novel

Vision: Reading a novel: you have too many illusions and a rather poor sense of reality. Get more actively involved in real life.

Depth Psychology: Who is telling you stories—or who are you telling them to? See Book, Learning, Writing.

See Library.

The title and content are important.

Folklore: Danger in matters of business.

All printed matter is unfortunate in your dreams. Be careful of your business affairs and speculations.

1. A need or desire for control in life, sometimes over specific situations or relationships.

2. Difficulties in the offing.

3. A good omen regarding social activities.

also see Book and Reading

1- Strictly; a novel represents a different way of looking at things.

If we are aware in dreams of reading such a book, we need to ascertain what kind of a novel it is.

The storyline may have relevance in our lives at that particular moment.

For instance, a historical novel might suggest we need to explore the past, whereas a romantic novel would suggest the need to look at relationships.

1- Novel also means new, and psychologically we are often searching for stimulation. In dreams, therefore, there can be a play on words to indicate that we should be looking for some new way of dealing with our lives.

2- New spiritual learning can often be explained in terms of a story or a myth.



Novel | The Dream Meanings

Keywords of this dream: Novel

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Novel

1- Our search for knowledge and the ability to learn from other people’s experience and opinions, is symbolised in dreams by books and libraries.

To dream of old books represents inherited wisdom and spiritual awareness.

To dream of account books indicates the need or ability to look after our own resources.

2- Intellectually we are searching in our dreams for ways which will help us to handle what happens in our lives.

3- A book, particularly a sacred one such as the Bible or Koran, signifies hidden or sacrcd knowledge. Dreaming of one can represent our need to look into the realms of sacred knowledge or reassurance that we are going in the right direction.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

About Dream Interpretation

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‘one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm’), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‘research workers on dreams’, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‘Les savants ne sont pas curieux’, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‘interpretation of dreams’ is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

About Dream Interpretation

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems

I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‰_÷one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm‰_ª), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‰_÷research workers on dreams‰_ª, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‰_÷Les savants ne sont pas curieux‰_ª, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‰_÷interpretation of dreams‰_ª is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: I dreamt I was a prisoner with many others. Myself and other men were outside the prison work­ing. Then a tremendous explosion blew a hole in the prison wall. I knew prisoners were trying to escape. I saw some wardens and shouted or signalled to the prisoners to be care- fiiT (Terry D). Terry worked as a therapist without scholastic qualification. Terry represents his attitudes to authority as the prison, and sees more of his work potential escaping those attitudes.

Example: ‘1 often dreamed I was being chased by boys or men. I would suddenly take off like a helicopter and fly away. Sometimes narrowly escaping from my pursuer’ (MC). As in the example, we often use escape’ in a dream to avoid diffi­cult feelings. This is like reading an exciting novel because it distracts our attention from problems in our marriage.

The problems remain. Something escaping from us: a realisation, emotion or opportunity eluding awareness. See enclosed.

ESP in dreams Many dreams appear to extend perception in different ways. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Mystic Dream Book

A visit to a place of amusement of a novel kind, or to see something which is quite new to you, is indicated.... Mystic Dream Book

New American Dream Dictionary

To those who understand the novel, the desire to engage in an adulterous affair. ... New American Dream Dictionary

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- Dreaming of something which is new suggests a new beginning, a new way of looking at or dealing with situations, or perhaps even a new relationship. Thus, new shoes might suggest either a different way forward or a way of connecting with the earth.

A new hat might suggest a novel intellectual approach, whereas new spectacles indicate a lresh way of seeing things.

2- To be doing something new in a dream highlights the potential in a fresh learning situation. We are stimulated and excited initially. When we move into a new situation in real life our dreams can highlight our lcars and difficulties. We may often dream of possible scenarios where we are not functioning as well as we should, or of actions we might take to enhance our performance.

3- The new; within the spiritual, is information which comes to us at the right time to enable us to progress. What Is new to us may not actually be new but has impact because we have not previously known it.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: Dreaming of something that is new suggests a new beginning, a new way of looking at or dealing with situations, or perhaps even a new relationship. Thus, new shoes might suggest either a different way forward or a way of connecting with the earth.

A new hat might suggest a novel intellectual approach, whereas new spectacles indicate a fresh way of seeing things.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Book and Novel

1- Reading a book in a dream suggests that we are seeking information. Reading a letter signifies receiving news. Reading a list e.g. a shopping list indicates a need to give some order to our lives. Reading a Bible or other holy book is attempting to understand a belief system.

2- Until recently, the only way to record events was to write them down. Reading is an activity which assists us in recalling things from memory our own, or joint, memories.

To be aware that we are reading a novel is to begin to understand our own need for fantasy.

A psychic reading often works with manv basic dream images.

To dream of having such a reading suggests a need to understand ourselves on a deeper level.

3- Reading, or being in a library; appears in dreams as a form of spiritual realisation.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Psychological / emotional perspective: Until comparatively recently, the only way to record events was to write them down. Reading is an activity that assists us in recalling things from memory – our own or joint memories.

To be aware that we are reading a novel is to begin to understand our own need for fantasy.

A psychic reading often works with the symbolism of many basic dream images.

To dream of having such a reading suggests a need to understand ourselves on a deeper level.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

of the universe dreams Writers commonly quote the experience of William James who, while under anaesthetic, dreamt he found the secret of the universe. What he was left with was the doggerel ‘Higamus Hogumus women are mo­nogamous—Hogumus Higamus, men are polygamous’ The conclusion is that dreams cannot be truly revelatory. While it may be true to say that some such dreams contain little which adds to the dreamer’s understanding, some dreams give in­sights which profoundly alter the dreamer’s future attitudes or actions.

