Many dreams lead us to feel an intensity of emotion we may seldom if ever feel in waking life.

If the emotions felt are frightening or disgusting we call the dream a nightmare. One of the common features of a nightmare is that we are desperately trying to get away from the situation; feel stuck in a terrible condition; or on waking feel enormous relief that it was just a dream. Because of the intensity of a nightmare we remember it long after other dreams; even if we seldom ever recall other dreams, even worry about what it means.

As so many dreams have been investigated in depth, using such varied approaches as hypnosis, exploration of associa­tions and emotional content, and LSD psychotherapy, in which the person can explore usually unconscious memories, imagery and feelings, we can be certain we know what night­mares are. They arise from six main causes.

Unconscious memories of intense emotions, such as those arising in a child being left in a hospital without its mother. Example: see second example in dark.

Intense anxiety produced—but not fully released at the time—by external situations such as involvement in war scenes, sexual assault (this applies to males as well as females, as they are frequently assaulted). Example: ‘A THING is marauding around the rather bleak, dark house I am in with a small boy.

To avoid it I lock myself in a room with the boy.

The THING finds the room and tries to break the door down. I frantically try to hold it closed with my hands and one foot pressed against it, my back against a wall for leverage. It was a terrible struggle and I woke myself by screaming’ (Terry F). When Terry allowed the sense of fear to arise in him while awake, he felt as he did when a child—the boy in the dream—during the bombing of the Second World War. His sense of insecurity dating from that time had emerged when he left a secure job, and had arisen in the images of the nightmare. Un­derstanding his fears, he was able to avoid their usual paralysing influence.

Childhood fears, such as loss of parent, being lost or abandoned, fear of attack by stranger or parent, anxiety about own internal drives.

Many nightmares in adults have a similar source, namely fear connected with internal drives such as aggression, sexuality and the process of growth and change, such as encounter with adolescence, loss of sexual characteristics, old age and death. Example: see third example in doors under house, buildings.

Serious illness. Example: ‘I dream night after night that a cat is gnawing at my throat’ (male from Landscapes of the Night).

The dreamer had developing cancer of the throat. These physical illness dreams are not as common as the other classes of nightmare.

Precognition of fateful events. Example: My husband, a pilot in the RAF, had recently lost a friend in an air crash. He woke one morning very troubled—he is usually a very positive person. He told me he had dreamt his friend was flying a black jet, and wanted my husband to fly with him.

Although a simple dream, my husband could not shake off the dark feelings. Shortly afterwards his own jet went down and he was killed in the crash’ (Anon.).

Understanding the causes of nightmares enables us to deal with them.

The things we run from in the nightmare need to be met while we are awake. We can do this by sitting and imagining ourselves back in the dream and facing or meeting what we were frightened of. Terry imagined himself opening the door he was fighting to keep closed. In doing this and remaining quiet he could feel the childhood feelings arising. Once he recognised them for what they were, the terror went out of them.

A young woman told me she had experienced a recurring nightmare of a piece of cloth touching her face. She would scream and scream and wake her family. One night her brother sat with her and made her meet those feelings de­picted by the cloth. When she did so she realised it was her grandmother’s funeral shroud. She cried about the loss of her grandmother, felt her feelings about death, and was never troubled again by the nightmare.

The techniques given in dream processing will help in meeting such feelings. Even the simple act of imagining ourselves back in the nightmare and facing the frightening thing will begin the process of changing our relationship with our internal fears.



Nightmares | The Dream Meanings

Keywords of this dream: Nightmares

DreamPedia

Partial excerpt from “Dream Language” by Jim & Michal Ann Goll Various ministries and organizations have logged literally thousands of dreams and therefore have been able to decipher the most common dreams that people have.

The following is not a comprehensive list and they are not listed in any particular order, but they are 20 of the most common dreams that people experience.


Dreams of Your House

This one would easily rank in the top five most common dreams. The house normally represents your life, and the circumstances taking place in the house reflect the specific activities in your life. These dreams may also reflect the church as well.

Individual rooms of the house may represent specific things. For instance, if the bedroom appears, the dream may have something to do with issues of intimacy.

The bathroom may represent a need for cleansing. The family room may be a clue that God wants to work on family relationships and so on.


Dreams of Going to School

These dreams often center on taking of tests. The tests may be for the purpose of promotion. Or you might find yourself searching for your next class-an indication that guidance is needed or a graduation has just occurred. You might be repeating a class you took before, possibly meaning that you have an opportunity to learn from past failures. High School dreams may be a sign that you are enrolled in the School of the Holy Spirit (H.S. = High School = Holy Spirit). There are limitless possibilities.

