper therapeutic setting, may haunt the indi­vidual, perhaps for years. Even at a much milder level, ele­ments of the unconscious will emerge and disrupt the person’s ability to appraise reality and make judgments. Un­acknowledged fears may lead the drug user to rationalise their reasons for avoiding social activity or the world of work. See ESP and dreams; dead lover in husband under family. See also out of body experience.... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

If we are not the hero/ine of our own dream, we are probably still not accepting responsibility for our own drives, potentials and weaknesses.

The hero/ine frequently depicts our initiative and unexpressed potential. We might see our highest ideals as coming from an exterior figure such as Christ, and so miss touching the depths of our own being, avoid responsibility for our urges or actions. What happens to the hero/ine shows how one’s own creativity and expressed love fare. See Christ, hero/ine and the self under archetypes; religion and dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘I was in my bedroom, I looked up and saw the top of some long cunains were on fire. I thought “My God, now my sister’s setting fire to the house to hide the evidence” ‘ (Ms A T).

The example illustrates how we may use one emotion or situation to hide what is really important.

Hiding from feeling; avoiding awareness of something we don’t want to see; being protective—hiding how we really feel about someone, or our sexual feelings about someone; not knowing. Hiding from something dangerous, dangerous thing hidden: feeling threatened either by unconscious contents or exterior situation. Hiding a body, object: not facing difficult feelings connected with the body or thing. See dead people dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dreamers Dictionary

Symbol: Like a town or temple, a house stands for the center of the world and a reflection of your universe.

Vision: The condition of the house represents your present situation.

The roof of the house refers to the state of your health, the exterior to your external appearance.

The upper floor stands for your forehead (and brain); the middle floor the area of the chest, the first floor the intestines, and the ground floor and base- ment the legs and feet.

If you dream of old houses frequendy, you are afraid of old age. Building a house together with other people: you have good friends at your side. Looking at an empty house: you have missed a few opportunities. Tearing down a house: you are strong enough to deal with the ol>stacles that come your way. Living in a run-down house: pay more attention to your health. Watching a house collapse: you won’t reach your goals—be prepared for losses. In a man’s dream, the house (it does not matter if it is a luxurious villa or a farmhouse) represents ambitions, professional advancement, security, and safety. In a woman’s dreams, the balcony is the chest.

Depth Psychology: The house in a dream is the symbol for the Body and what happens with the body.

A house in ill repair, destroyed, or even on fire, points to your poor health and should be taken seriously.

The foundation is a symbol for the mental/intellectual “foundation’ on which you have built your life.

The basement is the symbol of the unconscious, where repressed urges and cravings hide.

The kitchen is the place where “life is lived” every day and where diversion can be found.

The bedroom represents attitudes toward sex and emotional connections to other people.

The living room stands for recreation, rest, and relaxation.

The bathroom is the place for moral cleansing and the “washing away” of disappointments.

The toilet stands for “letting go” of emotional ballast, tensions, and the past.

The roof (and attic) stands for your mental/spiritual part, and symbolizes protection from the outside world. See Door, Furniture, Stairs, Window.... Dreamers Dictionary

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Buildings

1- The igloo is interesting as a symbol in dreams. It can equally represent a cold exterior containing a very warm interior, or the coldness of the construction itself.

It can appear as though someone is uncaring and therefore creating an unloving home environment, although in fact there is warmth within that person.

2- The igloo can often represent the feminine and the womb. Sometimes, it represents frigidity, but at other times the ability of a woman to relax and be herself once her barriers have been overcome.

3- The feminine principle, in the sense of sheltering and nurturing, is depicted in the igloo.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Psychological / emotional perspective: The igloo is interesting as a symbol in dreams. It can equally represent a cold exterior containing a very warm interior, or the coldness of the construction itself. It can appear as though someone is uncaring and, therefore, creating an unloving home environment, although in fact there is warmth within that person.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

One of Carl Jung s most interesting areas of thought is that of individuation. In a nutshell the word refers to the processes involved in becoming a self-aware human being.

The area of our being we refer to when we say T, ‘me’ or ‘myself’ is our conscious self awareness, our sense of self, which Jung calls the ego.

