one-thousand

God’s ultimate perfection



One Thousand | The Dream Meanings

Keywords of this dream: One Thousand

DreamPedia

Partial excerpt from “Dream Language” by Jim & Michal Ann Goll Various ministries and organizations have logged literally thousands of dreams and therefore have been able to decipher the most common dreams that people have.

The following is not a comprehensive list and they are not listed in any particular order, but they are 20 of the most common dreams that people experience.


Dreams of Your House

This one would easily rank in the top five most common dreams. The house normally represents your life, and the circumstances taking place in the house reflect the specific activities in your life. These dreams may also reflect the church as well.

Individual rooms of the house may represent specific things. For instance, if the bedroom appears, the dream may have something to do with issues of intimacy.

The bathroom may represent a need for cleansing. The family room may be a clue that God wants to work on family relationships and so on.


Dreams of Going to School

These dreams often center on taking of tests. The tests may be for the purpose of promotion. Or you might find yourself searching for your next class-an indication that guidance is needed or a graduation has just occurred. You might be repeating a class you took before, possibly meaning that you have an opportunity to learn from past failures. High School dreams may be a sign that you are enrolled in the School of the Holy Spirit (H.S. = High School = Holy Spirit). There are limitless possibilities.

These are just a few examples. Interesting enough, the Teacher is always silent when giving a test!


Dreams of Various Vehicles

These may indicate the calling you have on your life, the vehicle of purpose that will carry you from one point to another. Cars, planes, buses, etc., may be symbols of the type or even the size of the ministry you are or will be engaged in. That’s why there are different kinds of vehicles. Note the color of the vehicle. If it is a car, what is the make and model? Observe who is driving it. Are you driving or is someone else driving? If someone else is driving, who is it? Do you know the person? Is it a person from your past? If the driver is faceless, this may refer to a person who will appear sometime in your future or that the Holy Spirit Himself is your driving guide.


Dreams Concerning Storms

Storm dreams tend to be intercessory, spiritual warfare-type dreams. They are particularly common for people who have a calling or gift in the area of discerning of spirits. These dreams often hint of things that are on the horizon –both dark, negative storms of demonic attack for the purpose of prayer, intercession, and spiritual warfare, as well as showers of blessing that are imminent. What kind of storm is it? Are there tornadoes involved? What color are they. Tornadoes can indicate change that is coming good or bad. Also tornadoes can indicate great destruction.


Dreams of Flying or Soaring

Flying dreams deal with your spiritual capacity to rise above problems and difficulties and to soar into the heavenlies. These are some of the most inspirational and encouraging in tone of all dreams. When awakening from a dram where you fly or soar, you often wake up feeling exhilarated –even inebriated- in the Spirit.

Ascending-type dreams are more unusual yet edifying. Remember, we are seated with Christ Jesus in heavenly places far above all principalities and powers.


Dreams of Being Naked or Exposed

These dreams indicate that you will be or are becoming transparent and vulnerable.

Depending on your particular situation, this may be exhilarating or fearful and could reveal feelings of shame. Note: these dreams are not meant to produce embarrassment but rather draw you into greater intimacy with the Lord and indicate places where greater transparency is required. These types of dreams often appear during times of transition where you are being dismantled in order to be re-mantled.


Dreams of Condition of Your Teeth

Often, these dreams reveal the need for wisdom. Are your teeth loose, rotten, falling out, or are they bright and shiny? Do you have a good bite? Are you able to chew your cud? Teeth represent wisdom, and often teeth appear to loose in a dream.

What does that mean? It may mean that you need a wisdom application for something you are about to bit off. The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom.


Dreams of Past Relationships

This kind of dream may indicate that you are being tempted to fall back into old patterns and ways of thinking. Depending upon who the person is in the dream, and what this person represents to you, these dreams might also be an indication of your need to renew your former desires and godly passions for good things in life.

Seeing a person from your past does not usually mean that you will literally renew your old relationship with that individual. Look more for what that person represents in your life – for good or bad. A person who was bad in your life may represent God’s warning to you not to relapse into old habits and mind-sets that were not profitable. On the other hand, a person who was good in your life may represent God’s desire or intention to restore good times that you thought were gone.


Dreams of Dying

These dreams are not normally about the person seen in the dream in a literal sense, but are symbolic about something that is passing away or departing from your life. The type of death may be important to note. Watch, though, to see if resurrection is on the other side.


Dreams of Birth

Normally these dreams are not about an actual childbirth but rather about new seasons of purpose and destiny coming forth into your life. If a name is given to the child, pay close attention because that usually indicates that a new season in the purposes of God is being birthed. There are, of course, exceptions to this where an actual pregnancy and birth is going to take place.


Dreams of Taking a Shower

These are cleansing-type dreams (toilets, showers, bathtubs, etc) revealing things that are in the process of being flushed out of your life, cleansed and flushed away. These are good dreams by the way. Enjoy the showers of God’s love and mercy and get cleansed from the dirt of the world and its ways. Apply the blood of Jesus and get ready for a new day!


Dreams of Falling

These dreams may reveal a fear you have of losing control of some area of your life or, on the positive side, that you are actually becoming free of directing your own life.

What a substance you fall into in the dream is a major key to proper understanding. The outstanding primary emotions in these dreams will indicate which way to interpret them. Falling can be fearful, but it can also represent falling into the ocean of God’s love.


Dreams of Chasing and Being Chased

Chasing dreams often reveal enemies that are at work, coming against your life and purpose. On the opposite side, they may indicate the passionate pursuit of God in your life, and you towards Him. Are you being chased? By whom? What emotions do you feel? Are you afraid of being caught? Or maybe you are the one doing the chasing. Who are you chasing? Why? Again, what emotions do you feel during the chase? The answers to these questions and, particularly, the dominant emotions in the dream, will often help determine the direction of its interpretation. Often the Lord appears in various forms, motioning to us, saying, “Catch Me if you can!”


Dreams of Relatives, Alive and Dead

Most likely, these dreams indicate generational issues at work in your life –both blessings and curses. You will need discernment as to whether to accept the blessing or cut off the darkness. This is particularly true if grandparents appear in your dreams, as they will typically indicate generational issues.


Dreams Called Nightmares

Nightmares tend to be more frequent with children and new believers in Christ, just as calling dreams do. They may reveal generational enemies at work that need to be cut off. Stand against the enemies of fear. Call forth the opposite presence of the amazing love of God, which casts out fear, the fear has torment!


Dreams of Snakes

The snake dream is probably one of the most common of all the categories of animal dreams. These dreams reveal the serpent – the devil with his demonic hosts- at work through accusation, lying, attacks, etc. Other common dreams of this nature include dreams of spiders, bears, and even alligators. Spiders and bears are two other major animals that appear in dreams that show fear. The spider in particular, releasing its deadly poison, is often a symbol of witchcraft and the occult.


Dreams of Dogs and Cats

After snakes, the most common animal to appear in dreams is the dog. A dog in your dream usually indicates friendship, loyalty, protection, and good feelings. On the other hand, dog dreams may also reveal the dark side, including growling, attacking, biting, ect. Sometimes these dreams reveal a friend who is about to betray you.


Dreams of Going Through Doors

These dreams generally reveal change that is coming. New ways, new opportunities, and new advancements are on the way. Similar to dreams of doors are dreams including elevators or escalators, which indicate that you are rising higher into your purpose and your calling.


Dreams of Clocks and Watches

Clocks or watches in a dream reveal what time it is in your life, or the need for a wake-up call in the Body of Christ or in a nation. It is time to be alert and watchful.


These dreams may indicate a Scripture verse as well, giving a deeper message. Are you a watchman on the walls? If so, what watch are you on?


Dreams with Scripture Verses

Sometimes you may have a dream in which Bible passages appear, indicating a message from God. This phenomenon may occur in a number of ways: verbal quotes where you are actually hear a voice quoting a passage, digital clock-type readouts, and dramatizations of a scene from a Bible, just to name a few. Quite often these are watchmen-type dreams, dreams of instructions filled with ways of wisdom.... DreamPedia

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Over thousands of years numbers have taken on a mystical and magical quality, which has helped man to understand his world and eventually led to scientific discovery. Numbers and mathematics have a great deal of significance within spiritual development and thus anything which represents counting or classification bears careful interpretation.

An abacus, which allows you to learn about numbers and such concepts as addition, subtraction, multiplication and division, is today more of a child’s toy than a scientific instrument. Though basic, it often suggests keeping some kind of a tally.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

DreamPedia

This site is designed to make sense of dream symbols and make the most of our dreams.

The Dream Interpretation Dictionary: Symbols, Signs and Meanings brings a deep and rich understanding to a variety of images, signs, and symbols.