These are just a few examples. Interesting enough, the Teacher is always silent when giving a test!


Dreams of Various Vehicles

These may indicate the calling you have on your life, the vehicle of purpose that will carry you from one point to another. Cars, planes, buses, etc., may be symbols of the type or even the size of the ministry you are or will be engaged in. That’s why there are different kinds of vehicles. Note the color of the vehicle. If it is a car, what is the make and model? Observe who is driving it. Are you driving or is someone else driving? If someone else is driving, who is it? Do you know the person? Is it a person from your past? If the driver is faceless, this may refer to a person who will appear sometime in your future or that the Holy Spirit Himself is your driving guide.


Dreams Concerning Storms

Storm dreams tend to be intercessory, spiritual warfare-type dreams. They are particularly common for people who have a calling or gift in the area of discerning of spirits. These dreams often hint of things that are on the horizon –both dark, negative storms of demonic attack for the purpose of prayer, intercession, and spiritual warfare, as well as showers of blessing that are imminent. What kind of storm is it? Are there tornadoes involved? What color are they. Tornadoes can indicate change that is coming good or bad. Also tornadoes can indicate great destruction.


Dreams of Flying or Soaring

Flying dreams deal with your spiritual capacity to rise above problems and difficulties and to soar into the heavenlies. These are some of the most inspirational and encouraging in tone of all dreams. When awakening from a dram where you fly or soar, you often wake up feeling exhilarated –even inebriated- in the Spirit.

Ascending-type dreams are more unusual yet edifying. Remember, we are seated with Christ Jesus in heavenly places far above all principalities and powers.


Dreams of Being Naked or Exposed

These dreams indicate that you will be or are becoming transparent and vulnerable.

Depending on your particular situation, this may be exhilarating or fearful and could reveal feelings of shame. Note: these dreams are not meant to produce embarrassment but rather draw you into greater intimacy with the Lord and indicate places where greater transparency is required. These types of dreams often appear during times of transition where you are being dismantled in order to be re-mantled.


Dreams of Condition of Your Teeth

Often, these dreams reveal the need for wisdom. Are your teeth loose, rotten, falling out, or are they bright and shiny? Do you have a good bite? Are you able to chew your cud? Teeth represent wisdom, and often teeth appear to loose in a dream.

What does that mean? It may mean that you need a wisdom application for something you are about to bit off. The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom.


Dreams of Past Relationships

This kind of dream may indicate that you are being tempted to fall back into old patterns and ways of thinking. Depending upon who the person is in the dream, and what this person represents to you, these dreams might also be an indication of your need to renew your former desires and godly passions for good things in life.

Seeing a person from your past does not usually mean that you will literally renew your old relationship with that individual. Look more for what that person represents in your life – for good or bad. A person who was bad in your life may represent God’s warning to you not to relapse into old habits and mind-sets that were not profitable. On the other hand, a person who was good in your life may represent God’s desire or intention to restore good times that you thought were gone.


Dreams of Dying

These dreams are not normally about the person seen in the dream in a literal sense, but are symbolic about something that is passing away or departing from your life. The type of death may be important to note. Watch, though, to see if resurrection is on the other side.


Dreams of Birth

Normally these dreams are not about an actual childbirth but rather about new seasons of purpose and destiny coming forth into your life. If a name is given to the child, pay close attention because that usually indicates that a new season in the purposes of God is being birthed. There are, of course, exceptions to this where an actual pregnancy and birth is going to take place.


Dreams of Taking a Shower

These are cleansing-type dreams (toilets, showers, bathtubs, etc) revealing things that are in the process of being flushed out of your life, cleansed and flushed away. These are good dreams by the way. Enjoy the showers of God’s love and mercy and get cleansed from the dirt of the world and its ways. Apply the blood of Jesus and get ready for a new day!


Dreams of Falling

These dreams may reveal a fear you have of losing control of some area of your life or, on the positive side, that you are actually becoming free of directing your own life.

What a substance you fall into in the dream is a major key to proper understanding. The outstanding primary emotions in these dreams will indicate which way to interpret them. Falling can be fearful, but it can also represent falling into the ocean of God’s love.


Dreams of Chasing and Being Chased

Chasing dreams often reveal enemies that are at work, coming against your life and purpose. On the opposite side, they may indicate the passionate pursuit of God in your life, and you towards Him. Are you being chased? By whom? What emotions do you feel? Are you afraid of being caught? Or maybe you are the one doing the chasing. Who are you chasing? Why? Again, what emotions do you feel during the chase? The answers to these questions and, particularly, the dominant emotions in the dream, will often help determine the direction of its interpretation. Often the Lord appears in various forms, motioning to us, saying, “Catch Me if you can!”


