response

The meaning of response in dream | Dream Interpretation


Dream Meanings of Versatile | Versatile - Anonymous

A spiritual response is one that affects every part of our being and is a reaching out to whatever we deem the ultimate to be.

An instinctive response is often one drawn from us by a situation that has personal resonance.

Dream Meanings of Versatile | Versatile - Anonymous

Psychological / emotional perspective: If a response is needed or if a reply is given there must have been a question. This will often have been a subconscious one. In dreams it is unfortunate that we sometimes have one without knowing the other.

Dream Meanings of Versatile | Versatile - Anonymous

Material aspects: To reply is to respond, usually in words to a question or an action. In dreams any response we make should be carefully considered as to whether it reflects our feelings accurately in a waking situation.



Response | Dream Interpretation

Keywords of this dream: Response

The Premier in Dream Dictionary

Dreams of being chased are a natural response to stress. It could be events are catching up with you and you’re running to keep ahead of the game.

• Or you’re running away from something literal in your life or perhaps an emotional or psychological issue. Revisit the dream and face what’s chasing you.

• By accepting who you are, exactly as you are, right now will help you make real progress towards your future and relieve some of the stress.... The Premier in Dream Dictionary

The Premier in Dream Dictionary

Dreaming of drowning in deep water suggests being overwhelmed by your unconscious thoughts and emotions.

• Face your fears and explore what you’re feeling over emotional about. This can be a dream response to losing someone very close.

• It can also mean that you feel suffocated or dominated by someone in your life.... The Premier in Dream Dictionary

The Premier in Dream Dictionary

Snakes are one of the most powerful dream symbols known to humankind. They have been both revered and feared since time immemorial. They represent sexual power, resurrection, healing, initiation and knowledge.

• All snakes shed their skin signifying transformation and regeneration. Look at what you need to change and let go of in your life and what needs to be reborn.

• Is there a “snake in the grass” in your life? Are you feeling venomous? If you’re terrified of snakes in real life you may dream of them in response to this phobia.... The Premier in Dream Dictionary

DreamPedia

Here are 30 different dream symbol that appear most common in the world and these dreams meanings.

Animals


Animals can usually be linked to survival or the instinct to keep going no matter how difficult things are. It can mean you’re holding things back that you should express. Dreams of an animal symbolize that you are connecting with your wild side, basic instincts and survival needs. Consider the type of animal.

Babies


Babies most times just mean that you want to continue your life and family, and want to share your knowledge with your next of kin. They might also mean you’re holding something back. Something new comes into your life. A new idea or a new creative project at work. Symbol of new possibilities and potential for growth in multiple areas of your life.

Lost


Being lost in your dreams may signify that you have lost your true purpose in life. It may point to soul loss or your disas- sociation from an important aspect of your personality. If the theme of being lost recurs, it may point to a need to seek guidance spiritually or psychologically.

Naked


Dreams of being naked or seeing someone naked represent a desire for honesty and intimacy. It can also represent the fear of others knowing your private thoughts and feelings. If you are comfortable being naked, then you feel you have nothing to hide in intimacy. If you are uncomfortable, ashamed, or embarrassed, then this dream is telling you to do some ego-integration work, and begin the process of releasing your own judgments and criticisms.

Trapped


If you dream of being trapped, it means that you feel confined and restricted in a friendship, career or romantic relationship. You may be feeling bad physically because of your emotional worries. This dream can also mean that your rivals will get the best of you if you are not careful. If you successfully escape the trap in your dream, you will triumph over your rivals and your relationships will improve in real life.

Buildings and Houses


Building a house may signify construction of a new project in your business or building a totally new life. Building with Legos or building blocks may comment on needing to play with your ideas before putting them into action.

Clothing


Clothing in general reveals the image that you want to project to the world. Each article of clothing reveals different concerns, qualities, beliefs, attitudes, and expressions Even the color and conditions of the clothing may reveal significant information.

For example, clothing that is tattered or torn may signify that you feel emotionally shredded by an experience. You may also be expressing a "poor me" attitude.

Cry


Dreams of crying symbolize that you are healing, grieving, cleansing, and releasing that which no longer supports you, as you make room for that which does support you. Consider that this might be a cry for help and that you would be wise to seek support to help you through this challenge you are going through. Keep in mind that you can’t heal what you can’t feel.