The autobiography of Helen Keller has helped in understanding what may be the difference be­tween an animal and a human being with self awareness. Helen, made blind and deaf through illness before learning to speak, lived in a dark unconscious world lacking any self awareness until the age of seven, when she was taught the deaf and dumb language. At first her teacher’s fingers touch­ing hers were simply a tactile but meaningless experience. Then, perhaps because she had leamt one word prior to her illness, meaning flooded her darkness. She tells us that ‘noth­ingness was blotted out’. Through language she became a person and developed a sense of self, whereas before there had been nothing.

The journey of individuation is not only that of becoming a person, but also expanding the boundaries of what we can allow ourselves to experience as an ego. As we can see from an observation of our dreams, but mostly from an extensive exploration of their feeling content, our ego is conscious of only a small area of experience.

The fundamental life pro­cesses in one’s being may be barely felt. In many contempo­rary women the reproductive drive is talked about as some­thing which has few connections with their personality. Few people have a living, feeling contact with their early child­hood, in fact many people doubt that such can exist. Because of these factors the ego can be said to exist as an encapsulated small area of consciousness, surrounded by huge areas of ex­perience it is unaware of.

In a different degree, there exists in each of us a drive towards the growth of our personal awareness, towards greater power, greater inclusion of the areas of our being which remain unconscious.

A paradox exists here, because the urge is towards integration, yet individuation is also the process of a greater self differentiation. This is a spontaneous process, just as is the growth of a tree from a seed (the tree in dreams often represents this process of self becoming), but our personal responsibility for our process of growth is neces­sary at a certain point, to make conscious what is uncon­scious.

Because dreams are constantly expressing aspects of indi­viduation it is wonh knowing the main areas of the process. Without sticking rigidly to Jungian concepts—which see indi­viduation as occurring from mid-life onwards in a few individuals—aspects of some of the main stages are as fol­lows. Early babyhood—the emergence of self consciousness through the deeply biological, sensual and gestural levels of experience, all deeply felt; the felt responses to emerging from a non-changing world in the womb to the need to reach out for food and make other needs known. Learning how to deal with a changing environment, and otherness in terms of rela­tionship.

Childhood—learning the basics of motor, verbal and social skills, the very basics of physical and emotional indepen­dence. One faces here the finding of strength to escape the domination of mother—difficult, because one is dependent upon the parent in a very real way—and develop in the psyche a satisfying sexual connection. In dream imagery this means, for the male, an easy sexual relationship with female dream figures, and a means of dealing with male figures in competition (father); see sex in dreams.

The dream of the mystic beautiful woman precedes this, a female figure one blends with in an idealistic sense, but who is never sexual.

The conflict with father—really the internal struggle with one’s image of father as more potent than self—when re­solved becomes an acceptance of the power of one’s own manhood. Women face a slightly different situation.

The woman’s first deeply sensual and sexual love object—in a bonded parent-child relationship—was her mother. So be­neath any love she may develop for a man lies the love for a woman. Whereas a man, in sexual love which takes him deeply into his psyche, may realise he is making love to his mother, a woman in the same situation may find her father or her mother as the love object. In the unconscious motivations which lead one to choose a mate, a man is influenced by the relationship he developed with his mother, a woman is influ­enced by both mother and father in her choice. Example: ‘I went across the road to where my mother’s sister lived. I wanted to cuddle her and touch her bare breasts, but we never seemed to manage this. There were always interruptions or blocks.’ (Sid L).

At these deep levels of fantasy and desire, one has to recog­nise that the first sexual experience is—hopefully—at the mother’s breast. This can be transformed into later fantasies/ dreams/desires of penis in the mouth, or penis in the vagina, or penis as breast, mouth as vagina.

For most of us, however, growth towards maturity does not present itself in such primi­tively sexual ways, simply because we are largely unconscious of such factors. In general we face the task of building a self image out of the influences, rich or traumatic, of our experi­ence. We leam to stand, as well as we may, amidst the welter of impressions, ideas, influences and urges, which constitute our life and body. What we inherit, what we experience, and what we do with these creates who we are.

One of the major themes of individuation is the journey from attachment and dependence towards independence and involved detachment. This is an overall theme we mature in all our life. In its widest sense, it pertains to the fact that the origins of our consciousness lie in a non-differentiated state of being in which no sense of T exists. Out of this womb condi­tion we gradually develop an ego and personal choice. In fact we may swing to an extreme of egotism and materialistic feel­ings of independence from others and nature.

