Healer, Dream Interpretation


Dreams of a healer represent your inner shaman/goddess that knows just the right soul medicine to prescribe for any challenge or imbalance you face. Healing is at hand. See Doctor.



Healer | Dream Interpretation

Keywords of this dream: Healer

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Loving healer... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Healer of mind and body... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Ariadne's Book of Dream

For Native Americans, the bear comes to initiate the power of healing medicine and can represent a call to walk the path of a healer or medicine person.

For the urban shaman, the bear’s call may be to a profession in the healing arts such as massage therapy or reflexology. As an archetype, the bear pos sesses strength and a grounded connection to the earth.

The bear often represents the nurturing or mothering aspect that comforts and heals as the primary relationship early in life.

Thus, an angry bear can signify a response to the devouring nature of your own mother.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Gnffith, Miyago and Tago give 34 types of dream themes, from falling to being hung by the neck.

For the lay dreamer it is more useful to put dreams into much broader categories such as psychological. ESP, body, sexual, spiritual and problem solving. In researching the data for this book, some special cluster of dream themes were no­ticed.

For instance a cluster was noted in women past middle age, they dreamt of walking in a town and losing their hus­band. Description of these clusters can be seen in son and husband under family; losing teeth under body; flying; secret room under house; dead people; individuation. See also dream as meeting place; dream as spiritual guide; dream as therapist and healer; sex in dreams; ESP in dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ariadne's Book of Dream

The newest heavenly body, Chiron is the sign of the wounded healer It may announce someone who has coped with a great deal of emotional pain and thus learned compassion toward others. Chiron’s appearance may call you to a healing profession It may also represent the influence of karma in your life brought up from previous incarnations or any other transgressions of your soul.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- Colour is a vital part of symbolism. This is partly to do with the vibratory frequency which each individual colour has, and partly to do with tradition. Scientific experiments have now been carried out to ascertain what effect colour has, and have proved what occultists and healers have always known. In working with the colours of the rainbow, we discover that the warm, lively colours which give back light - are yellow, orange and red. Cold passive colours are blue, indigo and violet.

Green is a synthesis of both warmth and cold. White light holds all colour in it.

2- By working with one’s own colour spectrum, it is possible to maintain health. Some meanings given to colours are

Black This colour holds within it all colour in potential. It suggests manifestation, negativity and judgement.

Blue It is the colour of the clear blue sky. This is the prime healing colour. It suggests relaxation, sleep and peaceful ness.

Brown The colour of the earth, death and commitment. Green This is the colour of balance and harmonv. It is the colour of nature and of plant life. Grey There is probably no true grey. It means devotion and ministration.

Magenta This is in some ways a colour which links both the physical and spiritual. It signifies relinquishment, selflessness, perfection and meditative practice. Orange This is an essentially cheerful uplifting colour.

The qualities associated are happiness and independence. Red Vigour, strength, energy, life, sexuality and power are all connected with is colour.

A beautiful clear mid-red is the correct one for these qualities; if there is any other red in dreams, the attributes may not be totally uncontaminated.

Turquoise The colour is clear greeny blue. This is supposed in some religions to be the colour of the freed soul. It means calmness and purity.

Violet This colour, while found by- some to be too strong, means nobility, respect and hope. Its purpose is to uplift. White This colour contains within it all colours. It suggests innocence, spiritual purity and wisdom.

Yellow This colour is the one which is closest to daylight. Connected with the emotional sell”, the attributes are thinking, detachment and judgement.

3- Colour affirms the existence of light. In spiritual terms, red is the colour of self-image and sexuality, orange is relationship both with self and others. Yellow is the emotional self, green is self- awareness blue is self-expression and wisdom. Indigo is the colour of creativity, while violet depicts cosmic responsibility.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: Colour is a vital part of symbolism, dream and otherwise. By learning to work with our own colour spectrum, particularly in the dream state, we can maintain and enhance our physical wellbeing. This is partly to do with the vibratory frequency which each individual colour has, and partly to do with tradition. Experiments have been carried out to ascertain what effect colour has, and have proved what occultists and healers have always known. In working with the colours of the rainbow, we discover that the warm, lively colours – which give back light – are yellow, orange and red. Cold passive colours are blue, indigo and violet. Green is a synthesis of both warmth and cold. White light holds within it the whole colour spectrum and its potential.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Little Giant Encyclopedia

See Physician. Helper, healer, wise man, adviser, and leader. Symbol of the healing power residing in yourself, which you can trust. On the other hand, “Doctor” as a title points to the appearance that we would like to present to the outside world.

If that is the case, this is a message to seek your true self.

Folklore: In general, always speaks of a good omen.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- When we dream of a doctor we are aware that we need to give way to a higher authority in health matters.

For older people the doctor may also represent the professional classes.

