If the group is orderly and good-naturedly discussing their business, whatever it may be, then you will see some good luck heading your way in the marital department.

If the group is a group of children, then you will be blessed with many children and much love.

If the group is ugly and arguing then expect misfortune to befall you.



Groups | The Dream Meanings

Keywords of this dream: Groups

The Premier in Dream Dictionary

To be trapped in a dream suggests you feel trapped by your current circumstances. It means you feel unable to see a way of escaping your current problems.

• It reflects feelings of frustration perhaps due to being trapped in your job or a difficult relationship.

• If you are trapping something in a dream be aware of holding onto things too tightly.

• Sometimes dreams of being trapped relate to the paralysis mechanism that affects the large muscle groups during dream sleep to stop us acting out our dreams.... The Premier in Dream Dictionary

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- To be absorbed in what we are doing in dreams indicates our ability to be totally focused on our action. We are capable of taking in ideas, concepts or beliefs which then become part of us and the way we function.

To absorb something into ourselves is to consume it, in the sense of making it our own.

A great deal of the process of understanding takes place through absorption of information.

2- As we mature and grow we perceive the necessity to belong to social groups.

To be absorbed into something represents the need to belong to a greater whole, or to make efforts to integrate various parts of our lives.

3- We have the ability to integrate the various parts of our lives. Spiritually our yearning is to go back to Source.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Separation.Viewing an Aisle tells of an upcoming discrepancy between two people or groups you are involved in. Standing to one side of an aisle shows you are one side of an issue. Note: Gypsies always stick to the same side of an aisle when attending a function where an aisle is present. ... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Often indicates how we relate to groups; our feelings about society, can be difficulties regarding alcohol; one’s technique for avoiding confrontation with loneliness, anxiety, sense of failure, etc. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Islamic Dream Interpretation

If a person sees himself as a mediator between two groups of people it means he will reach some agreement with his opposition provided the person acting as the mediator does not see blood oozing from his body. Otherwise there is no good to be expected.

The same dream could also mean that there is doubt insofar as the lawfulness of his wealth is concerned.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

New American Dream Dictionary

1. A symbol or measure of the ability to manage or “blend” aspects of self or life together.

2. Feelings of confusion, being overwhelmed—usually by life, often by emotions, some­times by groups of people.

3. The ability to “blend” together sometimes conflicting thoughts and feelings. ... New American Dream Dictionary

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Places and Money

1- I’o dream of one’s financial capital would imply a need to conserve resources. Dreaming of a country’s capital city indicates we should look at our attitude to the wider issues in that country or our conncction with that city. We may also need to consider how we deal with large groups of people, particularly those whose customs and accepted behaviour is unknown.

2- To dream of capital letters could indicate that we need to pay more attention to important issues in our lives. There is a matter which needs sorting out.

3- Spiritually, capital is the result of past actions.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Barn; Byre; Coach; Cowshed; Stall) A carriage house in a dream represents the assembly place of politicians, leaders, scholars, merchants, visitors or spectators.

The condition in which the carriage house appears in one’s dream reflects the state of such groups of people. (Also see Barn; Stableman)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: Dreaming of a city, particularly one known to us, is to be trying to understand our sense of community; of belonging to groups. We will often, through dreams, give ourselves clues as to what we require in the mental and emotional environment in which we live, and a bustling city may show our need for social interaction.

A deserted city may portray our feelings of having been neglected by others.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- Dreaming of a city, particularly one known to us is to be trying to understand our sense of community; of belonging to groups. We will often, through dreams, give ourselves clues as to what we require in the mental and emotional environment in which we live, and a bustling city may show our need for social interaction.

A deserted city may portray our feelings of having been neglected by others.

2- A city usually has a core community, and we sometimes represent the place of work or opportunity in this way.

3- A spiritual community to which we belong can be represented by a city, sincc a city was originally given status becausc it had a cathedral.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Compromise; Peace; Reconciliation; Settlement) Making peace with one’s adversary in a dream means disagreement in wakefulness. However, reconciliation between two adversaries or friends in accordance with the prescribed laws in a dream means unity, repentance from sin, guidance that pleases God Almighty, blessings and profits. It also could mean an argument with the person seen in the dream.

If one sees himself making peace with an adversary in a dream, it means that he will call upon a heedless person to walk on God’s path. Making a settlement with an adversary over money in a dream means profits for the lender. In a dream, signing a peace agreement between two enemies in the battlefield means safety and prosperity, intending to get marDICTIONARY OF DREAMS 95 ried, or building a business partnership. Conciliation between arguing drunkards over what they are drinking means enmity between people.

If two groups of opposing trends compromise or consent to respect each others’ philosophy in a dream, it denotes the birth of a new ideology, innovations and trials.

If someone invites a litigant to making an out of court settlement in a dream, it means that he is admonishing people to follow the divine guidance.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of a crowd symbolize your relationship with groups of people.

If you are going along with the crowd, then this dream may be showing you that it is time to express your individuality.

If you are fitting in and enjoying yourself, then this dream reflects your ability to harmonize and be supported.

If you feel out of place in the crowd, then you may be dealing with pressure to conform and/or to exert yourself.

The crowd represents powerful energy, either good or bad, depending upon the consciousness and intent. As in the story of the Ugly Duckling, it is important to find the tribe/crowd that supports your true nature.... Strangest Dream Explanations

The Language of Dreams

(see Door, Fabric, Obstacles, Veil, Windows)

Differences in, or separations between, groups of people, ideals, and dimensions. In the Old Testament, a veil or curtain separated the outer court and the Holy of Holies.

Privacy 7 ; having something that ensures a quiet, personal sanctuary.

Closing yourself off (especially if you see the curtains being drawn). Not wanting people to see you as you truly are; hiding from yourself or your feelings.

Torn curtains reveal quarrels and reproach within the home.

The rifts caused by this discord need to be mended.

Changing curtains discloses similar transformations within you or your home.

For example, a change to loud, vibrant hues might indicate increased energy and an outgoing nature.... The Language of Dreams

My Dream Interpretation

To dream of fighting over the custody of a child is a warning of trouble from your enemies.

To dream of winning custody of a child foretells a surprising turn of events concerning a cause you believed to be lost.

If you were the one being fought over in your dream, you may feel torn between conflicting beliefs or groups of people in your waking life, or be stuck for an answer on a certain decision.... My Dream Interpretation

My Dream Interpretation

Pay attention to dreams about dogs, as they often bring important messages. Dog dreams that are positive mean that the dreamer is lucky in friendship.

A threatening dog signifies discomfort with large social groups. Also see “Barking”, “Puppy” and “Rabies”... My Dream Interpretation

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Dolphins bnng the spmt of playfulness to your life. They swim in groups, called pods, and thus can reflect the need for a closer connection to your family or social group. Extremely intelligent, they may come to activate your own higher intelligence or higher self that is connected to the universal mind.

A dolphin in dreams may reflect shared intelligence and telepathic communication.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Sigmund Freud was the founder of modern therapeutic analysis of dreams. Freud encouraged clients to relax on a couch and allow free associations to arise in con­nection with aspects of their dream. In this way he helped the person move from the surface images (manifest content) of the dream to the underlying emotions, fantasies and wishes (latent content), often connected with early childhood. Be­cause dreams use condensation—a mass of different ideas or experiences all represented by one dream image or event— Freud stated that the manifest content was meagre’ compared with the ‘richness and variety’ of latent content.