Revelatory dreams are more common to men than women. This may be because more men concern themselves with questions of what the universe is.

If the dreamer creates a mental or emotional tension in themselves through the inten­sity with which they pursue such questions—and we need to accept that often such intensity anses out of anxiety regarding death and one’s identity—then the self-regulatory process of dreaming might well produce an apparent revelation to ease the tension. On the opposite tack, research into mental func­tioning during dreaming, or in a dreamlike state as in research using LSD, shows that there is an enormously increased abil­ity to access associated ideas, allow feeling responses and achieve novel viewpoints. Freud pointed out that dreams have access to greater memory resources and associated ideas. P H. Stafford and B.H. Golightly, in their book dealing with LSD as an aid to problem solving, say that this dreamlike state en­ables subjects to ‘form and keep in mind a much broader picture . . . imagine what is needed—for the problem—or not possible . . . diminish fear of making mistakes*. One subject says ‘1 had almost total recall of a course I did in thermodynamics; something I had not given any thought to in years.’

Although humans have such power to scan enormous blocks of information or experience, look at it from new an­gles, sift it with particular questions in mind and so discover new connections in old information, there are problems, oth­erwise we would all be doing it.

The nature of dream con­sciousness, and the faculties described, is fundamentally dif­ferent to waking awareness, which limits, edits, looks for specifics, avoids views conflicting with its accepted norm, and uses verbalisation.

A nonverbal, symbolic scan of massive in­formation is largely lost when translated to waking conscious­ness.

My experience is that the content of revelatory dreams is almost wholly lost on waking.

If the individual explores the dream while awake, however, and dares to take consciousness into the realm of the dream, then the enormous waves of emotional impact, the massive collection of details, the per­sonality changing influence of major new insights, can be met.

The reason most of us do not touch this creative process is in fact the same reason most of us do not attempt other daring activities—it takes guts. See creativity and problem solving in dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

My Dream Interpretation

To dream of a snow snovel, or about you/somebody else shoveling snow, suggests that you are seeking your self-identity. You are on a quest for a new understanding of your waking life and true self. Alternatively, this dream can occur when you are trying too hard in find the truth to a problem.... My Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Words are themselves symbols of objects, ideas, or feelings. Whether we look at mathematical equations, a film, a novel, or a business logo, each involves the use of symbols. When we look at a thermometer we lose sight of it as a real object, and see it as temperature. Through­out our everyday life we use things symbolically without no­ticing.

A name on the label of goods may depict quality to us.

A face can represent love or brutality. In the struggle towards human awareness, and its increasingly subtle use of symbols such as language to think and express with, there must have been stages of development. This is a side of ‘history’ seldom given attention, yet very important. Perhaps our dream think­ing’ is using an earlier form of using symbols, one which might have been more an everyday event prior to language.

Even though we exist as an individual integrated with today’s world, our earlier levels of thinking still exist. Uncon­sciously we still see the thermometer as temperature; the car as status, independence or ease in getting to work; inside our house as an expression of ourself—if we didn’t we would not take pains to make it nice for guests. Through these uncon­scious feeling connections or symbolic views we have of things, dreams create their store of images and scenes. Pro­cessing a dream is an attempt to discover what values we ourself unconsciously place upon the people, animals, objects and situations around us. See unconscious. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Jot down; Scribble; Writing) Writing in a dream signifies a trick, a gimmick or a conspiracy.

A writer in a dream represents a cunning and a fraudulent person.

If one’s handwriting looks illegible, or inelegant in the dream, it means that he will repent for dishonesty and from defrauding people. Writing on a scroll or on a legal pad in a dream means that one may receive an inheritance. Writing in a notebook in a dream means dodging, or repudiation. Writing a novel or a book in a dream means receiving unlawful money, or it could mean falling sick.

If one sees himself writing a book or a letter and finishes it in his dream, it means that he will complete a project and fulfill his goals.

If he fails to complete his book or his letter in the dream, it means that something will hamper, or stand in the way of completing his project. Writing with the left hand in a dream means indulging in loathsome actions, going astray, or perhaps having a son who is born from adultery, or it could mean that one may become a poet. Signing a deed, a check or a legal contract in a dream means failing to fulfill an agreement.

If one sees someone he knows drafting a contract between them in a dream, it means that the other person will defraud him, mislead him in a business deal and drive him astray.

If one finds himself illiterate and incapable of writing in a dream, it means that he is depressed, though God Almighty will show him a way out of his difficulties.

If an illiterate person sees himself trying to learn how to write and read in a dream, it means that he will benefit from something he feared for a long time, or it could mean that he will go through hard times.

If a learned person finds himself incapable of writing anything in a dream, it means depression, fear, toiling and obstruction of his business. (Also see Book; Letter; Paper; Sign)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

Dream Explanations of Astro Center

Dreams of writing letters can mean the need to get in touch with people whom you haven’t spoken with in awhile.

Dreams of writing novels, plays or stories indicate that there is a creative streak in you that needs an outlet. Many great authors have received inspiration from their dreams.

To dream of writing and not knowing what you’re writing is a warning that you may be inadvertently communicating messages to others that they are misinterpreting in an insulting way.... Dream Explanations of Astro Center