You can have an idea about what your dreams mean benefiting from this dream dictionary that we have gathered up with expressions of From fifty different sources. For this, you should determine the objects you saw clear in your dream and you should look at their interpretation by one bye.


With our site learning more about dreams and dream interpretation, you will come to recognize the different types of dreams and be able to understand what is causing them without ascribing the wrong meaning to them.

dreampedia.org, it brings profound insights to thousands of dream messages. It shows what to look for and what to ignore and teaches how to master dream interpretation.


Dreams sometimes want to show us the right way.

The job of our website is to help us find the right way our dreams try to tell us.

By listening to the wisdom of your dreams, you can increase the satisfaction and success you experience in your waking life.

... DreamPedia

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Money; Sun-dried bricks) Seeing blocks of adobes in a dream signify money. Each adobe represents a denomination often, thousand or one hundred thousand units of money, depending on the type of work one does in wakefulness. Ifadobes are used for construction in a dream, then they mean good work, good deeds or they could represent a religious person.

An adobe in a dream also represents a servant. Building a house with adobes in a dream means unity and love between the father and his children.

If an adobe falls to the ground in a dream, it means the death of a sick person or disunity in the family or dispersal of one’s children. Manufacturing adobes in a dream means increase in the number of one’s workers or employees. Each adobe represents a worker. Building a house with adobes in a dream also means leadership.

A pile of adobes in a dream means a pile of money. (Also see Adobe maker; Bricks)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Loaf; Knowledge; Life; Longevity; Money; Mother; Nanny; Needs; Prosperity; Religion; A strong person.) When bread is made from bleached flour in a dream, it means blessed earnings and a comfortable life. When it is made with unbleached flour in a dream, it means disturbances in one’s life. It is said that each loafof bread represents forty years of one’s life. Each loafofbread also may represent money in denominations of tens, hundreds or thousands, all relative to the financial standing of the person in the dream, or the type of work he performs. Whole wheat bread, barley bread or sweet bread made with honey or sugar in a dream means rising prices. Eating bread with its crusts in a dream is like eating honey with its beeswax. Oven fresh bread when eaten in one’s dream is best. Bread in a dream represents woman’s chastity. Bread made with bleached flour means living a clean life, having pure knowledge, or a beautiful wife.

If a student sees himself distributing bread among poor people in a dream, it means that he will attain his goals and succeed in his studies.

If he is a preacher, it means that people are accepting his admonitions and advice. Otherwise, ifhe sees people crowding over him to get their bread in the dream, it means that people will seek what he has to offer. In that case, his position is better than theirs, for the giving hand is better than the receiving one.

If one sees a deceased person offering him a piece of bread in a dream, it means that he will receive unexpected money from an unsolicited source. Ifone sees bread hanging in the skies, over the roofs or hanging down from trees in a dream, it means rising prices and the same interpretation applies for all commodities.

If he sees bread scattered on the ground and people walking over it in a dream, it means prosperity in that land which leads to vanity.

A good looking loaf of bread represents one’s good religious stand, otherwise it means the opposite. Bakingbread in a dream means working for one’s livelihood. Seeing squandered loaves of bread and not eating from them in the dream means meeting with brothers one has not seen for a long time. Having a loaf of bread baked with coarsely grounded grains in the dream means living a comfortable life, though with insignificant religious attendance.

If it is a loaf of barley bread in the dream, it means a strenuous life, though well managed. Corn bread, chick peas bread or millet bread means tight financial conditions and rising prices.

If one is given a piece of dried bread in a dream, it indicates the near end of his life.

A loaf of bread in a dream means marriage for an unwed person, and for a craftsman, it means progress in his trade. As for a ruler or ajudge, a well baked loafof bread in a dream represents hisjustice. Small loaves of bread in a dream represent a short life, while large loaves mean longevity. Eating a hot loaf of bread means hypocrisy, because the effect of the oven’s heat is still in it. Eating bread without a meal means a sickness or dying alone. Eating from a loaf of bread which is halfbaked in a dream means that one may suffer from high fever.

If a poor person eats sweet bread or a cake in a dream, it means sickness or loss of what he maybe expecting to receive. Eating the thin variety of rock baked bread in a dream means increase in one’s earnings.

A thin loaf of bread in a dream also could mean a short life. Holding two loaves of bread in a dream means marrying two sisters, one after the other. Eating simultaneously from two loaves of bread, one in each hand in a dream also means a marriage to two sisters. Eating pretzels in a dream means adopting a good health diet. Stale bread in a dream means inexpensive or shoddy prices. Dough in a dream means debts or loans.

A flying loaf of bread with two wings means high prices. Eating a flat loaf of bread, or a loaf of pita bread in a dream means easy living or prosperity. Eating a bun in a dream denotes a decent financial stability. In a dream, a loaf of bread also represents little money or little earnings, or a small wage. (Also see Dough)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

The Fabric of Dream

A dream of prosperity (Gypsy) ; “cattle over a thousand hills/’ we read as the symbol of success in the Old Testament.

A sexual dream, declares Freud.... The Fabric of Dream

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Because of the ease with which computers can file, son, cross reference and present informa­tion, a great deal of work has been done in analysing the content of thousands of dreams (The Content Analysis oj Dreams, Hall and Van De Castle). As computers are an every­day pan of many homes, we can easily use them to gain insight into our own dreams. Two areas of help are as follows.

We can enter many dreams, then with a program such as Seeker or Masterfile, easily scan through them to see the fre­quency of dream themes. This approach to dreams—self in­sight through a series of dreams—is explained by Hall in The Meaning of Dreams. Important issues in our life and develop­ment occur as frequent dream themes, and are easily seen using a computer.

The program Brainstonn (Brainstorm Software Ltd) makes cross referencing dream symbols and associated comments easy. Using this program, if one dreamt of a tree and wrote one s associations, then six months later dreamt of a tree and entered this, the program instantly reminds you of the past reference to tree and can display it. Gradually a reference base of your own dreams and comments can be built up and quickly scanned. Such comparisons help to form a personality profile of yourself or others. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Add; Calculate; Enumerate; Number) Counting apples in a dream means counting money. Counting up to the number one hundred, five thousand or twenty thousand in a dream signifies victory against one’s enemy. Counting up to the number seven or eight means distress or pressures. Counting up to the number nine in a dream means adversities and joining the company of corrupt and evil people. Counting up to the number ten in a dream means completing a project, or it could mean attending the pilgrimage in Mecca. Counting up to the number forty in a dream means anticipating the fulfillment of a promise. Counting up to the number thirty in a dream means promising someone the impossible or telling a lie.

The number one in a dream signifies uniqueness, superiority, having the leading edge in knowledge, money, prosperity, marriage, child, or it could mean languor, solitude or liking to be alone or cessation of activities.

The number one in a dream also represents the truth or God Almighty Who has no partner, associate or equal.

The number two means help against one’s enemy.

The number three signifies fulfillment of a promise.

The number four means a pilgrimage to Mecca.

The number five means doubt and weakness of one’s faith. Perhaps the number six also means victory against one’s enemy or establishing a proof of guilt against one’s adversaries. Counting up to number seven or eight in a dream has negative connotations. Counting up to number ten in a dream could mean atonement for one’s sins. Ifone sees himself in a dream counting money coins that has the name of God inscribed on it in a dream, it means that he celebrates God’s praises and glorifies His Name. Ifone sees himself in a dream counting large denomination of money that has the Name of God Almighty written on it, it means acquiring knowledge. Ifthe money coins or the banknotes are designed with images or portray the picture of known people in the dream, then theymean engaging in innovation, religious innovation, falsehood or polytheism. Counting pearls in a dream means reading the Qur’an. Counting gems in a dream means learning wisdom or acquiring knowledge at the hand of a gnostic. Counting beads in a dream means getting involved in people’s business, using obscene language, or fornication. Counting sheep in a dream means counting money or counting one’s children. Counting cows in a dream means longevity or going through a long and difficult times.

If a farmer sees himself counting camels in a dream, it means rain and a good harvest. Counting buffaloes in a dream means hardships and toiling in one’s life. (Also see Money)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Few dreams are, by themselves, problem solving or creative.

The few excep­tions are usually very clear. Example: ‘My mother-in-law died of cancer. I had watched the whole progression of her illness, and was very upset by her death. Shortly after she died the relatives gathered and began to sort through her belongings to share them out. That was the climax of my upset and distress, and I didn’t want any part of this sorting and taking her things. That night I dreamt I was in a room with all the relatives. They were sorting her things, and I felt my waking distress. Then my mother-in-law came into the room. She was very real and seemed happy. She said for me not to be upset as she didn’t at all mind her relatives taking her things. When I woke from the dream all the anxiety and upset had disap­peared. It never returned (told to author dunng a talk given to the Housewives Register in Ilfracombe).