If one suc­ceeds in touching the feelings and memories usually con­nected with a dream image, this becomes apparent because of the depth of insight and experience which arises. Although ideally the Freudian analyst helps the client discover their own experience of their dream, it can occur that the analyst puts to the client readymade views of the dream. Out of this has occurred the idea of someone else ‘analysing or telling us about our dream.

Carl Jung used a different approach. He applied amplifica­tion (see entry), helped the client explore their associations, used active imagination (see entry) and stuck to the structure of the dream. Because amplification also put to the client the information and experience of the therapist, again the dreamwork can be largely verbal and intellectual, rather than experiential.

In the approach of Fritz Perls (gestalt therapy) and Moreno (psychodrama), dream analysis is almost entirely experiential.

The person exploring the dream acts out or verbalises each role or aspect of the dream.

If one dreamt of a house, in gestalt one might stan by saying I am a house’ and then go on to describe oneself just as one is as the particular house in the dream. It is important, even if the house were one existing externally, not to attempt a description of the external house, but to stay with the house as it was in the dream. This is like amplification, except the client gives all the information. This can be a very dramatic and emotional experience because we begin consciously to touch the immense realms of experience usually hidden behind the image. When successful this leads to personal insights into behaviour and creativity. See dream processing; amplification; gestalt dream work.

dream as a meeting place Any two people, or group of people who share their dreams, particularly if they explore the associated feelings and thoughts connected with the dream images, achieve social intimacy quickly. Whether it is a family sharing their dreams, or two fnends, an environment can be created in which the most profound feelings, painful and wonderful, can be allowed. Such exposure of the usually pri­vate areas of one s feelings and fears often presents new infor­mation to the dreamer, and also allows ventilation of what may never have been consciously expressed before. In doing so a healing release is reached, but also greater self under­standing and the opportunity to think over or reconsider what is discovered.

Herbert Reed, editor of the dream magazine Sundance, and resident in Virginia Beach, Va., initiated group dreaming ex­periments. It started because Reed noticed that in the dream groups he was running, when one of the group aired a prob­lem, other members would subsequently dream about that person’s problem. He went on to suggest the group should attempt this purposely and the resulting dreams shared to see if they helped the person with the problem.

The reported dreams often formed a more detailed view of the person’s situation. In one instance the group experienced many dream images of water. It aided the woman who was seeking help to admit she had a phobia of water and to begin thinking about learning to swim. In another experiment, a woman presented the problem of indecision about what college to transfer to and what to study. Her group subsequently said they were confused because they had not dreamt about school. Several had dreams about illicit sex. though, which led the woman to admit she was having an affair with a married man. She went on to realise that it was the affair which was underlying her indecision. She chose to end the affair and further her career.

Whatever may be underlying the results of Reed’s expen- ments, it is noticeably helpful to use the basic principles he is working with. They can be used by two people equally as well as a group—by a parent and child, wife and husband, busi­nessman and employee. One sets out to dream about each other through mutual agreement. Like any undertaking, the involvement, and therefore the results, are much more pro­nounced if there is an issue of reasonable importance behind the experiment. It helps if one imagines that during sleep you are going to meet each other to consider what is happening between you. Then sleep, and on waking take time to recall any dream. Note it down, even if it seems far removed from what you expected. Then explore its content using the tech­niques in dream processing.

Example: My wife and I decided to attempt to meet in our dreams. I dreamt I was in a room similar to the back bedroom of my previous marnage. My present wife was with me. She asked me to help her move the wardrobe. It reminded me of, but did not look like, the one which had been in that bed­room. I stood with my back to it, and reached my hands up to press on the top, inside. In this way I carried it to another wall. As I put it down the wood broke. I felt it ought to be thrown away’ (Thomas B). Thomas explored the dream and found he connected feelings about his first marriage with the wardrobe and bedroom. In fact the shabby wardrobe was Tom’s feelings of shabbiness at having divorced his first wife. In his first marriage, represented by the bedroom, he always felt he was married for life. In divorcing, he had done some­thing he didn’t like and was carrying it about with him. He says ‘1 am carrying this feeling of shabbiness and second best into my present relationship, and I need to get rid of it.’

dream as a spiritual guide Dreams have always been con­nected with the spiritual side of human experience, even though today many spiritual leaders disagree with consider­ation of dreams. Because dreams put the dreamer in touch with the source of their own internal wisdom and certainty, some conflict has existed between authoritative priesthood and public dreaming.

A lay person finding their own ap­proach to God in a dream might question the authority of the priests. No doubt people frequently made up dreams about God in order to be listened to. Nevertheless, despite opposi­tion, Matthew still dreamt of an angel appearing to him, Jo­seph was still warned by God to move Jesus; Peter still dreamt his dream of the unclean animals.

The modern scientific approach has placed large question marks against the concept of the human spirit. Study of the brain’s functions and biochemical activities have led to a sense of human personality being wholly a series of biological and biochemical events.

The results of this in the relationship between doctor and patient, psychiatrist and client, some­times results in the communication of human personality be­ing of little consequence. It may not be put into words, but the intimation is that if one is depressed it is a biochemical prob­lem or a brain malfunction.

If one is withdrawn or autistic, it is not that there is a vital centre of personality which has for some reason chosen to avoid contact, but that a biochemical or physiological problem is the cause—it’s nothing personal, take this pill (to change the biochemistry, because you are not really a person). Of course we have to accept that human personality must sometimes face the tragedy of biochemical malfunction, but we also need to accept that biochemical and physiological process can be changed by human will and courage.

In attempting to find what the human spirit is by looking at dreams, creativity stands out.

The spiritual nature may not be what we have traditionally considered it to be.

An overview of dreams and how dreamers relate to them suggests one amaz­ing fact. Let us call it the ‘seashell effect’. When we hear sounds in a shell that we hold to our ear, the noises heard seem exterior to oneself, yet they are most likely amplification of sounds created in our own ear, perhaps by the passage of blood. Imagine an electronic arcade machine which the player could sit in and, when running, the player could be engulfed in images, sounds, smell and sensation. At first there is shim­mering darkness, then a sound, and lights move. Is it a face seen, or a creature. Like Rorschach’s ink blots, the person creates figures and scenes out of the shapeless light and sound.

A devil appears which terrifies the player. People, de­mons, animals, God and angels appear and fade. Scenes are clearcut or a maelstrom of movement and ill-defined activity. Events arise showing every and any aspect of human experi­ence. Nothing is impossible.

If, on stepping out, we told the player that what occurred was all their own creation due to unconscious feelings, fears, habits, thoughts and physiological processes occurring within them, like the seashell effect, they might say ‘Good God, is that all it was, and I thought it was real. What a waste of time.’

Whether we can accept it or not, as a species we have created out of our own longings, fears, pain and perhaps vi­sion, God, with many different names—politics, money, dev­ils, nationalism, angels, an, and so on and on. All of it has flowed out of us. Perhaps we even deny we are the authors of the Bible, wars, social environments. Responsibility is diffi­cult. It is easier to believe the source is outside oneself. And if we do take responsibility for our amazing creativity, we may feel ‘is that all it is—me?’ Yet out of such things, such fears, such drives, such unconscious patterns as we shape our dreams with, we shape our life and fonune, we shape our children, we shape the world and our future.

