flicker

To waver in hope and faith; see “waver”



Flicker | The Dream Meanings

Keywords of this dream: Flicker

Dreamers Dictionary

Symbol: The candle is a symbol of light—representing a connection between spirit and matter.

Vision: A brighdy burning candle is a promise: in future things will turn out the way you have hoped. It could also mean an invitation to a party.

The flame of the candle flickering or giving off smoke: the state of your health is not stable.

A candle burning quietly and steadily is a sign of peace, prayer, contemplation, and a challenge to look within. Watching the flame of a candle go out: you may suddenly be informed of the illness or death of a person close to you, or it could mean that a dose friendship is coming to an end.

Depth Psychology: The candle is a phallic symbol. Is there a flame of passion burning within you for another person? The candle also gives us light and warmth and expresses your desire for greater understanding, enlightenment, or wisdom. See Light.... Dreamers Dictionary

My Dream Interpretation

Seeing, or being in, the beam of headlights is a sign that you can get what you want but you will have to focus completely on it and nothing else.

If the headlights kept moving around, disappearing, or faded/flickered, be prepared to deal with hostile competition.... My Dream Interpretation

My Dream Interpretation

To dream of turning on a lamp foretells an unexpected reward for a past kindness.

To turn out a lamp suggests that you will have a holiday or a well earned rest.

A dream of red lamps is a warning of danger due to uncontrolled passion or temper.

An unlit lamp indicates a disappointment, while a dim or flickering lamp forecasts news of an illness.

To hang a guide lamp outdoors or in a window foretells a stroke of good luck.

To break a lamp portends difficulties through lack of trust. Many bright or decorative lamps are a sign of coming festive occasions. Also see “Lava Lamp.”... My Dream Interpretation

Dreamers Dictionary

Vision: According to ancient folklore, a lighted lantern stands for an impending, sorrow-filled event.

A blinking traffic light is always a warning to be careful.

If you or someone else is turning the traffic light off: the danger has passed, expect improvement in the present situation.

If the light in the lantern is burning brightly: you have gained great insights, or you are about to reveal a secret.

If the light in the lantern is flickering or going out: don’t get involved in other people’s business; you are probably misreading the situation. See Light.

Depth Psychology: The image of a traffic light is always a sign of a budding love affair—particularly’ when the traffic light is Red.

A softly burning lantern reflects deep insight and inner wisdom. See Lamp.... Dreamers Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Generally, being aware; waking as opposed to sleep­ing; being able to understand and have insight; to see; light­ness of heart; release from dark feelings.

Example: ‘1 am alone in the house. It begins to grow dark, so I switch the light on, but the light is very dim. So I go to another room and try another light, but this light is even dimmer. I carry on like this all over the house until I am in virtual darkness and very frightened’ (Jw) Jw was s»x al the time of the dream, and here light depicts feelings of sureness or confidence, which gave way to anxiety.

The light is the opposite to the emotions of fear which arise from within. Flickering dimming lights: also feelings about death.

Example: ‘My husband was laying on top of me, his feet on my chest and was giving me sexual pleasure by kissing, lick­ing, sucking my fanny. He reached over to turn the light on, he wanted to look at my body. I felt OK about him looking but saw the blinds were partly open and felt anyone walking past in the street would see as well, I felt very uneasy about that’ (Heather C). Here light represents becoming aware of how others might see one.

Very bright light: intuition; the Self; mega concept; see aura. Spotlight, searchlight: focusing attention on what is shown. Idioms: bright lights; cold light of day, come to light; hide one’s light; in its true light; lighter side; in a good light; see the light; light at the end of the tunnel; throw a light on. See dark; day. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

My Dream Interpretation

A dream featuring very bright light means you will solve a problem by learning to look at it in a new way. It is a sign that you should trust your instincts.

To dream of turning on lights foretells an unexpected reward for a past kindness.

To turn out lights suggests that you will have a holiday or a well earned rest.

A dream of red lamps is a warning of danger due to uncontrolled passion or temper.

