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Latent | The Dream Meanings

Keywords of this dream: Latent

Dream Symbols and Analysis

To dream you are an addict could signify that you’ve lost control of a circumstance. You have given up control and denied all responsibility for your actions. This kind of dream can also indicate fear, low self-image issues, and other latent insecurities.... Dream Symbols and Analysis

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

This cold-blooded animal could hold several different meanings in your dream. It could symbolically represent something from your memory, emotions, or a current situation or individual in your life. Some think that the alligator represents verbal power used in a destructive way (angry and hurtful words). Others believe that it represents an enemy. Consider the details in your dream and your level of fear. This dream symbol should encourage you to look at some of your more “dangerous” emotions, memories, and experiences.

The alligators in your dreams will begin to lose the power to frighten you as your understanding increases. Carl Jung said that all wild animals indicate latent affects (feelings and emotions that we do not readily deal with). They are also symbolic of dangers (hurtful and negative things) being “swallowed” by the unconscious. ... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Hidden enemies (could be hidden internal patterns causing you to self destruct) and health hazards. This cold-blooded animal could hold several different meanings in your dream. It could symbolically represent something from your memory, emotions, or a current situation or individual in your life. Some think that the alligator represents verbal power used in a destructive way (angry and hurtful words). Others believe that it represents an enemy. Consider the details in your dream and your level of fear. This dream symbol should encourage you to look at some of your more “dangerous” emotions, memories, and experiences.

The alligators in your dreams will begin to lose the power to frighten you as your understanding increases. Carl Jung said that all wild animals indicate latent effects (feelings and emotions that we do not readily deal with). They are also symbolic of dangers (hurtful and negative things) being “swallowed” by the unconscious.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Depends on your feelings for the particular animal (for typical meaning see the specific type).

A helpful animal normally represents the instinctive self. Look at your feelings and beliefs about this animal.

An animal relates to your own natural and inborn instincts. Good omens of a base nature as long as they are not being violent.

If misbehaving, it is an indication of a party where people are lacking good manners and are demonstrating poor judgment. This is all a reflection of the patterns that need to be repatterened within you. Your belief system is drawing you to these situations and people. Animals represent your primitive, physical and sexual mannerisms and expressions.

A heard: prosperity. Animal instincts (or human nature), sex, aggression. Animals may also be healing agents (e.g.An alligator to a timid person) or entities. Black Dog Animals represent the dreamer’s animal instincts (or human nature), sex, aggression, paternal or maternal instincts, social status, etc.

The choice of animal, its color and location indicate how the instinct is regarded.

For example, a black dog in the bedroom means the dreamer’s attitude to sex is dominated by fear. Animals may also be healing agents (e.g.An alligator to a timid person) or entities **Animals: “Carl Jung said that all wild animals indicate latent effects (feelings and emotions that we do not readily deal with). They are also symbolic of dangers (hurtful and negative things) being “swallowed” by the unconscious.

The interpretation of the animal in your dream depends on your relationship with it in daily life. Animals represent the qualities in our character or specific aspects of our personalities. They could symbolize our more intuitive and instinctive parts, or they could serve as messengers for the unconscious. Please look up each animal individually by name. ... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Carl Jung said that all wild animals indicate latent affects (feelings and emotions that we do not readily deal with). They are also symbolic of dangers (hurtful and negative things) being “swallowed” by the unconscious.

The interpretation of the animal in your dream depends on your relationship with it in daily life. Animals represent the qualities in our character or specific aspects of our personalities. They could symbolize our more intuitive and instinctive parts, or they could serve as messengers for the unconscious. Please look up each animal individually by name.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The male within the female, shown as a man in a woman’s dreams. Physically a woman is predominantly fe­male, but also has a clitoris and produces some male hor­mones. Psychologically, we may only express part of our po­tential in everyday life. In a woman, the more physically dynamic, intellectual and socially challenging side of herself may be given less expression. Apart from this, some features, such as innovation and creative rational thought, may be held in latency. These secondary or latent characteristics are de­picted by the male in female dreams. In general we can say the man represents the woman’s mental and social power, her ability to act creatively in ‘the world’. It also holds in it an expression of her complex of feelings about men, gained as experience mostly from her relationship with—or lack of— father, but also from a synthesis of all her male contacts. So the whole realm of her expenence of the male can be repre­sented by the man in her dream, and is accessible through the image.

Good relationship with or marrying the man: shows the woman integrating her own ability to be independent and capable in outwardly active terms. This makes her more whole, balancing her ‘female’ qualities. It also shows the woman meeting her experience of her father in a healing way. This enables the woman to have a realistic relationship with an actual man. It also bnngs a sense of connectedness be­tween her conscious self and what she senses as the ‘commer­cial’ world. See father in this entry.

To be in conflict with the man, or unable to make real physical and pleasurable contact with him: suggests difficulty in meeting what may have been a painful or threatening expe­rience of father. This can lead to lack of ability to make clear judgments, and lack of decisiveness in areas outside feeling values. She is prone to acceptance of collective or long held social norms without question; family or national attitudes not applicable to present situations; and reasoning’ which actu­ally arises out of emotions connected to such family or social norms. Actual relations with men will be difficult, or entered into simply as a duty. Emotional or intimate merging with a man is threatening because it brings the woman close to the conflicts and pain connected with father. Sex may be possible but not a close feeling union. See man.