Dreams of Relatives, Alive and Dead

Most likely, these dreams indicate generational issues at work in your life –both blessings and curses. You will need discernment as to whether to accept the blessing or cut off the darkness. This is particularly true if grandparents appear in your dreams, as they will typically indicate generational issues.


Dreams Called Nightmares

Nightmares tend to be more frequent with children and new believers in Christ, just as calling dreams do. They may reveal generational enemies at work that need to be cut off. Stand against the enemies of fear. Call forth the opposite presence of the amazing love of God, which casts out fear, the fear has torment!


Dreams of Snakes

The snake dream is probably one of the most common of all the categories of animal dreams. These dreams reveal the serpent – the devil with his demonic hosts- at work through accusation, lying, attacks, etc. Other common dreams of this nature include dreams of spiders, bears, and even alligators. Spiders and bears are two other major animals that appear in dreams that show fear. The spider in particular, releasing its deadly poison, is often a symbol of witchcraft and the occult.


Dreams of Dogs and Cats

After snakes, the most common animal to appear in dreams is the dog. A dog in your dream usually indicates friendship, loyalty, protection, and good feelings. On the other hand, dog dreams may also reveal the dark side, including growling, attacking, biting, ect. Sometimes these dreams reveal a friend who is about to betray you.


Dreams of Going Through Doors

These dreams generally reveal change that is coming. New ways, new opportunities, and new advancements are on the way. Similar to dreams of doors are dreams including elevators or escalators, which indicate that you are rising higher into your purpose and your calling.


Dreams of Clocks and Watches

Clocks or watches in a dream reveal what time it is in your life, or the need for a wake-up call in the Body of Christ or in a nation. It is time to be alert and watchful.


These dreams may indicate a Scripture verse as well, giving a deeper message. Are you a watchman on the walls? If so, what watch are you on?


Dreams with Scripture Verses

Sometimes you may have a dream in which Bible passages appear, indicating a message from God. This phenomenon may occur in a number of ways: verbal quotes where you are actually hear a voice quoting a passage, digital clock-type readouts, and dramatizations of a scene from a Bible, just to name a few. Quite often these are watchmen-type dreams, dreams of instructions filled with ways of wisdom.... DreamPedia

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: Physical abuse can give rise to nightmares and other terror dreams, further depleting our resources due to both broken sleep patterns and the over stimulation of the fright, fight, flight response.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dreamers Dictionary

Being plagued by anxiety is often a sign that you arc dealing with mistakes you’ve made. Feelings of guilt and lack of confidence are most often the reasons for nightmares.

The dream may also indicate fear of chaos and problems—sometimes also a far-reaching change in your life. Being hunted by terrible images: you are harboring secret worries, or people you consider dangerous are the cause of the anxiety.

If you frequendy dream about being fearful and anxious: courage and being more assertive will make it easier to overcome hurdles. Making others fearful: a difficult situation or disappointment ahead. Sometimes anxietv-filled dreams are a sign of physical symptoms, like heart problems. Frequent anxiety dreams would suggest that you make an appointment with your physician for a check up.

For women in particular, nightmares are often a sign of physical problems.

The circulatory system may also be reacting to a heavy meal, too much smoking, too much alcohol.... Dreamers Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

J.A. Hadfield, in his book Dreams and Nightmares (Pelican 1954), puts forward what he calls a biological theory of dreams. He says the function of dreams is that, by reproducing difficult or unsolved situations or experi­ences, the dream aids a solving or resolution of the problems. He gives the example of a man climbing a cliff who slips fractionally. He then may dream of actually falling and waking terrified. Subsequently the dream recurs, but in each he tries out a different behaviour, such as clasping for a branch, until he manages to act appropriately to avert the disaster. He sums up by saying dreams stand in the place of experience. They make us relive areas of anxious or difficult experience. They thus help problem solving. But they not only look back at past behaviour, they act just like thinking in considering future plans and needs. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Christian Dream Symbols

A black cat can symbolize evil or bad luck for many non-Christians and is a common dream symbol in many nightmares... Christian Dream Symbols

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Jung, Hadfield and several other dream researchers believe the dream process is linked with homoeostasis or self regulation (see Man and His Sym­bols, Jung; Dreams and Nightmares, Hadfield; Mind and Move­ment, Crisp). This means that the process underlying dream production helps keep psychological balance, just as homoeostasis keeps body functions balanced. Put bluntly, dreams are said to compensate for conscious attitudes and personality traits. So the coldly intellectual man would have dreams expressive of feelings and the irrational, as pan of a compensatory process; the ascetic might dream of sensuous pleasures; and the lonely unloved child dreams of affection and comfon. Although dreams can be seen as self regulatory, this narrower view of compensation is only seen in a few dreams. See computers and dreams; sleep movements; sci­ence and dreams; sleep walking. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Below are described simple techniques which make it possible to gain information quickly from dreams. They have been put as a series of questions.