To dream of flickering or flashing lights suggests that something is preventing you from solving a current relationship or family problem - it could be your own emotions or preconceptions that are getting in the way. Try to cool down and look at the situation in “a clearer light.” Also see “Neon Lights”... My Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

In most ancient cultures, consider­ation and even veneration of dreams played a great pan. Some groups felt that dream life was more real and imponant than waking life. Not only were dreams looked to for information about hunting (Eskimo groups), but also for ways of healing physical and psychological ills (Greek dream temples) and insights into the medicinal properties of herbs, barks and clays (African tribal witchdoctors). Common to most of these groups, and evident in the Old Testament, was also the sense that through dreams one had awareness of the transcendental or supersensible. St Peter’s dream of the sheet and unclean animals was a turning point in the history of western socicty —as was Constantine’s dream of his victory if he used the symbol of Christianity.

At its most fundamental, the human religious sense emerges out of several factors. One is the awareness of ex­isting amidst external and internal forces of nature which cause us to feel vulnerable and perhaps powerless. Such natu­ral processes as illness, death, growth and decay, earthquakes, the seasons, confront us with things which are often beyond our ability to control. Considenng the information and re­sources of the times, one of religion’s main functions in the past was the attempted control of the ‘uncertain’ factors in human life, and help towards psychological adjustment to vali­ne rability. Religions were the first social programmes aiding the human need for help and support towards emotional, mental, physical and social health and maturity. Even if prim­itive, such programmes helped groups of people to gain a common identity and live in reasonable harmony together. Like a computer program which is specific to a particular business, such programmes were specific to a particular group, and so are outdated in today’s need for greater integra­tion with other races. Religions also offered some sort of con­cept of and connection with the roots of being.

Example: ‘For two nights running I have dreamt the same nightmare. I am in a chapel walking down the first flight of several flights of steps when I hear loud noises behind me. I am told to run, being warned of the soldiers who ride the cavalry horses nght down the steps, and who run you over if you are in their way.

The horses are fierce and they absolutely race down the steps at the same time every day, and you literally have to lock yourself away in a nearby room which is a long way down the chapel. I ran into the room hearing the pounding of the horses’ hooves. It was a terrible pandemo­nium in that chapel. In the room were school children the same age as me and some perhaps younger’ (Maria H). Maria, who is 16, in describing her dream says she had recently been confronted with whether to have a sexual relationship with her boyfriend. Religion, represented by the chapel, is Maria’s way of locking out her powerful sexual urges. Many dreams show that religion, as a set of beliefs, is used as a way of avoiding anxiety in the face of life’s uncertainties.

For many people, the rigid belief system helps them to avoid uncertainty in making decisions.

Dreams also portray and define the aspect of human expe­rience in which we sense a kinship with all life forms. This is the side of spiritual expenence through which we find a con­nection with the roots of our being. While awake we might see the birth of a colt and feel the wonder of emergence and newness; the struggle to stand up and survive, the miracle of physical and sexual power which can be accepted or feared. In looking in the faces of fellow men and women we see something of what they have done in this strange and painful wonder we call life. We see whether they have been crushed by the forces confronting them; whether they have become ngid; or whether, through some common miracle, they have been able to carry into their mature years the laughter, the crying, the joy, the ability to feel pain, that are the very signs of life within the human soul. These things are sensed by us all, but seldom organised into a comprehensive view of life, and an extraction of meaning. Often it is only in our dreams, through the ability the unconscious has to draw out the signif­icance of such widely divergent expenences, that we glimpse the unity behind phenomena which is an essential of spiritual life, i.e. we all have a life, we breathe, we have come from a mother, so share a universal experience.

Example: To quote J.B. Priestley from his book Rain Upon Godshill: ‘Just before I went to Amenca, dunng the exhausting weeks when I was busy with my Time Plays, I had such a dream, and I think it left a greater impression on my mind than any experience I had ever known before, awake or in dreams, and said more to me about this life than any book I have ever read.