The shadow of fear we create in our dream, the situation of aloneness and anger, becomes a pattern of feelings, real in its world of mind. We create a monster, a Djinn, a devil, which then haunts and influences us. Or with feelings of hope, of purposiveness and love, create other forces in us and the world. But we are the creator. We are in no way separate from the forces which create our existence. We are those creative forces. In the deep­est sense, not just as an ego, we create ourselves, and we go on creating ourselves. We are the God humanity has looked so long for.

The second aspect of the human spirit demonstrated by dreams is consciousness.

The unconscious mind, if its func­tion is not clogged with a backlog of undealt with painful childhood experience and nonfunctional premises, has a pro­pensity to form gestalts. It takes pieces of experience and fits them together to form a whole. This is illustrated by how we form gestalts when viewing newsprint photographs, which are made up of many small dots. Our mind fits them together and sees them as a whole, giving meaning where there are only dots. When the human mind is working well, when the indi­vidual can face a wide range of emotions, from fear and pain to ecstasy, this process of forming gestalts can operate very creatively. This is because it needs conscious involvement, and if the personality is frightened of deep feeling, the uniting of deeply infantile and often disturbing cxpcrience is cut out. Yet these areas are very rich mines of information, containing our most fundamental learning.

If the process is working well, then one’s expenence is gradually transformed into insights which transcend and thereby transform one s personal life.

For instance, we have witnessed our own binh in some manner, we also see many others appeanng as babies. We see people ageing, dying. We see millions of events in our life and in others.

The uncon­scious, deeply versed in imagery, ritual and body language, out of which it creates its dreams, picks up information from music, architecture, traditional rituals, people walking in the street, the unspoken world of parental influence.

The sources are massive, unbelievable. And out of it all our mind creates meaning. Like a process of placing face over face over face until a composite face is formed, a synthesis of all the faces; so the unconscious scans all this information and creates a world view, a concept of life and death.

The archetypes Jung talks of are perhaps the resulting synthesis of our own expenence, reaching points others have met also.

If so, then Chnst might be our impression of humanity as a whole.

If we dare to touch such a synthesis of experience it may be seanng, breathtaking.

It breaks the boundaries of our present personality and con­cepts because it transcends. It shatters us to let the new vision emerge. It reaches, it soars, like an eagle flying above the single events of life. Perhaps because of this the great hawk of ancient Egypt represented the human spirit.

Lastly, humans have always been faced by the impossible.

To a baby, walking and not wetting its pants is impossible, but with many a fall and accident it does the impossible. It is a god in its achievement.

To talk, to fly heavier-than-air planes, to walk on the Moon, were all impossible. Humans challenge the impossible every day. Over and over they fall, back into defeat. Many lie there broken. Yet with the next moment along come youngsters with no more sense than grasshoppers, and because they don’t know what the differ­ence is between right and left, do the impossible. Out of the infinite potential, the great unknown, they draw something new. With hope, with folly, with a wisdom they gain from who knows where, they demand more. And it’s a common everyday son of miracle. Mothers do it constantly for their children—transcending themselves. Lovers go through hell and heaven for each other and flower beyond who they were. You and I grow old on it as our daily bread, yet fail to see how holy it is. And if we turn away from it, it is because it offers no certainties, gives no authority, claims no reward. It is the spir­itual life of people on the street. And our dreams remember, even if we fail.

For this is the body and blood of the human spirit.

dream as a therapist and healer There is a long tradition of using dreams as a base for both physical and psychological healing. One of the earliest recorded incidents of such healing is when Pharaoh’s ‘spirit was troubled, and he sent for all the magicians of Egypt and all its wise men; and Pharaoh told them his dream, but there was none who could interpret it’. Then Joseph revealed the meaning of the dream and so the healing of Pharaoh’s troubled mind took place (Genesis 41).

The Greek Temples of Asclepius were devoted to using dreams as a base for healing of body and mind (see dreams and ancient Greece).

The Iroquois Amerindians used a social form of dream therapy also (see Iroquoian dream cult).

The dream process was used much more widely throughout his­tory in such practices as Pentecostal Christianity, shaktipat yoga in India, and Anton Mesmer’s groups (see sleep move­ments).

Sigmund Freud pioneered the modern approach to the use of dreams in therapy, but many different approaches have developed since his work. Examples of the therapeutic action of gaining insight into dreams are to be found in the entnes on abreaction, recurring dreams, reptiles.

The entry on dream processing gives information about using a dream to gain insight and healing. See also dream as meeting place.

A feature which people who use their dreams as a thera­peutic tool mention again and again is how dreams empower them. Many of us have an unconscious feeling that any impor­tant healing work regarding our body and mind can only be undertaken and directed by an expert, the expert might be a doctor, a psychiatrist, psychotherapist, or osteopath. Witness­ing the result of their own dream process, even if helped by an expert, people feel in touch with a wonderful internal process which is working actively for their own good. One woman, who had worked on her dream with the help of a fnend (non expert), said It gave me great confidence in my own internal process. I realised there was something powerful in myself working for my own good. It was a feeling of cooperating with life.’ One is frequently amazed by one’s own resources of wisdom, penetrating insight and sense of connection with life, as met in dreamwork. This is how dreams play a pan in helping one towards wholeness and balance.

The growing awareness of one’s central view of things, which is so wide, piercing and often humorous, brings developing self respect as the saga of one’s dreams unfolds.

There may be no hint of this, however, if a person simply records their dreams without attempting to find a deeply felt contact with their contents. It is in the searching for associ­ated feelings and ideas that the work of integrating the many strands of one’s life begins. Gradually one weaves, through a co-operative action with the dream process, a greater unifica­tion of the dark and the light, the painful and transcendent in one’s nature.

The result is an extraordinary process of educa­tion. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Complete Dream Book

A lucky dream, whether seen singly or in groups.

Performing elephants are an omen of a happy family life.

Elephants at work foretell prosperity in business.... The Complete Dream Book

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘At the top of the stairs is a small door, half opened as if inviting me to go up. I get an overpowering sense of something evil beyond the door just waiting for me’ (Charles M). Usually refers to some of our own urges which we have judged as wrong because of moral values, and thus denied expression. Charles probably feels that what he identi­fies with as himself—his established values and beliefs—is threatened by what he senses beyond the door. Whatever threatens our T or ego is often felt to be evil, even if it is natural urges.

The unbalanced and real evils in the world, such as terrorising of individuals and minority groups, can of course be shown as the feeling of evil.

Example: %I am lying on the floor in my bedroom with a towel over me. I am trying to hide and protect myself because I am terrified. There are four devils trying to get into my body and take over. My bedroom is going like a whirlpool around me, like evil all around me. I wake in a hot sweat and am terrified to go back to sleep’ (Joanna). Joanna is most likely in conflict with her sexuality—the bedroom. When we fight with our own urges they often feel like external agencies—evil forces—attacking us. Sometimes refers to repressed emotional pain. See aboriginal; devil under archetypes. See also active/ passive. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: As humans we have a strong need at times to belong to groups. When we dream of being excommunicated we must cope with feelings of rejection, and perhaps of disapproval.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

These mystical, magical creatures are a part of European, Roman and Greek folklore. They are known for their fickle nature, for their ability to grant wishes and for their whims of trickery. Fairies have a capacity for malice, their tools are wands and rings and they can generally be found in groups of three.