2- It will depend what sort of doctor appears in our dream as to the correct interpretation.

A surgeon would suggest the need to cut something out of our lives.

A physician would indicate that careful consideration should be given to our general state, whereas a psychiatrist signifies the need to look at our mental state.

If the doctor is known to us lie may stand as an authority figure.

3- The personality of a doctor in dreams suggests the appearance of the healer within.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Consulting with a doctor in a dream may remedy concerns about your health. It may announce that you may neec someone to assist you in diagnosing a health problem. There is an aspect within the subconscious called the inner healer, which brings the power to transform a condition of disease within you that may have created a real disease in your body.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Dream Meanings of Versatile

The presence of a doctor in dreams suggests the appearance of the healer within. We each have within us an aspect of spiritual knowledge, which is capable of reminding the physical body of its right to be well.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Sigmund Freud was the founder of modern therapeutic analysis of dreams. Freud encouraged clients to relax on a couch and allow free associations to arise in con­nection with aspects of their dream. In this way he helped the person move from the surface images (manifest content) of the dream to the underlying emotions, fantasies and wishes (latent content), often connected with early childhood. Be­cause dreams use condensation—a mass of different ideas or experiences all represented by one dream image or event— Freud stated that the manifest content was meagre’ compared with the ‘richness and variety’ of latent content.

If one suc­ceeds in touching the feelings and memories usually con­nected with a dream image, this becomes apparent because of the depth of insight and experience which arises. Although ideally the Freudian analyst helps the client discover their own experience of their dream, it can occur that the analyst puts to the client readymade views of the dream. Out of this has occurred the idea of someone else ‘analysing or telling us about our dream.

Carl Jung used a different approach. He applied amplifica­tion (see entry), helped the client explore their associations, used active imagination (see entry) and stuck to the structure of the dream. Because amplification also put to the client the information and experience of the therapist, again the dreamwork can be largely verbal and intellectual, rather than experiential.

In the approach of Fritz Perls (gestalt therapy) and Moreno (psychodrama), dream analysis is almost entirely experiential.

The person exploring the dream acts out or verbalises each role or aspect of the dream.

If one dreamt of a house, in gestalt one might stan by saying I am a house’ and then go on to describe oneself just as one is as the particular house in the dream. It is important, even if the house were one existing externally, not to attempt a description of the external house, but to stay with the house as it was in the dream. This is like amplification, except the client gives all the information. This can be a very dramatic and emotional experience because we begin consciously to touch the immense realms of experience usually hidden behind the image. When successful this leads to personal insights into behaviour and creativity. See dream processing; amplification; gestalt dream work.

dream as a meeting place Any two people, or group of people who share their dreams, particularly if they explore the associated feelings and thoughts connected with the dream images, achieve social intimacy quickly. Whether it is a family sharing their dreams, or two fnends, an environment can be created in which the most profound feelings, painful and wonderful, can be allowed. Such exposure of the usually pri­vate areas of one s feelings and fears often presents new infor­mation to the dreamer, and also allows ventilation of what may never have been consciously expressed before. In doing so a healing release is reached, but also greater self under­standing and the opportunity to think over or reconsider what is discovered.

Herbert Reed, editor of the dream magazine Sundance, and resident in Virginia Beach, Va., initiated group dreaming ex­periments. It started because Reed noticed that in the dream groups he was running, when one of the group aired a prob­lem, other members would subsequently dream about that person’s problem. He went on to suggest the group should attempt this purposely and the resulting dreams shared to see if they helped the person with the problem.

The reported dreams often formed a more detailed view of the person’s situation. In one instance the group experienced many dream images of water. It aided the woman who was seeking help to admit she had a phobia of water and to begin thinking about learning to swim. In another experiment, a woman presented the problem of indecision about what college to transfer to and what to study. Her group subsequently said they were confused because they had not dreamt about school. Several had dreams about illicit sex. though, which led the woman to admit she was having an affair with a married man. She went on to realise that it was the affair which was underlying her indecision. She chose to end the affair and further her career.

Whatever may be underlying the results of Reed’s expen- ments, it is noticeably helpful to use the basic principles he is working with. They can be used by two people equally as well as a group—by a parent and child, wife and husband, busi­nessman and employee. One sets out to dream about each other through mutual agreement. Like any undertaking, the involvement, and therefore the results, are much more pro­nounced if there is an issue of reasonable importance behind the experiment. It helps if one imagines that during sleep you are going to meet each other to consider what is happening between you. Then sleep, and on waking take time to recall any dream. Note it down, even if it seems far removed from what you expected. Then explore its content using the tech­niques in dream processing.