The observable beginnings of this move to independence are seen as our at­tempt to become independent of mother and father. But de­pendence has many faces: we may have a dependent relation­ship with husband or wife; we may depend upon our work or social status for our self confidence; our youth and good looks may be the things we depend upon for our sense of who we are, our self image. With the approach of middle and old age we will then face a crisis in which an independence from these factors is necessary for our psychological equilibnum.

The Hindu practice of becoming a sanyassin, leaving behind family, name, social standing, possessions, is one way of meeting the need for inner independence from these in order to meet old age and death in a positive manner. Most people face it in a quieter, less demonstrative way. Indeed, death might be thought of as the greatest challenge to our identifica­tion with body, family, worldly status and the external world as a means to identity. We leave this world naked except for the quality of our own being.

Meeting oneself, and self responsibility, are further themes of individuation.

The fact that our waking self is a small spot­light of awareness amidst a huge ocean of unconscious life processes creates a situation of tension, certainly a threshold or ‘iron curtain’, between the known and unknown.

If one imagines the spotlighted area of self as a place one is standing in, then individuation is the process of extending the bound­ary of awareness, or even turning the spotlight occasionally into the surrounding gloom. In this way one places together impressions of what the light had revealed of the landscape in which we stand, clues to how we got to be where we are, and how we relate to these. But one may remain, or choose to remain, largely unconscious of self.

The iron curtain may be defended with our desire not to know what really motivates us, what past hurts and angers we hide. It may be easier for us to live with an exterior God or authority than to recognise the ultimate need for self responsibility and self cultivation.

To hide from this, humanity has developed innumerable escape routes—extenonsed religious practice, making scapegoats of other minority groups or individuals, rigid belief in a political system or philosophy, search for samadhi or God as a final solution, suicide. This aspect of our matunng process shows itself as a paradox (common to maturity) of becoming more sceptical, and yet finding a deeper sense of self in its connec­tions with the cosmos. We lose God and the beliefs of humanity’s childhood, yet realise we are the God we searched for. This meeting with self, in all its deep feeling of connec­tion, its uncertainty, its vulnerable power, is not without pain and joy. Example: ‘On the railway platform milled hundreds of people, all men I think. They were all ragged, thin, dirty and unshaven. I knew I was among them. I looked up at the mountainside and there was a guard watching us. He was cruel looking, oriental, in green fatigues. On his peaked cap was a red star. He carried a machine gun. Then I looked at the men around me and I realised they were all me. Each one had my face. I was looking at myself. Then I felt fear and terror’ (Anon).

The last of the great themes of individuation is summed up in William Blake’s words ‘1 must Create a System, or be en- slav’d by another Man’s; I will not Reason and Compare: my business is to Create.’ A function observable in dreams is that of scanning our massive life experience (even a child’s life experience has millions of bits of information) to see what it says of life and survival. Out of this we unconsciously create a working philosophy of what life means to us. It is made up not only of what we have experienced and learnt in the gen­eral sense, but also from the hidden information in the cul­tural riches we have inherited from literature, music, art, the­atre and architecture.

The word hidden” is used because the unconscious ‘reads’ the symbolised information in these sources. It is, after all, the master of imagery in dreams. But unless we expand the boundaries of our awareness we may not know this inner philosopher.

If we do get to know it through dreams, we will be amazed by the beauty of its in­sight into everyday human life.

In connection with this there is an urge to be, and perhaps to procreate oneself in the world. Sometimes this is experi­enced as a sense of frustration—that there is more of us than we have been able to express, or to make real. While physical procreation can be seen as a physical survival urge, this drive to create in other spheres may be an urge to survive death as an identity. Dreams frequently present the idea that our sur­vival of death only comes about from what we have given of ourself to others. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Feeling other people’s opinions or will forced on and influencing one; internal influence of something exterior, social pressure to conform or be obedient; sexual intercourse.