Christ Although people generally think of Christ as a histori­cal figure, in dreams Christ is not this at all. He is a powerful process in the human unconscious. In the west we give this process the name of Christ, but the process or archetype is universal and has various names in different cultures. Some­times represented in dreams as a fish or a big man, in general the Christ is an expression of the dreamer’s own potential— what they can become in their life. But it also depicts what might be called a sense of the forces of symbiosis or co­operative activity operative in human life and the cosmos. There are at least four aspects to Chrisi as depicted in dreams.

The Sunday school or Church Christ: depicts social norms, the generally accepted morals and social rules. This Christ’ comes about because the Church tends to represent tradi­tional values, and also the attempt to press people to live these values.

The dreamer may have a childlike relationship with this Christ or, if attempting to be self responsible, be in con­flict with it. Some people find this Christ has a castrating role in their life, and flee in horror. In fact this aspect of social indoctrination may lead to such a burden of guilt and sup­pression that it can create psychic cripples. Trying to do all the right’ things may lead us to the point where ‘we can’t say no to a glass of water without a pang of guilt*. Two of the great forces which push at the human soul or psyche are social pressure, such as the moral norm, and biological pressures, such as the sex drive, individuals may fight a lifelong battle with one or the other of these.

The social cnminal typifies battle with the first; the ascetic, battle with the second.

The ideal Christ: the psychological process which causes us not to take responsibility for our own highest ideals; our own yearnings for the good, our own most powerful urges arising against what we see as evils in the world. This influ­ences us to wait for a sign from Christ in our dream in order to gain authority, or to overcome the anxiety associated with the drive. We want God to say we should act in a cenain way because we are not willing to be self responsible. Example: I stood outside a castle. It was closed and guarded by soldiers in armour. Wondering how to get in I thought that if I dressed and acted as a soldier I would be allowed entrance. It worked and inside Christ met me and said he had important work for me to do’ (Sonia).

The closely guarded secret is Soma’s own impulse to do some son of socially creative work. She doesn’t want to acknowledge the impulse as her own; it is much easier if she can say ‘Christ told me to do this’. In this way she avoids direct encounter with opposition.

The unofficial Chnst. Example: A fierce battle was raging with bullets flying. I immediately fell down and played “dead”. It wasn’t that I was hurt in any way, but I didn’t want to be at any risk in the fight. As I lay there, I saw a tall well built man in soldier’s uniform walk to me. He gave no sign of any fear concerning the bullets, and quietly knelt beside me. I felt he was Christ, but was confused by him being a soldier. He placed a hand on my back and gradually worked his fin­gers under the shell of a large limpet type creature that I had never before known was parasitically attached to my back. I could feel him pull it away, but knew its tentacles still ran right into my chest. He then sat me up and told me how I could rid myself of the tentacles and so be healed’ (Peter Y).

Peter had a debilitating psychosomatic illness at the time of the dream, causing pain where the tentacles ran.

The shell is his defence against feeling his own hurts and inner conflicts.

The dream shows him contacting a strength which is not afraid of his internal battlefield of conflicts, and can show ways of healing real human problems.

The healing rests upon the dreamer’s conscious action, not Christ’s, suggesting the dreamer taking responsibility for his own situation. Peter real­ised he had been avoiding his own internal battlefield, but felt he had met a strength which would support his efforts to find healing. In fact he met his conflicts and grew beyond his ailments. Peter’s conflicts were between his love for his chil­dren and his sexuality. This Christ is our undammed life; the flood of loving sexuality; the strength to burst through social rules and regulations because love of life pushes us. It doesn’t give a hang about bullets, death, nght or wrong, because it has a sense of its own integral existence within life, and its own lightness and place in eternity.

The integral or cosmic Christ. Example: ‘I am a journalist reponing on the return of Christ. He is expected on a paddle steamer going upstream on a large river. I am very sceptical and watch disciples and followers gather on the rear deck.

The guru arrives, dressed in simple white robes. He has long, beautiful auburn hair and beard, and a gentle wise face. He begins to tap a simple rhythm on a tabla or Indian drum. It develops into complex intermingling of orchestral rhythms as everyone joins in. I now realise he is Christ, and feel over­whelmed with awe as I try to play my part in the music. I’m tapping with a pen and find myself fumbling.

A bottle or can opener comes to me from the direction of Christ. I try to beat a complementary rhythm, a small pan of a greater, universal music’ (Lester S).

Each of us has a sense of connectedness with the whole, with the cosmos. We may be little aware of this sense, our scepticism may deny it, as Lester’s was doing. But finding it can enrich the rest of our nature.

The sense bnngs with it a realisation of taking part in the unimaginably grand drama called life. It gives a feeling, no matter what the state of our body, crippled or healthy, that we have something that makes any faults in body or achievement insignificant. It doesn’t take all the difficulties out of life, but it is a good companion on the way. In dreams and religion Christ is also represented as the son of the Cosmos or God. This aspect of Christ is cosmic, from beyond the Earth. This is a process in the cosmos which the unconscious senses and presents under the image of Christ, or other figures in different religions. It is possible that there is an innate process in human beings to do with love and symbiosis which humanity became aware of at a particu­lar stage in the development of consciousness. This becoming aware was expressed in what we know as the histoncal Jesus. See religion and dreams; the self within this entry. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The female within the male, shown as a woman in a man’s dream. Physically a man is predominantly male, but also has nipples and produces some female hormones. Psy­chologically, we may only express pan of our potential in everyday life. In a man, the more feeling and caring side may be given little expression. Apart from this, some functions, such as intuition and unconscious creativity, may also be held in latency. These secondary or latent characteristics are de­picted by the female in male dreams. In general we can say the woman represents the man’s emotions, his nurturing and caring quality. It also holds in it an expression of his complex of feelings about women, gained as experience mostly from his mother—or lack of mother—but also from a synthesis of all his female contacts. So the whole realm of his experience of the female can be represented by the woman in his dream, and is accessible through the image.