What is the background to the dream? The most imponant aspects of your everyday life may have influenced the dream or feature in it. Briefly consider any aspects of your life which connect with what appears in the dream. Example: ‘1 have a plane to catch. I get to the plane but the suitcase is never big enough for my clothing which I have left behind. I am always anxious about stuff left behind. I wake still with the feeling of anxiety’ (Jane). When asked, Jane said plane flights had been a big feature of her life. She had moved home often, travelling to different pans of the world, leaving friends and loved ones behind.

What is the main action in the dream? There is often an over­all activity such as walking, looking, worrying, building some­thing, or trying to escape. Define what it is and consider if it is expressive of something you are doing in waking life. Activi­ties such as walking or building a house need to be seen as generalisations; walking can simply represent taking a direc­tion in life. When you have defined the action, look for fur­ther information under the other headings in this book, such as swimming or sitting.

What is your role in the dream? Are you a friend, lover, sol­dier, dictator, watcher or participant in the dream? Consider this in relationship with your everyday life, especially in con­nection with how the dream presents it. Where possible, look for the entry on the role in this book. See dreamer.

Are you active or passive in the dream? By passive is meant not taking the leading role, being only an observer, being directed by other people and events, If you are passive, consider if you live in a similar attitude in your life. See active/passive.

What do you feel in the dream? Define what is felt emotionally and physically. In the physical sense are you tired, cold, re­laxed or hungry? In the emotional sense do you feel sad, angry, lost, tender or frightened anywhere in the dream? This helps clarify what feeling area the dream is dealing with. It is important also to define whether the feelings in the dream were satisfyingly expressed or whether held back.

If held back they need fuller expression. See emotions and mood.

Is there a because’ factor in the dream? In many dreams something happens, fails to happen, or appears . . . be­cause! For instance, trapped in a room you find a door to escape through. All is dark beyond and you do not go through the door ‘because’ you are frightened of the dark. In this case the ‘because’ factor is fear.

The dream also suggests you are trapped in an unsatisfying life through fear of opportunity or the unknown.

Am I meeting the things I fear in my dream? Because a dream is an entirely inward thing, we create it completely out of our own internal feelings, images, creativity, habits and insights. So even the monsters of our dream are a pan of ourself.

If we run from them it is only aspects of ourself we are avoiding. Through defining what feelings occur in the dream you may be able to clarify what it is you are avoiding. See nightmares; dream as spiritual guide.

What does the dream mean? We alone create the dream while asleep. Therefore, by looking at each symbol or aspect of the dream, we can discover from what feelings, thoughts or expe­rience, what drive or what insight we have created the drama of the dream. In a playful relaxed way, express whatever you think, feel, remember or fantasise when you hold each symbol in mind. Say or write it all, even the seemingly trivial or dan­gerous’ bits. It helps to act the pan of each thing if you can; for instance as a house you might describe yourself as ‘a bit old, but with open doors for family and friends to come in and out. I feel solid and dependable, but I sense there is something hidden in my cellar’. Such statements portray one­self graphically. Consider whatever information you gather as descriptive of your waking life. Try to summarise it, as this will aid the gaining of insight.

Try amplifying your dream You will need the help of one or two friends to use this method.

The basis is to take the role of each part of the dream, as described above. This may seem strange at first, but persist. Supposing your name is Julia and you dreamt you were carrying an umbrella, but failed to use it even though it was raining, you would talk in the first person present—I am an umbrella. Julia is carrying me but for some reason doesn’t use me.’ Having finished saying what you could about yourself, your friend(s) then ask you questions about yourself as the dream figure or object. These questions need to be simple and directly about the dream symbol. So they could ask Are you an old umbrella?’ Does Julia know she is canying you?’ ‘What is your function as an umbrella? ‘Are you big enough to shelter Julia and someone else?’ And so on.

The aim of the questions is to draw out information about the symbol being explored.

If it is a known person or object you are in the role of—your father for instance—the replies to the questions need to be answered from the point of view of what happened in the dream, rather than as in real life. Listen to what you are saying about yourself as the dream symbol, and when your questioneKs) has finished, review your statements to see if you can see how they refer to your life and yourself.

