horror

Horror, Dream Interpretation


A dream that features horror, or where you are “in” a horror movie, must be analyzed for the various parts in the dream. It is not necessarily a bad omen - try to break down what happened in your dream, and look up the meanings of each symbol or situation.



Horror | Dream Meanings

Keywords of this dream: Horror

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘I am sleeping rough in a garden with a woman I do not love. I think I should try to make the best of the situation, but my feelings against it are too strong. Then I decide I don’t ever want to live like that again and tear up the mattress we slept on. As I do this I realise, as if waking from amnesia, that Pat lives just across the road. She has specially moved there because of our love. I realise with horror I had forgotten and may have lost her’ (David H).

The dream says only too clearly how we often forget things that are so impor­tant to us, and fall into old habits.

The woman David was sleeping with was someone from his past he was unhappy with. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The male within the female, shown as a man in a woman’s dreams. Physically a woman is predominantly fe­male, but also has a clitoris and produces some male hor­mones. Psychologically, we may only express part of our po­tential in everyday life. In a woman, the more physically dynamic, intellectual and socially challenging side of herself may be given less expression. Apart from this, some features, such as innovation and creative rational thought, may be held in latency. These secondary or latent characteristics are de­picted by the male in female dreams. In general we can say the man represents the woman’s mental and social power, her ability to act creatively in ‘the world’. It also holds in it an expression of her complex of feelings about men, gained as experience mostly from her relationship with—or lack of— father, but also from a synthesis of all her male contacts. So the whole realm of her expenence of the male can be repre­sented by the man in her dream, and is accessible through the image.

Good relationship with or marrying the man: shows the woman integrating her own ability to be independent and capable in outwardly active terms. This makes her more whole, balancing her ‘female’ qualities. It also shows the woman meeting her experience of her father in a healing way. This enables the woman to have a realistic relationship with an actual man. It also bnngs a sense of connectedness be­tween her conscious self and what she senses as the ‘commer­cial’ world. See father in this entry.

To be in conflict with the man, or unable to make real physical and pleasurable contact with him: suggests difficulty in meeting what may have been a painful or threatening expe­rience of father. This can lead to lack of ability to make clear judgments, and lack of decisiveness in areas outside feeling values. She is prone to acceptance of collective or long held social norms without question; family or national attitudes not applicable to present situations; and reasoning’ which actu­ally arises out of emotions connected to such family or social norms. Actual relations with men will be difficult, or entered into simply as a duty. Emotional or intimate merging with a man is threatening because it brings the woman close to the conflicts and pain connected with father. Sex may be possible but not a close feeling union. See man.

Christ Although people generally think of Christ as a histori­cal figure, in dreams Christ is not this at all. He is a powerful process in the human unconscious. In the west we give this process the name of Christ, but the process or archetype is universal and has various names in different cultures. Some­times represented in dreams as a fish or a big man, in general the Christ is an expression of the dreamer’s own potential— what they can become in their life. But it also depicts what might be called a sense of the forces of symbiosis or co­operative activity operative in human life and the cosmos. There are at least four aspects to Chrisi as depicted in dreams.

The Sunday school or Church Christ: depicts social norms, the generally accepted morals and social rules. This Christ’ comes about because the Church tends to represent tradi­tional values, and also the attempt to press people to live these values.

The dreamer may have a childlike relationship with this Christ or, if attempting to be self responsible, be in con­flict with it. Some people find this Christ has a castrating role in their life, and flee in horror. In fact this aspect of social indoctrination may lead to such a burden of guilt and sup­pression that it can create psychic cripples. Trying to do all the right’ things may lead us to the point where ‘we can’t say no to a glass of water without a pang of guilt*. Two of the great forces which push at the human soul or psyche are social pressure, such as the moral norm, and biological pressures, such as the sex drive, individuals may fight a lifelong battle with one or the other of these.

The social cnminal typifies battle with the first; the ascetic, battle with the second.

The ideal Christ: the psychological process which causes us not to take responsibility for our own highest ideals; our own yearnings for the good, our own most powerful urges arising against what we see as evils in the world. This influ­ences us to wait for a sign from Christ in our dream in order to gain authority, or to overcome the anxiety associated with the drive. We want God to say we should act in a cenain way because we are not willing to be self responsible. Example: I stood outside a castle. It was closed and guarded by soldiers in armour. Wondering how to get in I thought that if I dressed and acted as a soldier I would be allowed entrance. It worked and inside Christ met me and said he had important work for me to do’ (Sonia).

The closely guarded secret is Soma’s own impulse to do some son of socially creative work. She doesn’t want to acknowledge the impulse as her own; it is much easier if she can say ‘Christ told me to do this’. In this way she avoids direct encounter with opposition.

The unofficial Chnst. Example: A fierce battle was raging with bullets flying. I immediately fell down and played “dead”. It wasn’t that I was hurt in any way, but I didn’t want to be at any risk in the fight. As I lay there, I saw a tall well built man in soldier’s uniform walk to me. He gave no sign of any fear concerning the bullets, and quietly knelt beside me. I felt he was Christ, but was confused by him being a soldier. He placed a hand on my back and gradually worked his fin­gers under the shell of a large limpet type creature that I had never before known was parasitically attached to my back. I could feel him pull it away, but knew its tentacles still ran right into my chest. He then sat me up and told me how I could rid myself of the tentacles and so be healed’ (Peter Y).

Peter had a debilitating psychosomatic illness at the time of the dream, causing pain where the tentacles ran.

The shell is his defence against feeling his own hurts and inner conflicts.