Good relationship with or marrying, the woman: shows the man integrating his own real emotions, sensitivity and intu­ition. This makes him more whole, balancing his exterior male qualities. It also shows the man meeting his experience of his mother in a healing way. This enables the man to have a realistic relationship with an actual woman. It also brings a sense of connectedness between his conscious self and what he senses as Life or, as Buckminster Fuller calls it. Universe. See Great Mother in this entry.

To be in conflict with the woman, or unable to make real physical and pleasurable contact with her: suggests difficulty in meeting what may have been a painful or threatening expe­rience of mother. This can lead to becoming an intellectual but emotionally barren man. Or being possessed in a negative way by the female traits, becoming emotionally unstable, opinionated and illogical. Actual relations with women will be difficult. Actual emotional or intimate merging with a woman is threatening because it bnngs the man close to the pain or fear connected with mother. Sex may be possible but not close feeling union. See woman. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Language of Dreams

(see Weapons)

Cutting yourself off or away from someone or something (see Knife). Fear of losing one’s job (e.g., “getting the axe”).

Two-headed axe (the Labrys): Duality.

A choice or situation that has two distinct edges, one of which may not be known. It can also be a symbol of feminine power.

Being executed by: Punishment or judgment for something about which you feel morally awkward or ashamed.

In ancient Israel, people used axes in divinatory rights. This may be how the phrase “see where the axe falls” originated. In this context, if the axe lands at your feet, or you take one in hand, it reveals a latent prophetic ability or, on a less lofty level, good instincts.... The Language of Dreams

The Premier in Dream Dictionary

Dreams of babies generally relate to two areas. At the individual level they symbolise new opportunities for personal growth, the discovery of new talents and skills and the release of latent potential.

• If you’re a mother then, the second, and most likely area a baby dream relates to is general anxieties concerning your own children that are common to every mother.... The Premier in Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

New force entering your life, cleansing away old attitudes; opening to one’s inner possibilities; life pervading and healing, an influx of what had been latent or potential in the self, birth. See religion and dreams; Christ under arche­types. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Animals

1- To have a bear appear alive in a dream indicates aggression, or if it is dead, the handling of one’s deeper negative instincts.

To dream of a toy bear i.e. a teddy bear shows a childlike need for security.

2- Psychologically; we have recognised the need to meet the force of our own creativity.

3- The bear symbolises spiritual strength and power, both latent for example, when a bear hibernates and also apparent.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

The bear symbolizes spiritual strength and power, both latent – for example, when a bear hibernates – and also apparent. In shamanism the bear is a very powerful totem animal – a form of guardian.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

A bear in a dream is a very rich and complicated dream symbol. In order to understand it, objective association need to be made. Bears are solitary animals and the females are solitary mothers. They hibernate in a cave and they are generally not predatory animals.

A bear is only aggressive when provoked, and as such times he is dangerous and deadly. Bears in dreams may represent a period of introspection and depression. However, this may be a part of a healing cycle, where the dreamer has retreated into himself in order to regenerate and in order to create something new and valuable in his life. Bears are highly regarded symbols in a variety of cultures and traditions, including the Native American tradition. Carl Jung said that all wild animals represent latent affects (feelings and emotions).

The interpretation of the bear in a dream may be influenced by your perception of it and by the events in the dream.

The bear may represent qualities in your character or specific aspects of your personality. Bears are usually associated with danger and aggression, but this is a very narrow view of this powerful dream symbol. ... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Psycho Dream Interpretation

To dream of performing feats of legerdemain such as tricks with cards or billiard balls denotes an urge to express one’s self or display talent that is latent.... Psycho Dream Interpretation

The Language of Dreams

(see by type, Gems, Jrweliy, Stones) Clear crystals: purity, refinement, and accuracy.

A single crystal: The core of self, our identity and existence. Look at how the crystal appears for more interpretive value. Is it clear, multifaceted, cloudy?

Clear vision, discernment, or foresight. Smooth crystal surfaces were used for scrying throughout history, in numerous cultures including that of Medieval Europe

and Victorian America. Watch and see if any symbols or images form in the sphere, and use those as a starting point for interpretation (see Divination).

As with gems, each crystal has different interpretive value and represents various omens. Agate, for example, portends positive business ventures, while amethyst reveals contentment with your work. Conversely, dreaming of losing an amethyst signals the loss of love or self-control. Here is a brief list of other common crystals and their interpretations. Note that many meanings correlate to the crystal’s color:

Beryl: harmonious relationships Lapis: psychic awareness

Bloodstone: wish fulfillment Lodestone: enticement Camelian: luck and safety Malachite: peaceful rest Garnet: faithfulness Onyx: discord Hematite: charm and grace Opal: change, bad luck Jet: sadness and mourning Quartz: energy, strength

What happens to the crystal in the dream will alter the interpretation.

To illustrate, having a bloodstone shatter probably indicates that you feel as if your hopes have been dashed, whereas receiving the gift of a lapis might indicate an openness to develop your latent psychic abilities.... The Language of Dreams

Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

To dream of holding disputes over trifles, indicates bad health and unfairness in judging others.

To dream of disputing with learned people, shows that you have some latent ability, but are a little sluggish in developing it.... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

The Language of Dreams

(see A?tow, Axe, Ciystals, Dice, Feather, Gypsy, Hand, Hazel, Tea, Writing, Zodiac Signs)

To dream of fortune-telling indicates a dependence on the opinions or ideas of others when making decisions, especiallv those of a spiritual nature.

