fables

Fables, Dream Interpretation


Dreaming of reading or telling fables may mean you have many pleasant tasks before you or that you have a strong interest in writing. Religious fables mean you have, or will have, a deep devotional feeling toward God.

To dream you are living a fable may mean that you are pretending too much and you should face the truth, or it may mean you have an inner wish to escape a situation you find uncomfortable in your daily life.

To dream of reading or telling fables, denotes pleasant tasks and a literary turn of mind.

To the young, it signifies romantic attachments.

To hear, or tell, religious fables, denotes that the dreamer will become very devotional.

(see Dragon, Monsters, Phoenix, Storytellers)

Characters or themes from the fables of our youth commonly appear in dreams as archetypes of personality traits or prevalent situations. Normally, the subconscious tries to illustrate a key that will help you develop those traits, overcome negative habits, or succeed in your present circumstances.

For example, the tale of Goldilocks and the Three Bears could be counseling you to be less selfish or bearish in the way you act toward strangers.

The hero or heroine reflects your Higher Self, and the best personal characteristics you hope to eventually develop. Pay close attention to what these people do (see Icons, Men, Women).

Kings and queens reflect authority figures (or situations, belief systems, etc.) to whom you subjugate yourself.

The question here is whether such service is beneficial to you as a whole person. Alternatively, these can be icons of gods and goddesses.

Fantastic creatures represent your ability to imagine and reach beyond surface reality. Each creature also has a unique symbolic message to consider.

For example, dreaming of a Lilliputian might indicate that you feel very “small” about something right now, or that you lack self-confidence.



Fables | Dream Meanings

Keywords of this dream: Fables

The Language of Dreams

(see Insects)

Business concerns. What is the ant pulling or walking upon?

Tenacity.

The ability to overcome insurmountable odds (note Aesop’s Fables).

Community and solidarity. Ants live and work as a unit.

Being bitten by an ant: A Victorian symbol of quarrels or bad feelings that came out as biting words.

Divinatory insight.

The ancients believed because these creatures traverse both worlds (the above and below) that they were excellent prognosticators, especially of the weather.

Moslem: A teacher of wisdom. What lesson does the ant offer you in your dream? Chinese: A symbol of patriotism, virtue, and orderliness.... The Language of Dreams

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Animals and Pig

1- One of the wavs in which the dream mind can bring matters to our attention is by a play on words, and since not many people have contact with the animal boar, for this to appear in a dream usually indicates ‘a bore’.

2- By its association with feasting and festivals, the boar can represent lust and gluttony.

3- Abundance and vitality. By- association with mythology and children’s fables it can also represent evil.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

By association with mythology and children’s fables a boar can suggest evil, or rather overbearing aggression. It also suggests abundance and vitality.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Little Giant Encyclopedia

Hat. Consciousness and thinking. Are you living too much in your head? It also addresses the fact that you keep something hidden or that something seems to be hidden.

The verb “to cap” also points to completion, the end of a situation. In fables and fairy tales, the cap often plays a significant role as a magical covering for the head, allowing the person to become invisible. It also points to the fact that you may be too visible. Or that you might pay more attention to yourself and be more outgoing. See Shadow.

Folklore: Unhappy love.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

The Language of Dreams

(see Fish)

According to Pliny, this creature represents the need for swift movement with regard to a decision or opportunity.

A guide. Many fables tell of dolphins aiding shipwrecked sailors. From what reef is this creature offering to liberate your mind, body, or spirit?

Native American: A messenger between the worlds, dancing above and below the waves (see Water).

The dolphin is the essence of the Great Spirit and the wind of life itself. Breathe deeply of its symbolic messages.

Playfulness. Dolphins speak directly to the child within and urge it to come out more regularly.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals, Fables, Lizard, Monsters, Snake)

The guardian of great power, magic, and wisdom.

If you can befriend this aspect of yourself, many new talents and abilities will open to you.

Among Taoists, the dragon represents eternal change, and the part of the path that we cannot as yet see. Consequently, you must perfect the spirit and trust that your road is sure.

In China, the highest spiritual Yang (masculine) power attainable. On Earth, this was embodied by the power of the Chinese emperor.

Slaying a dragon: Overcoming negative traits. Alternatively, cutting off the feminine aspects of self (see Sivord).

Fever breathing dragon: An overbearing person with strong words.

Procreative power of nature. In Assyrian and Babylonian mythology, Tiamat was a half- dragon, half-human (to show higher and lower self) Goddess who gave birth to all things.

Archetypal: The primordial consciousness and psychic transformation.