The dream shows him contacting a strength which is not afraid of his internal battlefield of conflicts, and can show ways of healing real human problems.

The healing rests upon the dreamer’s conscious action, not Christ’s, suggesting the dreamer taking responsibility for his own situation. Peter real­ised he had been avoiding his own internal battlefield, but felt he had met a strength which would support his efforts to find healing. In fact he met his conflicts and grew beyond his ailments. Peter’s conflicts were between his love for his chil­dren and his sexuality. This Christ is our undammed life; the flood of loving sexuality; the strength to burst through social rules and regulations because love of life pushes us. It doesn’t give a hang about bullets, death, nght or wrong, because it has a sense of its own integral existence within life, and its own lightness and place in eternity.

The integral or cosmic Christ. Example: ‘I am a journalist reponing on the return of Christ. He is expected on a paddle steamer going upstream on a large river. I am very sceptical and watch disciples and followers gather on the rear deck.

The guru arrives, dressed in simple white robes. He has long, beautiful auburn hair and beard, and a gentle wise face. He begins to tap a simple rhythm on a tabla or Indian drum. It develops into complex intermingling of orchestral rhythms as everyone joins in. I now realise he is Christ, and feel over­whelmed with awe as I try to play my part in the music. I’m tapping with a pen and find myself fumbling.

A bottle or can opener comes to me from the direction of Christ. I try to beat a complementary rhythm, a small pan of a greater, universal music’ (Lester S).

Each of us has a sense of connectedness with the whole, with the cosmos. We may be little aware of this sense, our scepticism may deny it, as Lester’s was doing. But finding it can enrich the rest of our nature.

The sense bnngs with it a realisation of taking part in the unimaginably grand drama called life. It gives a feeling, no matter what the state of our body, crippled or healthy, that we have something that makes any faults in body or achievement insignificant. It doesn’t take all the difficulties out of life, but it is a good companion on the way. In dreams and religion Christ is also represented as the son of the Cosmos or God. This aspect of Christ is cosmic, from beyond the Earth. This is a process in the cosmos which the unconscious senses and presents under the image of Christ, or other figures in different religions. It is possible that there is an innate process in human beings to do with love and symbiosis which humanity became aware of at a particu­lar stage in the development of consciousness. This becoming aware was expressed in what we know as the histoncal Jesus. See religion and dreams; the self within this entry. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

An ax is generally associated with destruction. We use it to break things up, and in popular horror movies it is used to kill people.

The ax can also be used to carve and create art, furniture or other tools.

If your dream was violent, then you may be experiencing frustration, anger and hostility.

If there was no violence in your dream, then the ax may be positively interpreted as a symbol of productivity and creativity. Either way, an ax is a powerful tool, and as a dream symbol it may be saying something about your personal power and its expression.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Dividing, death, pain, strength, and strenuous labors. Strength of character. Strength, perseverance.

An axe is generally associated with destruction. We use it to break things up, and in popular horror movies it is used to kill people.

The ax can also be used to carve and create art, furniture or other tools.

If your dream was violent, then you may be experiencing frustration, anger and hostility.

If there was no violence in your dream, then the ax may be positively interpreted as a symbol of productivity and creativity. Either way, an ax is a powerful tool, and as a dream symbol it may be saying something about your personal power and its expression.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

The body represents the individual and is his outward physical manifestation of all that he is. In dreams, the body often represents the Ego (see Introduction). Since being ‘physical’ is the baby’s first experience of itself, the body- forms the prime source of information.

Psychologically, most experience is translated into bodily feeling, and therefore becomes a rich source of symbolism in dreams. When emotions cannot be faccd in ordinary everyday life, they very often become distorted dream symbols.

Physical manifestation of an inner spirituality.

Different aspects of the body can have various meanings in dreams.

For example:

To dream of the upper part of the body is to link with the mind and the spiritual aspects of the charactcr, while the lower part of the body represents the instincts and emotional aspects of a character.

An adult’s head on an immature body, or a child’s head on an adult body is an indication that the dreamer needs to recognise the difference between mature thought and emotion.

If there is conflict between the upper and lower part, it indicates that there is disharmony between the mental faculties and instinctive behaviour.

The right side or hand being especially noticeable in dreams signifies we should take note of the logical side of our personality, whereas the left side or left hand indicates we need to be aware of our intuitive, creative side.

Body parts can have relevance as follows:

Abdomen, stomach, belly When the dream appears to concentrate on the abdomen, there is a need to focus 011 emotions and repressed feelings. Anus also see Excrement.

The young child’s first experience of control is as he or she gains control over bodilv functions. In dreams, the mind returns to that experience as a symbol of self- realisation and self-reliance and. more negatively, of suppression and defence. Such a dream therefore is indicating an aspect of childish behaviour or egotism. Arms We use our arms in all sorts of different ways. In dreams we may be defending ourselves, fighting or being held. We may also be showing passionate commitment. Back Dreaming of seeing someone else’s back suggests we should identify the more private elements in our characters. We should also be aware that other people may not at this present time - wish to share their thoughts with us. We may also find that we are vulnerable to the unexpected.

If we dream of turning our backs, we arc rejecting the particular feeling being experienced in the dream. Backbone If the backbone is particularly noticeable in a dream, we should consider the main support structure in our lives. Intellectually; we need to consider our firmness of character. Blood also see individual entry and Menstruation in M Dreaming of blood can have one of two meanings. It can signify that the dreamer feels on some level that a sacrifice is being made. This links into the ancient belief that the blood somehow contained the life of the spirit, and therefore spilt blood was sacred. It can also represent renewal of life through its connection with menstruation. Many- people fear blood, and thus a dream about blood can highlight the need to come to terms with these fears. On a more spiritual level it represents the blood of Christ.