The idea of three fairies is at times interpreted as representing childhood, adulthood and old age, or birth, life and death. Fairies may be called the “mistresses of magic” and they may symbolize the extraordinary powers of the human spirit and our fundamental capacity of imagination. Alternatively, we may want to hold on to beliefs in magical powers that will save us from ourselves. In order to be well adjusted human beings, we need to adapt to our environment and accept our limitations.

The fairy in your dream may be interpreted according to the details of the dream and according to your current issues or developmental dilemmas. Is the fairy in your dream giving you hope by encouraging you to be creative and resourceful, or is she playing tricks on you and perpetuating your desire to be saved by magic?... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Little Giant Encyclopedia

Fulfillment of the need for protection and security, as in Notice-of’Intention-to-Marry, Bureaucrat, Tree Trunk, Sidewalk, and Parents’ House. On an objective level, the “own” family that is often unconsciously experienced aggressively. On a subjective level, needs, emotions, and partly reflecting the characteristics of self. It can also refer to other groups (at work, friends, etc.)

According to Freud, a symbol for secrets.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

Ariadne's Book of Dream

One of the most beautiful of aquatic birds, the flamingo reflects grace as well as beauty. As they flock in groups, flamingos bring the message thai group energy can offer an emotional quality of love and support. Their pink color reflects love and beauty. In your dream, flamingos may flock together to inspire you to join with others in the celebration of love. (See Birds.)... Ariadne's Book of Dream

New American Dream Dictionary

1. Lower down on the social scale than most groups.

2. Ability to absorb great indignities.

3. Stupid and gullible.

4. No compas­sion (from steinbeck’s reference in east of eden: “she had eyes like a goat, flat, no depth, devoid of human compassion”). ... New American Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: At some point in our lives, social skills become important to us. Groups and gangs in dreams show us how good we are at handling ourselves and others.

If we are members of either then we have passed some kind of personal test; in the case of gangs we may feel we have passed through some kind of initiation ceremony.

If we are rejected in dreams we ourselves may not yet be ready to belong.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Public or dance hall: how you relate to groups or the public; meeting sexuality, a place of initiation, maturing be­yond old habits, ways of life and views—perhaps because civic ceremonies such as marriage, trials, social rewards, take place in hall-like environments.

Hallway: the way one meets other people or allows them into one’s life or intimacy, the receptive female reproductive function, connecting link with aspects of oneself. Example: ‘I find myself in the entrance hall of a very large house.

The hall is very large with curved staircases at either side meeting at the top to form a balcony. There is nobody about and I am frightened. I stan to walk up the stairs but then find myself hiding in the roof with very little space above my body’ (Mrs B).

The hall is probably Mrs B’s childbearing ability and her image of herself as a woman.

The words ‘little space above my body’ suggest her main area of life has always been her childbearing function or physical attractiveness as a woman, and she had not developed her mental self. See also corridor; white under colour. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

One of Carl Jung s most interesting areas of thought is that of individuation. In a nutshell the word refers to the processes involved in becoming a self-aware human being.

The area of our being we refer to when we say T, ‘me’ or ‘myself’ is our conscious self awareness, our sense of self, which Jung calls the ego.

The autobiography of Helen Keller has helped in understanding what may be the difference be­tween an animal and a human being with self awareness. Helen, made blind and deaf through illness before learning to speak, lived in a dark unconscious world lacking any self awareness until the age of seven, when she was taught the deaf and dumb language. At first her teacher’s fingers touch­ing hers were simply a tactile but meaningless experience. Then, perhaps because she had leamt one word prior to her illness, meaning flooded her darkness. She tells us that ‘noth­ingness was blotted out’. Through language she became a person and developed a sense of self, whereas before there had been nothing.

The journey of individuation is not only that of becoming a person, but also expanding the boundaries of what we can allow ourselves to experience as an ego. As we can see from an observation of our dreams, but mostly from an extensive exploration of their feeling content, our ego is conscious of only a small area of experience.

The fundamental life pro­cesses in one’s being may be barely felt. In many contempo­rary women the reproductive drive is talked about as some­thing which has few connections with their personality. Few people have a living, feeling contact with their early child­hood, in fact many people doubt that such can exist. Because of these factors the ego can be said to exist as an encapsulated small area of consciousness, surrounded by huge areas of ex­perience it is unaware of.

In a different degree, there exists in each of us a drive towards the growth of our personal awareness, towards greater power, greater inclusion of the areas of our being which remain unconscious.

A paradox exists here, because the urge is towards integration, yet individuation is also the process of a greater self differentiation. This is a spontaneous process, just as is the growth of a tree from a seed (the tree in dreams often represents this process of self becoming), but our personal responsibility for our process of growth is neces­sary at a certain point, to make conscious what is uncon­scious.

Because dreams are constantly expressing aspects of indi­viduation it is wonh knowing the main areas of the process. Without sticking rigidly to Jungian concepts—which see indi­viduation as occurring from mid-life onwards in a few individuals—aspects of some of the main stages are as fol­lows. Early babyhood—the emergence of self consciousness through the deeply biological, sensual and gestural levels of experience, all deeply felt; the felt responses to emerging from a non-changing world in the womb to the need to reach out for food and make other needs known. Learning how to deal with a changing environment, and otherness in terms of rela­tionship.

Childhood—learning the basics of motor, verbal and social skills, the very basics of physical and emotional indepen­dence. One faces here the finding of strength to escape the domination of mother—difficult, because one is dependent upon the parent in a very real way—and develop in the psyche a satisfying sexual connection. In dream imagery this means, for the male, an easy sexual relationship with female dream figures, and a means of dealing with male figures in competition (father); see sex in dreams.

The dream of the mystic beautiful woman precedes this, a female figure one blends with in an idealistic sense, but who is never sexual.

The conflict with father—really the internal struggle with one’s image of father as more potent than self—when re­solved becomes an acceptance of the power of one’s own manhood. Women face a slightly different situation.

The woman’s first deeply sensual and sexual love object—in a bonded parent-child relationship—was her mother. So be­neath any love she may develop for a man lies the love for a woman. Whereas a man, in sexual love which takes him deeply into his psyche, may realise he is making love to his mother, a woman in the same situation may find her father or her mother as the love object. In the unconscious motivations which lead one to choose a mate, a man is influenced by the relationship he developed with his mother, a woman is influ­enced by both mother and father in her choice. Example: ‘I went across the road to where my mother’s sister lived. I wanted to cuddle her and touch her bare breasts, but we never seemed to manage this. There were always interruptions or blocks.’ (Sid L).

At these deep levels of fantasy and desire, one has to recog­nise that the first sexual experience is—hopefully—at the mother’s breast. This can be transformed into later fantasies/ dreams/desires of penis in the mouth, or penis in the vagina, or penis as breast, mouth as vagina.

For most of us, however, growth towards maturity does not present itself in such primi­tively sexual ways, simply because we are largely unconscious of such factors. In general we face the task of building a self image out of the influences, rich or traumatic, of our experi­ence. We leam to stand, as well as we may, amidst the welter of impressions, ideas, influences and urges, which constitute our life and body. What we inherit, what we experience, and what we do with these creates who we are.