If you are asking the questions, even if you have ideas regarding the dream, do not attempt to interpret. Put your ideas into simple questions the dreamer can respond to. Maintain a sense of curiosity and attempt to understand, to make the dream plain in an everyday language sense. Lead the dreamer towards seeing what the dream means through the questions. When you have exhausted your questions ask the dreamer to summarise what they have gathered from their replies. See postures, movements and body language for an example of how to work with body movement to explore a dream meaning.

Can / alter the dream to find greater satisfaction? Imagine yourself in the dream and continue it as a fantasy or day­dream. Alter the dream in any way that satisfies. Experiment with it, play with it, until you find a fuller sense of self expres­sion. It is very imponant to note whether any anger or hostil­ity is in the dream but not fully expressed.

If so, let yourself imagine a full expression of the anger. It may be that as this is practised more anger is openly expressed in subsequent dreams. This is healthy, allowing such feelings to be vented and redirected into satisfying ways, individually and socially. In doing this do not ignore any feelings of resistance, pleasure or anxiety. Satisfaction occurs only as we leam to acknowl­edge and integrate resistances and anxieties into what we ex­press. This is a very important step. It gradually changes those of our habits which trap us in lack of satisfaction, poor cre­ativity or inability to resolve problems.

Summary To summarise effectively gather the essence of what you have said about each symbol and the dream as a whole and express it in everyday language. Imagine you are explaining to someone who knows nothing about yourself or the dream. Bnng the dream out of its symbols into everyday comments about yourself.

A man dreamt about a grey, dull office. When he looked at what he said about the office he realised he was talking about the grey, unimaginative world he grew up in after the Second World War, and how it shaped him.

Further information on using these techniques can be found in Tony Crisp s work The Instant Dream Book, published by C.W. Daniel. See amplification; plot of dream; adventure of the dream world; dreamer; postures, movement and body language; settings; symbols and dreaming; word analysis of dreams; wordplay and puns. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

If you are experiencing great fear in your dreams, you are having nightmares. These types of dreams are positive because your unconscious mind is trying to tell you something.

If you have repressed issues, they may be coming to the surface. Think about the fear in your dreams and try to be honest with yourself. Face your fears and as a great American president once said “There is nothing to fear, but fear itself.” Having fearful dreams seems to be relatively common. Most dreams are unpleasant and that is the nature of our private unconscious. Issues and concerns, repressed emotions, and daily stress all contribute to an uneasy sleep and to fear filled dreams.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Little Giant Encyclopedia

We are confronted with many different fears in dreams, but they always refer to obstacles that are a mirror of our everyday—often unconscious—fears and insecurities. Nightmares often have physical causes; we have eaten too much, smoked too much, drunk too much alcohol. Often it is fear of illness (hypochondria), that needs to be overcome. It is important to determine what made you become frightened.

Usually, this is about literal fear, or about undoing a mistake. On the other hand, such a dream might also suggest letting go of unnecessary fears. Fear can escalate into nightmares, showing the way to personal development. Fear is also connected to being too narrow, and is usually a sign that the dreamer is in search of a more broad, liberated alternative to his or her present lifestyle.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

Little Giant Encyclopedia

Overdramatization or fleeing from a problematic situation. Looking for clarification in difficult situations. Flying and Falling appear in Abyss, Elevator, and Trap, usually in nightmares; or as in: Brook, Leaf, and in part Parachute, during very pleasurable liberation dreams. In case of teenagers: often a sign that too much is being asked of them and that they are being pressured to succeed. These dreams are often like being intoxicated, having a sense of being elevated, and a lightness: like being in love. Many ancient myths show the connection between flying and sexuality, and while flying today has become a commonplace activity, the old interpretations are still true (see Fear of Flying by Erica Jong). Now modern symbolic interpretations of flying include the image of worldliness, expansive ideas, and communications. Flying is also seen as a symbol of creative ideas. This image may also be a warning not to become too aloof and removed from reality through fantasizing.

The dream may also be a challenge for either being too earthbound or taking flight into a greater dimension.

In Egypt, dreams of flying were interpreted as fleeing from difficulties. In ancient Greece and Rome, dreams of flying were seen as passionate love.