Breasts also see individual entry Usually; to be conscious of breasts in dreams, indicates our connection with the mother figure and our need for nurturing. Such a dream can also indicate a wish to return to being an infant without responsibilities.

Constipation (in life as well as in dreams) Retention signifies an inability to let go of the past or of previous patterns of behaviour, literally to be uptight. Excrement I he dreamer may not have progressed on a subconscious level beyond a feeling that anything to do with bodily functions is dirtv and self-centred.

There may be an element of rebellion in the dreamer’s waking life. Playing with excrement can represent money and value, so playing with it in a dream can highlight anxiety about money, as well as fear of responsibility.

If the excrement is transformed into living animals, maybe rats, the dreamer is coming to terms with the fact that he is responsible for managing his own impulses. Excrement in its more spiritual meaning belongs to the realm of feelings and we may simply be trying to get rid of bad feelings. Those bad feelings can be turned into something worthwhile. Evacuation of the bowel usually highlights our need to be free of worry and responsibility, or possibly the need to learn how to be uninhibited. It can also signify the sexual act.

Eye Any dream to do with the eye is to do with observation and discrimination. It is indicative of enlightenment and wisdom, protection and stability. It has a connection with the power of light and, in ancient times, of the sun- gods. Through its connection with Egyptian symbolism, the eye is also a talisman. Loss of eyesight signifies the loss of clarity and, depending on which eye, can be either the loss of logic (right eye) or the loss of intuition (left eye). Regaining the eyesight can indicate a return to the innocence and clear-sightedness of the child. Fat To dream of becoming fat is to recognise the need to widen the scope of our activities in some way.

If the dreamer is uncomfortable with his or her size it would indicate fear possibly of taking on too much responsibility or of not being adequate for a task. Hair The hair represents strength and virility. In dreams to be combing the hair is to be attempting to untangle a particular attitude we mav have.

To be having our hair cut is to be trying to create order in our lives.

To be cutting someone else’s hair may be to be curtailing an activity (it is possible that there may be some fear or doubt connected with sexuality).

To be bald in a dream is to perhaps recognise one’s own intelligence. Hand The hands are one of the most expressive parts of the body and signify power and creativity.

The two hands contrasted with each other, a different object in each hand There may be some conflict in the dreamer between his belief and his feelings.

A hand on the breast signifies submission. Clasped hands indicate union or friendship, while clenched hands suggest a threat. Folded hands suggest deep repose, or a state of rest.

The hands covering the eyes generally represent shame or horror, while hands crossed at the wrists suggest that one is being bound.

The open hand represents justice and the laying on of hands signifies healing and blessing particularly if the hand is placed on the neck.

The hands placed together is an indication of dcfencclessness, while placed in someone else’s is an indication of a pledge of service. When the hands are raised this can indicate either adoration, prayer or surrender; if the palms are turned outwards a blessing is being given, while when they are raised to the head the dreamer should give a great deal of thought and care to his situation. Washing the hands suggests innocence or rejection of guilt, while wringing the hands signifies grief.

A huge hand, particularly from the sky suggests that one has been ‘specially chosen’.

The right hand is the ‘power’ hand, while the left is passive and receptive. Sometimes in dreams the left hand can represent cheating. Head The head is considered to be the principle part of the body. Because it is the scat of the life force, it denotes power and wisdom. Dreaming of the head suggests that we should look very carefully at the way we deal with both intelligence and folly.

To dream of the head being bowed suggests supplication. When the head is covered we may be covering up our own intelligence or acknowledging somebody else’s superiority.

A blow to the head in a dream can indicate that we should reconsider our actions in a particular situation. Heart The heart is the centre of the being and represents ‘feeling’ wisdom rather than intellectual wisdom. It is also representative of compassion and understanding. Heel This suggests the part of ourselves which is strong but, at the same time, vulnerable. Jaw The jaw often is representative of our self-expression. It also, on a more esoteric level, suggests the opening to the underworld. Kidneys The kidneys are organs of elimination, therefore to dream of them is to be aware of the need for cleansing.

Knees The knees are symbolic of prayer and supplication, and of emotional commitment. Limbs Whether it is partly to do with some kind of cellular memory and the growth process that takes place is uncertain, but in dreams anv limb can be taken to mean sexuality and fears associated with gender issues. Being dismembered can be taken in its literal sense - we are being torn apart. Sometimes this can suggest the need to restructure our lives and begin again. At other times it can indicate that there is a way in which we arc being threatened to the very core of our existence. Liver The liver is representative of irritability and suppressed anger.

Lungs In Chinese medicine the lungs represent grief. They are also involved in decision-making. Spiritually, the lungs are the seat of righteousness, and the source of thoughts concerning the Self. Mouth The mouth represents the devouring, demanding part of ourselves. It can also stand for the receptive side.

The circumstances of the dream may give a clue to the correct interpretation. Sometimes the mouth can svmbolisc the feminine side of our nature. Nose The nose in dreams can stand for curiosity, and also for intuition.

Penis Dreaming of a penis either one’s own or someone else’s usually highlights the attitude to penetrative sex.

Skin Skin in a dream stands for our persona or the facade we create for others. Hard, tough skin shows we have crcatcd a tough exterior, and are trying to protect ourselves.

Stomach -see Abdomen in this section Teeth Popularly, teeth are supposed to stand for aggressive sexuality although more properly they signify the growth process towards sexual maturity. Teeth falling or coming out easily indicates we arc aware of going through some form of transition, similar to that from childhood to maturity, or from maturity to old age and helplessness.