Example: My wife and I decided to attempt to meet in our dreams. I dreamt I was in a room similar to the back bedroom of my previous marnage. My present wife was with me. She asked me to help her move the wardrobe. It reminded me of, but did not look like, the one which had been in that bed­room. I stood with my back to it, and reached my hands up to press on the top, inside. In this way I carried it to another wall. As I put it down the wood broke. I felt it ought to be thrown away’ (Thomas B). Thomas explored the dream and found he connected feelings about his first marriage with the wardrobe and bedroom. In fact the shabby wardrobe was Tom’s feelings of shabbiness at having divorced his first wife. In his first marriage, represented by the bedroom, he always felt he was married for life. In divorcing, he had done some­thing he didn’t like and was carrying it about with him. He says ‘1 am carrying this feeling of shabbiness and second best into my present relationship, and I need to get rid of it.’

dream as a spiritual guide Dreams have always been con­nected with the spiritual side of human experience, even though today many spiritual leaders disagree with consider­ation of dreams. Because dreams put the dreamer in touch with the source of their own internal wisdom and certainty, some conflict has existed between authoritative priesthood and public dreaming.

A lay person finding their own ap­proach to God in a dream might question the authority of the priests. No doubt people frequently made up dreams about God in order to be listened to. Nevertheless, despite opposi­tion, Matthew still dreamt of an angel appearing to him, Jo­seph was still warned by God to move Jesus; Peter still dreamt his dream of the unclean animals.

The modern scientific approach has placed large question marks against the concept of the human spirit. Study of the brain’s functions and biochemical activities have led to a sense of human personality being wholly a series of biological and biochemical events.

The results of this in the relationship between doctor and patient, psychiatrist and client, some­times results in the communication of human personality be­ing of little consequence. It may not be put into words, but the intimation is that if one is depressed it is a biochemical prob­lem or a brain malfunction.

If one is withdrawn or autistic, it is not that there is a vital centre of personality which has for some reason chosen to avoid contact, but that a biochemical or physiological problem is the cause—it’s nothing personal, take this pill (to change the biochemistry, because you are not really a person). Of course we have to accept that human personality must sometimes face the tragedy of biochemical malfunction, but we also need to accept that biochemical and physiological process can be changed by human will and courage.

In attempting to find what the human spirit is by looking at dreams, creativity stands out.

The spiritual nature may not be what we have traditionally considered it to be.

An overview of dreams and how dreamers relate to them suggests one amaz­ing fact. Let us call it the ‘seashell effect’. When we hear sounds in a shell that we hold to our ear, the noises heard seem exterior to oneself, yet they are most likely amplification of sounds created in our own ear, perhaps by the passage of blood. Imagine an electronic arcade machine which the player could sit in and, when running, the player could be engulfed in images, sounds, smell and sensation. At first there is shim­mering darkness, then a sound, and lights move. Is it a face seen, or a creature. Like Rorschach’s ink blots, the person creates figures and scenes out of the shapeless light and sound.

A devil appears which terrifies the player. People, de­mons, animals, God and angels appear and fade. Scenes are clearcut or a maelstrom of movement and ill-defined activity. Events arise showing every and any aspect of human experi­ence. Nothing is impossible.

If, on stepping out, we told the player that what occurred was all their own creation due to unconscious feelings, fears, habits, thoughts and physiological processes occurring within them, like the seashell effect, they might say ‘Good God, is that all it was, and I thought it was real. What a waste of time.’

Whether we can accept it or not, as a species we have created out of our own longings, fears, pain and perhaps vi­sion, God, with many different names—politics, money, dev­ils, nationalism, angels, an, and so on and on. All of it has flowed out of us. Perhaps we even deny we are the authors of the Bible, wars, social environments. Responsibility is diffi­cult. It is easier to believe the source is outside oneself. And if we do take responsibility for our amazing creativity, we may feel ‘is that all it is—me?’ Yet out of such things, such fears, such drives, such unconscious patterns as we shape our dreams with, we shape our life and fonune, we shape our children, we shape the world and our future.

The shadow of fear we create in our dream, the situation of aloneness and anger, becomes a pattern of feelings, real in its world of mind. We create a monster, a Djinn, a devil, which then haunts and influences us. Or with feelings of hope, of purposiveness and love, create other forces in us and the world. But we are the creator. We are in no way separate from the forces which create our existence. We are those creative forces. In the deep­est sense, not just as an ego, we create ourselves, and we go on creating ourselves. We are the God humanity has looked so long for.

The second aspect of the human spirit demonstrated by dreams is consciousness.

The unconscious mind, if its func­tion is not clogged with a backlog of undealt with painful childhood experience and nonfunctional premises, has a pro­pensity to form gestalts. It takes pieces of experience and fits them together to form a whole. This is illustrated by how we form gestalts when viewing newsprint photographs, which are made up of many small dots. Our mind fits them together and sees them as a whole, giving meaning where there are only dots. When the human mind is working well, when the indi­vidual can face a wide range of emotions, from fear and pain to ecstasy, this process of forming gestalts can operate very creatively. This is because it needs conscious involvement, and if the personality is frightened of deep feeling, the uniting of deeply infantile and often disturbing cxpcrience is cut out. Yet these areas are very rich mines of information, containing our most fundamental learning.