According to Freud, they were dreams of sexual desire and erection (Freud dealt with this extensively). He saw dreams of flying exclusively as desire for sex. Some modern dream experts interpret flying dreams exclusively as a desire to get away from problematic sit- uations, or to cross one’s own boundaries. Some researchers believe that in our dreams we go back to preborn states, make contact with the state of birds, and realize our innate ability to fly. Another contemporary dream researcher, Jack Maguire, believes that most dreams about flying are just a sign that we want to recuperate and refresh ourselves.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: When we are having to defend our own corner, our way of working, or our own beliefs, a violent reaction can lead to dreams of lynching. Such dreams are less likely in this day and age, but could be classed as nightmares when we are under extreme pressure.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dreamers Dictionary

Vision: Dreaming about mysterious, frightening creatures, or monsters: you have been shaken to the depths of your soul.

Hidden emotions deep in vour unconscious are raking shape, troubling you. Sometimes the reason for nightmares is actual physical stress. Did the creatures resemble real animals? See Animals.... Dreamers Dictionary

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- To be conscious of the navel, whether our own or another’s, is to be aware of the wav in which we connect our inner-self with the rest of the outside world. It is the way in which the baby in the womb first becomes aware of its physicality. In dreams we often need to be aware of our bodily image, which will help indicate the way we sec ourselves, which in turn enables us to work out the way wc lit in to the everyday world.

2- The navel in a dream can signify our dependency on others, particularly our mother.

The navel is our emotional centre, and also, as adults, initially the scat of our power. Often in nightmares we become conscious of something, perhaps a Devil sitting on our navel, and this can be a personification of our own fears.

3- The navel or solar plexus Is spiritually the point of connection between the spiritual and the physical.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Psychological / emotional perspective: The navel in a dream can signify our dependency on others, particularly our mother. Often in nightmares we become conscious of something, perhaps a devil or demon sitting on our navel, and this can be a personification of our own fears.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

If you have nightmares, try to understand the fears and the events in those dreams. They suggest that you might be holding on to be traumatic or guilt based conflicts. You may have a lot of powerful negative feelings that require reconciliation.

If nightmares continue for an extended period of time, the individual should consider obtaining professional counseling services. Nightmares are a direct result of overwhelming feelings of fear and helplessness, or a result of an unprocessed traumatic experience.

A nightmare is any dream that wakes you up because of its frightening and overwhelming images.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

Nightmares suggest that you are holding on to very strong conflicts, which may be traumatic or guilt based. You may have a lot of powerful negative feelings which need to be reconciled.... Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Feeling trapped by one’s mother, dependence upon mother, one’s own possessiveness. Hadfield, in Dreams and Nightmares, says that a baby often seizes upon its mother’s breast with this feeling.

The octopus can also symbolise any unconscious fear which may drag us into its realm of irra­tional terror. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Little Giant Encyclopedia

In alchemy this image is part of the process of blackening and a symbol of total unconsciousness, of decay.

A frequent symbol in nightmares.

The decay usually points to your own characteristics that have died and that you either need to let go of or revive. Fear of illness. Challenge to be more self-critical and more self-confident... Little Giant Encyclopedia

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

If we keep a record of our dreams it will soon become obvious that some of our dream themes, charac­ters or places recur again and again. These recurrences are of various types.

A cenain theme may have begun in childhood and continued throughout our life—either without change, or as a gradually changing series of dreams. It might be that the feature which recurs is a setting, perhaps a house we visit again and again, but the details differ. Sometimes a senes of such dreams begin after or dunng a particular event or phase of our life, such as puberty or marriage.

Example: ‘This dream has recurred over 30 years. There is a railway station, remote in a rural area, a central waiting room with platform going round all sides. On the platform mill hundreds of people, all men I think. They are all ragged, thin, dirty and unshaven. I know I am among them. I looked up at the mountainside and there is a guard watching us. He is cruel looking, oriental, in green fatigues. On his peaked cap is a red star. He carries a machine gun. Then I looked at the men around me and I realise they are all me. Each one has my face. I am looking at myself. Then I feel fear and terror (Anon.).

The theme of the dream can incorporate anxious emotions, such as the above example, or any aspect of experi­ence. One woman, an epileptic, reports a dream which is the same in every detail and occurs every night. In general such dreams recur because there are ways the dreamer habitually responds to their internal or external world. Because their attitude or response is unchanging, the dream which reflects it remains the same. It is noticeable in those who explore their dreams using such techniques as described under dream pro­cessing that recurring themes disappear or change because the attitudes or habitual anxieties which gave rise to them have been met or transformed.

A recurring environment in a dream where the other fac­tors change is not the same. We use the same words over and over in speech, yet each sentence may be different.

The envi­ronment or character represents a particular aspect of oneself, but the different events which surround it show it in the changing process of our psychological growth. Where there is no such change, as in the examples above, it suggests an area of our mental emotional self is stuck in a habitual feeling state or response.