The setting of the dream was quite simple, and owed something to the fact that not long before my wife had visiied the lighthouse here at St Catherine’s to do some bird ringing. I dreamt I was standing at the top of a very high tower, alone, looking down upon myriads of birds all flying in one direction; every kind of bird was there, all the birds in the world. It was a noble sight, this vast aerial river of birds. But now in some mysterious fashion the gear was changed, and time speeded up, so that I saw generations of birds, watched them break their shells, flutter into life, mate, weaken, falter and die. Wings grew only to crumble; bodies were sleek, and then, in a flash bled and shrivelled; and death struck every­where at every second. What was the use of all this blind struggle towards life, this eager trying of wings, this hurried mating, this flight and surge, all this gigantic meaningless ef­fort? As I stared down, seeming to see every creature’s ignoble little history almost at a glance, I felt sick at heart. It would be better if not one of them, if not one of us, had been bom, if the struggle ceased for ever. I stood on my tower, still alone, desperately unhappy. But now the gear was changed again, and the time went faster still, and it was rushing by at such a rate, that the birds could not show any movement, but were like an enormous plain sown with feathers. But along this plain, flickering through the bodies themselves, there now passed a sort of white flame, trembling, dancing, then hurry­ing on; and as soon as I saw it I knew that this white flame was life itself, the very quintessence of being; and then it came to me, in a rocket burst of ecstasy, that nothing mattered, nothing could ever matter, because nothing else was real but this quivering and hurrying lambency of being. Birds, men and creatures not yet shaped and coloured, all were of no account except so far as this flame of life travelled through them. It left nothing to mourn over behind it, what I had thought was tragedy was mere emptiness or a shadow show; for now all real feeling was caught and purified and danced on ecstatically with the white flame of life. I had never before felt such deep happiness as I knew at the end of my dream of the tower and the birds.’

Some Nonh American Indians developed the totem out of similar processes. In one generation a person might learn to plant a seed and eat the results. Later someone might see that through fertilisation more food was produced. Still later some­one found that by irrigating, still more improvement was made. No one individual was responsible for such vital cul­tural information, and the collective information is bigger than any one person, yet individuals can partake of it and add to it.

The totem represented such subtle realities, as it might in a modem dream; as Christ might in today’s unconscious. That older cultures venerated their collective information, and that modem humans seem largely apathetic to it, shows how our ‘religion’ has degenerated. Yet utilising the power of the unconscious to portray the subtle influences which impinge upon us, and building the information gained into our re­sponse to life, is deeply important.

With the growth of authoritarian structures in western reli­gion, and the dominance of the rational mind over feeling values, dreams have been pushed into the background. With this change has developed the sense that visionary dreams were something which ‘superstitious* cultural groups had in the past. Yet thoroughly modem men and women still meet Christ powerfully in dreams and visions. Christ still appears to them as a living being.

The transcendental, the collective or universal enters their life just as frequently as ever before. Sometimes it enters with insistence and power, because a too rational mind has led to an unbalance in the psyche—a bal­ance in which the waking and rational individuality is one pole, and the feeling, connective awareness of the uncon­scious is the other.

Although it is tempting to think of the transcendent as ethereal or unreal, the religious in dreams is nearly always a symbol for the major processes of maturing in human life. We are the hero/ine who meets the dangers of life outside the womb, who faces growth, ageing and death.

The awe and deep emotions we unconsciously feel about such heroic deeds are depicted by religious emotion.

See angel; Christ, rebirth and Devil under archetypes; church; evil; fish, sea creatures; example in whale under fish, sea creatures; heaven, hell; sweets under food; dream as spiritual guide. See also hero/ine; mass; masturbation; old; paralysis; colours; sheep under animals. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Explanations of Astro Center

A dream of actually holding onto your tongue with your hand, or with your teeth, is an admonition that you could be tempted to reveal too much, and it’s time to “hold your tongue.”

To see someone sticking their tongue out at you means that you are more highly respected than you think.

To dream of licking or tasting food depends on the nature of the food involved. See Taste.

If the dreamer sees a snake with its tongue flickering in and out, someone in his aura “speaks with a forked tongue,” or, in other words, isn’t being totally up front with him.

To see an animal panting with its tongue hanging out indicates that the dreamer has been moving too fast, working “hot and heavy,” and needs to stop and take time out.

Dreaming of the tongue of a shoe implies that there are issues going on with you now that you don’t really understand, and thus you should reserve any comments about them until you do.... Dream Explanations of Astro Center

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