If the process is working well, then one’s expenence is gradually transformed into insights which transcend and thereby transform one s personal life.

For instance, we have witnessed our own binh in some manner, we also see many others appeanng as babies. We see people ageing, dying. We see millions of events in our life and in others.

The uncon­scious, deeply versed in imagery, ritual and body language, out of which it creates its dreams, picks up information from music, architecture, traditional rituals, people walking in the street, the unspoken world of parental influence.

The sources are massive, unbelievable. And out of it all our mind creates meaning. Like a process of placing face over face over face until a composite face is formed, a synthesis of all the faces; so the unconscious scans all this information and creates a world view, a concept of life and death.

The archetypes Jung talks of are perhaps the resulting synthesis of our own expenence, reaching points others have met also.

If so, then Chnst might be our impression of humanity as a whole.

If we dare to touch such a synthesis of experience it may be seanng, breathtaking.

It breaks the boundaries of our present personality and con­cepts because it transcends. It shatters us to let the new vision emerge. It reaches, it soars, like an eagle flying above the single events of life. Perhaps because of this the great hawk of ancient Egypt represented the human spirit.

Lastly, humans have always been faced by the impossible.

To a baby, walking and not wetting its pants is impossible, but with many a fall and accident it does the impossible. It is a god in its achievement.

To talk, to fly heavier-than-air planes, to walk on the Moon, were all impossible. Humans challenge the impossible every day. Over and over they fall, back into defeat. Many lie there broken. Yet with the next moment along come youngsters with no more sense than grasshoppers, and because they don’t know what the differ­ence is between right and left, do the impossible. Out of the infinite potential, the great unknown, they draw something new. With hope, with folly, with a wisdom they gain from who knows where, they demand more. And it’s a common everyday son of miracle. Mothers do it constantly for their children—transcending themselves. Lovers go through hell and heaven for each other and flower beyond who they were. You and I grow old on it as our daily bread, yet fail to see how holy it is. And if we turn away from it, it is because it offers no certainties, gives no authority, claims no reward. It is the spir­itual life of people on the street. And our dreams remember, even if we fail.

For this is the body and blood of the human spirit.

dream as a therapist and healer There is a long tradition of using dreams as a base for both physical and psychological healing. One of the earliest recorded incidents of such healing is when Pharaoh’s ‘spirit was troubled, and he sent for all the magicians of Egypt and all its wise men; and Pharaoh told them his dream, but there was none who could interpret it’. Then Joseph revealed the meaning of the dream and so the healing of Pharaoh’s troubled mind took place (Genesis 41).

The Greek Temples of Asclepius were devoted to using dreams as a base for healing of body and mind (see dreams and ancient Greece).

The Iroquois Amerindians used a social form of dream therapy also (see Iroquoian dream cult).

The dream process was used much more widely throughout his­tory in such practices as Pentecostal Christianity, shaktipat yoga in India, and Anton Mesmer’s groups (see sleep move­ments).

Sigmund Freud pioneered the modern approach to the use of dreams in therapy, but many different approaches have developed since his work. Examples of the therapeutic action of gaining insight into dreams are to be found in the entnes on abreaction, recurring dreams, reptiles.

The entry on dream processing gives information about using a dream to gain insight and healing. See also dream as meeting place.

A feature which people who use their dreams as a thera­peutic tool mention again and again is how dreams empower them. Many of us have an unconscious feeling that any impor­tant healing work regarding our body and mind can only be undertaken and directed by an expert, the expert might be a doctor, a psychiatrist, psychotherapist, or osteopath. Witness­ing the result of their own dream process, even if helped by an expert, people feel in touch with a wonderful internal process which is working actively for their own good. One woman, who had worked on her dream with the help of a fnend (non expert), said It gave me great confidence in my own internal process. I realised there was something powerful in myself working for my own good. It was a feeling of cooperating with life.’ One is frequently amazed by one’s own resources of wisdom, penetrating insight and sense of connection with life, as met in dreamwork. This is how dreams play a pan in helping one towards wholeness and balance.

The growing awareness of one’s central view of things, which is so wide, piercing and often humorous, brings developing self respect as the saga of one’s dreams unfolds.

There may be no hint of this, however, if a person simply records their dreams without attempting to find a deeply felt contact with their contents. It is in the searching for associ­ated feelings and ideas that the work of integrating the many strands of one’s life begins. Gradually one weaves, through a co-operative action with the dream process, a greater unifica­tion of the dark and the light, the painful and transcendent in one’s nature.