Some recurring dreams can be ‘stopped’ by simply receiv­ing information about them. One woman dreamt the same dream from childhood. She was walking past railings in the town she lived in as a child. She always woke in dread and perspiration from this dream. At 40 she told her sister about it.

The response was ‘Oh, that’s simple. Don’t you remember that when you were about four we were walking past those railings and we were set on by a bunch of boys. Then I said to them, ‘Don’t hurt us, our mother’s dead!” They left us alone, but you should have seen the look on your face.’ After realis­ing the dread was connected with the loss of her mother, the dream never recurred. Another woman who repeatedly dreamt of being in a tight and frightening place, found the dream never returned after she had connected it to being in the womb.

Recurring dreams, such as that of the railings, suggest that pan of the process underlying dreams is a self regulatory (homocostatic) one.

The dream process tries to present trou­blesome emotions or situations to the conscious mind of the dreamer to resolve the trauma or difficulty underlying the dream.

An obvious example of this is seen in the recurring nightmare of a young woman who felt a piece of cloth touch her face, and repeatedly woke her family with her screams. Her brother, tiring of this, one night woke her from her screams and made her talk about her feelings. His persistence gradually revealed that she associated the cloth with the burial shroud of her grandmother. This brought to the surface grief and feelings about death she had never allowed herself to feel before.

The nightmare never returned. See nightmares; dream processing. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Exuberance; flowing life energy; strong and easy motiva­tion, Running away; avoiding one’s own emotions or sexual­ity; not meeting problems in a way that will resolve them; anxiety about what you are running from; feelings of guilt. Running to: anxiety; responsibility and self-giving; sometimes running towards danger. Running as if made of lead: held back by one’s own hesitations. Example: There followed a nightmare of running along streets, round corners, knowing I was being followed and trying to get away. Then I met a friend who was also running away. She took me down a nar­row street full of down and outs and prostitutes’ (Pauline B).

Idioms: run for one’s money; run of the house; out of the running; on the run; run along; run down; run for it; run out of steam; run out on someone; run up against, run wild. See second example in emotions, mood; Am / meeting things I fear? in dream processing; nightmares; chased. See also lu­cidity. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Meanings of Versatile

A spiritual threat is one that forces us to reassess our beliefs. Most often it will contain options of action that lead to a degree of inevitability either way. Once on that particular path we have no choice but to continue. In dreams the image of a divided path or road will often occur at this time, or of going up or down. You might also like to consult the entry for path as well as the information on archetypes, anxiety dreams and nightmares in the introduction.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Spiritual torture can be a conflict between right and wrong and spiritual torment is the mental agony, which ensues when we must make choices between two or more courses of action. Often the idea of such torture for the benefit of the majority – that is, the greater good is part of the process of growth. Spiritual teasing is the sort of irritation engendered by the imp. You might also like to consult the entries for imp, sadism and victim as well as the information on nightmares in the introduction.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘After our first baby was born I had such nightmares my doctor gave me a tranquilliser to take before going to sleep. I have taken one at bedtime for 36 years! I am too afraid not to take it. But I still have dreams’ (Margaret S-W). Although this is not a dream about being trapped, Mar­garet is trapped by fears which she never faces. Such fears can stay with us a lifetime, so it is much more economical and satisfying to meet the difficulties they represent. In a dream, Margaret’s fears might be represented by a trapped dream, such as the next example.

Example: I am trapped in a small brick room with no way out. I shout for someone to help me. Then either a huge bird or creature with arms tries to catch me and I scream myself awake’ (Karen S). Karen had lived through a divorce, an un­happy love affair, the loss of a baby. In the dream the figure who comes after she has called for help might save her, but her fears make her reject it. Perhaps Karen’s feelings about men paint them as monsters. Whatever her past males may have been like, with such feelings it is Karen herself who is the prisoner and suffers loneliness. Trapped dreams can also depict feelings we have about work, about lack of opportunity, and so on. It must be remembered that the dream puts into images one’s own feelings about the situation, not the external thing itself. See imprisoned; cage; cell; wolj under animal; escape; holding. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Strangest Dream Explanations

Venting dreams represent your subconscious mind’s attempt to assist you with the process of cleaning out the old in order to make room for the new. You may be playing out a a frightening or anxiety provoking scenario in order to come to terms with how you would handle it, or to conquer it. Venting dreams usually occur as nightmares or frightmares, anxiety dreams that leave you feeling shaken up. Venting dreams are showing you what we are ready to release. See Types of Dreams (Introduction).... Strangest Dream Explanations

Strangest Dream Explanations

Nightmares about weapons of mass destruction represent that you are venting out your fear of death, destruction, ego-obliteration and grand scale annihilation. See War and Venting Dreams.... Strangest Dream Explanations

About Dream Interpretation

Recurrent dream themes often start at a young age, but can begin at any time, and persist for the rest of one’s life.