If a sedative is given: return to non-responsibility, as in in­fancy. See syringe. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

The true motive; one’s interior and exterior must match; see “cup”... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘When inside the house I dream of recur­rently, I am terrified of someone, a man who is trying to find and kill me’ (Barbara T). As a young woman Barbara discov­ered the dead body of her father (he had shot himself) in the house of her dream. Being killed shows Barbara feeling over­whelmed by the feelings about her father—the man. Being killed: an interior or exterior influence which you feel is ‘kill­ing’—undermining, making ineffective, strangling, choking— one’s self confidence or sense of identity. Killing: repressing or stopping some aspect of oneself, as when we kill our love for someone. Killing parents, animals: see family; animals.

Example: ‘Some two weeks before my dear wife died of cancer of the oesophagus, at about three a.m. in the morning, she shot up in bed screaming “No. No! No!” On questioning her she said her mother, who had died in November 1981, was trying to kill her’ (Gerry B). In this unusual dream the wife feels the approach of death, depicted by her mother. As dreams suggest, death is as much a new area of experience as adolescence was, it would have helped the dreamer if she had taken time to develop a more positive relationship with her mother as described in dream processing. See death. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Grass in your front or backyard may represent the exterior carpet that you lay out to welcome others and thus reflects your presentation to the world.

If it is overgrown with weeds, a lawn in a dream may comment on a negativity that may repel others.

A lawn may represent the energy field that extends out from the body known as the aura.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Left:

if we are right handed, the left represents the less dominant or expressed side of oneself, or the parts of our nature we try to hide or suppress.

If we write or knock in a nail using our right hand, we will hold the paper or nail with our left. So left leg or arm frequently has this sense of representing the supponive but less dominant functions in us. Our confidence may suppon our activity as a salesperson, so may be depicted as being on the left.

Right:

the dominant, confident, conscious, exterior or expressed side of self; light­ness; correct social behaviour, moral.

Dreams can also use a play on what is right and left to illustrate a polarity or opposites. Our internal world of feel­ings, memories and values—the left; our external world of activity and environment—the right.

A secondary choice— left; the right’ choice at the time—right. Pans of self uncon­scious or shadowy—left; our conscious known self—right.

The immoral, selfish, wrong action—left; the moral, right ac­tion—right.

Example: ‘On my right are three monks, on my left sits a beautiful, shapely blonde. I am in the centre and I see a road, which leads to the right and a beautiful sunlit valley in the distance’ (from Dreams Your Magic Mirror by Elsie Sechrist). Here right and left represent not only choice between sexual pleasure and religious discipline, but also the polar opposites of spiritual and material. Although in the dream there is a movement to the right, to find equilibrium we often have to take a way between the opposites.

Idioms: two left feet; keep on the right side of somebody; in one’s right mind, in the right; mister right; set somebody right; right hand man; right in the head, stan on the right foot; give one’s right arm. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Because feelings arc often felt to flow within us, as when we listen to rousing music, or notice a feeling in the chest which moves to the throat, then may become crying or other expressed emotion, they may be shown in a dream as fluid. Liquid in bottle: a change of feelings, as when we dnnk wine or medicine; influenced by exterior emotions. White liq­uid: milk of kindness, self-giving or sperm, the magic fluid out of which life emerges. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of a male who is man enough to care for his appearance is about the balance of masculine and feminine energy. You are allowing the masculine part of you out into the light of day to get primped and primed, sanding off the rough edges of your rugged masculine exterior and interior. Or this dream may be showing you that you are spending too much time caring for your exterior, and not enough time caring for your most essential, interior self.... Strangest Dream Explanations

The Language of Dreams

(see Barefoot, Body, Clothes)

Being, or feeling, overexposed.

Freedom; the loosening of conventional restrictions.

The real you, devoid of all exterior ??iasks.

Total comfort with yourself to the point where you need no trappings for confidence. Also the ability to be totally open and honest.

The barest, most succinct facts (e.g., the “naked truth”). Look to see what appears naked in the dream for further insight.... The Language of Dreams

Dreamers Dictionary

Vision: Eating nuts means good fortune and recognition. Cracking nuts but not eating them means hard work but slow success.

If cracking nuts is difficult: you will need every ounce of strength to reach your goal. Looking at nuts: a noble character is hidden behind a rough exterior. Eating a bitter nut: bad luck, but you don’t need to take the coming events too seriously! Cracking an empty nut shell: someone is going to disappoint you very deeply. See Almonds.