If one is anxious about teeth dropping out il suggests there is a fear of getting old and undesirable, or an anxiety about maturing. In a woman’s dream, if the teeth are swallowed this can signify pregnancy.

Throat Dreaming of the throat denotes awareness of our vulnerability and also of the need for self-expression.

Thumb Dreaming of a thumb suggests awareness of how powerful we are.

The thumb pointing upwards represents beneficial energy, poiting downwards is negative. This latter was used as the death signal for Roman gladiators. Tongue The tongue in dreams often signifies our ability to know- when to speak and when to remain silent. It may also be to do with our own understanding of information that we wish to pass on to other people. We may have deeply felt beliefs we wish to share. Another explanation that is much more basic is that of the symbolism of the serpent and the phallus, and hence sexuality. Urine Urine in a dream often indicates our feelings about emotional control. We may either yield to emotion or bottle it up. How we deal with urine often also tells us a great deal about our own sexuality.

Vagina Most often, dreams of the vagina are to do with one’s self image. In a woman’s dream, il highlights her receptivity. In a man’s dream it suggests his need to be penetrative, both mentally and physically. Womb The womb represents a return to the beginning. We all have need of basic security and shelter, and perhaps to do away with responsibility. Dreams of the womb can signify our need to satisfy those requirements. On a slightly more esoteric level the womb represents our connection with the Great Mother or Mother Earth (see Introduction). Dreams of returning to the womb suggest our need to reconnect with the passive, more yielding side of our nature. We may need a period of self-healing and recuperation.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: Having been enjoying ourselves with some work mates at a social club, my husband and I are travelling down a country lane in an open horsedrawn car­riage. It is dark. We come to a humpbacked bridge. As we arrive at the brow of the bridge a voice says, “Fair lady come to me”. I float and everything is black and peaceful. Then great fear overcomes me. I wake with terror and feelings of horror* (Evelyn K). Evelyn’s dream paints a vivid picture of her journey through life, drawn by the natural forces within her, shown as a horse. She has enjoyed life, but comes to the brow of her life, her 40th year, and feels it is all downhill now into old age, which horrifies her.

The bridge generally has this significance of crossing from one phase of life, activity or emphasis, to another. It depicts connection between yourself and a relationship; self and op­portunity; self and change in life. Fallen bridge: lost oppor­tunity, broken bonds and connections. Idioms, burn one’s bridges; cross that bridge when I come to it; water under the bridge. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Little Giant Encyclopedia

A frequent symbol in dreams and mythology, the bridge spans an abyss. It is often a place of danger and of falling; you are crossing a boundary. In the Catholic faith, the protector is Saint Napomuk, patron saint of bridges. Uniting, re-establishing relationships; contradictions are bridged.

If the dreamer has self-confidence, the fear of the abyss may be going away, but although the bridge becomes wider and is safe, it is still a place of danger.

The condition of the bridge is important. How are you feeling on the bridge? When you have crossed the bridge, you have done a lot of inner work. Changes have taken place (you have reached the other shore).

In the Koran, the bridge over hell is as thin as a thread and can only be crossed by the righteous. In Celtic lore, there exists a bridge of horror that is also as narrow as a thread.

The bridge always spans an abyss in which spirits, the devil, or God resides. Often in the dream one must bring a sacrifice in order to cross the bridge.

For that reason we often see chapels on the bridge where the sacrifice has to be offered. Jung related the symbol of the bridge to the unconscious. He saw the unconscious as different islands in the sea.

For him, the bridge connected these islands and is therefore a symbol of working toward a strong consciousness.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

The Fabric of Dream

Obscurity and misfortune are interpreted from these symbols (Gypsy) ; the ancient and sacred symbolism of caves, grottoes, etc., was lost upon the Jews who regarded them with horror, while popular tradition peopled them with dragons and other evil creatures.... The Fabric of Dream

Islamic Dream Interpretation

If one suffers a damage in a dream, it means dismay, horror, a scare, a shock or a menace. Complaining about a damage or a loss one suffers in a dream means attaining one’s goal in wakefulness.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The symbols of death or the fear of death can be: sunset; evening; a crossed river or falling in a river, a skeleton; snarling dogs; sleep; anaesthetic; gravestones; ceme­tery; blackness, or something black; ace of spades; a fallen mirror; stopped clock; a pulled tooth; an empty abyss, the chill wind; falling leaves; a withering plant; an empty house; a lightning-struck tree; coffin; struggling breaths; the dead ani­mal in the gutter; the rotting carcass, underground; the depths of the sea; the Void.

What lies beyond death is conjecture, but the archetype of death we are considering is not completely about physical death. It is about our observation of it in others; our concep­tions of it gained from our culture and our impressions; the feelings which generate around our experiences and thoughts; our attempts to deal with our own aging and approach to death, plus what material the deeper strata of our unconscious release regarding it. It is about how our sense of conscious personal existence meets the prospect of its disintegration.

Unless we can come to terms with what is behind the haunting images of death we meet in our dreams, we fail to live fully and daringly, we are too haunted by death lurking in the shadows of injury and the unknown. Images of death and the associated emotions, carried within for years, can have a negative influence on our health. Coming to terms means the courage to feel the emotions of fear or chill and discover them for what they are—emotions. They are certainly not death, only our feelings about it.

The differences shown in the two following examples illustrate the avoiding and the meeting. Example: 4So to get to the bedroom I had to jump across this gap. I tried to jump but missed and I fell and hit the bottom.