The theme of missing an exam, to take one example, commonly begins during college years, when the stress of performing well may be more intense than ever before. However, this theme may then carry forward as a recurring dream for many years, even as one moves on to a career.

The “missing the exam” dream may reappear the night before an important job interview or an evaluation at work.

The circumstances may change, but the same feelings of stress, and the desire to perform well, can trigger the relevant recurrent dream. Theorists suggest that these themes may be considered “scripts” (Spoormaker, 2008) or perhaps “complexes” (Freud 1950); as soon as your dream touches any aspect of the theme, the full script unfolds in completion. Dream theorists generally agree that recurring dreams are connected to unresolved problems in the life of the dreamer. In a previous post I discussed the idea that dreams often portray a Central Image, a powerful dream image that contextualizes a certain emotion or conflict for the dreamer.

The Tidal Wave dream is an example of a Central Image that represents overwhelming emotions such as helplessness and fear.

The Tidal Wave dream is a common dream to experience following trauma or abuse, and often becomes a recurrent theme that reflects a person’s struggling with integrating and accepting the trauma. Resolution of this theme over time is a good sign that the trauma has been confronted and adaptively integrated in the psyche. Empirical research has also supported findings that resolution of a recurrent dream is associated with improved well-being (Zadra, 1996). This is one way that keeping track of your dreams can be extremely informative and helpful in a therapeutic, or even self-help, process.


Many people have the same or a similar dream many times, over either a short period of time or their lifetime. Recurring dreams usually mean there is something in your life you’ve not acknowledged that is causing stress of some sort.

The dream repeats because you have not corrected the problem. Another theory is that people who experience recurring dreams have some sort of trauma in their past they are trying to deal with. In this case, the dreams tend to lessen with time. Nightmares are dreams that are so distressing they usually wake us up, at least partially. Nightmares can occur at any age but are seen in children with the most frequency. Nightmares usually cause strong feelings of fear, sadness or anxiety. Their causes are varied. Some medications cause nightmares (or cause them if you discontinue the medication abruptly). Traumatic events also cause nightmares. Treatment for recurring nightmares usually starts with interpreting what is going on in the dream and comparing that with what is happening in the person’s life. Then, the person undergoes counseling to address the problems that are presumably causing the nightmare. Some sleep centers offer nightmare therapy and counseling. Another method of treating nightmares is through lucid dreaming. Through lucid dreaming, the dreamer can confront his or her attacker and, in some cases, end the nightmares.... About Dream Interpretation

Little Giant Encyclopedia

The male wolf is universally accepted as an image of Man, with reckless aggression and problems in sexual restraint. Considered a cunning, malicious predator, the concept of the wolf implies greed and hunger and, in that sense, physical urges and dissatisfaction. See Greed.

The wolf often symbolizes the shadow of male sexuality. Be glad to have had such a strong dream. You are powerful; you do not need to kill the wolf, hut you can dance with him.

In Steppenwolfy by Herman Hesse, the wolf becomes a symbol for the lonely seeker (and sufferer). Here it is not so much a reference to the meanness of the wolf, but rather the lonely search for the meaning of life.

In Christianity, the wolf is compared to the false prophet and heretic.

According to Jung, the wolf is wilder than the Lion and the Dog. Between 1910 and 1914, Sigmund Freud treated a patient who later would become famous as the “Wolfman.” As a small child this patient suffered from terrifying dreams about wolves, which was the reason why Freud gave him this name.

The earliest memories this man had about his nightmares involved six or seven White wolves that were sitting in a hazelnut tree in front of his window, and he was sure they had come to devour him. Freud here makes reference to two fairy tales: “Little Red Riding Hood” and “The Wolf and the Seven Little Goats.” In addition, Freud sees the wolf as a father substitute. As a young boy, the patient had observed his parents having intercourse from behind, and according to Freud, the patient transferred his repressed desire for sexual gratification by his father to a fear of wolves.

The female wolf symbolizes the nurturing power of nature, like Romulus and Remus, who were both nursed by a wolf. This is also the essence of the fairy tale “Little Red Riding Hood,” where the wolf is not only devouring Grandmother but he is Grandmother—the great mother symbol of wild nature.... Little Giant Encyclopedia