muscular

Muscular, Dream Interpretation


Spiritually strong



Muscular | Dream Interpretation

Keywords of this dream: Muscular

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

During experiments to monitor the brain activ­ity of animals and humans while asleep, it was noted that the brain seemed to move through a series of levels of activity. In deep sleep there are slow rhythmic brainwaves. These at times would give way to faster rhythms of a more dynamic nature. This was at first called desynchronised’ sleep because during it the muscular system relaxed deeply, even though the brain was active. It was also known as paradoxical sleep, but more recently has become internationally known as ‘active sleep’. During active sleep the rapid eye movements (REM) characteristic of dreaming occur.

The brain’s activity was found to be a better indicator of dreaming in animals than REM because some creatures, such as owls, do not move their eyes. In this way, all mammals were seen to exhibit active sleep or dreaming. Birds also dream, and, measured in this way, so do many types of fish, reptiles and some amphibians. See science, sleep and dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The emotional and intellectual rigidity we use to protect ourself from hurt. Can depict muscular tension which blocks free flowing sexuality and feelings. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: 4I was standing on a clifftop overlooking the ocean. By my side was a man. He had short cropped silver hair, gleaming, and piercing blue eyes. He seemed old, but was broad, muscular and gave me the impression of having lived many lifetimes, or being very wise. He indicated the sea and I understood I should plunge into it. I did so, leaving my body behind, and became a part of the sea. At the same time it seemed I could at any time stand beside the man on the cliff again’ (Debbie). On edge; danger, decision, taking a risk; a barrier, or the unknown, depending on dream content. In the example we see the cliff presented as a wider view of life, one which includes death. It is shown as the uphill struggle in life, looking back or down from which one has wisdom. It is also the test of self trust, facing fear. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

According to modem theory, the amount of information the human brain can hold is more than is held in all the books in the Library of the British Museum. Gradually it is becoming recognised that informa­tion gathered is not simply what we ‘learn’ from vocal com­munication, or read, or set out to leam. In fact an unimagin­able amount of information gathering has gone on prior to speech, and goes on at an unimaginable speed prior to school years. Consider a small preschool child walking into the gar­den It has learnt gradually to relate to muscular movement, balance and its own motivations and feeling reactions in a way enabling it to walk. It has already grasped thousands of bits of ‘information’ about such things as plants in the garden, the neighbour’s cat, the road outside, possible dangers, safe areas. Stupendous amounts have already been absorbed about interrelationships.

An idea of ‘reality’ in the sense of what is probable, and what would be dangerously out of norm, has been formed. We gather information in ways little recognised. How our parents relate to their environment and to other people is all recorded and leamt from, bringing about enor­mous ‘programming’ affecting how we act in similar circum­stances.

As explained in the entry on the dream as spiritual guide, we have great ability in ‘reading’ symbols, ritual, an, music, body language, architecture, drama, and extracting ‘meaning’ from them. So we have immense stores of information from these sources. Work done with people exploring their dreams over a long period suggests that some of these information resources are never focused on enough to make conscious what we have actually learnt. Sometimes it is enough simply to ask oneself a question to begin to focus some of these resources. Such questions as what social attitude and response to authority did I learn at school? What feeling reaction do I get when I am in the presence of someone I know well? These may help to bring to awareness aspects of information gath­ered but remaining unconscious. These unfocused, or uncon­scious, areas of information can explain why we have appar­ently irrational feeling responses to some people or situations.

the body A lot of what we call the unconscious are basic physiological and psychological functions.

For instance in a modern house, when we flush the toilet, we do not have to bring a bucket of water and fill the cistern again.

A self regu­lating mechanism allows water to flow in and switches it off when full. This is a clever built-in function that had to be done manually at one time. Nowadays we have built into some dwellings fire sprinklers or burglar alarms. Through re­peated actions over thousands or millions of years, many ba­sic functions, or functions only switched on in emergencies, have been built into our being. We do not need to think about them, just as we do not have to give awareness to the fire sprinkling system or toilet each time we walk through a room or flush the toilet. They are therefore unconscious.

Research with animals in connection with rewards and conditioned reflexes has shown that by gradually leading an animal towards a certain performance by rewarding it each time it gets nearer to the goal, it can do the most amazing things. It can increase the circulation of blood to its ear, slow its heart, and in fact influence body functions which were thought to be completely involuntary. Where human beings have learnt to use some of these techniques—such as raising the temperature of an arm at will, or helping to increase the efficiency of the immune system—the actual processes still remain unconscious. In general, however, the body’s func­tions are thought to be outside our awareness, and so are one of the areas of the unconscious. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

A large room, etc., İs spiritually blessed; a large, muscular person is spiritually strong; see “obesity”... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of your lower back represent support and financial issues.

