hats

Hats, Dream Interpretation


This is a variable dream and depends more on the action in the dream rather then the hat itself. These are a few meanings: A new elaborate hat denotes a rise in status and good luck, while old shabby hats are a wide range of bad luck; if you lose your hat you will have a loss of finances, etc..

Hats are usually symbolic of power and authority. They also stereotype the person that is wearing it. Look at the details in your dream especially who is wearing the hat.

The type and quality of the hat usually represents the degree of authority and respect that your unconscious mind is giving to the person wearing it. Generally the person wearing the hat is representing a part of you. What is the hat saying about your position in life and your attitude toward it?

A new elaborate hat denotes a rise in status and good luck, while old shabby hats are a wide range of bad luck; if you lose your hat you will have a loss of finances.



Hats | Dream Interpretation

Keywords of this dream: Hats

Strangest Dream Explanations

If you dream of being in a chat room, then this represents connecting with aspects of yourself that you have not yet met. Pay particular attention to the content of the chat, the words are the prime message in this dream.

A chat room also reflects a desire for anonymity, intimacy at a safe distance, and a desire for connection with people that share a mutual interest. This dream may be advising you to venture out and take your chats to the next level. See Internet.... Strangest Dream Explanations

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example:41 dreamt my sister was attacking me with a pair of scissors. She backed me against a wall and stabbed me. During the day after the dream my sister phoned me at work and said she’d had an awful dream in which she stabbed me with scissors’ (D).

The Poseidia Institute of Vir­ginia Beach, Va., have run a number of group ‘mutual dream­ing’ experiments. Although the Institute suggests very positive results, a critical survey of the dreams and reports reveals a lack of hard evidence. Like other areas of ESP dreaming, it can seldom ever be willed. But the dreams did show themes related to problems regarding intimate meeting. Also, some of the dreams were directly about the goal of dream meeting, as in the following example.

Example: ‘I find the group of people I am looking for. There were maybe six or more people. They were asleep on mattresses except for two or three. These were awake and waiting for me, and wearing small pointed hats such as Ti­betan Lamas wear. In the dream I realised this meant they had achieved sufficient inner growth to remain awake in sleep. We started to communicate and were going to wake the others’ (Tom C). See dream as a meeting place.

the dream as extended perception Even everyday mental func­tions such as thought and memory occur largely uncon­sciously. During sleep, perhaps because we surrender our vo­lition, what is left of self awareness enters the realm where the nine-tenths of the iceberg of our mind is active. In this realm faculties can function which on waking seem unobtainable.

For example:

1- Extending awareness to a point distant from the body, to witness events confirmed by other people. This is often called out of body experience (OBE), but some of these experiences suggest the nature of consciousness and time may not be dualistic (having to be either here or there). See out of body experience.

2-Being aware of the death or danger of a member of family. Kinship and love seem to be major factors in the way the unconscious functions. See dead people dreams.

3-Seeing into the workings of the body and diagnosing an illness before it becomes apparent to waking observation. Dr Vasali Kasatkin and Professor Medard Boss have specialised in the study of such dreams. In a recent dream told to me, a man looked back into a bedroom and saw a piece of the wall fall away. Waves of water gushed from a main pipe.

The dreamer struggled to hold back the piece of broken pipe. Within two weeks his colon burst and he had to have a major operation. See meditation.

4-Access to a computer-like ability to son through a massive store of information and experience to solve problems. These dreams are often confused with precognitive ability. Prediction does occur from these dreams, but it arises, as with weather prediction, from a massive gathering of in­formation, most of which we have forgotten consciously. Monon Schatzman, in a New Scientist anicle, showed how subjects can produce answers to complex mathematical problems in their dreams. See dream process as com­puter; creativity and problem solving in dreams.

5-Tapping a collective mind which stores all experience, and is sensed as godlike or holy. See dream as spiritual guide.

It seems likely that before the development of speech the human animal communicated largely through body lan­guage. Some dreams suggest we still have this ability to read a person’s health, sexual situation, intentions and even their past, through body shape, posture and tiny movements. See postures, movement and body language.

See Cayce, Edgar; collective unconscious; wife under family. See also hallucinations. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Language of Dreams

(see Clothes)

Antiquated methods or approaches (e.g., something is “old hat”). Involvement or interest (e.g., “tossing your hat into the ring”).

The mind: Keeping ideas “under one’s hat.” Top hat: A refined, classy approach to a situation.

Jester’s hat: Clowning around. Possibly using humor as a communication tool, or to cover up insecurity.