Although in any collection of dreams such clearcut prob­lem solving is fairly rare, nevertheless the basic function in dreams appears to be problem solving.

The proof of this lies in research done in dream withdrawal. As explained in the entry science, sleep and dreams, subjects are woken up as they begin to dream, therefore denying them dreams. This quickly leads to disorientation and breakdown of normal functioning, showing that a lot of problem solving occurs in dreams, even though it may not be as obvious as in the exam­ple. This feature of dreaming can be enhanced to a marked degree by processing dreams and arriving at insights into the information they contain. This enables old problems to be cleared up and new information and attitudes to be brought into use more quickly. Through such active work one be­comes aware of the self, which Carl Jung describes as a cen­tre, but which we might think of as a synthesis of all our experience and being. Gaining insight and allowing the self entrance into our waking affairs, as M L. Von Franz says in Man and His Symbols, gradually produces a wider and more mature personality’ which emerges, and by degrees becomes effective and even visible to others’.

The function of dreams may well be described as an effort on the part of our life process to support, augment and help mature waking consciousness.

A study of dreams suggests that the creative forces which are behind the growth of our body are also inextricably connected with psychological develop­ment. In fact, when the process of physical growth stops, the psychological growth continues.

If this is thwarted in any way, it leads to frustration, physical tension and psychosomatic and eventually physical illness.

The integration of experience.

which dreams are always attempting, if successful cannot help but lead to personal growth. But it is often frozen by the individual avoiding the growing pains’, or the discomfon of breaking through old concepts and beliefs.

Where there is any attempt on the pan of our conscious personality to co-operate with this, the creative aspect of dreaming emerges. In fact anything we are deeply involved in, challenged by or attempting, we will dream about in a creative way. Not only have communities like the American Indians used dreams in this manner—to find better hunting, solve community problems, find a sense of personal life direction— but scientists, writers, designers and thousands of lay people have found very real information in dreams After all, through dreams we have personal use of the greatest computer ever produced in the history of the world—the human brain.

1- In Genesis 41, the story of Pharaoh’s dream is told—the seven fat cows and the seven thin cows. This dream was creative in that, with Joseph’s interpretation, it resolved a national problem where famine followed years of plenty. It may very well be an example of gathered information on the history of Egypt being in the mind of Pharaoh, and the dream putting it together in a problem solving way. See dream process as computer.

2- William Blake dreamt his dead brother showed him a new way of engraving copper. Blake used the method success­fully.

3- Otto Leowi dreamt of how to prove that nervous impulses were chemical rather than electncal. This led to his Nobel prize.

4- Friedrich Kekule tned for years to define the structure of benzene. He dreamt of a snake with its tail in its mouth, and woke to realise this explained the molecular forma­tion of the benzene ring. He was so impressed he urged colleagues, ‘Gentlemen, leam to dream.’

5- Hilprecht had an amazing dream of the connection be­tween two pieces of agate which enabled him to translate an ancient Babylonian inscription.

6- Elias Howe faced the problem of how to produce an effec­tive sewing machine.

The major difficulty was the needle. He dreamt of natives shaking spears with holes in their points. This led to the invention of the Singer sewing ma­chine.

7- Robert Louis Stevenson claims to have dreamt the plot of many of his stories.

8- Albert Einstein said that during adolescence he dreamt he was riding a sledge. It went faster and faster until it reached the speed of light.

The stars began to change into amazing patterns and colours, dazzling and beautiful. His meditation on that dream throughout the years led to the theory of relativity.

To approach our dreams in order to discover their creativity, first decide what problematic or creative aspect of your life needs ‘dream power’. Define what you have already leamt or know about the problem. Write it down, and from this clarify what it is you want more insight into.

If this breaks down into several issues, choose one at a time. Think about the issue and pursue it as much as you can while awake. Read about it, ask people’s opinions, gather information. This is all data for the dream process.

If the question still needs further insight, be­fore going to sleep imagine you are putting the question to your internal store of wisdom, computer, power centre, or whatever image feels right.

For some people an old being who is neither exclusively man nor woman is a working image.

In the morning note down whatever dream you remember. It does not matter if the dream does not appear to deal with the question; Elias Howe’s native spears were an outlandish image, but nevertheless contained the information he needed. Investigate the dream using the techniques given in the entry dream processing. Some problems take time to define, so use the process until there is a resolution.

If it is a major problem, it may take a year or so; after all, some resolutions need re­structuring of the personality, because the problem cannot disappear while we still have the same attitudes and fears. See secret of the universe dreams; dream processing. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

vu Many dreamers say they find a connection between a place they dream of—especially a house—and a place they later see while awake. Most of these descriptions appear to be attempts to find connections obvious to no one but the dreamer.

A strong desire to have the inner world connect with the real world seems to be the motivation. This may be through a need for human life to have meaning and connec­tion with a wider, invisible, life.

The evidence of thousands of dreams suggests that searching for meaning in this direction is misplaced. Meaning arises from a love or acceptance of the many aspects of oneself, and thus the expansion of awareness into what was unconscious. While there may be valid cases of dcjd vu, they are rare. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

About Dream Interpretation

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‘one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm’), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‘research workers on dreams’, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‘Les savants ne sont pas curieux’, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‘interpretation of dreams’ is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

About Dream Interpretation

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems

I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‰_÷one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm‰_ª), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‰_÷research workers on dreams‰_ª, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‰_÷Les savants ne sont pas curieux‰_ª, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‰_÷interpretation of dreams‰_ª is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

DreamPedia

Entries are organized alphabetically, so readers can browse through common subjects or objects in dreams. The material from thousands of dreams gathered during of this essential dream dictionary, alphabetically, providing instant access to a wealth of fascinating prepared of information.
  • Uncover the mysteries of the mind with the help of the most entertaining, colorful, and comprehensive Dream Dictionary ever.
  • Christian Dreams, China interpretation of dreams, India interpretation of dreams andåÊ islamic Dreams entries. Also, Psychological / emotional perspective, Material aspects and Gives gender - specific, interpreted of dream.
... DreamPedia

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The brain is not a computer, but it has the power to compute.

The word computare is Latin, and comes from putare, to think. Neither is a computer any­thing like a human brain. But there are parallels. Christopher Evans, a psychologist, computer scientist and world authority on microprocessors, says the brain and computers are both information handling devices, taking impulses which in them­selves mean nothing, like sound waves, and processing them. It is also his theory that both computers and the waking-brain function are taken off-line to re-program. Our behaviour re­sponses and information bases need bringing up to date with any new experience and information that is relevant. In the case of the computer, off-line means having modifications made to programs, in the human it means sleeping and dreaming, the dream being the powerful activity of review, sifting and reprogramming. Thirdly, the brain and computer use programs. In humans, a program means a learnt set of responses, values or activities, such as walking or talking, but including more subtle activities such as judging social or busi­ness situations.

If, as Christopher Evans believes, dreaming is partly a pe­riod of revising and updating responses, insights and skills, then by working with the process one can make it more effi­cient.

The background for this statement is that many people have recurring dreams which change very little. Looking at this from the programming’ view, the attempt to revise is thwarted. But individuals can free such ‘stuck’ dreams by us­ing dream processing.