Depth Psychology: A nut may be a reference to your character or the truth about a certain matter. Sometimes it also indicates stupidity, your own or that of others. It may be a symbol for a difficult task—wa tough nut to crack”—or one that can’t be accomplished without assistance.... Dreamers Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

It is reasonable and healthy for all of us to have a dream which surprises us or shocks us occasionally. As dreams partly deal with aspects of our urges and fantasies which we do not allow in waking life, such occasional dreams are safety valves. It is healthy to be able to allow a wide range of dream experience, from the holy to the deeply sexual; from outright aggression to tender love. In fact we gain an idea of the depth and broadness of our own soul—whether or not our psyche is narrow—from the range of dreams we experience.

If obscene dreams assail and worry us again and again, however, then there is a problem in the way we are relating to ourself and the exterior world. Psychotherapeutic counselling might help. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of the Orient signify that you have an emotionally cool exterior, restricted expression, and disciplined behavior. This dream might also be bringing your attention to eastern religions. See China, Buddha and Krishna.... Strangest Dream Explanations

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Blank writing paper: unexpressed sentiments or ideas; opportunity; feeling a lack of communication with someone else. Wrapping paper: depending on the colour and quality, how you feel others see you; the exterior impression of what you are getting or giving in a relationship; the outward appearance of your own potential. Idioms: commit to paper; not worth the paper it’s written on; on paper, paper tiger, pen to paper, paper over the cracks. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of pineapple represent a juicy and delicious reward that comes after arduous labor, as symbolized by the prickly exterior and its delicious interior.

The pineapple can also represent your protective mechanism that surrounds your most sensitive and vulnerable feelings.... Strangest Dream Explanations

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- When a particular position is highlighted in a dream it usually signifies our moral standpoint, or our position in life. It can also give an indication of how we arc handling situations in our lives.

For instance, something in the wrong position means we are going about things in the wrong way.

2- Our spirit, intellect, ideals and consciences are being brought to our attention when we dream of anything higher or above us. This applies also when dreaming of the upper part of anything (of a building or body, for example). Our altruism may be being brought into question. Anything underneath, below, or downstairs signifies the anarchic or immoral side of our personalities.

The sexual impulses can also be characterised in this way. Something appearing upside down emphasises the potential for chaos and difficulty.

The ‘ups and downs’ of situations in life can be experienced in dreams as the actual movement of one’s position, ‘fhe personality has a need to balance the heights and depths of its experience, and if this docs not happen a warning will usually appear in dream form. Back/Front Rejection and acceptance can be shown in a dream as seeing the back and front of something. Backward/ Forward Having the attention drawn to a backward and/or forward movement usually indicaes the potential to adopt a regressive bae kward-looki ng tendency. There is a need to retire into the past, rather than tackling lears and moving ahead. Centre falso see Shapes) To be conscious of the centre of any aspect of a dream is to be aware of a goal or objective, or perhaps even of the dreamer’s real Self. There is a need to be the centre of attention whatever the circumstances. Far/Near In dreams, space and time can become confused. Dreaming of something which is far awav, may indicate that it is far away in time. This may be future or past, depending on the dream.

A long way in front would be future, a long way behind would be past. Near or close would mean recently, or in the immediate.

Horizontal This usually symbolises the material world. Left The left side suggests the less dominant, more passive side. Often it is taken to represent all that is dark and sinister and those parts of our personality which we try to suppress. It is more to do with instinctive behaviour, what feels good inside and with personal behaviour without attention to moral codes. It is supportive in expression, and receptive by nature, so anything appearing in dreams on the left side can be accepted as a symbol of support. Any pain experienced on the left side is interpreted in terms of sensitivity.

The left expresses the more feminine attributes and often the past. Feelings of being left behind suggest a sense of inadequacy, of disintegration and of having to leave the past behind. Indecision over left or right suggests an inability to decide whether to rely on drive or instinct.

Low In dreams, feeling ‘low’ can suggest a sense of inferiority or humility. Often we will give way to submissive behaviour, and put ourselves in a lower position than others. Occasionally to be below something or someone can indicate a need to explore the underside or negativity of a relationship or situation. Opposite Anything in a dream which is opposite the dreamer may suggest some difficulty in reconciling two paradoxes (Good/bad. male/female, up/down, etc.). This may or may not suggest conflict. One thing deliberately put opposite another There is a deliberate attempt to introduce discord. Changing the position from opposite Differences maybe adjusted.