The result is an extraordinary process of educa­tion. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Meanings of Versatile

The east in spiritual terms has from ancient time suggested the spring, a time for hope and youth.

The archangel for the east is raphael, healer of the world.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Enlightened healer of mind and spirit... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- For many women, her hairdresser is someone with whom she can communicate freely. In dreams the hairdresser may appear as the part of ourselves which deals with self- image and the way we feel about ourselves. We perhaps need to consider ways in which we can change our image.

2- Psychologically and intellectually, the hairdresser can represent the healer within us.

An intimate yet objective relationship can be important within our lives.

A hairdresser appearing in dreams would signify this relationship.

3- In terms of spirituality the connection between self-image and beauty is obvious. We cannot grow spiritually unless we like ourselves.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Psychological / emotional perspective: Psychologically and intellectually, the hairdresser can represent the healer within us. Developing an intimate yet objective relationship, with ourselves or others, can be valuable and a hairdresser appearing in dreams would signify this.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

The Language of Dreams

(see Body, Fingers, Gloves)

Healing (e.g., the “laying on of hands”). In many cultures, hands are a predominant tool as a healer’s conduit for divine energy.

A token of friendship, especially if extended toward you.

Good intentions. In some tribal societies, people greeted each other with upheld hands to indicate the lack of -weapons and a mutual wish for peaceful discourse.

Help or service (e.g., “many hands make light work” or “lend a helping hand”).

Surrender. Two hands held high in the air indicate giving yourself over to some authority figure or letter of the law.

Tied: A situation over which you have no direct influence or control (see Knots, Ties / Tying).

Clenched hands reveal a lot of tension and anxiety- present in the dreamer.

Upturned hands are a sign that some comprehension is lacking. Alternatively, you are constantly asking for help, like a beggar, but not necessarily helping yourself.

Missing: To dream of not having any hands means that you probably feel helpless or ineffective in your current situation. You need to find an alternative tool or approach that’s productive.

The palm of the hand represents life’s road map—the directions one has taken or is soon to take (note that the divinatory art of palmistry is based on the secrets that lie literally in the palm of your hand).

Callused or chapped hands equate to hard work that has questionable rewards.... The Language of Dreams

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Traditionally a handshake symbolizes a welcome into heaven and a farewell to earthly existence. Our spiritual journey contains many welcomes and goodbyes, and today the handshake symbolizes the transitions we make. Equally the handshake can suggest the touch of healers and is also a sign of good faith.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Receiving healing in a dream may comment on the self-healing potential of the dream state. Healing someone else may express your concerns about someone close to you. It may reflect a soul-to-soul connection that places you in the helper role. It may also represent a deep desire to be a healer in a carcgivmg profession... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Healer of body and spirit... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

The Language of Dreams

(see Salve)

Historically, receiving such a dream on holy ground was believed to foretell recuperation from whatever sickness was depicted (see Church, Monastery, Temple).

A pressing need for physical attention. Take note of what type of healer is pictured here to better discern where to seek aid.

The person or animal receiving healing in a dream can represent a situation, relationship, or condition of the soul or mind that needs gentle care.... The Language of Dreams

DreamPedia

What did you dream of last night?

What did you see and whathappened in those dreams?

Convert your dreams into Lucky Numbers to take on this weeks draws, they could help you get lucky!