One of the major themes of individuation is the journey from attachment and dependence towards independence and involved detachment. This is an overall theme we mature in all our life. In its widest sense, it pertains to the fact that the origins of our consciousness lie in a non-differentiated state of being in which no sense of T exists. Out of this womb condi­tion we gradually develop an ego and personal choice. In fact we may swing to an extreme of egotism and materialistic feel­ings of independence from others and nature.

The observable beginnings of this move to independence are seen as our at­tempt to become independent of mother and father. But de­pendence has many faces: we may have a dependent relation­ship with husband or wife; we may depend upon our work or social status for our self confidence; our youth and good looks may be the things we depend upon for our sense of who we are, our self image. With the approach of middle and old age we will then face a crisis in which an independence from these factors is necessary for our psychological equilibnum.

The Hindu practice of becoming a sanyassin, leaving behind family, name, social standing, possessions, is one way of meeting the need for inner independence from these in order to meet old age and death in a positive manner. Most people face it in a quieter, less demonstrative way. Indeed, death might be thought of as the greatest challenge to our identifica­tion with body, family, worldly status and the external world as a means to identity. We leave this world naked except for the quality of our own being.

Meeting oneself, and self responsibility, are further themes of individuation.

The fact that our waking self is a small spot­light of awareness amidst a huge ocean of unconscious life processes creates a situation of tension, certainly a threshold or ‘iron curtain’, between the known and unknown.

If one imagines the spotlighted area of self as a place one is standing in, then individuation is the process of extending the bound­ary of awareness, or even turning the spotlight occasionally into the surrounding gloom. In this way one places together impressions of what the light had revealed of the landscape in which we stand, clues to how we got to be where we are, and how we relate to these. But one may remain, or choose to remain, largely unconscious of self.

The iron curtain may be defended with our desire not to know what really motivates us, what past hurts and angers we hide. It may be easier for us to live with an exterior God or authority than to recognise the ultimate need for self responsibility and self cultivation.

To hide from this, humanity has developed innumerable escape routes—extenonsed religious practice, making scapegoats of other minority groups or individuals, rigid belief in a political system or philosophy, search for samadhi or God as a final solution, suicide. This aspect of our matunng process shows itself as a paradox (common to maturity) of becoming more sceptical, and yet finding a deeper sense of self in its connec­tions with the cosmos. We lose God and the beliefs of humanity’s childhood, yet realise we are the God we searched for. This meeting with self, in all its deep feeling of connec­tion, its uncertainty, its vulnerable power, is not without pain and joy. Example: ‘On the railway platform milled hundreds of people, all men I think. They were all ragged, thin, dirty and unshaven. I knew I was among them. I looked up at the mountainside and there was a guard watching us. He was cruel looking, oriental, in green fatigues. On his peaked cap was a red star. He carried a machine gun. Then I looked at the men around me and I realised they were all me. Each one had my face. I was looking at myself. Then I felt fear and terror’ (Anon).

The last of the great themes of individuation is summed up in William Blake’s words ‘1 must Create a System, or be en- slav’d by another Man’s; I will not Reason and Compare: my business is to Create.’ A function observable in dreams is that of scanning our massive life experience (even a child’s life experience has millions of bits of information) to see what it says of life and survival. Out of this we unconsciously create a working philosophy of what life means to us. It is made up not only of what we have experienced and learnt in the gen­eral sense, but also from the hidden information in the cul­tural riches we have inherited from literature, music, art, the­atre and architecture.

The word hidden” is used because the unconscious ‘reads’ the symbolised information in these sources. It is, after all, the master of imagery in dreams. But unless we expand the boundaries of our awareness we may not know this inner philosopher.

If we do get to know it through dreams, we will be amazed by the beauty of its in­sight into everyday human life.

In connection with this there is an urge to be, and perhaps to procreate oneself in the world. Sometimes this is experi­enced as a sense of frustration—that there is more of us than we have been able to express, or to make real. While physical procreation can be seen as a physical survival urge, this drive to create in other spheres may be an urge to survive death as an identity. Dreams frequently present the idea that our sur­vival of death only comes about from what we have given of ourself to others. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Similar to car—drives such as ambition, what moti­vates one—but usually connected with work or our more commercial relationship with people.

For instance, one s per­sonal motivations meeting the influence of big unified groups such as the police or large businesses.

Example: ‘I was a passenger in a very large eight-wheeled lorry, my husband being the driver. We stopped at a pedes­trian crossing in our town and my husband got out of the driving seat and went into the local town hall near a crossing. I waited in the lorry for what in my dream seemed hours.

The next thing I remember is that I was then riding a bicycle on the other side of the crossing and cycled away up the road’ (Diann R). Her husband’s involvement with social and work activities—the lorry and hall—make Diann decide to become more independent rather than wait for her husband to be ‘with her’. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Authority Figures in People

1- Whenever an authority figure appears in a dream, it is very often harking back to our relationship with our father, with the need to be told what to do, or perhaps to have somebody who is more powerful than we are take control within our lives. Since a magistrate imposes the laws of society, it is also to do with our willingness to submit to authority on behalf” of the Greater Good. Throughout life, we learn to belong to groups and to act in a way that is more in keeping with the needs of those groups.

2- Authority figures are part of our make up. It may well be that part of our being knows best what we should be doing, and our conscious, everyday working self is not operating in keeping with that inner authority.

3- Spiritual authority coupled with spiritual knowledge is often represented by a dream of a magistrate. It signifies the dreamer can be susceptible to both.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘I was walking down the steps of a house, leading into the front area of the basement. I was with a man, perhaps a friend. At the bottom of the steps a psychiatrist was talking to a male client. They were having a session there in the open. I sensed the man’s feelings of embarrassment and exposure. But I felt it was necessary to be thus exposed, i.e. the psychiatrist was purposely holding the session in the open so the man could leam to relax’ (Bernard O). Bernard, a prac­tising therapist, is all of the men in the dream. It portrays the interaction between different parts of himself.

The T walking down the steps is the active, fairly adventurous person Ber­nard sees himself as; the man following—a fnend—is a man Bernard knows who has sexual difficulties, and represents Bernard’s own sexual hesitations; the psychiatrist is Bernard’s therapeutic skill used in his own life, the male client is Bernard’s difficult feelings when dealing with groups of peo- pie—the public—which he is trying to expose’ or get to know and transform.

Generally, a man depicts an aspect of self—even in a woman’s dream—depending on the activity and character of the man in the dream. Any indication whatsoever in the dream gives a clue to what aspect of self. In the example, the character of the friend, the role of the psychiatrist and the feelings of the client indicate which aspects of Bernard s char­acter are being dealt with. Therefore a man trying to rape a woman would be her fears about sex; a homosexual would depict those feelings; a businessman, one’s work or business abilities; a loving man, one’s feelings about love, and so on.

Older man: father or one’s accumulated experience and wisdom; perhaps even wisdom from the unconscious if man is white haired or holy. Wild, ape, half animal man: urges which have not yet been integrated and socialised, usually pertaining to sexuality in today’s social attitudes or natural social feelings at odds with present attitudes.

Man in woman’s dream: in general, a woman’s ability to question conventional behaviour and social habits; her strength to look with insight into her own life and change it thereby—but not her feeling values, emotions and intuitions, her creative or business ability in the world, and power to be competitive and challenging, her defence against just know­ing’ out of the power of her emotions and inbuilt prejudices. Man she knows or loves: feelings, worries about relationship. Dreaming the man is looking at other women or leaving is usually fears about same. Two men: might be a triangle.