The reading received in such a dream may be a prognostication of forthcoming developments in your current situation.

Each type of divination system has a specific theme that can add dimension to your interpretation of this dream.

For example, Tarot entails dispensing cards and accepting or rejecting the hand fate deals. Dice speak of taking risks, and aystal balls rely on vision, thereby putting the dreamer on notice to open her or his eyes fullv!

Divinatory abilities and interests developing, or latent talents coming to the forefront.... The Language of Dreams

Psycho Dream Interpretation

Meeting a doctor professionally indicates that the dreamer has a discouraging situation and is seeking help subconsciously.

To meet a doctor socially, good news and health.

If you dream that you are a doctor, you have a latent desire for power or authority.... Psycho Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Sigmund Freud was the founder of modern therapeutic analysis of dreams. Freud encouraged clients to relax on a couch and allow free associations to arise in con­nection with aspects of their dream. In this way he helped the person move from the surface images (manifest content) of the dream to the underlying emotions, fantasies and wishes (latent content), often connected with early childhood. Be­cause dreams use condensation—a mass of different ideas or experiences all represented by one dream image or event— Freud stated that the manifest content was meagre’ compared with the ‘richness and variety’ of latent content.

If one suc­ceeds in touching the feelings and memories usually con­nected with a dream image, this becomes apparent because of the depth of insight and experience which arises. Although ideally the Freudian analyst helps the client discover their own experience of their dream, it can occur that the analyst puts to the client readymade views of the dream. Out of this has occurred the idea of someone else ‘analysing or telling us about our dream.

Carl Jung used a different approach. He applied amplifica­tion (see entry), helped the client explore their associations, used active imagination (see entry) and stuck to the structure of the dream. Because amplification also put to the client the information and experience of the therapist, again the dreamwork can be largely verbal and intellectual, rather than experiential.

In the approach of Fritz Perls (gestalt therapy) and Moreno (psychodrama), dream analysis is almost entirely experiential.

The person exploring the dream acts out or verbalises each role or aspect of the dream.

If one dreamt of a house, in gestalt one might stan by saying I am a house’ and then go on to describe oneself just as one is as the particular house in the dream. It is important, even if the house were one existing externally, not to attempt a description of the external house, but to stay with the house as it was in the dream. This is like amplification, except the client gives all the information. This can be a very dramatic and emotional experience because we begin consciously to touch the immense realms of experience usually hidden behind the image. When successful this leads to personal insights into behaviour and creativity. See dream processing; amplification; gestalt dream work.

dream as a meeting place Any two people, or group of people who share their dreams, particularly if they explore the associated feelings and thoughts connected with the dream images, achieve social intimacy quickly. Whether it is a family sharing their dreams, or two fnends, an environment can be created in which the most profound feelings, painful and wonderful, can be allowed. Such exposure of the usually pri­vate areas of one s feelings and fears often presents new infor­mation to the dreamer, and also allows ventilation of what may never have been consciously expressed before. In doing so a healing release is reached, but also greater self under­standing and the opportunity to think over or reconsider what is discovered.

Herbert Reed, editor of the dream magazine Sundance, and resident in Virginia Beach, Va., initiated group dreaming ex­periments. It started because Reed noticed that in the dream groups he was running, when one of the group aired a prob­lem, other members would subsequently dream about that person’s problem. He went on to suggest the group should attempt this purposely and the resulting dreams shared to see if they helped the person with the problem.

The reported dreams often formed a more detailed view of the person’s situation. In one instance the group experienced many dream images of water. It aided the woman who was seeking help to admit she had a phobia of water and to begin thinking about learning to swim. In another experiment, a woman presented the problem of indecision about what college to transfer to and what to study. Her group subsequently said they were confused because they had not dreamt about school. Several had dreams about illicit sex. though, which led the woman to admit she was having an affair with a married man. She went on to realise that it was the affair which was underlying her indecision. She chose to end the affair and further her career.

Whatever may be underlying the results of Reed’s expen- ments, it is noticeably helpful to use the basic principles he is working with. They can be used by two people equally as well as a group—by a parent and child, wife and husband, busi­nessman and employee. One sets out to dream about each other through mutual agreement. Like any undertaking, the involvement, and therefore the results, are much more pro­nounced if there is an issue of reasonable importance behind the experiment. It helps if one imagines that during sleep you are going to meet each other to consider what is happening between you. Then sleep, and on waking take time to recall any dream. Note it down, even if it seems far removed from what you expected. Then explore its content using the tech­niques in dream processing.

Example: My wife and I decided to attempt to meet in our dreams. I dreamt I was in a room similar to the back bedroom of my previous marnage. My present wife was with me. She asked me to help her move the wardrobe. It reminded me of, but did not look like, the one which had been in that bed­room. I stood with my back to it, and reached my hands up to press on the top, inside. In this way I carried it to another wall. As I put it down the wood broke. I felt it ought to be thrown away’ (Thomas B). Thomas explored the dream and found he connected feelings about his first marriage with the wardrobe and bedroom. In fact the shabby wardrobe was Tom’s feelings of shabbiness at having divorced his first wife. In his first marriage, represented by the bedroom, he always felt he was married for life. In divorcing, he had done some­thing he didn’t like and was carrying it about with him. He says ‘1 am carrying this feeling of shabbiness and second best into my present relationship, and I need to get rid of it.’

dream as a spiritual guide Dreams have always been con­nected with the spiritual side of human experience, even though today many spiritual leaders disagree with consider­ation of dreams. Because dreams put the dreamer in touch with the source of their own internal wisdom and certainty, some conflict has existed between authoritative priesthood and public dreaming.