1. King, Human blood, White man, Left eye

2. Monkey, Native, A Spirit Chief, Copper, Money, Jockey

3. Sea Water, Accident Frog, Sailor, Sex

4. Dead man, Turkey, Small fortune, Bed

5. Tiger, Fight, Strong man

6. Ox Blood, Gentleman, Milk

7. Lion, ‘Thief, Big stick, Chickens

8. Pig, Drunken man, Loafer Fat man, Chinese king

9. Moon, Baby, Hole, Owl, Devil, Pumpkin, Anything round

10. Eggs, Train, Boat Grave, Anything oval

11. Carriage, Wood, Tree, Furniture, Bicycle, Flowers

12. Dead woman, Ducks, Small fire, Chinese Queen

13. Big fish, Ghosts, Spirits

14. Old woman, Fox, Detective, Nurse, Native woman

15. Bad woman, Prostitute, Canary, White horse, Small knife

16. Small house, Coffin, Pigeon, Young woman, Paper money, Letter

17. Diamond woman, Queen. Pearls, Diamond, Stars, White woman;

18. Silver money, Servant girl, Right eye, Butterfly, Hook, Rain

19. Little girl, Smoke, Bread, Big bird, Left hand

20. Cat Sky, Handkerchief, Body, Music, Minister, Naked woman

21. Old man, Stranger, Fisherman, Elephant, Knife, Nose, Teeth

22. Rats, Motor car Big ship, Left foot, Shoes

23. Horse, Doctor, Head, Hair, Crown

24. Mouth, Wild cat, Vixen, Lioness, Hole, Purse

25. Big house, Church, Boxer, Hospital

26. Bees, Crown, Bad man, Bush, General, Funeral, Madman

27. Dog, Policeman, Newborn baby, Medicine, Sad news 28 Sardines, Small fish, Thief, Right foot Surprise, Small child

29. Small water, Coffin, Rain, Tears, Big knife, Right hand

30. Fowl, Graveyard, Sun, Throat, Indian, Forest

31. Big fire, Bishop, Big spirit Feathers, Fight Woman

32. Gold money, Dirty woman, Snake

33. Lithe boy, Spider

34. Meat, Human dung, Anything dirty, Cripple, Tramp

35. Clothes, Sheep, Big hole, Big grave

36. Shrimp, Stick, Admiral, Cigars, Gum

37. Arrow, Lawyer, Treasure, Cooking, Stream

38. Crocodile, Balloons, Sjhambok, Fireworks, Stadium

39. Sangoma, Soccer team, Tattoos, Bloodshed, Teacher

40. Birth, Clock, Snail, Dwarf, River Traditional healer

41. Cattle, Planets, Cave, Desert, Monster.

42. Tornado, Spear Umbrella, Camel, Door

43. Army, Thunder Astronaut Rabbit Turtle

44. Shark, Stud farm, Body builder, Injury, Mud

45. Football, Computers, Jewellery, Wrestler, Storm

46. Ambulance, Beard, Sea sand, Scissors, Key

47. Stallion, Kite, TV, Lightening, Carnival, Hut

48. Clown, Rainbow, Nightmare, Whale, Wealth

49. Shebeen. Circus, Chocolate, Space ship

... DreamPedia

The Language of Dreams

(see Abbreviations)

Each name’s meaning derives from its root language. Patricia, for example, means noble (which is the origin of the word patrician). Try looking in a baby’s name book for more information along these lines.

Names can have symbols built into them.

For example, someone in your dream named Mr. or Ms. Heart can symbolize your own emotions, or a person you know who is very loving.

Receiving a new name in a dream indicates drastic change and personal transformations to the point of a figurative rebirth. In European and Judaic folk traditions, healers often gave people new names to fool the spirit of sickness into leaving the body. Similarly, in many cultures a child is given a new name after undergoing a rite of passage into adulthood. This name marks the child’s new role in that society.

A sense of individuality. Each person’s name engenders images and feelings to those who hear it. People often chose nicknames that are more appropriate representations of their true natures.

The development of, or initiation into, an esoteric or metaphysical path. Many people practicing such faiths adopt a new name that reflects their spiritual vision and other positive qualities.

Control over aspects of the self or a specific situation. Many ancient peoples in Europe believed that if you knew a person’s or entity’s true name (like that of a fahy), you would have power over it. By naming something in a dream, you may be trying to exert or develop increased command, and make that item or characteristic more concrete.... The Language of Dreams

Ariadne's Book of Dream

A nurse may appear to give care and nurturing that are healing to the soul as well as to the body. As the feminine archetype of a caregiver, she may comment that compassion is the greatest healer.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Christian Dream Symbols

A symbol of Christ or a pastor.

If you are the physician in a dream it can symbolize a role you fill in the lives of others as healer, comforter, and counselor, Jer. 8:22 ... Christian Dream Symbols

The Language of Dreams

(see Authority Figures, Healing, Medicine, Operation)

If you have a tendency to always help others while neglecting your own needs, the physician in your dreams is the Super Ego counseling that to be a healer, you must first heal yourself.

A gentle nudge to seek medical evaluation or treatments for something you have either ignored or overlooked up until now.

The patient in this dream can represent a person or group with whom you need to patch things up. It may also be situational.... The Language of Dreams

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Our basic spinal and lower brain reactions, such as fight or flight, reproduction, attraction or repulsion, sex drive, need for food and reaction to pain. This includes the fundamental evolutionary ability to change and the urge to survive—very powerful and ancient processes. Our relationship with the reptile in our dreams depicts our relat- edness to such forces in us, and how we deal with the im­pulses from the ancient pan of our brain.

Modern humans face the difficulty of developing an inde­pendent identity and yet keeping a working relationship with the primitive, thus maturing/bringing the primitive into an efficiently functioning connection with the present social world.

The survival urge at base might be kill or run, but it can be transformed into the ambition which helps, say, an opera singer meet difficulties in her career. Also the very primitive has in itself the promise of the future, of new aspects of human consciousness. This is because many extraordinary human functions take place unconsciously, in the realm of the reptile/spine/lower brain/right brain/autonomic nervous sys­tem. Being unconscious they are less amenable to our waking will. They function fully only in some fight or flight, survive or die, situations.