Death


Dreams of death are very common in that it is the job of our subconscious mind to keep us alive, so your dreams are assisting you to process your fears of death and dying. If you dream of your own death, then you are contemplating the value and impact of your life. Dreaming of someone else dying is about transformation and change in your relationship with then, not necessarily a forecast of a literal death (though sometimes it does). You might also be venting out your fears of losing someone that you love. Often the dream of death represents the ending of chapter in a person’s life, and that a new cycle is about to begin. Keep in mind that the Native Americans believe that the most powerful way to live is as if death were always just over your shoulder. This dream is suggesting that you consider what aspect of your life is ending, how can you harmoniously participate in completing this cycle, and what new beginning is wanting to come into your life.

Demons


To see demons in your dream, represents negativity and distress. It also forewarns of overindulgence. If you dream of being possessed by demons, you are feeling helpless about something.

Dogs


Dogs are man’s companions and loyal " friends and thus can come in a dream to represent a real friendship, fteca dog’s extreme loyalty to its owner, the appearance of a dog can represent a tendency toward being too loyal to-your friends and thus sacrificing yourself and your needs. A dead dog can come to represent the death of a fnendship, and the birth of a puppy can come to signify the amval of a new friendship. A bite from a dog can be a response to an argument with a fnend. Dogs as guardians can signify the need for personal protection, or they may comment that you feel watched, as by a watchdog.

Drowning


Sinking into the unconscious, helplessness, lack of planning in your life. Being washed away by the flow of emotions. Fear of being swallowed up by the unconscious. As in Suffocating, where the issue is to get more air, here it is a matter of being safe in the Water, about feelings and (emotional) needs that bring more energy and inner strength.

Falling


Falling in your dream may come as a response to some failure. It may comment on feelings of loss of control. It may also be a response to falling from grace or falling from your stature in life. Falling dreams may recur when you have lost a significant relationship, or have faced a personal disaster in your career, or have been diagnosed with a particular illness.

Fire


Fire is a punfying element that is destruc tive yet transforms everything eventually. Setting fire to your emotions may act as the cleansing agent of the soul. It can represent the passion that fuels the heart and the sacred ember of your sexuality. A fire in your house may relate to some anger that is destroying the peace at home. Fire may also signify destructive behavior on your part or that of another family member.

Flying


If you dream you are flying so high that you can actually touch the moon and stars this portends many different types of global disaster that you may soon hear of. If you fly high with black wings you are warned that you are headed for a let down of magnitude. Flying dreams are normally a good omen and if the flight is pleasant, with no worries and anxieties, you can look for happiness and plenty to follow.

Food


People often dream about food. All types of food are a consistent part of a dream life. Anything from meat to elbow macaroni comes up through our unconscious and leaves vivid memories upon awakening. Food is symbolic of a large variety of things. It could symbolize pleasure and indulgence. To the perpetual dieter, the dream could have a "compensatory" function where the food that is denied to the individual during the day shows up in the dream state. Dreams could additionally symbolize physical, mental, spiritual and emotional nourishment.

Chased


Being chased by shadows shows the need to escape from something previously repressed, such as past childhood trauma or difficulty. To be chased by an animal generally indicates we have not come to terms with our own passion.

Horses


A horse may offer its power to the dreamer as a vehicle for moving forward in life. Horse brings the attnbute of strength to deliver you to your destination.

For the hero, the horse cames him to his mission, perhaps over long distances, and thus it may signify the need to travel. A wild horse can represent unleashed and untamed power. Horses may also trot into your dream to indicate the need to stand your ground in a power struggle.

Jumping


  • The act of jumping can be somewhat ambiguous in a dream. It can indicate either jumping up attempting to attain something better for ourselves or jumping down, which can mean going down into the unconscious and those parts of ourselves where we may feel we are in danger. Jumping on the spot can indicate joy and has the same significance as dance (See Dance).
  • Repetitive movement of any sort in a dream usually indicates the need to reconsider our actions, to look at what we arc doing and perhaps to express ourselves in a different way. On a psychological level, jumping up and down in a dream may indicate being caught up in a situation without having the power to move either forwards or backwards.
  • In certain religions, spiritual ecstasy is induced by jumping. This is a way of employing the physical in order to reach the spiritual.
  • Also See: Jumping

Kiss - Kissing


Affection. In this dream you may be expressing feelings that are difficult to express during the day. Kissing is usually an indication of warmth, affection, and happiness. If you don’t receive enough love and affection in your daily life, then this could be a compensatory dream, where the dreamer is comforting himself. If you are kissing the object of your affection, the dream could be a form of wish fulfillment. Superstition based interpretations say that if you are kissing strangers, you may have a need to conquer. If the kissing is insincere, you are pretentious while if you see your partner kissing someone else, you may be afraid of infidelity.