Right/Left The conflict between right and left is usually between logic and intuition. Right The right side represents the more dominant logical side. It is the consciously expressed, confident side which perceives the exterior world in perhaps a more objective sense. It is to do with ‘lightness’ that is, correctness and moral and social behaviour. Anything observed on the right side in dreams is usually significant as the dreamer progresses. Any pain experienced on the right side can also be interpreted in terms of drive. It also expresses the more masculine attributes. Movement to the right indicates that something is coming into conscious awareness. Straight Straight suggests a direct approach, the shortest way between two objects or places. Top To be at the top is to have succeeded in our endeavours.

To be on top is to have assumed control. Trying to reach the top suggests more effort is needed. Under/underneath Being underneath something suggests either taking shelter or submitting to someone else’s handling of us. It may also represent the part of us that we hide, or the part that is less capable.

Up, upper We have the capability of achieving a degree of supremacy. We are capable of getting the ‘upper hand’ in particular situations. We can move away from the mundane, ordinary- everyday world.

Vertical The vertical in dreams tends to represent the spiritual realm.

3- The points of the compass can be read spiritually.

The North signifies the Unknown, and hcnce sometimes darkness. It is spirituality within the world.

The East traditionally suggests birth and mystic religions. It also represents becoming ‘conscious’.

The South is representative of earthly passion and sensuality.

The West can symbolise death, but more properly the state after death when there is increased spiritual awareness. Traditionally, it can also represent the more logical side of our natures.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

The right side represents the more dominant, logical side. It is the consciously expressed, confident side that perceives the exterior world in perhaps a more objective sense. It is to do with ‘rightness’ – that is, correctness and moral and social behaviour. Anything observed on the right side in dreams usually becomes more significant as we progress. Any pain experienced on the right side can also be interpreted in terms of drive. It also expresses the more masculine attributes. Movement to the right indicates that something is coming into conscious awareness.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Islamic Dream - Cafer-i Sadik

interpreted upon 6 sides: man of good exterior / appearance, nice words & a just religious sovereign, compliment, improvement & usefulness & wealth.... Islamic Dream - Cafer-i Sadik

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

One’s contact with the world; what tactics we use to deal with others. Rough skin: rough exterior. Burnt skin: hun in relationship with outside world or people. Shed skin: like a snake, changing one’s old way of life; old attitudes. Idioms: under one’s skin, a thick skin, skin deep, skin alive. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Skin in a dream stands for our persona or the facade we create for others. Hard, tough skin shows we have created a tough exterior and are trying to protect ourselves, whereas particularly soft skin indicates we are aware of our vulnerability.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Porous and soft, a sponge may symbolically represent spongy exterior boundaries. It may comment that you too easily absorb the energy of others. As in “sponging of£ someone,” it may mention that you could be using people or are too dependent.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Our involvement in the exterior world of change, opposites, and needs which require expenditure of effort, our ‘standing’ in society, what one ‘stands1 for, being active, con­frontation; cooperation with others. Idioms: know where one stands; left standing, make a stand against; stand alone; stand aside; stand by, stand conected; stand down; stand firm, stand in someone’s way; stand up for, stand up to; stand one’s ground; stand on ceremony or dignity. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- Stiffness in dreams would suggest some anxiety or tension is present. There is a holding back of energy that is causing rigidity.

2- To be stiff with someone is to be reserved and withdrawn, probably through shyness but possibly through anger.

A stiff exterior would suggest a judgmental attitude.

3- At certain stages of spiritual development, discipline can appear as stiffness.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: Then I was in a place where we were having a staff party. Not very big but people were sitting at tables eating, a party mood. I sat with my child, maybe youngest son, no one else at the table. I felt I didn’t wish to get involved with the others, the feeling I often get at parties, just alone in crowd’ (Simeon T). Simeon’s dream table shows him not feel ing inclined to connect with others. So.it shows how he re lates socially. Generally, a table shows social connection with others; communal activity; everyday certainties which support our activities—confidence you will get paid at the end of the week; one’s attitude towards the inner and exterior commu nity, thus an altar—if table is bare, perhaps not giving much of self. Quality of table: the quality of your relationship with others. Place at table: self image of your status. Dressing table one’s attempts to create a good social image. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Forest and Wood

1- The tree is symbolic in dreams of the basic structure of our inner lives. When one appears in our dreams it is best to work with the image fairly extensively.