Idioms: man to man; be a man; front man; hit man; make a man of; odd man out; right hand man. See family; woman; and other entries pertaining to particular roles or age. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Language of Dreams

(see Herbs, Oak)

Invincibility. Teutonic warriors carried mistletoe into battle as protective amulets.

Setting aside bad feelings out of respect for a common belief or need. In Scandinavian regions, warring groups who met underneath this plant put away their ireapons for the day.

Among Druids, a plant that heals all wounds and protects the bearer. What is it in your life that needs healing}

Romantic advances.

A favored holiday tradition is to kiss anyone caught beneath the mistletoe.

A dream key to unlocking a specific door in your life.

The German philosopher and theologian Albertus Magnus recommended this plant as a magical key that could open anv locked door, including doors to the hidden realms of the earth.... The Language of Dreams

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Symbolized as friend or foe, not literal nations of ethnic groups... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: Then I was in a place where we were having a staff party. Not very big but people were sitting at tables eating in a party mood. I sat with my child, maybe youngest son, no one else at the table. I felt I didn’t wish to get involved with the others, the feeling I often get at parties, just alone in a crowd. I left with my son. Some young men tried to dissuade us but I pushed away’ (Simeon T). Simeon finds groups of people difficult to relate to.

The dream shows this is a feeling which started in his childhood—his youngest son. Generally, our feelings about groups; social skill or lack of it; social pleasure. Dreamer as host of party: our relation­ship with the different aspects of self. Dreamer as main guest, say at a birthday party: wanting family or social acclaim and love, or feeling loved. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- When we find we are attending a party in a dream, we arc often alerted to our social skills or lack of such skills. In waking life we may be shy and dislike such gatherings, but in dreams if we arc coping with the groups involved, we have a greater awareness of our own belonging, ‘lb belong to a political party would indicate that we are prepared to stand up for our beliefs, that we have made a commitment to a particular way of life.

2- The human being often has need of celebration in his or her life.

To be attending a party in a dream can indicate our need for celebration, for joining with other people to create a potentially happy atmosphere.

3- When a group celebrates a belief, which can be spiritual, it is an occasion for a party or festival.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of a party represent your feelings and attitudes toward groups and/or family gatherings, your public persona, and your people/social skills. This dream might symbolize that you are walking through a rite of passage. Whether the party is joyous or uncomfortable, it reflects your level of -integration, your relationships and the level of harmony in your life. See Celebration and Integration Dreams.... Strangest Dream Explanations

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: When we find we are attending a party in a dream, we are often alerted to our social skills – or lack of them. In waking life we may be shy and dislike such gatherings, but in dreams if we are coping with the groups involved, we have a greater awareness of our own ability to belong and to take enjoyment from that.

To belong to a political party would indicate that we are prepared to stand up for our beliefs, that we have made a commitment to a particular way of life.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Several people in dream: not feeling lonely; involve­ment of many aspects of oneself in what is being dreamt about; social ability. Large crowds: enormous involvement of self in issue, one’s relationship or feelings about the social environment one lives in; in groups we have a feeling of being looked at or on view—how we relate to that may be depicted by what we are doing in the dream group. See party; roles.

Example: ‘I was outdoors with a group of people acting as leader. We were in the middle of a war situation with bullets playing around us. Maybe aeroplanes were also attacking. I was leading the group from cover to cover, avoiding the bul­lets’ (Paul W). Despite feeling attacked, either by external events, or from inner conflicts, Paul is using leadership skills to deal with his own fears and tendencies.

If a friend told us he had just had an argument with his wife and was going to leave her, we might sit down and counsel them by listening and helping them to son out the hun feelings from their long- term wishes. We might point out they had felt this way before, but it passed—in other words give feedback they had missed. In a similar way, our various emotions and drives often need this son of skill employed by ourself. This unifies us, leading to coping skills as in Paul’s dream.

Example: Walking alone through a small town. I was heading for a place that a group of people, in a street parallel to mine, were also heading for.

A person from the group tried to persuade me that the right way to get to the place was along the street the group was walking. I knew the street did not matter, only the general direction.

The person was quite dis­turbed by my independence. It made him or her feel uncenain co have their leader apparently questioned. I felt uncenain too for a moment’ (Ivor S).

A group of people, as in Ivor’s dream, can also depict how one meets the pressure of social norms. As social relationship is one of the most imponant factors outside personal survival—and survival depends upon it— such dreams help us to clarify our individual contact with society. Human beings have an unconscious but highly devel­oped sense of the psychological social environment. Ivor’s dream shows something we are all involved in—how we are relating to humans collectively. Are we in conflict with group behaviour and direction? Do we conform, but perhaps have conflict with our individual drives? Do we find a way between the opposites? Much of our response is laid down in child­hood and remains unconscious unless we review it.

In some dreams, a group of people represent what is meant by the word God. This may sound unlikely, but the uncon­scious, because it is highly capable of synthesis, often looks at humanity as a whole. Collectively humanity has vast creative and destructive powers which intimately affect us as individu­als. Collectively it has performed miracles which, looked at as an individual, appear impossible. How could a little human being build the Great Pyramid, or a space shuttle? The Bible echoes this concept in such phrases as Whatever you do to the least of one of these, you do to me. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- To be in a pub in a dream and aware of our behaviour indicates how we relate to groups and what our feelings are about society. We may feel that it is appropriate to use a public space to create new relationships, or to come to terms with our own sense of loneliness.

A public space where we can drop inhibitions has links with the Pagan need for festivity and celebration.

2- We all have social needs that can be met in convivial company, in a pub or bar.

The origins of the public house were the old inns, which were stopping-olf places for travellers. Any companionship was purely transitory. This symbolism is still present today in dreams. We arc in a place where we can rest and relax and nothing more is expected of us.

3- As a public place where shared values arc important, the public house can be a creative space. As a meeting place where few judgements arc made, it becomes a placc in which people can co-exist.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

In most ancient cultures, consider­ation and even veneration of dreams played a great pan. Some groups felt that dream life was more real and imponant than waking life. Not only were dreams looked to for information about hunting (Eskimo groups), but also for ways of healing physical and psychological ills (Greek dream temples) and insights into the medicinal properties of herbs, barks and clays (African tribal witchdoctors). Common to most of these groups, and evident in the Old Testament, was also the sense that through dreams one had awareness of the transcendental or supersensible. St Peter’s dream of the sheet and unclean animals was a turning point in the history of western socicty —as was Constantine’s dream of his victory if he used the symbol of Christianity.

At its most fundamental, the human religious sense emerges out of several factors. One is the awareness of ex­isting amidst external and internal forces of nature which cause us to feel vulnerable and perhaps powerless. Such natu­ral processes as illness, death, growth and decay, earthquakes, the seasons, confront us with things which are often beyond our ability to control. Considenng the information and re­sources of the times, one of religion’s main functions in the past was the attempted control of the ‘uncertain’ factors in human life, and help towards psychological adjustment to vali­ne rability. Religions were the first social programmes aiding the human need for help and support towards emotional, mental, physical and social health and maturity. Even if prim­itive, such programmes helped groups of people to gain a common identity and live in reasonable harmony together. Like a computer program which is specific to a particular business, such programmes were specific to a particular group, and so are outdated in today’s need for greater integra­tion with other races. Religions also offered some sort of con­cept of and connection with the roots of being.