Also, as some dreams are obviously a synthesis of experi­ence and information gathered over a lifetime, the dream pro­cess is much more than a computing function which sorts new information and updates. It is also capable of creative leaps through synthesis and conjecture. J.B. Priestley’s dream of the birds (see religion and dreams) appears to be a mas­sive synthesis of things observed over a lifetime. It also depicts a brain function like computer simulation, which takes infor­mation and forms it into an expenmental view of possibilities arising from the thousands of millions of separate bits of gath­ered data. See ESP in dreams; creative and problem solving dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

DreamPedia

Dream Interpretation & an A to Z dictionary of symbols and their meanings helps you make sense of your dreams and harness them to increase your creativity, solve problems, find life purpose, and obtain accurate personal guidance. A to Z Dream Dictionary and Dream Interpretation will help you become an expert dream interpreter.
Dream symbolism communicates more accurately than a thousand words when the dreamer understands what the chosen dream symbols mean. One symbol can represent different ideas, concepts and things to every individual. Their divine secrets will release your concealed potential so that you can design the destiny you have always longed for. With in-depth, classic meanings and an empowering technique for personalized interpretation, our site is the most complete and balanced guide to understanding your dreams. As omens or insights, as alarms or a memory, for years people have been interpreting their dreams in different way, with whatever comforts them, but now we have science. Researchers have spent time in comprehending, studying, understanding them, for all dreams don’t really say the same story. It becomes fascinating and complicated when people from diff a rent cultural background, societies, past, present, living standards, problems, mental illness report same dreams. Features an alphabetized list of over 42.000 dream symbols and meaning with classic. This dictionary of Christian Dreams, China interpretation of dreams, India interpretation of dreams contains over 24700 indexed entries and this dictionary of islamic Dreams contains over 5300 indexed entries. Also, Psychological / emotional perspective, Material aspects and Gives gender – specific, interpret of dream. Dreamfairy.org the complete dream dictionary is the only interpretation site based on concrete data about real people's dreams and how the real events in their lives relate to their nighttime visions.
  • You will be able to interpret the hidden messages revealed to you in your sleep.
  • See how to use dreams to solve problems and explore past lives and look into the future.
  • Extraordinary color illustrations conjure up the mystical images of your dreams.
  • A dream that takes place on an island may indicate a need for personal space.
  • A dream of rabbits running in green grass is a good omen.
  • A ship in dock or on a calm sea may promise happiness in love. By deciphering the language of your dreams, you can achieve greater spiritual awareness and lasting happiness.

Understand the meaning of dreams. Great dictionary of dream interpretation. Dreams Interpreted, the most compelling and thorough study of all the symbols that appear in our dreams. By reading the dictionary definitions, you'll be gin to understand symbology in a much deeper way. You’ll learn how to synchronize your body, emotions, mind, and soul to experience the full meaning of your dreams and, in some cases, make them your reality.

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The things we take for granted which act as the sup­portive background to our life and activities, such as parental love, our own reality as a person, social order, the thousands of things which constitute reality’ for us. Also the ground we stand on’; attitudes and relationships we have taken for granted; everyday life; the past. Soft earth, fields: mother, the fundamental processes of life out of which we have our being and which continually nurture us. Under, swallowed by the earth: the unconscious habits, drives and psychobiologicai processes which existed before our emergence as a conscious self, and in which we might lose self in death. Idioms: down to earth; go to earth; like nothing on earth. See also uncon­scious. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

From our family we leam most of the positive and negative patterns of relationship and attitudes towards living, which we carry into daily events. Father’s uncertainty in deal­ing with people, or his anxiety in meeting change, may be the roots of our own difficulties in those areas.

If our mother is unable to develop a feeling contact with us, we may lack the confidence to meet our emotions.

Our maturation as a man or woman calls us in some way to meet and integrate our childhood desire, which includes sexual desire for our parent of the opposite sex, and rivalry with, mingled with dependence on, the parent of the same sex. Even a missing parent, the mother or father who died or left, is a potent figure internally.

An absence of a father’s or mother’s love or presence can be as traumatic as any power­fully injuring event. Our parents in our dreams are the image (full of power and feeling) of the formative forces and experi­ences of our identity. They are the ground, the soil, the bloody carnage, out of which our sense of self emerged. But our iden­tity cannot gain any real independence while still dominated by these internal forces of our creation. Heraclitus said we cannot swim in the same river twice; attempting to repeat or compete with the vinues of a parent is a misapprehension of the true nature of our own personality. Sec individuation.

Family group: The whole background of experience which makes up our values and views. This background is made up of thousands of different obvious and subtle things such as social status; amount of books in the home; how parents feel about themselves; how they relate to life outside the family; whether dominant roles are encouraged; what nationality par­ents are; what unconscious social attitudes surround the fam­ily (i.e. the master and servant, or dominating employer and subservient employee, roles which typified England at the turn of the century still colour many attitudes in the UK). Simply put, it is our internal ‘family’ of urges and values; the overall feeling tone of our family life—security, domination, whatever it was, the unconscious coping patterns of the fam­ily.

Parents together in dream: our general wisdom, back­ground of information and experience from which we make important decisions or gain intuitive insights. Parents also de­pict the rules and often irrational disciplinary codes we learnt as a child which still speak to us from within, and perhaps pass on to our own children without reassessment. These in­clude everything from ‘Don’t speak with your mouth full’ to the unspoken Masturbation is unholy/

Dead parent in dream: the beginning of independence from parent; repression of the emotions they engendered in us, our emotions regarding our parent’s death; feelings about death. See dead people dreams.

Example: ‘My father was giving me and another woman some medicine. Something was being forced on us. I started to hit and punch him in the genitals and, when he was facing the other way, in the backside. I seemed to be just the right height to do this and I had a very angry feeling that I wanted to hurt him as he had hurt me’ (Audrey V). Hurting, burying , killing parent: in the example Audrey’s height shows her as a child. She is releasing anger about the attitudes and situations her father forced down her throat’.

To be free of the intro­verted restraints and ready made values gathered from our parents, at some time in our growth we may kill or bury them. Although some people arc shocked by such dreams, they are healthy signs of emerging independence. Old myths of killing the chief so the tribe can have a new leader depict this pro­cess. When father or mother are dead’ in our dream, we can inherit all the power gained from whatever was positive in the relationship. Seeing parent drunk, incapable, foolish: another means of gaining independence from internalised values or stultifying drives to ‘honour’ or admire father or mother.

father

Generally positive: authority; ability in the external world; family or social conventions, how we relate to the ‘doer’ in us; physical strength and protectiveness; the will to be. Generally negative: introvened aggression; dominance by fear of other people’s authority, uncaring sexual drive; feelings of not being loved. See father under archetypes; man.

mother

Generally positive: feelings; ability in relationships; uniting spirit of family; how we relate to feelings in a relation­ship; strength to give of self and nunure; intuition. Generally negative: will based on irrational likes and dislikes; opinion generated by anxiety or jealousy; domination by emotions; lack of bonding. See Great Mother under archetypes; woman.

siblings and children

Whether brother, sister, daughter or son (see below in this entry), the most general use in our dreams is to depict an aspect of ourself. However it is almost universal to believe with great conviction that our dream is about the person in our dream.

A mother seeing a son die in her dream often goes through great anxiety because there lurks in her a sense of it being a precognitive dream. Vinually everyone at some time dreams about members of their close family dying or being killed—lots of mothers dream this, and their chil­dren live till 80. But occasionally children do die. Is the dream then precognitive, or is it coincidental?

Example: ‘I was walking along a rather dusty track carrying my younger son who would be around 10 months old and I was feeling rather tired. Suddenly I met a man who stopped to talk to me and commented I looked rather weary carrying the baby. He said, come with me and look over this wall and you will see such a sight that will gladden your hean. By standing on tiptoe I could just see over the wall and the sight I beheld took my breath away, it was so beautiful’ (Johan E). Here Johan’s son depicts the weight of responsibility she feels.

The beauty is her own resources of strength in motherhood.

Example: ‘I have just given binh to twins and they lay on the floor. We started to care for them. My mother took them to the doctor for his advice while I went to see my married sister who has two children. I met them there with the twins so that my sister could give her opinion on the babies. She had recent experience of childbirth and could tell us if the babies were good specimens’ (Miss E). Miss E has no children of her own, so she is uncertain of her own capacity to have and raise them.

The mother depicts her own mothering abilities, which seek confidence from an authority figure. Her sister is her own nearest experience of childbirth. So out of what she has leamt from observing her sister, she is assessing her own qualities.

Most often the family member depicts the qualities in our­self which we feel are part of the character of the person dreamt of. So the passionate one in the family would depict our passions; the intellectual one our own mind, the anxious one our hesitations. Use the questions in dream processing to define this. Having done this, can you observe what the dream depicts? For Miss E it would be questions regarding mother­hood.

Example: ‘My daughter told me the only positive part of my work in a helping profession was with a woman who had turned from it to religion. There followed a long and powerful interchange in which I said she had as yet no mind of her own. She was dominated by her mother’s anxiety, and the medical rationalism of her training. When she had dared to step beyond her own anxieties to integrate the lessons of her own life, then I would listen again’ (Desmond S). Desmond was divorced and struggling with his own pain and guilt about leaving his daughter while still a teenager. His daughter de­picts this conflict between his feelings and his rational self.

brother

Oneself, or the denied pan of self, meeting whatever is met in the dream; feelings of kinship; sense of rivalry, feel­ings about a brother. Woman’s dream, younger brother: out­going but vulnerable self; rivalry. Woman’s dream, older brother, authority, one’s capable outgoing self. Man’s dream, younger brother: vulnerable feelings; oneself at that age. Man’s dream, older brother: experience; authority, feelings of persecution. See boy; man. Idioms: big brother, brothers in arms; blood brother.

sister

Feeling self, or the lesser expressed pan of self; rival; feelings about a sister. Man s dream, younger sister: vulnera­ble emotions; rival for love of parents. Man’s dream, older sister: capable feeling self; feelings of persecution. Woman’s dream , younger sister: one’s experiences at that age; vulnera­ble feelings, rival for parents’ love. Woman’s dream, older sister: capable feeling self. See girl; woman. Idioms: sisters under the skin.

daughter

One’s relationship with the daughter, the daughter, or son, can represent what happens in a marnage between husband and wife.