The ongoing struggle of light versus darkness, and good versus evil, that is always with us. Here you become the hero who preserves your vision of virtue.... The Language of Dreams

The Way of Dreams and Visions

General Meaning: A picture high level demonic attack • Dreams

Negative:

Because Dragons are mythological in nature, if you keep dreaming of dragons, it could mean that you have been getting into writings of this nature.

• Visions Negative: The devil is mentioned as a dragon in Scripture, so if you see a vision of a dragon, this speaks of high level demonic attack.

• Revelation 12:9 And the great dragon was cast out, that old serpent, called the devil, and Satan, who deceives the whole world: he was cast out into the earth, and his angels were cast out with him.

• If you always have visions of dragons and other such folklore, then I would say that you have opened up your heart to teachings and fables that are not of the Lord.

• You have contaminated your spirit and given the enemy a hold of your life. See also: Alien, Alligator, Demons.... The Way of Dreams and Visions

The Language of Dreams

The unseen world, our imagination, and the spirit of the inner child that awaits acknowledgment or expression (see Fables).

Brownies: Tiny, ragged men who symbolize matters of hearth and home, especially keeping things orderly and well run.

Elves: Thin, fair-skinned, pointed-eared, forest-dwelling Devas, these represent your magical or mischievous side.

Gnomes: As squat earth-dwellers, these creatures symbolize earth-related concerns.

Goblins: Green-skinned impish creatures that usually equate to our fears, malevolent prankishness, and, potentially, thievery.

Leprechauns: Shoe makers and the eternal gypsies of the fairy folk, these represent good luck, improved wealth, and a rogue-like personality.

Pixies: Being lead astray by something that looks quite innocent.

Salamander: A spirit who embodies a single flame, this Being knows how to live life to its fullest, and suggests you do the same (see Fire).

Sylph: Joy, laughter, carefree existence. Possibly a type of flying dream, as these fairies have gossamer wings (see Air).

Troll: Something or someone that prohibits a change or movement that you’re trying to make (see Bridge), at least not without exacting a price.

Undines (Merpeople): Essential emotions, and things you regard as wholly lovely (see Water). Alternatively, your idealized image of masculinity or femininity, depending on the sex of the creature (see Men, Women).... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Baking, Candle, Disaster, Forge, Hearth, Hell, Red, Sun, Torch)

A predominantly masculine symbol associated with the sun and intense passion. Native Americans additionally believe the condition of the fire appearing in the dream reflects your emotional nature. Is it burning out of control—or neatly tended?

Goodness over evil. Fire illuminates the darkness and chases away frightening shadows. Upon what areas of your life does this light shine?

Drastic transformation. This is the flight of the phoenix who must die in a nest of flame to be renewed.

Emotional devastation or a burning obsession. Look to see what exactly you perceive as burning.

Awareness and vision. Besides shedding light, fire was used as a divinatory tool in cultures ranging from ancient Greece to Tibet. Known as pyromancy, seers would stare at a flame source, watching for symbolic images to appear in answer to questions posed.

Elemental forces that must be tempered and controlled or they will destroy instead of empower.

Dramatics (being full of “flash and fanfare”).

Squelching: Ignoring or turning your back on the masculine nature, or resentment toward men. Alternatively, having a source of personal energy taken away.

Walking through a fire: Your reactions in the dream to this experience indicate how you are coping with a particularly heated situation.

Sitting amidst a fire: Being on the proverbial “hot seat.” Alternatively, a type of death dream in which the fire relates to the ancient pyres upon which bodies were burned to release the spirit.

Campfires: Simple pleasures, reveling in nature, remembering stories and experiences from youth (see Fables, Storytellers).

What’s burning here can be vitally important to your dream’s meaning.

For example, seeing a building on fire might indicate that you’re burning up your body’s resources / energy.

An attic fire can reveal someone whose mind is totally consumed by one topic. Dreaming of burning clothes symbolizes the desire to do away with societally designed images for a more honest self-representation.

Dreaming of a fire whose coals have grown cold is a very negative image. It represents trouble, despair, and possibly the loss of love among those people close to you due to a misunderstanding. Try to find a way to put a fresh warm ember into this situation.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Fables, Icons, Men, Women)... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Bottle, Fables)

The manifestation of wishes on the dream plane through a mythical figure.

The tendency to want (or expect) instant gratification in certain situations without really working for that goal.

Heeding universal law. Despite the jinni’s power in ancient tales, they had specific restrictions with regard to life and love. So, if the jinni does not grant your wish in the dream, it may be time for some soul searching about your motivations.