The next thing I remember was I was floating up. I looked down and saw myself lying face down with arms spread out and I suddenly realised I was dead. I was so frightened that I woke up. I had the feelings of fear of dying, but I felt no pain’ (Cath). Example: “Suddenly I was in a huge underground cav­ern. It was hundreds of feet high and as wide. It had two great statues in it, both to do with death.

The whole place overpow­ered me with a sense of decay and skeletal death, darkness, underground, earth, the end. I cried out in the dismal cave, “Death, where is your sting! Grave, where is your victory!” I immediately had the sense of being a bodiless awareness. I knew this was what occurred at death. Fear and the sense of decay left me’ (Andrew).

Summarising these and many other dreams, it is not only the accumulated images of death, but also bodilessness and loss of power and identity which bring so much fear. There are two antipodes of human experience. At the tip of one is focused self-determining self consciousness. At the tip of the other is unfocused void without identity. Strangely enough we experience both each day in some degree—the first while awake, the second when we sleep. Yet to face the second with consciousness feels like all the horrors of death and loss. Yet facing it is important, especially to the second half of life.

The symbols of rebirth are: the cave; an egg; spring; the tree; the cross; dawn; emerging out of the sea; the snake; the bird; a seed; arising from the earth or faeces; green shoot from a dead branch; phoenix; flame; a pearl; the womb. Rebirth is as difficult to face as death. It holds within it not just the memones of the struggles and difficulties of our own physical birth and growth, but also the challenge of becoming the un­known future, the dark possibility, the new.

The dream of Andrew in the underground cavern is an example of positive rebirth. After realising himself as bodiless awareness he emerges from the cave and finds himself near a tree. Example: ‘A tremendous jolt of power poured into me from the tree. I saw that we had arrived at a place where a line of trees, about a 100 yards in length, stood very close together in a slight semicircle on the top of a bank.

The trees had great spiritual power and the place was a holy temple. Two spiritual beings were there—an ancient Earth Being, and Christ’ (Andrew).

The next example is of a dream typical of meeting memo­ries of physical birth. As can be seen, the experience is pow­erful enough to cause physical shaking. Example: All I can see of what I enter is a very narrow space with a light showing through. But immediately I enter I realise I have made a mis­take for I am being forced swiftly through a dark, very narrow tunnel. I feel pain as I am dragged along and I hear loud banging noises which frighten me, but although they are loud they seem to come from inside my head. I feel terrified and breathless and very relieved when I wake before reaching the end of the tunnel. In fact as I write this account I am shiver­ing” (female, anon). ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘She continues to attack him and, to my horror and feeling of helplessness, his head comes off. But the neck is made of some son of material with a string hanging off it, and I realise it is a doll’s head* (Mr RH). Many ‘doll’ dreams are, as the example, using the doll as a target for violence. This may refer to how the dreamer felt as a child when smacked or attacked emotionally—like a helpless doll. Also, in general, childhood states of feeling about ourself, a means of displacement for anger or feelings the dreamer would like to discharge on another, a feeling of wanting to be a precious ‘doll’ to someone, wanting to be loved. See also toy. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Some dream researchers suggest falling is one of the main themes in dreams. In the sample used for this book, the words fall, falls, fell, falling occur 72 times in 1,000 dreams.

The words find, finds, finding, found occur 297 times. And the words connected with looking and seeing occur 1,077 times.

During our development or growth we ‘fall’ from our mother’s womb when ripe; being dropped by a parent must be our earliest sense of insecurity; we fall many times as we learn to stand and walk; as we explore our boundaries in running, climbing, jumping and riding, falling is a big danger, at times it could mean death. Out of this we create the ways falling is used in dreams.

Example: ‘I am sitting in a high window box facing out­wards, with my son and a friend of his on my left. I feel very scared of falling and ask my son and his friend to climb back into the building. I feel too scared to move until they shift’ (Trevor N). At the time of the dream Trevor was working, for the first time in his life, as a full-time freelance journalist. His wife was out of work and his frequency of sales low enough to cause them to be running out of money.

The building behind him in the dream felt like a place he had worked nine to five —security. Falling was failure, getting in debt, dropping into the feelings of self doubt and being incapable.

In general, then, falling represents loss of confidence; threat to usual sources of security such as relationship, source of money, social image, beliefs; tension. Sometimes it is loss of social grace; losing face, moral failure—falling into tempta­tion; coming down to earth from a too lofty attitude, sexual surrender.

Example: ‘I was on a road which led up to the hospital I was put in at three. I felt a sense of an awful past as I looked at the road. Then I was standing on the edge of a precipice or cliff. My wife was about four yards away near the road. I stepped in an area of soft earth. It gave beneath my weight and I sank up to my waist. I realised the cliff edge was unsta­ble and the whole area would fall. I was sinking and shouting to my wife to help me. She was gaily walking about and made light of my call for help. I cried out again. Still she ignored me. I shouted again for her help. She took no notice and I sank deeper, the ground gave way and I fell to my death’ (Barry 1). Through being put in a hospital at three without his mother, Barry had a deep seated fear that any woman he loved could desen him. His fall is the loss of any sense of bonding between him and his wife out of this fear. His death is the dying of his feeling of love and relationship, and the pain it causes. Understanding these fears, Barry was able to leave them behind in later dreams and in life.

By learning to meet our insecurities (perhaps by using the last question in dream processing) we can dare more in life. This is in essence the same as meeting the fear of falling off our bike as we learn to ride.

If we never master the fear we cannot ride. Therefore some dreams take falling into realms beyond fear.

The following examples illustrate this.