If we begin to touch these with consciousness, as we do in dreams, new functions are added to conscious­ness. See The dream as extended perception under ESP and dreams.

frog

Unconscious life or growth processes which can lead to transformation (the frog/prince story); the growth from child­hood vulnerability—tadpole to frog—therefore the process of life in general and its wisdom. Frogspawn: sperm, ovum and reproduction.

lizard

Example: ‘My wife and I saw a large lizard on the wall near a banana. It was there to catch the flies.

The lizard turned so it was facing away from us—head up the wall. We then were able to see it had large wing-like flaps which spread from its head in an invened V. With amazement we saw on these flaps wonderful pictures, in full colour, of birds. In fleet­ing thoughts I wondered if the bird “paintings” were to attract birds, or were some form of camouflage. But I felt cenain the lizard had “painted” these wonderful pictures with its uncon­scious an’ (David T). Generally, a lizard is very much the same as a snake, except it lacks the poisonous aspect; aware­ness of unconscious or instinctive drives, functions and pro­cesses. In the above dream, the banana is both David’s plea­sure and sexuality, while the lizard is the creativity emerging from his unconscious through the attention he is giving it—he is looking at the lizard. Chameleon: either one’s desire to fade into the background, or adaptability.

snake

Example: A small snake about a foot long had dropped down my shirt neck. I could feel it on the left side of my neck Fearing it was poisonous and might bite me, I moved very slowly. At one point I put my head on the ground, hoping the snake would wish to crawl away. It did not. Then I was near an elephant I loved, and hoped it would remove the snake. It did not. Even as I slept I felt the snake was an expression of the attitude of not shanng myself with anybody except family’ (David T).

For months prior to the above dream David had experienced a great deal of neck pain. After dis­cussing the dream with his wife, and realising much of his thinking and feeling was intumed, the pain disappeared. So the snake was both poisoner’ and ‘healer’. This may be why snakes are used as a symbol of the medical profession.

The Hebrew word for the serpent in the Garden of Eden is Nahash, which can be translated as blind impulsive urges, such as our instinctive drives.

So, generally, snakes depict many different things, but usu­ally the life process.

If we think of a person’s life from con­ception to death, we see a flowing moving event, similar in many ways to the speeded up films of a seed growing into a plant, flowering and dying.

The snake depicts the force or energy behind that movement and purposiveness—the force of life which leads us both to growth and death. That energy —like electricity in a house, which can be heat, power, sound and vision—lies behind all our functions. So in some dreams the snake expresses our sexuality, in others the rising of that energy up our body to express itself as digestion—the intesti­nal snake; as the healing or poisonous energy of our emotions and thoughts.

Example: ‘I was in a huge cathedral, the mother church. I wanted to go to the toilet/gents. As I held my penis to urinate it became a snake and reached down to the urinal to drink. It was thirsty. I struggled with it, pulling it away from the un­clean liquid. Still holding it I walked to a basin and gave it pure water to drink’ (Bill A). Here the connection between snake and sexuality is obvious. But the snake is not just Bill’s penis. It is the direction his sexual urges take him he is strug­gling with. Out of his sense of love and connection with life— the cathedral—he wants to lift his drive towards something which will not leave him with a sense of uncleanness. Snake in connection with any hole: sexual relatedness.

A snake biting us: unconscious worries about our health, frustrated sexual impulse, our emotions turned against our­selves as internalised aggression, can poison us and cause very real illness, so may be shown as the biting snake. Snake biting others: biting remarks, a poisonous tongue.

A crowned or light-encircled snake: when our ‘blind impulses’ or instinctive or unconscious urges and functions are in some measure inte­grated with our conscious will and insight, this is seen as the crowned snake or even winged snake. It shows real self awareness and maturity. In coils of snake: feeling bound in the ‘blind impulses’ or habitual drives and feeling responses. Instincts and habits can be redirected, as illustrated by Hercu­les’ labours. Snake with tail in mouth: sense of the circle of life—binh, growth, reproduction, aging, death, rebirth; the eternal. Snake coiling up tree, pole, cross: the blind instinctive forces of life emerging into conscious experience—in other words the essence of human expenence with its involvement in pain, pleasure, time and eternity; the process of personal growth or evolution; healing because personal growth often moves us beyond old attitudes or situations which led to inner tension or even sickness. Snake in grass: sense or intuition of talk behind your back; danger, sneakiness. Colours: green, our internal life process directed, perhaps through satisfied feelings, love and creativity, into a healing process or one which leads to our personal growth and positive change; white, eternal aspect of our life process, or becoming con­scious of it; blue, religious feelings or coldness in relations. See colours; anxiety dreams; death and rebirth, the self under archetypes; dreams and Ancient Greece; cellar under house, buildings; hypnosis and dreams; jungle; paralysis. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Language of Dreams

(see Water)

Free-flowing thoughts and actions.