A lay person finding their own ap­proach to God in a dream might question the authority of the priests. No doubt people frequently made up dreams about God in order to be listened to. Nevertheless, despite opposi­tion, Matthew still dreamt of an angel appearing to him, Jo­seph was still warned by God to move Jesus; Peter still dreamt his dream of the unclean animals.

The modern scientific approach has placed large question marks against the concept of the human spirit. Study of the brain’s functions and biochemical activities have led to a sense of human personality being wholly a series of biological and biochemical events.

The results of this in the relationship between doctor and patient, psychiatrist and client, some­times results in the communication of human personality be­ing of little consequence. It may not be put into words, but the intimation is that if one is depressed it is a biochemical prob­lem or a brain malfunction.

If one is withdrawn or autistic, it is not that there is a vital centre of personality which has for some reason chosen to avoid contact, but that a biochemical or physiological problem is the cause—it’s nothing personal, take this pill (to change the biochemistry, because you are not really a person). Of course we have to accept that human personality must sometimes face the tragedy of biochemical malfunction, but we also need to accept that biochemical and physiological process can be changed by human will and courage.

In attempting to find what the human spirit is by looking at dreams, creativity stands out.

The spiritual nature may not be what we have traditionally considered it to be.

An overview of dreams and how dreamers relate to them suggests one amaz­ing fact. Let us call it the ‘seashell effect’. When we hear sounds in a shell that we hold to our ear, the noises heard seem exterior to oneself, yet they are most likely amplification of sounds created in our own ear, perhaps by the passage of blood. Imagine an electronic arcade machine which the player could sit in and, when running, the player could be engulfed in images, sounds, smell and sensation. At first there is shim­mering darkness, then a sound, and lights move. Is it a face seen, or a creature. Like Rorschach’s ink blots, the person creates figures and scenes out of the shapeless light and sound.

A devil appears which terrifies the player. People, de­mons, animals, God and angels appear and fade. Scenes are clearcut or a maelstrom of movement and ill-defined activity. Events arise showing every and any aspect of human experi­ence. Nothing is impossible.

If, on stepping out, we told the player that what occurred was all their own creation due to unconscious feelings, fears, habits, thoughts and physiological processes occurring within them, like the seashell effect, they might say ‘Good God, is that all it was, and I thought it was real. What a waste of time.’

Whether we can accept it or not, as a species we have created out of our own longings, fears, pain and perhaps vi­sion, God, with many different names—politics, money, dev­ils, nationalism, angels, an, and so on and on. All of it has flowed out of us. Perhaps we even deny we are the authors of the Bible, wars, social environments. Responsibility is diffi­cult. It is easier to believe the source is outside oneself. And if we do take responsibility for our amazing creativity, we may feel ‘is that all it is—me?’ Yet out of such things, such fears, such drives, such unconscious patterns as we shape our dreams with, we shape our life and fonune, we shape our children, we shape the world and our future.

The shadow of fear we create in our dream, the situation of aloneness and anger, becomes a pattern of feelings, real in its world of mind. We create a monster, a Djinn, a devil, which then haunts and influences us. Or with feelings of hope, of purposiveness and love, create other forces in us and the world. But we are the creator. We are in no way separate from the forces which create our existence. We are those creative forces. In the deep­est sense, not just as an ego, we create ourselves, and we go on creating ourselves. We are the God humanity has looked so long for.

The second aspect of the human spirit demonstrated by dreams is consciousness.

The unconscious mind, if its func­tion is not clogged with a backlog of undealt with painful childhood experience and nonfunctional premises, has a pro­pensity to form gestalts. It takes pieces of experience and fits them together to form a whole. This is illustrated by how we form gestalts when viewing newsprint photographs, which are made up of many small dots. Our mind fits them together and sees them as a whole, giving meaning where there are only dots. When the human mind is working well, when the indi­vidual can face a wide range of emotions, from fear and pain to ecstasy, this process of forming gestalts can operate very creatively. This is because it needs conscious involvement, and if the personality is frightened of deep feeling, the uniting of deeply infantile and often disturbing cxpcrience is cut out. Yet these areas are very rich mines of information, containing our most fundamental learning.

If the process is working well, then one’s expenence is gradually transformed into insights which transcend and thereby transform one s personal life.

For instance, we have witnessed our own binh in some manner, we also see many others appeanng as babies. We see people ageing, dying. We see millions of events in our life and in others.

The uncon­scious, deeply versed in imagery, ritual and body language, out of which it creates its dreams, picks up information from music, architecture, traditional rituals, people walking in the street, the unspoken world of parental influence.

The sources are massive, unbelievable. And out of it all our mind creates meaning. Like a process of placing face over face over face until a composite face is formed, a synthesis of all the faces; so the unconscious scans all this information and creates a world view, a concept of life and death.

The archetypes Jung talks of are perhaps the resulting synthesis of our own expenence, reaching points others have met also.

If so, then Chnst might be our impression of humanity as a whole.

If we dare to touch such a synthesis of experience it may be seanng, breathtaking.

It breaks the boundaries of our present personality and con­cepts because it transcends. It shatters us to let the new vision emerge. It reaches, it soars, like an eagle flying above the single events of life. Perhaps because of this the great hawk of ancient Egypt represented the human spirit.

Lastly, humans have always been faced by the impossible.

To a baby, walking and not wetting its pants is impossible, but with many a fall and accident it does the impossible. It is a god in its achievement.