Restricted power. Even the jinns answered to a greater authority—they each had a master. Know your own limits and observe them wisely.

In a bottle: Feeling caged or “bottled up” and limited by some authority over which you have no control. Alternatively, a power or talent within yourself that you have hesitated to release.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Authority Figures, Fables, Icons, A fen)... The Language of Dreams

Little Giant Encyclopedia

The king of the animal kingdom was often used as a symbol in the Coat of Arms: the British lion, the lion of Judea, Christ as a lion, the red lion of Wales. It stands for spirit, courage, awareness, and power. It is the symbol of transformation in alchemy, and represents the essence of the masculine and feminine. In antiquity it was the symbol of the creative power of the Sun, since in the summer the constellation of the Lion in the night sky is at the highest point. In the history of the Rosicrucians, initiation ceremonies included taming a lion.

The lion is the fire of the libido and thereby of vitality.

If not tamed, this energy will devour and destroy.

The lion as a Christian symbol stands for the domestication of the non-believers. In Northern Europe, the lion was replaced by the Bear. According to early Christian and medieval imagination, the lion used his tail to erase his footprints so that he could not be followed and found. It has also been said that lions sleep with their eyes open. And when a lioness gives birth, the young are initially born dead until three days later, when the male lion appears and blows in the face of the young. This gave rise to the idea of the lion as a symbol for awakening and vitality. In Christian fables, it is also depicted as the cunning animal. See Dragon, Sun, Heart.

The evil spirit Utukku is depicted with the head of a lion.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

The Language of Dreams

(see Bed, Closet, Dreams, Dragon, Evil, Fables) The feared or unexplored aspects of your own nature.

Slaying a monster: Becoming the hero for your own life; transforming fear into victory and creativity (see Sword).

Repressed drives and ambitions that need to be expressed.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals)

Frugality and resourcefulness. Saving and recycling even minute things effectively.

Someone overly soft in voice or who lacks backbone (e.g., being “mousy”).

The size of this creature may reflect an underdeveloped sense of self-worth.

Aesop s Fables portray the mouse as an emblem that makes weaknesses into strengths.

A secret, well-hidden adversary of whom you should become aware. Note too that this enemy may be within.

Mousetraps have become an emblem of ingenuity and tackling a difficult problem with creative insight (e.g., “building a better mousetrap”). They may also be regarded as an alternative cage emblem, where you get caught by, or caught up in, technology.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Fables)... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Fables, Horse)... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Fire, Fables)

Reincarnation, rebirth, and new beginnings. Known by the Egyptians as the bennu, this fire bird renews itself by making a nest in a raging conflagration from which it is born anew.

Longevity. Several ancient texts, including the Talmud, intimate this creature can live as long as one thousand years.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Authority Figures, Fables, Icons, Women)... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Blood, Colors)

Vital life, energy and passion, especially bright reds. Brownish-red: Death, bitterness, or smoldering anger.

Danger! Stop whatever you’re doing and look more closely, just as you would at a traffic light.

Red cape: Used in bull fighting, this is symbolic of controlling the masc uline nature.

Red caps: Often worn by mischievous fairies or wizards in fables, this might indicate your own yearning for a little playfulness and knavery.

Bright scarlet: Anger or fury (e.g., “seeing red”).

Red tape: Delays to the point of nearly being halted, often caused by bureaucratic approaches, people, or requirements.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Puzzles, Rhyme)

Some type of complexity that requires sound, creative thinking to solve. Unless time is of the essence, don’t rush this answer.

Lacking clarity in the way you present something, or purposefully hiding your true motivations and feelings in a matter (e.g., “talking in riddles”).

A lesson in disguise. In many fables, riddles are used to teach the main characters something specific about themselves or life. Similarly in ancient Japan, priests used riddles as a way of teaching seekers spiritual truths.

Something or someone who tries your patience by presenting everything in seemingly incongruous or incomprehensible terms.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals, Fables)

Depicted as having the head of a man and the lower body of a goat, this creature represents the untamed nature within, especially procreative instincts.

Animalistic impulses and humankind s greater connection to the animal kingdom.

Biblically: An emblem of destruction and barrenness (Is 13:21), probably due to the connection between this image and various frolicsome pagan deities, including Faunus and Pan.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Darkness, Sky, Space)

Your unrealized wishes.

The tradition of wishing on stars is very ancient, going back to Northern peoples who wished on the first star (Venus) as a type of supplication to that goddess. This custom also tied into astrology and the belief that the heavens influence life on earth (see Zodiac Signs).