Example: ‘Near where I stood in the school gymnasium was a diving board, about 20 ft off the ground. Girls were learning to dive off the board and land flat on their back on the floor.

If they landed flat they didn’t hurt themselves—like falling backwards standing up’ (Barry I).

The school is where we learn. Once we learn to fall ‘flat on our back’, i.e. fail, without being devastated or ‘hurt’ by it, we can be more cre­ative. Going fast to an edge and falling: could mean overwork and danger of breakdown of health.

Example: ‘As I prayed I realised I could fly. I lifted off the ground about 3 feet and found I could completely relax while going higher or falling back down. So it was like free fall. I went into a wonderful surrendered relaxation. My whole body sagging, floating in space. It was a very deep meditative expe­rience (Sarah D). Sarah has found an attitude which enables her to soar/dare or fall/fail without being so afraid of being hurt or dying emotionally. This gives a form of freedom many people never experience. This does not arise from denying or suppressing fears.

Seeing things fall: sense of danger or change in regard to what is represented. Person falling: wish to be rid of them, or anxiety in regard to what they represent; end of a relationship. Child, son falling: see baby; son and daughter under family. House falling down, personal stress; illness; personal change and growth due to letting old habits and attitudes crumble. Example: ‘I was standing outside my mother’s house to the right.

The ground in front had fallen away.

The house was about to cave in. I felt no fear or horror. Instead I was think­ing about new beginnings and the possibility of a new house’ (Helen B). Helen is here becoming more independent and leaving behind attitudes and dependency. See house; abyss; chasm. See also flying. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Hearth; Stove) An iron cast stove or a fireplace in a dream represents a woman who comes from a powerful and a strong family.

If the stove or the fireplace is made from yellow copper or brass in the dream, then such a woman may have come from a house of a worldly and rich people.

A wooden fireplace in a dream represents hypocrisy in such a family.

If the fireplace is made of plaster in the dream, it means that such a family has associated itself with Pharaonic traditions or worship. Ifthe fireplace is made ofargillite or form sundried bricks in the dream, it means that someone in that family is a godly and a pious person.

A fireplace in a dream also represents a state, a government, joblessness or fleeing from one’s enemy.

If the fireplace or the stove is lit with no food to cook or water to boil over it in the dream, it means that the head of the household, the butler or the house keeper will become angry and infuriated by someone’s slander or backbiting. Ifthe cooking pot in the dream is interpreted to represent the wife, then the fireplace would represent her husband who faces the adversities and hardships of life. On the other hand, if the fireplace in the dream is interpreted to represent the wife, then the cooking pot would be her husband who is always sitting on fire.

If the fireplace or the stove is not lit in the dream, then it represents distress, worries and trouble, but if it is on, then it means fulfilling one’s needs and earning one’s livelihood through hard work.

A fireplace in a dream also represents one’s wife, his tools and instruments, his vehicle, or it could represent a place of gathering, one’s rank, a chair, light, a woman in childbed, a father, a mother, a pregnant woman, one’s shop or a helper.

A fireplace in a dream also could represent the month of January or the cold season.

If a bachelor sees a fireplace in a dream, it means that he will get married, and if he is married, it means that his wife will become pregnant.

If he is a sinner, it means that he will repent for his sins, for a fireplace is the abode of fire and fire in a dream represents fear, horror and guidance.

A fireplace in a dream also represents one’s stomach and the firewood in a dream represents alate heavy meal that will cause indigestion or confused dreams. (Also see Brazier; Firewood)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

Dream Meanings of Versatile

The hands are one of the most expressive parts of the body and signify power and creativity.

The right hand is the ‘power’ hand, while the left is passive and receptive. Sometimes in dreams the left hand can represent cheating.

If the hands are contrasted with each other and / or have a different object in each, it indicates there may be some conflict in us between our beliefs and feelings.

A hand on the breast signifies submission. Clasped hands indicate union or friendship, while clenched hands suggest a threat. Folded hands suggest deep repose or a state of rest.

The hands covering the eyes generally represent shame or horror, while hands crossed at the wrists suggest that we are being bound, perhaps by our own actions.

The open hand represents justice whilst the laying on of hands signifies healing and blessing, particularly if the hand is placed on the neck. Hands placed together give an indication of defencelessness; if they are placed in someone else’s it suggests a pledge of service or commitment. When the hands are raised this can indicate either adoration, prayer or surrender; if the palms are turned outwards a blessing is being given; when they are raised to the head we should give a great deal of thought and care to our current situation. Washing the hands suggests innocenceor rejection of guilt, while wringing the hands signifies grief.

A huge hand, particularly from the sky, suggests that we have been ‘specially chosen’.

For this reason, advertising that contains such an image has a profound effect.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Damage; Loss) Suffering from harm in a dream means dismay, horror, a scare, a shock, or a menace. Complaining about a harm one is suffering or a loss in a dream means attaining one’s goal in wakefulness.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

The Fabric of Dream

This dream denotes an enemy who will backbite and bring trouble (Gypsy). An Egyptian symbol of judgment, and of watchfulness over sacred things, it was evidently held in horror by the faiths that succeeded those of Egypt.... The Fabric of Dream

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Business) Ifone’s losses relate to his earnings, then his losses in the dream mean decadence of one’s principals, religious downswing, or they could mean heedlessness after guidance, disbelief after following one’s religion, or losses in general. This sin is man’s own. Ifone suffers a loss in a dream, it means dismay, horror, a scare, a shock or a menace. Complaining about a harm one suffers, a damage or a loss in a dream means attaining one’s goal. (Also see Penny)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

Dream Meanings of Versatile

On a spiritual level, melting suggests losing form and has sometimes had connections with the overcoming of negativity and evil. This is pictured most successfully in horror movies and dream images often follow the same format.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Instinct; Nature; Profits) In a dream, milk represents nature, instinct, or easy and lawful money. However, curdled milk in a dream represents unlawful money.