If you dream of a strong, muscular back, then this signifies a healthy financial situation.

If you dream of a back that is decrepit or in pain, then this signifies financial insecurity.... Strangest Dream Explanations

Christian Dream Symbols

To dream of being muscular in a dream may be symbolic of spiritual strength, Matt. 12:29 NLT ... Christian Dream Symbols

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Blessed if muscular and strong; if excessive and weak, see “obesity”... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Considering that each of us has four or five periods of dreaming each night, most of our dreams are forgotten. But for people who observe family or friends regu­larly remembering a dream, and yet themselves are seldom if ever able to recall one, the question arises as to why such a wide divergence occurs.

There are many different reasons why dreams may be for­gotten.

The most obvious is that we do not give enough atten­tion to our dreaming process. When people become intrigued by what they might be dreaming, and develop a motivation to remember, they frequently start recalling several dreams a week. From this standpoint, the reason why some people have always remembered might be that they have always been ei­ther intrigued or anxious about their nightly dramas.

The way we rise in the morning has an effect upon this type of memory.

If our attention is immediately turned out­wards on waking, there is little hope of recalling a dream unless it has great power, as might a nightmare. Spending a few moments leaving our mind open to memory aids recall. Any visual, or even muscular activity, will fill consciousness with new and powerful impressions which might obliterate the subtler impressions of dreaming. Rorschach suggested not opening the eyes, and remaining physically still. Tests also showed that passage of time, even a few minutes, between dreaming and attempting to remember causes many dreams to fragment and be lost. So any attempts to remember need one to record the dream quickly, by speaking it to one’s bedmate, using a tape recorder by one’s bed, or writing it down.

Some dreams have rather misty or fragmentary imagery and theme, while others are clear, concise and dynamic. These latter are more easily remembered. There may be times when we sleep with longer periods of wakefulness, perhaps due to feeling cold, or uncomfonable in a strange bed, which cause us to remember as we are nearer consciousness. Be­cause dreams occur in cycles during the night, if something wakes us during a dream cycle the memory is easier, if only because less time has elapsed since occurrence. So another method of captunng a dream is to have one’s alarm gently sound prior to the time one usually wakes.

The last hour or so of sleep includes a long period of dreaming, so waking in this period with intent to remember can often capture the quarry.

Thereare also psychological reasons for forgetfulness. Dreams often deal with past areas of experience which we do not wish to remember, or would rather not be aware of.

If we find it difficult to feel emotions, or feel uncomfonable with them, it is highly likely we repress dream memory, as dreams have a base of high feelings. Experiments have shown that during dreaming our heartbeat, body movements and breath­ing frequently reflect intensified emotions. Also, research into what areas of the brain produce dreaming suggest that dreams may be from the ‘visceral brain’, which is largely non verbal.

If temperamentally we find feeling qualities a foreign lan­guage, connecting with a dream would need to be a learnt skill. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

In 1937 through the use of the electroencephalograph (EEG) measuring tiny electrical brain impulses, Loomis and his associates discovered that the form of brainwaves changes with the onset of sleep.

The next leap forward in understanding came when Aserinsky and Kleitman found rapid eye movements (REM) in 1953. In 1957 the REM were linked with dreaming. This defined sleep into two differ­ent observable states, REM sleep, and NREM (non-rapid eye movement or non-rem) sleep. Within NREM three different stages have been identified. These are defined by the different EEG patterns of electrical activity in the brain. They are mea­sured by the height (amplitude) of the brain waves and fre­quency of up and down movement. There are also electrical changes occurring in the muscles (measured using an electro- myograph or EMG), and in movement of the eyeballs (mea­sured using an electro-oculograph or EOG).

While awake the height is low and frequency fast. As we relax prior to sleep the EEG shifts to what are called alpha waves, at 8 to 12 cps (cycles per second). Stage one of sleep is the transition between this drowsy state of alpha waves to sleeping, in which theta waves occur, at 3 to 7 cps. In this first stage we experience random images and thoughts. This lasts about 10 minutes, followed by stage two, in which ‘sleep spindles’ occur which have 12 to 14 cps on the EEG. These last from 1/2 to 2 seconds, with K complexes following, which are slow large EEG waves. About half our sleep period is spent in this second stage of sleep. Deep sleep is reached when our brain exhibits delta waves, with 1/2 to 2 cps.