The child is what has arisen from the bonding, however momentary, of two people. In dreams the child therefore is sometimes used to depict how the relation­ship is faring. So a sick daughter might show the feelings in the relationship being ‘ill’.

In a mother’s dream: often feelings of suppon or compan­ionship; feelings of not being alone in the area of emotional bonds; or one’s feeling area; responsibility; the ties of parent­hood; oneself at that age; one’s own urges, difficulties, hurts, which may still be operative. Also a comparison; the mother might see the daughter’s youth, opportunity, and have feelings about that. So the daughter may represent her sense of lost opportunity and youth—even envy, competition in getting the desire of a man.

In a father’s dream: one’s feeling self, the feelings or diffi­culties about the relationship with daughter; the struggles one’s own feeling self goes through to mature, how the sexual feelings are dealt with in a family—occurs especially when she starts courting; sister, parental responsibility; one’s wife when younger. Someone else’s daughter: feelings about one’s own daughter, feelings about younger women.

Example: 1 am standing outside a supermarket with heavy bags wearing my mac, though the sun is warm. My daughter and two friends are playing music and everyone stops to lis­ten. I start to wnte a song for them, but they pack up and go on a bus whilst I am still writing. I am left alone at the bus stop with my heavy burden of shopping, feeling incredibly unwanted’ (Mrs F). Such dreams of the daughter becoming independent can occur as soon as the child starts school, per­sisting until the mother finds a new attitude. See child; woman.

son

Extroverted self; desires connected with self expression; feelings connected with son; parental responsibility. Mother’s dream: one’s ambitions; potential, hopes; your marriage—see example.

Example: ‘My wife and I were walking out in the country­side. I looked around suddenly and saw my four-year-old son near a hole. He fell in and I raced back.

The hole was narrow but very deep. I could see water at the bottom but no sign of my son. I didn’t know whether I could leap down and save him or whether it was too narrow. Then somehow he was out. His heart was just beating’ (Richard H). Richard had argued with his wife in such a way he feared the stability of their marriage.

The son represents what they had created together —a child, a marriage.

The marriage survived, as his dream self-assessed it would. Death of son: a mother often kills off her son in her dreams as she sees him make moves towards independence. This can happen from the first day of school on. Example: T am on a very high bridge over an extremely wide and deep river with steep banks. My son does a double somersault over the railing, falls into the water. I think he is showing off. I am unable to save him. My son is 18 and has staned a structural engineering course at university’ (Joyce H).

The showing-off suggests Joyce feels her son is doing daring things with his life, and the relationship in its old form dies.

Father’s dream: yourself at that age; what qualities you see in your son; your own possibilities, envy of youth and oppor­tunities; nvalry. Someone else’s son: feelings about one’s own son; feelings about younger men. Dead son: see dead people dreams. Sec boy. See also man; first example in falling.

wife

Depicts how you see the relationship with your wife; your relationship with your sexuality; sexual and emotional desire and pleasure; how you relate to intimacy in body, mind and spirit; your feeling, intuitive nature; habits of relationship developed with one’s mother. Example: ‘My wife was trying to get me out of her life, and out of the house. It was as if she were attempting to push me into a feeling of tension and rejection which would make me leave’ (David P). Out of childhood experience, in which his mother repeatedly threat­ened to give him away, David was finding it difficult to com­mit himself emotionally to his wife. In the dream his wife represents these feelings, so he sees her—his anxiety and pain —pushing him to break up the marriage.

Example: I was standing with my wife at the end of the garden of the house I lived in as a child. We were looking over the fence to the rising meadow beyond. She said, “Look at that bird in the tree there.” On our right, in a small ash tree, an enormous owl perched. It was at least 4 feet high, the biggest bird I have ever seen. I recognised it in the dream as a greater hooded owl, which was not native to our country. I was so excited I ran into the house to telephone someone— zoo, police, newspapers?—to tell them about the bird. I can­not remember contacting anyone, but felt the bird was there in some way to meet me. Also it was hungry and looking at next door’s bantams. So I wondered what I could give it to eat’ (David P). This shows the positive side of David’s rela­tionship with his wife.

The garden is the boundanes which arose from his childhood. But he is growing—the garden— and looking beyond them in connection with his marnage.

The amazing bird is the deep feelings he touches because he has a mate, like any other natural creature. Out of his mating he becomes aware of drives to build a home—nest—and give himself to his mate. These are natural and are a pan of his unconscious or spiritual nature.

The bird is a hooded owl which can see in the dark—the unconscious—because David is realising things he had never seen’ before.

The bird is masked, meaning putting the ego aside, which is a necessity for touching the wider dimension of life or the unconscious.

The hunger of the bird shows an intimate detail of what David has learnt from his wife. She had been working as a waitress and bringing home pieces of chicken for him, saved from her own meal.

The spiritual side of David wants to develop this quality of selfgiving, which his wife’s love had helped him see.

Example: ‘1 have been a widower since January 1979, hav­ing married in October 1941. I continually dream I am in London where my business was. I am walking the streets with my wife and suddenly I see her ahead of me in a yellow raincoat and hat. I call her and try to catch up, but suddenly she vanishes. In spite of calling and searching I cannot find her’ (Douglas G). This is a common theme dreamt by widow­ers or widows, disappearance of spouse. Douglas has ‘lost’ his wife. His dream shows the paradox of love after death of panner. His love is still there, years after her death. He is possibly still trying to love his wife as an externally real per­son. so his feelings can make no connection.

To meet what actually remains of his wife, within himself, he would need to face his own internal grieving, emotions, and all the feelings, memories, angers and beauty which make up the living re­mains of his wife within him. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Mystic Dream Book

This omen is a difficult one to judge, as the importance of the dream depends upon the Figures involved, and these again depend upon the circumstances of the dream. As a rough guide, low Figures are fortunate, high Figures are bad, while medium, in-between Figures show difficulties that can be surmounted if you exert yourself. Obviously, high Figures for a girl or for a working-man would only be low Figures for the wealthy individual, or prosperous business man, to whom a few thousands would mean little or nothing.... Mystic Dream Book

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Strength and thought. Hair is highly valued by most cultures. It is symbol of vanity, security, sensuality, sexual appeal, and of youth. In some cultures women are not allowed to show their hair outside their homes. Wealthy men go through painful surgery and spend thousands of dollars to replace lost hair follicles. Needless to say, hair is a valuable dream symbol. It represents physical and spiritual strength. Samson’s hair was the source of his strength and virility. In our dreams hair can represent our thoughts, knowledge, and reasoning. White or gray hair represents age and wisdom while body hair may symbolize protection and warmth. When interpreting this dream make attempts to identify a primary issue and connect it to a situation in your daily life. See also: Beard... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Little Giant Encyclopedia

Physical vitality, love, and courage; but also the organ of suffering.

The heart has been identified as the place where emotions reside for many thousands of years. Are you doing something with your whole heart? In fairy tales and dreams the Wise Women and Wise Men pose this question to a person, animal, or other worldly being in trouble, “Are you coming to me with an open heart?” If the hero or the dream-self reacts with compassion and a good heart, the test has been passed.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The archetype of the hero has fascinated, taught, even ennobled human beings for thousands of years. Appears as Christ, Athena, Krishna, Mohammed, Mary, Ulysses, Su­perman, Florence Nightingale, a great game hunter, Hercules, or any film or TV hero such as Captain Kirk or Dr Who. We are the hero/ine of our own life. We brave great dangers, face monsters, pass through difficult initiations. Fundamental to the whole drama of the hero/ine is the evolution of our own identity from the depths of unconscious in the physical pro­cess of conception, through to developing self awareness as an adult. It is such an incredible journey, so heroic, so impossi­ble of achievement, so fraught with dangers and triumphs, that it is the greatest story in the world.

We find it told over and over symbolically in all the ‘holy’ books as the binh of the holy child; the journey of the hero/ ine; the creation of the world—our consciousness, the jour­neys of Moses. All penain to the difficulties and means we use to be; to the an of keeping balance amidst the multitude of forces acting on our human psyche.

The hero/ine is the one who dares, even though they feel afraid and in pain.