A tree with wide branches would suggest a warm loving personality, whereas a small close- leafed tree would suggest an uptight personality.

A well-shaped tree would suggest a well-ordered personality, while a large, messy tree would suggest a chaotic personality. There is a game which can be played in waking life if one dares. Ask a friend a) what sort of tree does he or she think you arc and, b) what sort of tree they think they are. I’he results arc interesting.

An oak for instance would represent strength.

2- The roots of a tree are said to show our connection with ourselves and the earth. It could be more accurate to suggest that they signify our ability to belong to the practical side of life, to enjoy being here. Spreading roots would indicate an ability to relate well to the physical, and, conversely, deep-rootedness would suggest a more self-contained attitude.

The trunk of the tree gives an indication of how we use the energies available to us, and also what exterior we present to the world.

A rough trunk suggests obviously a rough and ready personality, whereas a smoother trunk would indicate more sophistication. Branches signify the stages of growth we go through, and leaves suggest the way we communicate to the rest of the world.

To be climbing the tree suggests we are looking at our hopes and abilities, in order to succeed.

3- Spiritually the tree symbolises the ‘free of Life and represents the union of heaven, earth and water. When we learn and understand our own Tree we arc able to live life successfully on all levels.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: The roots of a tree are said to show our connection with ourselves and the earth. It could be more accurate to suggest that they signify our ability to belong to the practical side of life, to enjoy being here. Spreading roots would indicate an ability to relate well to the physical, and, conversely, deep-rootedness would suggest a more self-contained attitude.

The trunk of the tree gives an indication of how we use the energies available to us, and also what exterior we present to the world.

A rough trunk suggests obviously a rough and ready personality, whereas a smoother trunk would indicate more sophistication.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

As dreams apparently emerge from what has been named the unconscious, it is helpful to understand ideas regarding it, and something of its nature.

In ancient cultures we occasionally find hints regarding the unconscious, but not definite statements as were presented by Freud. In the dream theories worked out by the Iroquois American Indians, they believed that through dreams the hid­den or unconscious area of the psyche makes its desires known (see Iroquoian dream cult).

The Greek stories of the Underworld also clearly depict common unconscious activi­ties.

In general, however, many ancient peoples developed con­cepts of exterior agents such as devils, angels, spirits and God to account for phenomena which today we connect with the unconscious.

The first philosopher to talk clearly of an aspect of the mind being unconscious was Leibnitz. He observed that one often recalled at a later date some detail of experience which at the time one was unaware of. One must therefore have observed it unconsciously. So in general the word means anything we are not generally aware of in our being.

Freud’s concept of an unconscious element of human na­ture which influenced conscious behavior was strongly re­sisted. It was disturbing to many people and questioned the idea of humans being the ‘captain of their soul’.

The Freudian slip has become one of the popular examples of the influence of the unconscious. Saying to guests arriving at one’s house, Tm so sorry—I mean glad—you could come’ suggests one’s real feeling was sorrow at their arrival, not gladness. There is a story of a faculty member of Oxford University who asked the guests at a function to toast the queen, but his actual words were ‘Let us toast our queer dean.’ However such slips might be seen as attempts to conceal our real feelings, rather than evidence of unconscious motivations.

Taking into account not only Freudian and Jungian ap­proaches to the unconscious, but something of more recent research, the term unconscious must be taken to represent many functions and aspects of self, rather than something we can neatly define. Therefore, we might think of the term as being like the word ‘body’, which means a whole spectrum of organs, functions, chemical processes, neurological events, systems, cell activities, as well as one’s experience of these. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of a veneer reflect your façade, exterior, public persona/ego presentation. You are realizing the “you” that you show to the world as opposed to your true feelings that lie beneath the surface. See Integration Dreams.... Strangest Dream Explanations

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Expression of oneself, not simply ideas, but subtle feelings or realisations. Spontaneous speech, voice that speaks through or to one: our personality or mind is not a totally unified whole. Some aspects of self we may not identify with. Because we disown them, they become split from our main expression. Contacting them may be like meeting a stranger— thus in dreams they are shown as exterior to self, or a separate voice, perhaps disembodied. Also some aspects of self express spontaneously—see autonomous complex.