After approximately an hour and a half from falling into deep sleep, an exciting change occurs. We return to level two and REM occur. Suddenly the brain is alert and active, though the person is asleep and difficult to wake. This level has been called paradoxical sleep because of this fact. Voluntary mus­cular activity is suppressed and the body is essentially paralysed. Morrison has pointed out that, although the brain is transmitting full muscular activity messages, these are usu­ally suppressed by an area of the brain in the pons. But bursts of short actions occur, such as rapid eyeball jerks, twitches of the muscles, changes in the size of the pupil, contractions in the middle ear, and erection of the penis. It may be that similar excitation occurs in the vagina. Also, autonomic storms’ occur dunng which large erratic changes occur in heart rate, blood pressure, breathing rate and in other auto­nomic nervous system functions. These are the changes ac­companying our dreams.

If we slept for eight hours, a typical pattern would be to pass into delta sleep, stay there for about 70 to 90 minutes, then return to stage two and dream for about five minutes. We then move back into delta sleep, stay for a short period and shift back to level two, but without dreaming, then back into level three.

The next return to stage two is longer, almost an hour, with a period of dreaming lasting about 19 minutes, and also a short period of return to waking. There is only one short period of return to stage three sleep which occurs nearly four hours after falling asleep. From there on we remain in level two sleep, with three or four lengthening periods of dreaming, and returns to brief wakefulness.

The average amount of body shifting is once every 15 minutes.

1- In undergoing 205 hours of sleep deprivation, four healthy males showed various physiological and psychological changes. Some of these were headache, lack of concentra­tion, hallucination, memory loss, tremor and, in some, paranoia. In all cases one night’s sleep restored normal functioning.

2- One in ten people who complain of excessive daytime drowsiness suffer from sleep apnoea, which is a stoppage of breathing while asleep.

3- A condition called narcolepsy causes sufferers to fall asleep at inappropriate times—while making love, walk­ing, playing tennis, working.

4- As we age we usually sleep less. Our REM sleep in partic­ular decreases sharply. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Adrian Morrison at the University of Pennsylvania, investigating narcolepsy, a condition producing sleep in the middle of activity, found that a small area of the brain, the pons, suppresses full muscular movement while we dream.

If this area is damaged or suppressed, humans or ani­mals make full muscular movements in connection with what is dreamt. He observed that cats would stalk, crouch and spring at imaginary prey. These very imponant findings sug­gest a number of things.

The unconscious process behind dreaming, apan from creating a non-volitional fantasy, can also reproduce movements we have not consciously decided upon. This shows we have at least two centres of will which can direct body and mental processes. Christopher Evans, linking with the work of Nicholas Humphrey at Cambridge University, sees the movements of dreaming cats as expres­sions of survival ‘programs’ in the biological computer. These ‘programs’ or strategies for survival need to be replayed in order not only to keep in practice, but also to modify them in connection with the influx of extra experience and informa­tion. In the human realm, our survival strategies and the way we relate to our social, sexual, marriage and work roles may also be replayed and modified in our dreaming.

Such movements are not linked simply to survival or social programs’.

An important aspect of dreaming is releasing painful emotions or trauma, and moving toward psychological growth. Also, the process producing these movements does not keep strictly to the realm of sleep. It is observable that many muscular spasms, ticks, or unwilled waking movements arise from this source—the will’ of the unconscious—at­tempting to release trauma or initiate a necessary programme of psychological growth. That such dream’ activities as spon­taneous movement or verbalisation should occur during wak­ing would appear to suggest that a dream must occur with them. Research shows this is unlikely. It does however show that a dream may be imagery produced to express this mental, muscular, emotional ‘self regulation’.

The imagery may not be necessary if the process is consciously experienced.

Because the self-regulatory process produces spontaneous movements, emotions and verbalisation, it is likely there is a connection between it and many ancient religious practices such as pentecostalism, shaktipat in India, subud in Indonesia and seitai in Japan. These are forms of psychotherapy prac­tised by other cultures. They create an environment in which practitioners can allow spontaneous movement and fantasy while awake. Because consciousness is then involved, and can co-operate with the self-regulating or healing activities of the unconscious, such practice can lead to better health and utilisation of unconscious functions.

The older religious forms of this practice relied on belief systems of spirits or gods. Once the connection between these practices and the dream is realised, much in them which was obscure becomes under­standable. In my book Mind and Movement I explain the con­nection between the dream process, self regulatory healing, extended perception and waking consciousness. See abreac­tion; sleep walking; dream as therapist and healer. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Determines one’s spiritual condition; research if abnormal, i.E. Thin, obese, muscular... Dream Dictionary Unlimited
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