Example: ‘For two nights running I have dreamt the same nightmare. I am in a chapel walking down the first flight of several flights of steps when I hear loud noises behind me. I am told to run, being warned of the soldiers who ride the cavalry horses nght down the steps, and who run you over if you are in their way.

The horses are fierce and they absolutely race down the steps at the same time every day, and you literally have to lock yourself away in a nearby room which is a long way down the chapel. I ran into the room hearing the pounding of the horses’ hooves. It was a terrible pandemo­nium in that chapel. In the room were school children the same age as me and some perhaps younger’ (Maria H). Maria, who is 16, in describing her dream says she had recently been confronted with whether to have a sexual relationship with her boyfriend. Religion, represented by the chapel, is Maria’s way of locking out her powerful sexual urges. Many dreams show that religion, as a set of beliefs, is used as a way of avoiding anxiety in the face of life’s uncertainties.

For many people, the rigid belief system helps them to avoid uncertainty in making decisions.

Dreams also portray and define the aspect of human expe­rience in which we sense a kinship with all life forms. This is the side of spiritual expenence through which we find a con­nection with the roots of our being. While awake we might see the birth of a colt and feel the wonder of emergence and newness; the struggle to stand up and survive, the miracle of physical and sexual power which can be accepted or feared. In looking in the faces of fellow men and women we see something of what they have done in this strange and painful wonder we call life. We see whether they have been crushed by the forces confronting them; whether they have become ngid; or whether, through some common miracle, they have been able to carry into their mature years the laughter, the crying, the joy, the ability to feel pain, that are the very signs of life within the human soul. These things are sensed by us all, but seldom organised into a comprehensive view of life, and an extraction of meaning. Often it is only in our dreams, through the ability the unconscious has to draw out the signif­icance of such widely divergent expenences, that we glimpse the unity behind phenomena which is an essential of spiritual life, i.e. we all have a life, we breathe, we have come from a mother, so share a universal experience.

Example: To quote J.B. Priestley from his book Rain Upon Godshill: ‘Just before I went to Amenca, dunng the exhausting weeks when I was busy with my Time Plays, I had such a dream, and I think it left a greater impression on my mind than any experience I had ever known before, awake or in dreams, and said more to me about this life than any book I have ever read.

The setting of the dream was quite simple, and owed something to the fact that not long before my wife had visiied the lighthouse here at St Catherine’s to do some bird ringing. I dreamt I was standing at the top of a very high tower, alone, looking down upon myriads of birds all flying in one direction; every kind of bird was there, all the birds in the world. It was a noble sight, this vast aerial river of birds. But now in some mysterious fashion the gear was changed, and time speeded up, so that I saw generations of birds, watched them break their shells, flutter into life, mate, weaken, falter and die. Wings grew only to crumble; bodies were sleek, and then, in a flash bled and shrivelled; and death struck every­where at every second. What was the use of all this blind struggle towards life, this eager trying of wings, this hurried mating, this flight and surge, all this gigantic meaningless ef­fort? As I stared down, seeming to see every creature’s ignoble little history almost at a glance, I felt sick at heart. It would be better if not one of them, if not one of us, had been bom, if the struggle ceased for ever. I stood on my tower, still alone, desperately unhappy. But now the gear was changed again, and the time went faster still, and it was rushing by at such a rate, that the birds could not show any movement, but were like an enormous plain sown with feathers. But along this plain, flickering through the bodies themselves, there now passed a sort of white flame, trembling, dancing, then hurry­ing on; and as soon as I saw it I knew that this white flame was life itself, the very quintessence of being; and then it came to me, in a rocket burst of ecstasy, that nothing mattered, nothing could ever matter, because nothing else was real but this quivering and hurrying lambency of being. Birds, men and creatures not yet shaped and coloured, all were of no account except so far as this flame of life travelled through them. It left nothing to mourn over behind it, what I had thought was tragedy was mere emptiness or a shadow show; for now all real feeling was caught and purified and danced on ecstatically with the white flame of life. I had never before felt such deep happiness as I knew at the end of my dream of the tower and the birds.’

Some Nonh American Indians developed the totem out of similar processes. In one generation a person might learn to plant a seed and eat the results. Later someone might see that through fertilisation more food was produced. Still later some­one found that by irrigating, still more improvement was made. No one individual was responsible for such vital cul­tural information, and the collective information is bigger than any one person, yet individuals can partake of it and add to it.

The totem represented such subtle realities, as it might in a modem dream; as Christ might in today’s unconscious. That older cultures venerated their collective information, and that modem humans seem largely apathetic to it, shows how our ‘religion’ has degenerated. Yet utilising the power of the unconscious to portray the subtle influences which impinge upon us, and building the information gained into our re­sponse to life, is deeply important.

With the growth of authoritarian structures in western reli­gion, and the dominance of the rational mind over feeling values, dreams have been pushed into the background. With this change has developed the sense that visionary dreams were something which ‘superstitious* cultural groups had in the past. Yet thoroughly modem men and women still meet Christ powerfully in dreams and visions. Christ still appears to them as a living being.

The transcendental, the collective or universal enters their life just as frequently as ever before. Sometimes it enters with insistence and power, because a too rational mind has led to an unbalance in the psyche—a bal­ance in which the waking and rational individuality is one pole, and the feeling, connective awareness of the uncon­scious is the other.

Although it is tempting to think of the transcendent as ethereal or unreal, the religious in dreams is nearly always a symbol for the major processes of maturing in human life. We are the hero/ine who meets the dangers of life outside the womb, who faces growth, ageing and death.

The awe and deep emotions we unconsciously feel about such heroic deeds are depicted by religious emotion.

See angel; Christ, rebirth and Devil under archetypes; church; evil; fish, sea creatures; example in whale under fish, sea creatures; heaven, hell; sweets under food; dream as spiritual guide. See also hero/ine; mass; masturbation; old; paralysis; colours; sheep under animals. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

In the Western world, the rosary is generally though of as a Catholic prayer item. Catholics say the rosary by repetitive prayer and meditation, with the focus on the Blessed Mother or the Virgin Mary. However, most religions have their own prayer beads or rosary.

A rosary consists of pearls or beads linked together by a thread.

The Hindu rosary has 50 beads, Buddhist rosary 108 beads, and the Muslim rosary 99 beads and in Africa some groups have a rosary made out of human teeth. Prayers and specific meditations of each religion are different and there are theological reasons for the number of beads. Rosaries may come in different colors, sizes and designs. However, the central purpose, which is to pray repetitively and to meditate, is the same across all religions that use them as a prayer tool.

If you are seeing rosary beads in your dream it suggests that prayer and meditation is needed in your daily life.

The unconscious generally provides us with helpful images that are not always difficult to understand. Thus, if you are not a prayerful person, the rosary in your dreams may be encouraging you to begin a more introspective and meditative life. Think about the rosary in your dream and try to decipher what it means to you and how you may incorporate meditation and peaceful reflection into your conscious life.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

My Dream Interpretation

To dream that you are schizophrenic, symbolizes your conflict between two ideas, opinions or ways of approaching life. You could also feel stuck between two people or groups in your life who want different things from you. You are feeling torn apart by this conflict - you must make a decision about the person who you want to become, and then act accordingly to make it happen.... My Dream Interpretation

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Education and Teacher

1- School is an important part of everyone’s life. In situations where we are learning new abilities or skills, the image of a school will often come up in dreams. It is also the place where we experience associations which do not belong to the family, and can therefore suggest new ways of learning about relationships. School may also be the place where we learn about competitiveness and how to belong to groups.