To talk, to fly heavier-than-air planes, to walk on the Moon, were all impossible. Humans challenge the impossible every day. Over and over they fall, back into defeat. Many lie there broken. Yet with the next moment along come youngsters with no more sense than grasshoppers, and because they don’t know what the differ­ence is between right and left, do the impossible. Out of the infinite potential, the great unknown, they draw something new. With hope, with folly, with a wisdom they gain from who knows where, they demand more. And it’s a common everyday son of miracle. Mothers do it constantly for their children—transcending themselves. Lovers go through hell and heaven for each other and flower beyond who they were. You and I grow old on it as our daily bread, yet fail to see how holy it is. And if we turn away from it, it is because it offers no certainties, gives no authority, claims no reward. It is the spir­itual life of people on the street. And our dreams remember, even if we fail.

For this is the body and blood of the human spirit.

dream as a therapist and healer There is a long tradition of using dreams as a base for both physical and psychological healing. One of the earliest recorded incidents of such healing is when Pharaoh’s ‘spirit was troubled, and he sent for all the magicians of Egypt and all its wise men; and Pharaoh told them his dream, but there was none who could interpret it’. Then Joseph revealed the meaning of the dream and so the healing of Pharaoh’s troubled mind took place (Genesis 41).

The Greek Temples of Asclepius were devoted to using dreams as a base for healing of body and mind (see dreams and ancient Greece).

The Iroquois Amerindians used a social form of dream therapy also (see Iroquoian dream cult).

The dream process was used much more widely throughout his­tory in such practices as Pentecostal Christianity, shaktipat yoga in India, and Anton Mesmer’s groups (see sleep move­ments).

Sigmund Freud pioneered the modern approach to the use of dreams in therapy, but many different approaches have developed since his work. Examples of the therapeutic action of gaining insight into dreams are to be found in the entnes on abreaction, recurring dreams, reptiles.

The entry on dream processing gives information about using a dream to gain insight and healing. See also dream as meeting place.

A feature which people who use their dreams as a thera­peutic tool mention again and again is how dreams empower them. Many of us have an unconscious feeling that any impor­tant healing work regarding our body and mind can only be undertaken and directed by an expert, the expert might be a doctor, a psychiatrist, psychotherapist, or osteopath. Witness­ing the result of their own dream process, even if helped by an expert, people feel in touch with a wonderful internal process which is working actively for their own good. One woman, who had worked on her dream with the help of a fnend (non expert), said It gave me great confidence in my own internal process. I realised there was something powerful in myself working for my own good. It was a feeling of cooperating with life.’ One is frequently amazed by one’s own resources of wisdom, penetrating insight and sense of connection with life, as met in dreamwork. This is how dreams play a pan in helping one towards wholeness and balance.

The growing awareness of one’s central view of things, which is so wide, piercing and often humorous, brings developing self respect as the saga of one’s dreams unfolds.

There may be no hint of this, however, if a person simply records their dreams without attempting to find a deeply felt contact with their contents. It is in the searching for associ­ated feelings and ideas that the work of integrating the many strands of one’s life begins. Gradually one weaves, through a co-operative action with the dream process, a greater unifica­tion of the dark and the light, the painful and transcendent in one’s nature.

The result is an extraordinary process of educa­tion. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Symbols and Analysis

To dream of an earlobe suggests an unconscious interest in awakening your ‘Kundalini’ or latent sexual energy. Touching somebody else’s earlobe in a dream indicates a desire to be guided and curiosity about the ideas of others.

The appearance of a fleshy earlobe shows the potential to grow sexually either within your relationship or through the healthy exploration of your own energy.... Dream Symbols and Analysis

Psycho Dream Interpretation

To dream of a farm is a desire for security.

The idea of independence because of the abundance that a farm is supposed to produce is latent in the dreamer’s mind. It can also express a desire for solitude and peace of mind.... Psycho Dream Interpretation

The Language of Dreams

(see Divination, Storyteller, Travel)

Latent psychic abilities or unexplored occult interests (we often equate Gypsies with fortune-telling with cards, crystal balls, and palmistry).

Having a free spirit, adventurous heart, and a slight disdain for definite rules (e.g., having “gypsy blood”).

Matters of sensuality or sexuality may be worked out through the image of a Gypsy, w is stereotyped as being more liberal in such matters.

Possibly a false guide or teacher who gives misleading information to gain adoration money.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

A fear, misunderstanding, or disapproval toward this lifestyle. Latent tendencies expressing themselves.

An intimate exploration of the masculine or feminine nature, depending on which gender is seen in the dream (see Men, Women).

The need to focus on your own gender for a while to achieve greater understanding, “brotherhood” or “sisterhood,” and empowerment from same.... The Language of Dreams

New American Dream Dictionary

1. Courage, dignity, strength.

2. Justice and righteousness.

3. Latent passion.

4. Wild, uncontrollable passion. ... New American Dream Dictionary

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Carl Jung said that all wild animals indicate latent affects (feelings and emotions that we do not readily deal with). They are also symbolic of dangers (hurtful and negative things) being “swallowed” by the unconscious.

The lion is a symbol of social distinction and leadership.

The interpretation depends on the circumstances and the interactions with the lion. See also: Animals, Cat.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Inactive; Latent; Languid) In a dream, a log represents a chronic illness, or paralysis. As for a butcher or a shoemaker, a log in a dream represents money and profits. (Also see Firewood)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Sometimes in the practice of deep relaxation, meditation or sensory deprivation, our being enters into a state akin to sleep, yet we maintain a personal waking awareness. This is like a journey into a deep interior world of mind and body where our senses no longer function in their waking manner, where the brain works in a different way, and where awareness is introverted in a degree we do not usually experience. It can be a frightening world, simply because we are not accustomed to it. In a similar way a measure of waking awareness can arise while dreaming. This is called lucid dreaming. During it we can change or wilfully direct what is happening in the dream in a way not usual to the dream state.