Time’s passage.

The beginning of the river is the past, and where it goes represents the future. This is especially true if you dream of yourself traveling on the river.

If you see yourself in the water, being conveyed by an overwhelming current, this reflects either relinquishing yourself to your instinctive, emotional nature or having your individuality washed away by circumstances.

Traversing a river in a small water craft is an alternative type of path dream in which the current reflects your direction of personal growth.

Healing. Rivers figure heavily into folk medicine in which healers used the water’s movement to convey sickness visually away from a patient.

If this is the case, what is the water taking away? This item will give more meaning to the dream.... The Language of Dreams

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreaming about a wise, interdimensional healer/medicine man represents your desire to evoke more of your own innate healing wisdom. You are connecting with your own inner spiritual source and infinite wellspring of talent, power and passion. See Prophetic Dreams.... Strangest Dream Explanations

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Adrian Morrison at the University of Pennsylvania, investigating narcolepsy, a condition producing sleep in the middle of activity, found that a small area of the brain, the pons, suppresses full muscular movement while we dream.

If this area is damaged or suppressed, humans or ani­mals make full muscular movements in connection with what is dreamt. He observed that cats would stalk, crouch and spring at imaginary prey. These very imponant findings sug­gest a number of things.

The unconscious process behind dreaming, apan from creating a non-volitional fantasy, can also reproduce movements we have not consciously decided upon. This shows we have at least two centres of will which can direct body and mental processes. Christopher Evans, linking with the work of Nicholas Humphrey at Cambridge University, sees the movements of dreaming cats as expres­sions of survival ‘programs’ in the biological computer. These ‘programs’ or strategies for survival need to be replayed in order not only to keep in practice, but also to modify them in connection with the influx of extra experience and informa­tion. In the human realm, our survival strategies and the way we relate to our social, sexual, marriage and work roles may also be replayed and modified in our dreaming.

Such movements are not linked simply to survival or social programs’.

An important aspect of dreaming is releasing painful emotions or trauma, and moving toward psychological growth. Also, the process producing these movements does not keep strictly to the realm of sleep. It is observable that many muscular spasms, ticks, or unwilled waking movements arise from this source—the will’ of the unconscious—at­tempting to release trauma or initiate a necessary programme of psychological growth. That such dream’ activities as spon­taneous movement or verbalisation should occur during wak­ing would appear to suggest that a dream must occur with them. Research shows this is unlikely. It does however show that a dream may be imagery produced to express this mental, muscular, emotional ‘self regulation’.

The imagery may not be necessary if the process is consciously experienced.

Because the self-regulatory process produces spontaneous movements, emotions and verbalisation, it is likely there is a connection between it and many ancient religious practices such as pentecostalism, shaktipat in India, subud in Indonesia and seitai in Japan. These are forms of psychotherapy prac­tised by other cultures. They create an environment in which practitioners can allow spontaneous movement and fantasy while awake. Because consciousness is then involved, and can co-operate with the self-regulating or healing activities of the unconscious, such practice can lead to better health and utilisation of unconscious functions.

The older religious forms of this practice relied on belief systems of spirits or gods. Once the connection between these practices and the dream is realised, much in them which was obscure becomes under­standable. In my book Mind and Movement I explain the con­nection between the dream process, self regulatory healing, extended perception and waking consciousness. See abreac­tion; sleep walking; dream as therapist and healer. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ariadne's Book of Dream

In general, the snake can be one of the most powerful forces emerging from a dream.

The power of Snake bnngs active libidinous or sexual energy out of the subconscious for creative use. Snake power is healing power that when cultivated and used can heal your physical and emotional wounds.

The undulating movement of Snake moves the energy known as kundalini up the spine of its initiate to activate a spintual awakening. It may announce the call to the profession of a healer or shaman. Snake may signify wisdom in its association with the tree of knowledge. Snakes may sometimes represent deep-seatec fears that disrupt your life, or sexual fears where there has beer trauma or violanon.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- Normally in dreams spittle will represent disgust. We would, in former times, ‘spit venom’, which is a very basic image as to how a hurt or threatened animal will react.

2- More positively, spittle can indicate a sign of good faith. Some cultures still spit on their hands when completing a deal. There is a bonding through the exchange of bodily fluids.

3- Since Biblical times, spittle has been seen as a healing fluid. It was supposed to be an antidote against being cursed, particularly by the use of the Evil Eye. Spiritually it is perhaps symbolic of the flow of energy between healer and patient.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Little Giant Encyclopedia

The male sex organ. Fear of a syringe points to sexual inhibitions. At present, the syringe is also a symbol of fear of AIDS, and fear of something intruding on you. Often a hint that you should be more open.

If a diabetic dreams of syringes, it could be a message from the inner healer to think about the right dose.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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