The avoidance of fear and pain in our society, where chemical anodynes or tranquillisers are sought to remove any tiny dis­comfort, is a great tragedy. Not that we need to become mas- ochists, but we miss our own wholeness through fear of our own power of experiencing. In other cultures the ability to meet pain and fear were considered spiritual strengths. They still are.

The following example shows one dreamer meeting his own fear and uncertainty. Example: 4I was in an ancient room. It had the feeling of being an old church. Then my wife and I were in bed in the room.

A middle aged woman was in the room. She was a ghost. I felt afraid of her, but to meet the fear I tried to confront her. I reached out my hand to her. I was crying out in my sleep from fear. As she took my hand I was amazed and shocked to feel it was physically real’ (see Christ within this entry, above). ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Islamic Dream Interpretation

It is related that Ameerul_Mu’mineen, Mansoor, dreamt that he had lost all his teeth. In the morning he called for an interpreter.

The interpreter came and after listening to the dram, said to Mansoor: “All your relatives will die.” Upon this, Mansoor became infuriated, saying : “May Allah lock your mouth! May He never let your interpretation become a reality! Now be gone!”.

The another interpreter was called who fortunately was familiar with courtly protocols. He said: “O Ameerul-Mu’mineen, you will live for a long time. You will be the last to die amongst your relatives”.

Highly delighted with his tactful interpretation, the Ameerul-Mu’mineen laughed, remarking: “both interpretations are the same, but the manner employed by you is more superior and excellent!” He then presented him ten Thousand Dirhams as a gift.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

According to modem theory, the amount of information the human brain can hold is more than is held in all the books in the Library of the British Museum. Gradually it is becoming recognised that informa­tion gathered is not simply what we ‘learn’ from vocal com­munication, or read, or set out to leam. In fact an unimagin­able amount of information gathering has gone on prior to speech, and goes on at an unimaginable speed prior to school years. Consider a small preschool child walking into the gar­den It has learnt gradually to relate to muscular movement, balance and its own motivations and feeling reactions in a way enabling it to walk. It has already grasped thousands of bits of ‘information’ about such things as plants in the garden, the neighbour’s cat, the road outside, possible dangers, safe areas. Stupendous amounts have already been absorbed about interrelationships.

An idea of ‘reality’ in the sense of what is probable, and what would be dangerously out of norm, has been formed. We gather information in ways little recognised. How our parents relate to their environment and to other people is all recorded and leamt from, bringing about enor­mous ‘programming’ affecting how we act in similar circum­stances.

As explained in the entry on the dream as spiritual guide, we have great ability in ‘reading’ symbols, ritual, an, music, body language, architecture, drama, and extracting ‘meaning’ from them. So we have immense stores of information from these sources. Work done with people exploring their dreams over a long period suggests that some of these information resources are never focused on enough to make conscious what we have actually learnt. Sometimes it is enough simply to ask oneself a question to begin to focus some of these resources. Such questions as what social attitude and response to authority did I learn at school? What feeling reaction do I get when I am in the presence of someone I know well? These may help to bring to awareness aspects of information gath­ered but remaining unconscious. These unfocused, or uncon­scious, areas of information can explain why we have appar­ently irrational feeling responses to some people or situations.

the body A lot of what we call the unconscious are basic physiological and psychological functions.

For instance in a modern house, when we flush the toilet, we do not have to bring a bucket of water and fill the cistern again.

A self regu­lating mechanism allows water to flow in and switches it off when full. This is a clever built-in function that had to be done manually at one time. Nowadays we have built into some dwellings fire sprinklers or burglar alarms. Through re­peated actions over thousands or millions of years, many ba­sic functions, or functions only switched on in emergencies, have been built into our being. We do not need to think about them, just as we do not have to give awareness to the fire sprinkling system or toilet each time we walk through a room or flush the toilet. They are therefore unconscious.

Research with animals in connection with rewards and conditioned reflexes has shown that by gradually leading an animal towards a certain performance by rewarding it each time it gets nearer to the goal, it can do the most amazing things. It can increase the circulation of blood to its ear, slow its heart, and in fact influence body functions which were thought to be completely involuntary. Where human beings have learnt to use some of these techniques—such as raising the temperature of an arm at will, or helping to increase the efficiency of the immune system—the actual processes still remain unconscious. In general, however, the body’s func­tions are thought to be outside our awareness, and so are one of the areas of the unconscious. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

DreamPedia

There are thousands of symbols, and it depends upon the context of one's own personal dream as to what they all mean for him / her. Look at it this way...a dream is like a puzzle, and although there are several pieces that are quickly pieced together because they are so obvious, the puzzle isn't complete until all the pieces are placed together bit by bit. Then you have the complete picture...until then, you-ll only have disjointed images that don't add up to anything coherent, and you'll still be confused..

Symbols in dream interpretation are just one piece of the puzzle. Each piece / symbol fits together and makes a complete picture. The entire dream tells the story, not just 1 or 2 symbols picked out of it, and each individual will have different nuances affecting the dream...such as daily influences perhaps integrating into the dream. For example: let's say you saw a movie yesterday about a vicious grizzly bear and it was frighteningly graphic, and then later that night you dreamt about a bear. This would be less meaningful than if you suddenly had a dream about a bear one night, without prior influences. That could be entirely different.

When interpreting dreams, the first thing everyone should consider is the typical universal meaning of the symbol / dream image. For instance, death symbolizes the end of something that's ready for change, and a new beginning. Most people start out highly resistive to changes of any sort, and see any upcoming change in their life as something foreboding and scary. Death dreams are usually about change.

... DreamPedia

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘At about two or three in the morning my wife Brenda and I were suddenly awoken from sleep by a noise. As we lifted our heads to listen we identified it as the handle on our children’s bedroom door being turned.

The house only had two bedrooms, and the children’s room was directly opposite ours. Both of us had had the same thought—”Oh no, it’s the children again.” Much to our annoyance they had been waking in the middle of the night claiming it was morning and time to play. We had tried to suppress it, but here it was again.

As these thoughts went through our minds we heard the sound of feet clomping down the stairs. This was strange as the children usually stayed in their room. Brenda got up, de­termined to get whoever it was back into bed. I heard her switch the light on, go down the stairs, switch the sitting room light on, and I followed her via the sounds of her movement as she looked in the kitchen and even toilet—we didn’t have a bathroom. Then up she came again and opened the children’s door—strange because we had assumed it had been opened. When she came back into our room she looked puzzled and a little scared. “They’re all asleep and in bed ‘ she said. ‘We talked over the mystery for some time, trying to under­stand just how we had heard the door handle rattle then foot­steps going down the stairs, yet the door wasn’t open. Also, the door handles on our doors were too high for the children to reach without standing on a chair. There was a stool in the children’s bedroom they used for that, yet it wasn’t even near the door when Brenda opened it.

Having no answer to the puzzle we stopped talking and settled to wait for sleep again. Suddenly a noise came from the children’s bedroom. It sounded like the stool being dragged and then the door handle turning again but the door not opening. “You go this time” Brenda said, obviously disturbed.

‘I opened our door quickly just in time to see the opposite door handle turn again. Still the door didn’t open. I reached across, turned the handle and slowly opened the door. It stopped as something was blocking it. Just then my daughter Helen’s small face peered around the door—high because she was standing on the stool. Puzzled by what had happened, I was careful what I said to her. “What do you want love?” I asked.

‘Unperturbed she replied, “I want to go to the toilet.” The toilet was downstairs, through the sitting room, and through the kitchen.

‘Now I had a clue so asked, “Did you go downstairs be­fore?”

“Yes,” she said, “but Mummy sent me back to bed.” * (Tony C).

This is an unusual example of an out of body experience (OBE). Mostly they are described from the point of view of the person projecting, and are therefore difficult to corroborate. Here, three people experience the OBE in their own way. From Tony and Brenda’s point of view what happened caused sensory stimuli, but only auditory. Helen’s statement says that she was sure she had physically walked down the stairs and been sent back to bed by her mother. Tony and Brenda felt there was a direct connection between what they were think­ing and feeling—get the children back to bed—and what Helen experienced as an objective reality.

OBEs have been reported in thousands in every culture and in every period of history.

A more general experience of OBE than the above might include a feeling of rushing along a tunnel or release from a tight place prior to the awareness of independence from the body. In this first stage some people experience a sense of physical paralysis which may be fright­ening (see paralysis). Their awareness then seems to become an observing point outside the body, as well as the sense of paralysis. Then there is usually an intense awareness of one­self and surroundings, unlike dreaming or even lucidity. Some projectors feel they are even more vitally aware and rational than during the waking state. Looking back on one’s body may occur here. Once the awareness is independent of the body, the boundaries of time and space as they are known in the body do not exist. One can easily pass through walls, fly, travel to or immediately be in a far distant place, witnessing what may be, or appears to be, physically real there.