Example: 4I had backed my car into a big yard, a commer­cial area. My wife, two of my sons and I got out of the car. As we stood in the yard talking I realised there was a motorbike where my car should be. I said to everyone, “There was a car here a moment ago, now it’s a motorbike. Do you know what that means? It means we are dreaming.” Mark my son was now with us, and my ex-wife. I asked them if they realised they were dreaming. They got very vague and didn’t reply. I asked them again and felt very clearly awake’ (William V). William’s is a fairly typical lucid dream, but there are features which it does not illustrate. During the days or weeks prior to a lucid dream, many people experience an increase in (lying dreams.

The next example shows another common feature.

Example: In many of my dreams I become aware that I am dreaming. Also, if anything unpleasant threatens me in the dream I get away from it by waking myself (Alan). Lucidity often has this feature of enabling the dreamer to avoid un­pleasant elements of the dream.

The decision to avoid any unpleasant internal emotions is a common feature of a per­son’s conscious life, so this aspect of lucidity is simply a way of taking such a decision into the dream. Some writers even suggest it as a way of dealing with frightening dreams. Avoid­ance does not solve the problem, it simply pushes the emo­tion deeper into the unconscious where it can do damage more surreptitiously. Recent findings regarding suppressed gnef and stress, which connects them with a higher incidence of cancer, suggests that suppression is not a healthy way of dealing with feelings.

Another approach to lucidity is that it can be a son of playground where one can walk through walls, jump from high buildings and fly, change the sofa into an attractive lover, and so on. True, the realisation that our dream life is a differ­ent world and that it does have completely different principles at work than our waking world is imponant. Often people introven into their dream life the morals and fears which are only relevant to being awake in physical life.

To avoid a charging bull is cenainly imponant in waking life. In our dream life, though, to meet its charge is to integrate the enor­mous energy which the bull represents, an energy which is our own but which we may have been avoiding or running away’ from previously. Realising such simple differences revolutionises the way we relate to our own internal events and possibilities.

To treat lucid dreams as if they offered no other attainable expenence than to manipulate the dream en­vironment, or avoid an encounter, is to miss an amazing fea­ture of human potential.

Example: ‘In my dream I was watching a fern grow. It was small but opened out very rapidly. As I watched I became aware that the fern was simply an image representing a pro­cess occurring within myself which I grew increasingly aware of as I watched. Then I was fully awake in my dream and realised that my dream, perhaps any dream, was an expres­sion of actual and real events occurring in my body and mind. I felt enormous excitement, as if I were witnessing something of great importance’ (Francis P). It is now acceptable, through the work of Freud, Jung and many others, to consider that within images of the dream lie valuable information about what is occurring within the dreamer, perhaps unconsciously. Strangely, though, it is almost never considered that one can have direct perception into this level of internal ‘events’ with­out the dream. What Francis describes is an experience of being on the cusp of symbols and direct perception. Consider­ing the enormous advantage of such direct information gath­ering, it is surprising it is seldom mentioned except in the writings of Corriere and Han, The Dream Makers.

Example: After defining why I had not woken in sleep recently, i.e. loss of belief, I had the following experience. I awoke in my sleep and began to see, without any symbols, that my attitudes and sleep movements expressed a feeling of restrained antagonism or irritation to my wife. I could also observe the feelings were arising from my discipline of sexual­ity. Realising I did not want those feelings I altered them and woke enough to turn towards her’ (Francis P). After the first of his direct perception dreams, Francis attempted to use this function again, resulting in the above, and other, such dreams. Just as classic dream interpretation says that the dream symbols represent psychobiological logical processes which might be uncovered by dream processing, what we see in Francis’ lucidity is a direct route to self insight, and through it a rapid personal growth to improved life experience. Such dreams provide not only psychological insight, but very fre­quently a direct perception of processes occurring in the body, as the following example illustrates.

Example: ‘Although deeply asleep I was wide awake with­out any shape or form. I had direct experience, without any pictures, of the action of the energies in my body. I had no awareness of body shape, only of the flow of activities in the organs. I checked over what I could observe, and noticed a tension in my neck was interfering with the flow and ex­change of energies between the head and trunk. It was also obvious from what I could see that the tension was due to an attitude I had to authority, and if the tension remained it could lead to physical ill health’ (Tony C).

An effective way to develop lucidity is frequently to con­sider the events of waking life as if they were a dream. Try to see events as one might see dream symbols. What do they mean in terms of one’s motivations, fears, personal growth? What do they suggest about oneself? For instance a person who works in a photographic darkroom developing films and prints might see they were trying to bnng to consciousness the latent—unconscious—side of themselves.

A banker might feel they were working at how best to deal with their sexual and personal resources. In this way one might actually apply what is said in this dream dictionary to one’s outer circumstances.

The second instruction is, on waking, at a convenient mo­ment, imagine oneself standing within one’s recent dream. As you get a sense of this dream environment, realise that you are taking waking awareness into the dream. From the standpoint of being fully aware of the dream action and events, what will you now do in and with the dream? Re-dream it with con­sciousness.