The voice may therefore be one’s intuition; expression of unconscious but not integrated parts of self; fears; the Self being met in the dream.

Example: ‘I was going mad. I was crawling around on my hands and knees and wailing and behaving in a most peculiar manner. I actually felt mad. But inside my head a tiny voice kept saying, “You aren’t completely insane yet—there’s still a chance.’’ People around me kept saying to each other, “We think she’s possessed by devils.’’ My sane voice then said *’Make the sign of the cross, cast out the evil spirit.” I kept trying to do that but my hands wouldn’t or couldn’t complete the sign. I woke still feeling disturbed’ (Margaret F). Margaret has fears about her sanity.

The voice here is that of her uncon­scious, speaking from a more whole view of her being. Such a voice might very well be the voice of one’s fears and confu­sion, however.

Example: ‘My present lover, Tony,’ and a man I had loved years before were standing side by side.

A voice was telling me to go to Tony (Miranda L). Here Miranda’s unconscious is summarising her feelings and helping her transfer her feelings of love connected with the past to her new lover. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Walls signify a block to progress, a difficulty we have or will come up against. Often the nature of the wall will give some clue as to what the block is.

For instance, a wall which looks old will signify an old problem, whereas a glass wall would indicate some difficulties with perception. Walls closing in could describe the remembered feelings of birth, but is more likely to represent a feeling of being trapped by the lifestyle we have.

A brick wall, rampart or dividing wall all signify the difference between two states of reality – often the inner psychological state and the exterior, everyday world. Windows – windows describe the means by which we appreciate the world we live in, the way we perceive reality. Dreaming that we are looking outwards through a window can suggest that we have a more extrovert view of ourselves and will tend to look at external circumstances. Looking inwards through a window indicates we are looking inwards at our own personality, and perhaps at our own motivation.

The interpretation for opening a window depends on whether we are opening the window from the inside or the outside.

If the former, we are dealing with our inner feelings which we may need to escape; the latter shows our attitude to outside opinion. Breaking through a window (or glass door) can suggest the first sexual experience, or the shattering of illusions. Because of the connection with religious buildings, stained glass can be accepted as picturing religious belief and ideals.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: I was looking at a little matchbox shaped thing and one looked into it like a window. I looked at my arm through the window, then my vision was full of patterns of my energy going up and down my arm. It was very beauti­ful, leaflike shapes with glass-like balls and clear liquid but even the liquid making patterns on the move up and down’ (Wendy O). In general one is either looking out of, looking into, or going through a window. This makes them largely connected with what we see in the sense of perception or being aware of things, either within ourself, as in the example, or in regard to other people. So they can depict our eyes or awareness also.

Looking out of a window: your ‘view’ of or feelings about what you perceive in your environment or life; looking for a way out of a situation. Looking into a window: what you feel or ‘see’ in regard to someone else if you see another person; what you are aware of when ‘looking’ at or giving awareness to yourself. Climbing out of window: possibly your way of avoiding difficult feelings, i.e. by giving attention to exterior things—television, a book—rather than what we feel. Climb­ing in window: looking within oneself or seeing what makes someone else ‘tick’. Opening window: letting others see your feelings or opinions; allowing other people’s influence on yourself. No windows: not seeing what is going on around you; introversion, attention held by internal feelings, thoughts or concerns. Height of windows, such as first floor suggest what area of your experience you are looking at the world through. You might only look at life through a basement win­dow, which suggests being influenced by one’s sexuality or unconscious feelings; see levels of house within entry above. Example: ‘Presently I come to another domed window and stand looking at sea and sky. I am filled with serenity and peace’ (JD). Domed window, window in roof: depicts our head or mind. We each have a cosmic sense—a synthesis of experience in which we develop a personal view of what life is about in the largest sense; looking through the domed or roof window depicts this cosmic sense. Idioms: window dressing; window on the world; a room with a view. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of a yucca signify your ability to survive tough and barren times, and flourish even in a drought. Consider that the sharp edges of your egoic exterior is defending your vulnerability, but it may also be keeping intimacy at bay. See Cactus.... Strangest Dream Explanations