Sir Auckland Geddes, an eminent British anatomist, de­scribes his own OBE, which contains many of these features. Example: Becoming suddenly and violently ill with gas­troenteritis he quickly became unable to move or phone for help. As this was occurring he noticed he had an A and a B consciousness.

The A was his normal awareness, and the B was external to his body, watching. From the B self he could see not only his body, but also the house, garden and sur­rounds. He need only think of a friend or place and immedi­ately he was there and was later able to find confirmation for his observations. In looking at his body, he noticed that the brain was only an end organ, like a condensing plate, upon which memory and awareness played.

The mind, he said, was not in the brain, the brain was in the mind, like a radio in the play of signals. He then observed his daughter come in and discover his condition, saw her telephone a doctor friend, and saw him also at the same time.

Many cases of OBE occur near death, where a person has died* of a hean attack for instance, and is later revived. Be­cause of this there are attempts to consider the possibility of survival of death through study of these cases. In fact many people experiencing an OBE have a very different view of death than prior to their experience.

Early attempts to explain OBEs suggested a subtle or astral body, which is a double of our physical and mental self, but able to pass through walls. It was said to be connected to the physical body during an OBE by a silver cord—a son of life­line which kept the physical body alive. This is like the con­cept that the people we dream about are not creations of our own psyche, but real in their own right. Whatever one may believe an OBE to be, it can be observed that many people in this condition have no silver cord, and have no body at all, but are simply a bodiless observer, or are an animal, a geo­metric shape, a colour or sound (see identity and dreams).

The person’s own unconscious concepts of self seem to be the factor which shapes the form of the OBE. If, therefore, one feels sure one must travel to a distant point, then in the OBE one travels.

If one believes one is immediately there by the power of thought, one is there.

If one cannot conceive of existing without a body, then one has a body, and so on.

This approach explains many aspects of the OBE, but there is still not a clear concept of what the relationship with the physical world is.

The many cases of OBE which occur during a near-death experience also suggest it may be connected with a survival response to death; not necessarily as a way of trying to transcend death, but perhaps as a primeval form of warning relatives of death.

If there is survival of death, then the OBE may be an anticipatory form, or a preparatory condition lead­ing to the new form. See hallucinations, hallucinogens. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

In attempting to put together the information gathered from viewing thousands of dreams—not simply at face value, but explored in depth through the emo­tions and direct associations of the dreamer—a philosophy or view of life arises. It suggests that our birth as a physical and psychological being is a paradox. We are unique, and at the same time a common undifferentiated person. Psychologically we have our identity out of the lives of thousands of humans who preceded us and left the gift of language, of music, an, of concepts and information. Our mental life, our consciousness, is in some very real way formed out of what they left from their life. Our consciousness has been hewn out of the rock of possibilities by the love, the struggle and pain, the endeavour and wit of their lives. Particularly our psyche has been shaped by or modelled on our parents, and the traces in their life, unknown though they may be, of their parents, backwards for many generations.

Our identity is given to us by the humans who raise us. This sense of self arises because we are treated as if we were a self. This, with language, is the creative matrix of our self awareness.

The giving of a name is therefore a miracle which acts as a nucleus around which the many mental connections can be made which form our self image. Perhaps this is why giving the name in baptism is seen as a holy rite in Chris­tianity.

Our conscious personality can live without ever becoming aware of its connections with other lives except as it meets them in everyday affairs. That its existence has depended upon what was given by countless other lives—that humans constantly create each other, consciously and unconsciously, through the dynamic flux of communication—might never be realised. That one’s own life is also a part of this creative process, this sea of living consciousness, might never be known. Nevertheless, each individual life constantly takes pan in the collective, negatively or positively. This is not a mystical thing, but is plainly observable. From the point of view of dreams, if our life has given nothing in deed, in love, in rearing of children, in ideas or art, or in common human­ity, we are dead—during life and afterwards. Giving and re­ceiving, kinship and symbiosis, growth and decay are the fun­damentals of the living process according to dreams.

At death, we face a very real end, a real death. There is no magical escape from this. All that we have been, all we have become, all we gathered and won is lost—finished. But the paradox occurs again. Dreams suggest that out of all we gave of ourself, out of all we received from the being of others, we are recreated in a realm of consciousness. This may mean that we continue as living influences in the lives of those who still live. But the suggestion is that something more than this oc­curs. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Language of Dreams

(see Fire, Fables)

Reincarnation, rebirth, and new beginnings. Known by the Egyptians as the bennu, this fire bird renews itself by making a nest in a raging conflagration from which it is born anew.

Longevity. Several ancient texts, including the Talmud, intimate this creature can live as long as one thousand years.... The Language of Dreams

Islamic Dream Interpretation

Eating pomegranate seeds in a dream means earning easy money.

A pomegranate in a dream also represents savings.

If it is ripened and tastes sweet, it represents a beautiful woman, a town, a son, a one thousand dollars, a one hundred dollars, or ten dollars depending on the type of work one performs.

If a pomegranate is eaten unripened in the dream, it represents suspicious money. As for a ruler or a governor, a pomegranate in a dream represents a city. Ifhe brakes one in a dream, it means that he will conquer or rule that city.

The skin of a pomegranate represents the city’s walls, its seeds represent its people and itsjuices represent its resources, industries and wealth. Ifa sick person eats the skin of a pomegranate in a dream, it means that he will recover from his illness.

A pomegranate in a dream also means a coffer, a beehive, or a honeycomb.

If the seeds are white in the dream, they represent little money.

If they are red, then they represent a sizeable profit.

A pomegranate in a dream also denotes fear or a journey.

A fresh looking pomegranate in a dream represents ayoungvirgin.Abroken pomegranate in halfin a dream represents a deflowered girl, a divorcee or a widow.

A rotten or a spoiled pomegranate in a dream represents an unchaste woman.Asour tastingpomegranate in adream represents unlawful money, worries, or disturbances. Ifone sells pomegranates in a dream, it means that he will sell the everlasting reward of the hereafter for the temporary pleasure of this world. Drinkingpomegranatejuice in a dream means spending for one’s livelihood.

A pomegranate tree in a dream represents a pious, respected and a rich man.lfhe is a merchant, his business will always multiply.

The thorns of a pomegranate tree in a dream represent the obstacles that restricts a believer from falling into or committing a wrongdoing. Cutting down a pomegranate tree in a dream means severing one’s blood ties, or neglecting one’s duty toward his family.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of a postcard represent long distance connection, telepathy and a desire to be in touch and in communication with those you love. Consider the picture on the postcard. This picture tells a thousand words.... Strangest Dream Explanations

Little Giant Encyclopedia

A symbol of Venus—love and devotion.

The contradiction of blossom and thorn.

The rose plays the same role in the West that the lotus plays in the Orient. Both blossom, producing many thousands of petals, and represent the highest stage of consciousness.

The rose is often a symbol of the self. As a well-known symbol of love, it points to the dreamer’s feeling of security and suggests that he should be more open to love.

The Greek word rodor for rose came from the ancient Greek word for “flowing,” which may have been coined to convey the flow of fragrance from this flower. But this never-ending flow of fragrance from the rose also shortens its life, causing it to wilt rapidly. Because this magnificently flowering, fragrant blossom wilts so fast, it is also considered a symbol of death.

The rose also points to the world beyond, which is the reason that the Catacombs in Rome are decorated with garlands of roses.

The rose also is the harbinger of death in the Oraclesy and it is reported that a few days before their death, bishops would find a white rose on their chair.

The belief in the death-announcing rose has influenced customs in England and Germany, where people have been reluctant to bring roses to a sick person. And if a rose bush produced a green rose—that is, when the petals turned green—as English folklore had it, a family member would die.

It is not only in England that the rose is connected with death. As far back as ancient Rome, every year a festival of the roses was celebrated where the dead were honored. Graves were decorated with wreaths made from roses.

Since time immemorial, what happens in the presence of the rose is not talked about. In antiquity, when a rose was suspended above the table, the meal was taken “sub rosa,” as it was called then, which means that absolutely nothing from the conversation was repeated after the meal.

The early Christians took up this symbolic tradition: the presence of a rose indicated that silence was to be observed when heathens were among them.

The rose as the symbol for silence continued into the 18th century, when, for instance, wooden roses were carved into the woodwork of the confessional and roses were also included in the stucco of the halls of the court.