For example the things you run from in your nor­mal dreaming you could now face. See dream processing for fun her suggestions. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Although a house represents all the aspects of self in which our identity lives—a body, emotions, creativity, etc. —a mansion is depicting the same thing with a different em­phasis. It is ourself as we are, plus features still latent, pos­sibilities not yet developed or explored. See house in this en­try. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Our false self we put on in meeting others. Latent qualities we can express or don when needed—a mother might be a tigress when her children are threatened, but a meek person otherwise, her tigress would not be ‘false’. Ego less. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Language of Dreams

(see Filing Cabinet)

Integrating or ordering recent experiences.

A fastidious personality expressing itself through your dream.

Exactly what’s being put in order in the dream may hold tremendous import.

For example, if detailing a pantry, this might be a situational dream (being hungry) or

it might reveal a latent fear of going hungry. On the other hand, organizing a closet speaks of different life roles and which ones are most important (see Clothes).... The Language of Dreams

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Parcels and packages can suggest latent potential gifts, skills and talents they can equally suggest opportunities offered from a spiritual perspective.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Something we have experienced but not explored the impon of.

A parent may die, for instance, but we may not ‘unwrap’ the feelings evoked enough to see we have taken something to hean.

If we did we might find a regret at not expressing the love we felt while Mum or Dad was still alive, and we now want to be more daring in giving love. Also, one’s potential or latent skills; impressions or ‘gifts’ re­ceived from others—such as support, love, their example— but not made fully conscious. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Address

1- When we receive a parcel in a dream, we are being made aware of something we have experienced but not explored. At this stage, we do not quite know what the potential of the gift is, but by exploration can find this out. When we are sending a parcel or package we arc sending our energy out into the world.

2- Parcels and packages in dreams can also represent the gifts that one receives from others. It can often be important to note who is actually giving us the gift, whether it is being directly received from the person concerned or whether we are simply aware who the donor is and that it is something that we can receive with joy.

3- Parcels and packages can suggest latent potential and gifts or skills.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Memories; wanting to be remembered or noticed; looking at some aspect of oneself. Looking at family photos: realisation of past influences in one’s life; family environment, mentally and emotionally. Taking photos : capturing a realisa­tion; taking notice of something; remembering. Photo of one­self: one’s self image; need to look at oneself or get an objec­tive view. Photos which come to life: the living influence of past experience; our continuing involvement in what the pic­ture depicts; something which we held as a thought, which is taking shape and becoming real. Developing photos: bringing to consciousness what was latent or unrealised before. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Psycho Dream Interpretation

Running usually indicates that the dreamer wishes advancement, an increase in earning power, or a better place in society.

If the dreamer is running with others contests or festivities may be subconsciously latent in the dreamers mind.

If the dreamer is running away from someone there is a fear of loss of money or a hatred for that someone.... Psycho Dream Interpretation

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- A seed in dreams stands for our potentiality. We may have an idea which is only just beginning, or a project which needs nurturing. In a woman’s dream a seed may suggest pregnancy.

2- Often in dreams a seed will suggest the validity of something we arc planning. We need to know the right conditions in which to grow and mature.

3- A seed carries great potential and latent power. It is this symbolism which is relevant spiritually.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

New growth; what was latent emerging; a new stan in business or relationship; childhood or youth. Spring of wa­ter: free-flowing feelings; rejuvenating energy. See water. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- Springtime in a dream can suggest new growth or opportunities. Perhaps there is a fresh start in a relationship.

A spring of water suggests fresh energy, whereas a bed spring or other type of coil would indicate latent power for movement.

2- To walk with a spring in one’s step is to be looking forward to something.

The saying ‘spring forward, fall back’ is also applicable in psychological terms, since effort is required to progress.

3- Spiritually a spring is a symbol of progression, particularly insofar as emotion is concerned. We can now afford to make a new beginning.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: Springtime in a dream can suggest new growth or opportunities. Perhaps there is a fresh start in a relationship.

A spring of water suggests fresh energy, whereas a bedspring or other type of coil would indicate latent power for movement.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Warmth; vitality; conscious awareness; the self or source of one s life energy. Sunlight: being aware; warmth; positive feelings in body and mind; health. Sunbathing: al­lowing the flow of inner energies to give pleasure. Sunrise: realisation; a new start, childhood; hope and energy to grow. M idday: maturity; middle life; time to be working at one s life. Sunset: old age; death; return to latent period prior to a new binh. See time; rebirth under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Gives gender - specific: In a man’s dream the tail can indicate sexual excitement, or possibly, by association, the penis.

For a woman it will initially suggest her own basic energy, and perhaps later on her way of linking with her own latent powers.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

New American Dream Dictionary

1. Emotional burden; emotions take on a life of their own, to the point of moving objects.

2. Mental energy needs to be put to better use.

3. Possible latent talents need to be explored. ... New American Dream Dictionary

The Language of Dreams

(see Air, Fan, Whistle)

Strong winds or storm winds reveal powerful forces at work in your life, some of which may cause confusion about your direction and path.

Change and movement, which often meets with some turbulence before positive transformations occur.

A sign of latent psychic abilities developing.

In Christian theology, the presence of the Holy Spirit.

Angry winds are often considered a sign of evil or negativity. Note that Lucifer is called the Prince of the Power of the Air, and in the Koran, demons control stormv winds (see Monsters).

Howling winds: In folklore, this portends either trouble on the horizon, or an unsettled spirit (see Ghost).

Anciently an emblem of the masc uline nature, with the four directions becoming a natural wheel or cross that later became the weather vane.

Weather vanes that show which way the wind blows are an alternative emblem for both a wheel and a cross, indicating the originating source of energy or problems.... The Language of Dreams

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