If a man or a woman discover that they are carrying milk in their breast in a dream, it means building of one’s savings.

If a man sees milk flowing from his breast in a dream, it means wealth, prosperity and that new opportunities will rise from every direction. Woman’s milk in a dream means recovering from an illness.

If a woman sees herselfcarrying milk in her breast in a dream, when in reality she does not have it, it means that she will breast feed a new born.

If a woman sees herself breast-feeding a baby, a man, or another woman in her dream, it means that the source of earnings will be hampered or restricted to both the suckling person and to the one who is breast-feeding him. Hiring a wetnurse to breast-feed one’s child in a dream means raising a child to be like his father, or to have the character of one’s father. Sucking milk from a woman’s breast in a dream also means prosperity and profits. Drinking the milk ofa horse in a dream means receiving love and affection from someone in authority and earning benefits from such a relationship. Drinking the milk of a mare in a dream means a meeting with a ruler. In general, cow’s milk, goat’s milk, or sheep’s milk in a dream represent lawful earnings. Milking in a dream means craftiness and cunning, or it could mean prosperity. Milking an Arabian shecamel in a dream means working in an Arab country. Milking an Asian Bactrian camel in a dream means working in another country. Ifblood comes out of the glands of a she-camel instead of milk in a dream, it means deviation from God’s path, or it could represent a tyranny. Ifa venom flows from one’s glands instead of milk in the dream, it means earning unlawful money.

If a merchant, or a business man milks any milk producing animal in a dream, it means profits. Sucking the gland of a pregnant she-camel, one, two, or three times in a dream means steadfastness in one’s religion, performing one’s obligatory prayers, distributing charity, acquiring knowledge and wisdom. Milking a camel and drinking its milk in a dream also means marriage to a pious and a chaste woman.

If one is already married, then it means that his wife will beget a blessed son. I[ a poor person sees himself milking a cow and drinking its milk in a dream, it means that he will earn enough money to satisfy his basic needs. Drinking sheep’s milk, or goat’s milk in a dream means profits, happiness, comfort and joy. Lioness milk in a dream also means money or conquering one’s enemy, or justly opposing the ruler of the country.

The milk of an eagle in a dream means power and victory. Tiger’s milk in a dream means avowing one’s enmity toward someone. Drinking the milk ofajackal or a wolf in a dream means paying a fine, extreme fear, suffering losses, or lack of determination, or it could mean presiding over people and skillfully defrauding them of their wealth. Drinking swine’s milk in a dream means changes in one’s state, altering one’s mind and focus. However, drinking a little of it in a dream may mean acquiring lawful earnings, though drinking a lot of it in the dream could mean receiving unlawful money. Drinking bitch’s milk in a dream means feebleness of mind, or senility, or it could represent money earned from an unjust person, or it could mean presiding over one’s local community, or becoming the governor of the town. Drinking the milk of any beasts in a dream represents doubt about one’s religion. Drinking zebra’s milk in a dream also means an illness. Drinking the milk of a deer or a gazelle in a dream represents small earnings.

The milk of non-milk producing animals or birds in a dream means that one’s wish will come true.

The milk of predatory animals and stingers in a dream means making peace with one’s enemy. Drinking snake’s milk in a dream means performing a deed that is pleasing to God Almighty, rejoicing, or escaping from a calamity.

The milk of a fox in a dream denotes a passing illness which will be followed by borrowing a small amount of money, or it could mean recovering from an illness. Drinking donkey’s milk in a dream also represents an illness, while drinking the milk of a she-ass in a dream means profits. eat’s milk in a dream represents an illness, experiencing life’s adversities, or it could denote generosity. Seeing.milk spilled on the ground in a dream means corruption, tyranny and blood-shed on earth that will equal the amount of the spilled milk. Sheep’s milk in a dream means honest earnings. Cow’s milk also means wealth.

A mule’s milk in a dream means financial straits, adversities and horror.

The milk of a sable in a dream means an illness or fear. Pouring milk into the drain or wasting it in a dream means losing money, or it could mean longevity, pregnancy, knowledge, or a scandal that will expose one’s private life. Curdled milk in a dream means distress. Rabbit’s milk and horse’s milk in a dream means having a righteous name, or giving a righteous name to one’s newborn. Human milk in a dream represents a trust one should not waste or give to other than its rightful owner.

The milk of an unknown animal in a dream means energy and strength for a sick person, release from prison, illegal seizure of property, or extortion and blackmailing. (Also see Breast-feeding; Colostrum; Dairyman; Milking)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

As a pan of the human survival ability, the capacity to predict the future is a well-developed everyday pan of life—so much so we often fail to notice it. When crossing a road we quickly take in factors related to sounds, car speeds and our own physical condition, and predict the likelihood of being able to cross the road without injury. Based on informa­tion gathered, often unconsciously, we also attempt to assess or predict the outcome of relationships, job interviews, busi­ness ventures, and any course of action imponant to us.

If detailed observations were made of the habits of ten people, one could predict fairly accurately what they would be doing for the next week, perhaps even pinpointing the time and place.

For instance some would never visit a pub, while others would be frequently there.