Changing hats: Transitions or additional responsibilities especially in a work-related situation (e.g., “wearing many hats”).... The Language of Dreams

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Hats, in general, represent the attitudes you wear and explain something about the direction of your thinking.

A flowered bonnet may comment on old-fashioned feminine values.

A Nike sports hat may point to someone who thinks he can do anything with the right attitude.

A Nike cap worn over the third eye may suggest that you use your psychic abilities.

A sports cap representing your favorite team may indicate a sense of rooting for yourself and those you love.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- A hole usually represents a difficult or trickv situation. It can also be a place where we may hide, or feel protected in.

To dream of falling into a hole indicates that we are perhaps getting in touch with our unconscious feelings, urges and fears.

To walk round a hole suggests we may need to get round a tricky situation. We may also need to become aware of the other parts of ourselves that are buried beneath our surface awareness.

2- A hole can very often represent the feminine and the emptiness one feels as one moves towards an understanding of the Self.

A hole in the roof of any sacred building, or any hole which allows steam or smoke to escape, is the opening upwards to the celestial world and is the door or gateway to other dimensions. It is interesting that, as central heating and living in Hats becomes more commonplace, we feel more and more enclosed without aspect to that spiritual awareness.

3- A round hole represents the Heavens, a square hole represents the Earth.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘I was walking down the steps of a house, leading into the front area of the basement. I was with a man, perhaps a friend. At the bottom of the steps a psychiatrist was talking to a male client. They were having a session there in the open. I sensed the man’s feelings of embarrassment and exposure. But I felt it was necessary to be thus exposed, i.e. the psychiatrist was purposely holding the session in the open so the man could leam to relax’ (Bernard O). Bernard, a prac­tising therapist, is all of the men in the dream. It portrays the interaction between different parts of himself.

The T walking down the steps is the active, fairly adventurous person Ber­nard sees himself as; the man following—a fnend—is a man Bernard knows who has sexual difficulties, and represents Bernard’s own sexual hesitations; the psychiatrist is Bernard’s therapeutic skill used in his own life, the male client is Bernard’s difficult feelings when dealing with groups of peo- pie—the public—which he is trying to expose’ or get to know and transform.

Generally, a man depicts an aspect of self—even in a woman’s dream—depending on the activity and character of the man in the dream. Any indication whatsoever in the dream gives a clue to what aspect of self. In the example, the character of the friend, the role of the psychiatrist and the feelings of the client indicate which aspects of Bernard s char­acter are being dealt with. Therefore a man trying to rape a woman would be her fears about sex; a homosexual would depict those feelings; a businessman, one’s work or business abilities; a loving man, one’s feelings about love, and so on.

Older man: father or one’s accumulated experience and wisdom; perhaps even wisdom from the unconscious if man is white haired or holy. Wild, ape, half animal man: urges which have not yet been integrated and socialised, usually pertaining to sexuality in today’s social attitudes or natural social feelings at odds with present attitudes.

Man in woman’s dream: in general, a woman’s ability to question conventional behaviour and social habits; her strength to look with insight into her own life and change it thereby—but not her feeling values, emotions and intuitions, her creative or business ability in the world, and power to be competitive and challenging, her defence against just know­ing’ out of the power of her emotions and inbuilt prejudices. Man she knows or loves: feelings, worries about relationship. Dreaming the man is looking at other women or leaving is usually fears about same. Two men: might be a triangle.

Idioms: man to man; be a man; front man; hit man; make a man of; odd man out; right hand man. See family; woman; and other entries pertaining to particular roles or age. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

lives While there may be some evidence for reincarna­tion in the work of Dr Ian Stevenson, dreams which clearly state reincarnation in their theme most likely represent pres­ent life situations.

Example: ‘I dream of living in China, a long time ago. I was married to a man with whom I had two children. He began to tire of me and brought concubines into our house­hold. I hated him. When I woke I realised I had dreamt about a past life’ (Patricia L). Patricia had in fact been married to a man in this life who, after her two children were born, began to bring other women home. This broke up their marriage. From Patricia’s point of view, this happened because in a past life her husband and she had not resolved their difficulties, so had to meet them again in this lifetime—whatsoever ye sow, so shall ye reap. Where such dreams have been thoroughly explored, I have found that their imagery arises from emotions and trauma which the dreamer finds difficult to meet. Placing it in a past life enables one to avoid the difficulty of experienc­ing present life pain. Patricia says she hated her Chinese hus­band.

The dream process can create a drama to represent our present situation using any form of structure. It is, after all, the master dramatist. This function of the unconscious explains many ‘past life’ memories elicited by hypnotic regression. Most of them are explainable in terms of present life trauma or situation. See hallucination, hallucinogens. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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