2- When we are relearning how to deal with our own personalities, the school or classroom will often appear in dreams. They will often appear at times when we are attempting to get rid of old. outmoded ideas and concepts. Also, when we are learning different ways of dealing with authority and with feelings of inadequacy, our feelings about school will surface.

3- Spiritually it is often considered that life itself is a school. Life is an arena for learning and experiencing so that we can maximise our best potential. It is believed that life is a testing-ground for the reality which comes afterwards.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: School is an important part of everyone’s life. In situations where we are learning new abilities or skills, the image of a school will often surface in dreams. It is also the place where we experience associations that do not belong to the family, and can in dreams, therefore, suggest new ways of learning about relationships. School may also be indicative of how we learn about competitiveness and belonging to groups. Consult the entries for education, teacher and university for further information.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Christian Dream Symbols

The sea can be symbolic of many nations and people groups, Ps. 65:5-7.

The sea can also symbolize current situation in life... Christian Dream Symbols

My Dream Interpretation

To dream of having separate identities suggests that you are feeling torn apart and divided. Your feelings are pulling you in opposite directions. You could also feel stuck between two people or groups in your life who want different things from you. You are feeling torn apart by this conflict - you must make a decision about the person who you want to become, and then act accordingly to make it happen.... My Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

As a species, humans have cer­tain norms of behaviour, many of which we share with other animals. We tend to find a partner of the opposite sex and produce children. We care for our children. We have strong feelings about territory. In groups this becomes nationalism and, like ants or some group animals, we fight to defend our territory. We elect leaders, and have complicated rituals re­garding group status or personal ‘face*. We seek outward signs of our status, and wherever possible show them.

Talking to individuals, these drives are often hardly recog­nised. Yet they are powerful enough when manipulated to gather huge armies of people who then march to their death. They are behind enormous hostility between neighbours and nations. Although irrational, and not in our best interest to be influenced by, millions of us are moved by them as if we had little will of our own.

The feelings behind them, although seldom acknowledged directly by our conscious self, are often raised to religious status.

The procreative drive, the election of leaders, the parental and child raising urges, are all to be seen in the Christian religion as the bones behind the robes and rituals. Why does Catholicism ban the condom and divorce, make a giant figure out of the Pope, worship a woman with a baby in her arms, if it is not based on these mighty urges and biological drives?

Dreams reveal that much of human life arises out of these patterns.

The patterns are in us unconsciously. We often ven­erate the norm’ of these patterns and raise them, religiously or politically, to a level of tremendous importance.

The prob­lem is that many of these patterns are no longer serving us well. They are habits developed through thousands or mil­lions of years of repetition. While they remain unconscious we find it difficult to redirect them or even admit to their influence in our life.

Thereare, of course, many other aspects of the uncon­scious, such as memories of childhood trauma, the dream process, the image formation process and sensory apparatus. It is enough to begin with if we recognise that a lot of ourself and our potential remains unknown to us because it remains unconscious, or a pan of our unconscious processes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Language of Dreams

(see Birds, Feathers, Wings)

A recognition of finality and ending (e.g., “singing one’s swan song”).

Among Hindus, this bird is interchangeable with the goose, representing creative origination and the breath of life.

The Celts regarded the swan as a solar bird that was beneficent and a shape-shifter. In a dream, this can relate to your ability to adapt to a new situation gracefully.

Native American: An emblem of trust and forgiveness.

Swans are also representative of love interests, being sacred to Aphrodite, Venus, and Zeus, the latter of whom changed himself into a swan to pursue the affection of Leda.

Dreaming of two swans together portends very devoted relationships. Swans mate for life.

Because of the story of the Ugly Duckling, swans also represent positive transformations in self-image. It can also reflect spending time with the wrong groups of people who engender lower self-esteem.... The Language of Dreams

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Dreaming about teeth is very common in all cultures and age groups. Most dreams about teeth leave people feeling uneasy and anxious. Consider the overall content and context of the dream and note if you are having dental problems before making interpretation. Teeth usually symbolize power and/or control. Animals use their teeth for defense and nourishment and show their teeth when angry. Humans often display similar behaviors. Look and see if you are losing or abusing power and control in any area of your life (especially if you are losing teeth in your dream). Old dream interpretations say that dreaming about teeth is a bad omen that suggest financial difficulties. ... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- When we dream of sitting on a throne, we are acknowledging our right to take authority. When the throne is empty, we are not prepared to accept the responsibility for who we arc. It may be that we are conscious of a lack of parenting. When someone else is on the throne, we may have passed over authority to that other person.

2- A throne is a seat of authority or power. In dreams it can represent our ability to belong to groups, or even to society. We may need to take the lead in a project or scheme.

The throne usually suggests that we have attained control on all levels of existence, both spiritually and physically.

3- Spiritually we could be at a point where knowledge and understanding are finally within our grasp. This can be symbolised by a throne in a dream.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Psychological / emotional perspective: A throne is a seat of authority or power. In dreams it can represent our ability to belong to groups, or even to society; we may need to take the lead in a project or scheme.

The throne usually suggests that we have attained an element of control on all levels of existence, both spiritually and physically.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Fellowship, groups... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Clothes

1- Dreaming of uniforms is all to do with our identification with a particular role or type of authority.

However rebellious we may be, a part of us needs to conform to the ideas and beliefs of the social group to which we belong. Seeing ourselves in uniform confirms that belonging.

2- Often, in collective groups, the right to wear a uniform has to be earned. Dreaming of being in a group of uniformed people indicates that we have acheived the right to be recognised.

3- Identification of a common spiritual goal and an agreement as to ‘uniform’ behaviour is an important aspect in spiritual development.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Psychological / emotional perspective: Often, in collective groups, the right to wear a uniform has to be earned. Dreaming of being in a group of uniformed people indicates that we have achieved the right to be recognized.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- Dreaming of voting in an election, whether general or within the workplace, highlights our wish and ability to belong to groups.

If we are conscious we arc voting with the group we are happy to accept group practice. Voting against the group indicates a need to rebel.

2- While the process of voting is supposed to be fair and just, when we dream of this we may be questioning that process.

To dream of being elected to a position is to seek power.

3- Spiritually when we have given unconditional acceptance to something, we have placed our trust in it.

A votive offering is a spiritual request.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: Dreaming of voting in an election, whether general or within the workplace, highlights our wish and ability to belong to groups. Being voted for signifies acceptance by our peers.

If we are conscious that we are voting with the group we are happy to accept group practice. Voting against the group indicates a need to rebel.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ariadne's Book of Dream

The elephant of the sea, the whale, navigates long distances. Traveling in groups called pods, whales can come to assist your navigation through the vast unseen potential of the subconscious.

The sound of the whale is a song that demonstrates the power of music in bnnging about harmony and healing.

The appearance of whales in a dream may indicate a need to migrate to a new environment.... Ariadne's Book of Dream