Because the unconscious is the storehouse of millions of bits of observed information, and because it has a well-devel­oped function enabling us to scan information and predict from it, some dreams forecast the future. Such predictions may occur more frequently in a dream rather than as waking insight, because few people can put aside their likes and dis­likes, prejudices and hopes sufficiently to allow such informa­tion into the consciousness. While asleep some of these barri­ers drop and allow information to be presented.

Ed Butler’s dream is about his work scene. Each detail was real and horrifying. Shonly afterwards, Rita was burnt just as in the dream. Example: ‘I was stanled by the muffled but unmistakable sound of a nearby explosion. While unex­pected, it wasn’t entirely unusual—the high energy propel- lants and oxidisers being synthesised and tested in the chem­istry wing were hazardously unstable. When I heard the screams I froze for an instant, recognising that they could only be coming from Rita, the one woman chemist in the all male department. I rushed to the doorway of her laboratory. Peer­ing through the smoke and fumes I saw a foot sticking out of the surrounding flames. I was only in my shirt sleeves, unpro­tected, not even wearing my lab coat, but I had to go into the flames. I grabbed Rita by the foot and noticed with horror that her stockings were melting from the heat. I pulled her back into the doorway and tugged at a chain which released gallons of water on her flaming body. When satisfied the fire was quenched, even though my own clothes still smouldered, I ran for the emergency phone’ (from Dream Network Bulletin, June 1985).

Some precognitive dreams appear to go beyond this ability to predict from information already held. So far there is no theory which is commonly accepted which explains this.

A not too bizarre one, however, is thai our unconscious has access to a collective mind. With so much more information available, it can transcend the usual limitations when predict­ing from personal information.

The next examples are all from Shirley G. Because of space, only three of the dreams are quoted. Nevertheless, they are typical of dreams which do not seem to fall into the category of precognitive dreams arising from unconscious scanning or information already known. Example: ‘1 set out to dream the winner of a horse race each day for a week. I was driving down a country road and sud­denly saw a glimpse of Emmerdale Farm down a side road. Following day: chosen horse Emmerdale Farm came in first. 2 Was working in a room when a man popped his head around the door and shouted excitedly “John, John, your uncle’s here” and disappeared. I carried on working. Chosen horse: Uncle John. Came in first. 3 Was walking down a road, called into a house by a friend to have a chat. On the way out she opened the door and I saw a completely empty room except for a huge black fireplace. Door closed and I left the house. Chosen horse Black Fire—which I insisted would only be placed due to a fireplace. Came in 2nd.* See ESP in dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘An old woman with a very pink, lined face, and wearing a clashing red hat, knelt close to my face.

The woman leaned forward to poke my hand, and I recoiled, screaming myself awake (Joy S). Even where red appears quite casually in a dream, as with the hat in the example, there is frequently fear, screaming, horror or a sense of danger in the same dream. Less frequently, red represents blood, menstruation; the biological life force; conception; death. Red face: anger; high emotion. Red bnck building : homeliness, warmth. Red furniture or decor plush; richness. Red flowers: love, passion, dangers of passion. Red clothes or motif: sexu­ality, passion; strong emotions. Red and grey together : emo­tions connected with depression. Rose pink, love. Pale pink: baby feelings; weakness. Idioms: see red; in the red; red car­pet; red light district; red faced. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Fabric of Dream

A dream of horror, fright (Gypsy). ... The Fabric of Dream

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Very common with some people, especially during adolescence or times of stress. Sometimes accompa­nied by hallucinations. Sleep walking is normal as an occa­sional event in children.

If the child is agitated, excited or acting in a manner to injure themselves during the sleep walk­ing, then it may be a sign of emotional distress.

The same applies to adults. Many sleep walkers perform complex acts without coming to harm.

A young Ponsmouth boy drove his father’s car 27 miles before waking in South­ampton.

The police checked his story and did not charge him. But sometimes severe injury is inflicted either upon them­selves or others. During a dream phone-in on London Broad­casting Company, a man told me his experience of smashing through a glass window, cutting an artery and nearly bleeding to death. In America and England homicidal acts have been committed while the person claimed to be sleepwalking, and the people involved were acquitted of murder.

Because of such powerful activity during sleep, many peo­ple who experience this type of sleep walking are worried about what they might do to a partner sleeping next to them.

In most cases one wakes as the contact is made, or the in­volved person wakes one, but the element of risk cannot be denied. Where such worry exists, hope can be gained by un­derstanding what was observed with many men who began to sleep walk after war combat. In their cases the movements, speech and emotions were observably connected with trauma occurring during their war experience.

The self regulatory process in dreams was thereby attempting to release the ten­sion, horror or emotional pain of the events. Where these emotions could be met consciously, perhaps with the help of a psychotherapist, the sleep movements stopped. This sug­gests that dramatic activity while sleep walking has similar roots, and can be dealt with. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Islamic Dream Interpretation

To see oneself standing before Allah entails a true and genuine dream. Matters will turn out to be very severe for the person.

The Same applies if a person sees scenes of the horror of Qiyaamah.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

Little Giant Encyclopedia

See Leopard.

An image frequently dreamed about by women. Longing for powerful love while, at the same time, also being afraid of the experience.

The tiger and the Lion are both symbols of vitality and passion.

The tiger is more a symbol of female sexual energy, while the lion is more a symbol of masculine sexual energy.

The tiger possesses great energy, and one of its main strengths when it attacks is the surprise factor. It is also the symbol of severe loss. In the Shinto (of ancient Japan), the tiger was considered a holy but people- devouring predator, the personification of horror and fear who stops at nothing. According to Jung, it is also the symbol for female compulsion, as in Cat, Bear, Snake.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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