Being overly romantic or idealistic (e.g., “starry eyed”).

WTiat constellation or portrait do the stars form? Draw the pattern that you saw in the dream, then play connect the dots and see what appears. Use this image to help interpret the dream further.

Dreams, hopes, and goals (e.g., “reaching for the stars”).

Deliverance or help in a time of great need.

A star heralded Christ’s birth, and the Good Fairy of fables carries a powerful magic wand topped with a star.

Falling stars and comets are usually some type of warning or announcement (see Meteorite). Historicallv people believed thev presaged important events or disasters.

The direction the star is moving, if or where it lands, and other scenery in this dream may qualify it more for you.

Sxaxfish dramatically reflect the New Age precept of “as above, so below.” Nothing exists in the heavens that is not likewise on the Earth or within you. They are also an alternative pentode emblem.

Your soul, or matters of spirit. In ancient times, people often believed that their soul was tied to a specific star, and when that star was low in the sky it represented peril to their life.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Books, Fables)

The preservation of history, culture, religion, or central truths. Among many civilizations, this person equated to the medieval bard, or Hebrew cantor, who by their talents kept an oral legacy for a specific group alive. In interpreting such a dream, consider what story is told, bv and to whom, and how it is received for more meaning.

For example, the rejection of a Bible story from your youth in a dream might likewise symbolize your personal rejection of that idea or belief system.

Morals or lessons from the subconscious or Higher Self, neatly disguised in a more enjoyable construct. Storytelling has always been an effective teaching tool because it draws our attention away from the chore to something we perceive as fun.

Potentially, a personal creation that should find its way into a tape or book, if only for your own enjoyment. Inventive energies are much more fluid when we sleep, and many excellent artists have received inspiration for a story, song, or painting this way.

Religious stories denote a change in perspectives from mundane to more devout matters, whereas hearing things like fables reveals a romantic nature prone to daydreaming.... The Language of Dreams

Little Giant Encyclopedia

The zone of the root chakra, where the Kundalini resides. This image may point to the relief of undigested leftovers, problems one has worked with.

The suggestion here is to “let go.”

From time immemorial, the toilet has been seen as a dark and scary place—in dreams, all places connected to natural functions are demonized. It is the place of forbidden sexuality—self-gratification and homosexuality—a place full of danger and frightening activities. It is a place where ghosts and devils do their bad deeds, and the reason why toilets in the past were always outside. It is a place of taboos, of secrets and forbidden things, a place where budding sexuality and puberty fantasies run amuck.

This dream image also expresses the finality of nature. On one hand, it addresses everything that is transitory and points out that everything material will pass on and has no value. On the other hand, it addresses the meaning of accomplishment, completion. It is, again, an example of the alchemistic idea that gold can be made out of feces. In one sense, the toilet is the place where products are transformed. Such dream images almost always point to a necessary change: you must let go of something, while, at the same time, you must produce something positive. In Norse fables, King Olaf warns his guests not to go to the toilet alone during the night, because they might end up in a dangerous adventure with the Devil.

The toilet has also been considered the place of ghosts.

According to Jung, it is the place of the highest creativity.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals, Fables)

Traditionally an emblem of purity. In fairy tales, the unicorn becomes a mount to only chaste maidens, and befriends only those who are pure in spirit.

The horn of this creature is an alternative phallic emblem. It is also considered the most potently magical part of the animal—the “magic” in this sense being the seed of life (sperm).

If the horn of the creature is dipped into water, this represents the purging of some type of poison, be it emotional, physical, or spiritual.

In Greece, an alternative emblem for the moon goddess, and as such reflects a predominance of the intuitive nature in your decisions and interactions.

In China, this is a most beneficent dream. Here, the unicorn symbolizes the perfect balance between Yin and Yang, and all five elements in harmony (earth-air-firewater- ether / void). Seeing one indicates goodwill and kindness toward you from others, as well as the presence of gentle, wise companions.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals, Lycanthropy)

Tilings that you fear about yourself, a situation, or others, and have been unwilling to face directly.

Some type of obscured threat (e.g., the “wolf in sheep’s clothing”). In Freudian analysis, this threat is construed as sexual intimacy.

The loss of innocence and naive outlooks.

In fables, the emblem of evil craftiness that threatens to devour all goodness.

AJchemically, a symbol of duality; the light and dark aspects of all things.

Howling at the moon: Discovering and announcing a secret alliance or treacherous plan. Alternatively, acknowledging the lunar / feminine aspect of self.... The Language of Dreams

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