The rose, like the lotus, is considered the perfect flower, which is one of the reasons why the Christian Church declared it to be the image of wisdom. This was instrumental in the rose becoming a symbol of Christ. Mary is also depicted as a rose, but a rose without thorns, because in Christian symbolism the thorns of the rose indicate sin, and Mary was free of sin.

The rose has something very mystical about it. Praying the rosary is considered meditation.

The Sufis pray with a drop of rose fragrance dabbed on the area of the “third eye,” because it is said that the rose cleanses and strengthens the spirit. In ancient Greece a wreath of roses was already thought to strengthen the mind.

The Roman Emperor wore a wreath of roses for the same reason. Romans wore wreaths made from roses during decadent outdoor feasts, because they hoped the roses would minimize the effects of too much drinking.

The rose as the image of a clear mind was also known to the alchemists, who connected the rose to the idea of deliverance. In Dante’s Paradiso the small group of saved sinners is pictured in the form of a white rose above which angels circle like bees. That the way to salvation is possible only through love is perhaps the most important lesson of the rose, the flower originally dedicated to Aphrodite, goddess of love. But that the rose also symbolizes flesh and blood is seen in the fact that Dionysus also claimed the rose to be his.

Time and again we hear about a rose bush that never stops blooming; about rose branches in a vase that for 70 years produced white blossoms; and about how the food for the poor that, in the basket of saints, is transformed into roses.

For those interested in the magic of the rose, we might also mention the Pentagram of the Rose.

If you connect the center of each petal with the center of the petal that comes after the next, you will form a pentagram, the foot of the Druids, the old magic figure that Faust wanted to use to overcome Satan.

The Greeks considered the long-lived, five-leaved rose bush, with the imprint of a pentagram, to be the symbol of the cycle of the Cosmos, which, according to Aristotle, is determined by the five elements (fire, water, earth, air, and ether). Also, the Rosicrucians see the rose as a symbol of hidden wisdom, using it as a symbol in their cross.

The color of the rose is also important.

A wilted rose is a sign of a relationship gone bad. According to Jung, the rose is always the symbol for wholeness, representing, in the form of the mandala, a symbol for the order of the world.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Angels; Travel) Soldiers in a dream represent God’s arc angels and the soldiers of mercy, while mercenaries in a dream represent the soldiers of punishment. Ifone sees himself as a soldier eating his meal inside the chambers of a king in a dream, it means that he will control a land without much efforts on his part.

If one’s name is listed as a soldier in a dream, it represents his welfare, satisfaction, or that he will continue his education.

If a bedridden person sees himselfas a soldier in a camp, or that he is discharged from the army in a dream, it means that his illness will end in his death, or it may mean difficulties, distress and losses.

A gathering of soldiers in a dream means destruction of the wrongdoers and victory of the righteous ones.

A soldier carrying a scourge or arrows in a dream also represents good conduct.

A count of one hundred soldiers in a dream represents the chastisement and calamity which God Almighty inflicts upon the people of the earth because of their sins at the conclusion of each century, or at the beginning of a new one. Seeing one thousand soldiers in a dream represents the blessed Night of Power which occurs near the end of the fasting month of Ramadan.

If soldiers are led by a prophet, a king, a wise man, or a man of knowledge in one’s dream, it means victory for the believers.

If one sees an army entering a town in a dream, they could represent rain. (Also see Night of Power)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

As a species, humans have cer­tain norms of behaviour, many of which we share with other animals. We tend to find a partner of the opposite sex and produce children. We care for our children. We have strong feelings about territory. In groups this becomes nationalism and, like ants or some group animals, we fight to defend our territory. We elect leaders, and have complicated rituals re­garding group status or personal ‘face*. We seek outward signs of our status, and wherever possible show them.

Talking to individuals, these drives are often hardly recog­nised. Yet they are powerful enough when manipulated to gather huge armies of people who then march to their death. They are behind enormous hostility between neighbours and nations. Although irrational, and not in our best interest to be influenced by, millions of us are moved by them as if we had little will of our own.

The feelings behind them, although seldom acknowledged directly by our conscious self, are often raised to religious status.

The procreative drive, the election of leaders, the parental and child raising urges, are all to be seen in the Christian religion as the bones behind the robes and rituals. Why does Catholicism ban the condom and divorce, make a giant figure out of the Pope, worship a woman with a baby in her arms, if it is not based on these mighty urges and biological drives?

Dreams reveal that much of human life arises out of these patterns.

The patterns are in us unconsciously. We often ven­erate the norm’ of these patterns and raise them, religiously or politically, to a level of tremendous importance.

The prob­lem is that many of these patterns are no longer serving us well. They are habits developed through thousands or mil­lions of years of repetition. While they remain unconscious we find it difficult to redirect them or even admit to their influence in our life.

Thereare, of course, many other aspects of the uncon­scious, such as memories of childhood trauma, the dream process, the image formation process and sensory apparatus. It is enough to begin with if we recognise that a lot of ourself and our potential remains unknown to us because it remains unconscious, or a pan of our unconscious processes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Sometimes a monster emerging out of the depths of the subconscious, Squid may appear as a frightening reminder of something that could be clinging to you. But in actuality it may appear to ask you to see what monstrous beliefs, patterns, or feelings lie twenty thousand leagues below that may be tormenting you.

A creature that holds his own ink like a fountain pen, Squid may come to deliver the message to write a book.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Islamic Dream Interpretation

this incident is related to a group of people living on the Island of Saqliyyah . It is narrated that their king was bent on annihilating the Muslims.

For this, he prepared a powerful navy comprising of thousands of soldiers. At this point he saw a dream in which he saw himself mounted on an elephant while drums were beaten and trumpets were blown before him. When he awoke he summoned some of his clergymen and asked them to interpret the dream. They gave him the glad tiding of victory. He demanded proof from them for their interpretation.

The said that the elephant is the most powerful animal on land and mounting such a powerful animal means becoming the master of power and strength. And the beating of drums and blowings of trumpets are signs of happiness, ecstasy and victory. Also drums are only beaten in the presence of asking if there is some reason for happiness.

When the king heard this, he became both surprised and delighted. He then summoned some Jewish ulama and asked them for their interpretation. They also interpdreted the dream as a glad tiding of victory. He then called some Muslim ulamaa and demanded that they interpret the dream. They all pointed to an experienced aalim to respond to the king’s demand.

The aalim said to the king that he would interpret the dream only if he guaranteed their safety which he did.

The learned aalim interpreted the dream thus; “O king, I see no wisdom in your wanting to kill the Muslims and marching on them for this purpose. Please do not deploy your army for they will not return to you alive. They will be defeated and destroyed. And do not for one moment think that I give this interpretation because I am a Muslim”.

The king asked him for proof to which he replied that the Holy Book of Allah was the source for his proof. He quoted the verse: Have you not seen what your Lord had done to the people of the elephants. He recited the entire Soorah Feel.

The king said: “This is your proof regarding the elephants. What have you to say about the drums?” He recited the verse: And when the trumpet will be blowns, this will be a very hard day for the non-believers-not an easy one.

When the king heard this he became utterly shocked and perplexed since the shaikh’s explanation was rational and irrefutable.

To avoid embarrassment to himself he dismissed the sheikh and his colleagues saying that he would have believed him if he (the sheikh) were not a Muslim. But since he is a Muslim he is biased in his delivery of interpretation.

The Shaikh said: “You will soon find out for yourself, o king!”.

When the sheikh and his colleagues departed the king began to ponder deeply about what the sheikh had said. He became convinced and decided not to go ahead with his plans. When the clergy heard of this they approached him and urged him to go ahead with his plan. They reasoned with him not to believe the interpretation of the sheikh as he was a Muslim and a Muslim would obviously be opposed to king Muslims. They also sought his permission to kill the sheikh which he refused. They continued to incite him against the Muslim and urged him to go ahead with his plans. He had no choice but to accede. He deployed a huge army under the command of his son.

The two sides met in the middle of the sea.

For three days a fierce battle ensued between the Muslims and non-Muslims. One the third day the Christians army was defeated. Not a single person was spared. When the king came to learn about this, he called for the sheikh and admitted his folly before him. He then secretly accepted Islam at his hands and bestowed many of his favours on him. It is said that he also learned the Holy Qur’aan by the Shaikh and this affair of the king became popular in Saqliyyah.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

Islamic Dream Interpretation

It symbolises a woman.

If a person sees himself planting a grape tree and it has grown tall so that it provides shade, it means he will attain honour and dignity.

The same dream could also be a glad tiding that his child will live and grow up healthy.

If it is only one tree, it is a glad tiding that he will receive money equivalent to one thousand Dirhams.... Islamic Dream Interpretation