Money


Money in dreams does not necessarily represent hard currency, but more the way in which we value ourselves. This symbol appearing in dreams would suggest that we need to assess that value more carefully, and equally to be aware of what we ‘pay’ for our actions and desires. If there is a feeling of self-denial in our making savings, particularly to the point of miserliness, we may not have managed our resources properly in the past and are having to suffer for it now. We may also fear the future. If someone else gives us their savings, we are able to use their knowledge and expertise.

Paralysis


  • When paralysis is felt in a dream we are probably experiencing great fear or suppression. Feelings that are emotionally based are experienced as paralysis in order to highlight the physical effect those feelings can have.
  • Imagination can often play tricks on us, and we experience as real some kind of reaction we would not normally allow ourselves. Paralysis is one such reaction.
  • Paralysis can signify spiritual inadequacy, inability to create movement, and inertia. There is a condition which sometimes occurs during development when we are forced into facing our own fears, and this can be experienced as paralysis.

Pregnancy / Pregnant


To dream you are pregnant signifies growth and development in your personal life. You may find that you are unprepared to act on it or to even discuss the matter with other people. It may also symbolize the birth of new ideas, projects, directions, or goals. To dream of being pregnant with a dying baby suggests an undertaking you worked hard for is suddenly doomed to fail. It denotes anxiety over things that are unfolding in ways you never expected. A pregnant woman having dreams of her pregnancy usually conveys her worries in various stages of her pregnancy. First trimester dreams are usually consists of small creatures, furry animals, flowers, fruits, and water. Second trimester dreams usually cover birth complications and self-doubt about motherhood. You may also dream of giving birth to a non-human baby. Finally, in the third trimester, you tend to dream of your own mother. When a man dreams of getting a girl pregnant, it is a warning that serious consequences may result from his sexual activities.

Prison


Being in a prison may comment on feelings of being persecuted or punished for doing something wrong. A prison may also mention that you are imprisoned by your own thoughts or beliefs. Since a prison represents lack of personal freedom, it may point to a relationship that restricts your freedom, such as a bad marnage.

Sexuality - Sex


Dreams of a sexual nature are very common and act both as an emotional release and a reassurance that everything is in order with your sexuality. Being intimate with a stranger is a fantasy that many people enjoy and this type of dream may indicate a wish for new experiences or experimentation. Intimacy with your partner in a dream acts as a reassurance of your love, and serves to strengthen your bond in your own mind.

Snakes


The snake is a powerful dream symbol, associated with the feminine, healing and spirituality. Being bitten by a snake in a dream is actually positive, meaning you are accepting all parts of your nature as you grow into a stronger person. If you dream about you or an animal attacking, wrestling with or trying to kill a snake, you will have to defend your reputation against nasty gossip. If the attempt to kill the snake was successful in your dream, you will succeed against all hostilities.

Spiders


In a dream, a spider represents a malicious woman, or a weak, perfidious and a distant man. A spider in a dream also represents a weaver, an ascetic or a monk. Ifone sees a spider in his dream, it may mean that he will meet a pious and a religious man. Weaving a web in a dream means becoming weak. A spider in a dream also could represent a pleasing wife. If one sees a spider hanging down from the ceiling in a dream, it indicates a severe winter in that area.

Teeth


Hostility or an attack, such as when dream figures deliver "biting words" or "bare their teeth. " Losing teeth in a dream may reflect words said in haste, or losing the ability to speak candidly. Because this bony part of the body endures long after death, it has some associations with the cycle of birth, death, and rebirth. In this context, losing teeth might equate to losing the will to live or having your personal power taken away. Rotten teeth equate either to the fear of old age, or someone whose words are filled with so much insincere sweetness that decay in that relationship is inevitable. Having teeth pulled out represents an end to suffering that is aided by an external force.

Vehicle - Vehicles


If you dream of riding in a vehicle and someone else is driving, you will soon take a business trip at your bosses convenience. If you are riding in a vehicle where you or a member of your family are driving, then your trip will be for pleasure or personal business.

Walking or Running


A running dream is basically a dream of escaping a certain situation, person, or thing. If you succeed in running away from, or elude a pursuer, then you will be able to change those things in your life that has you ‘on the run’. If you dream of the desire to run but cannot get your feet to obey it shows a lack of self confidence and perseverance on your part. Try sticking to your guns and see how much your life will change.

Water


It is a mirror of your subconscious mind.

The quality of water often describes the situation of your emotions. Crystal clear, clean, adulterated, calm mostly provides strong insights about the state of your feelings.

... DreamPedia

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: The people watching are saying “Kill her! Kill her! Kill her!” Then someone finds an extra bullet, puts it in the gun and shoots me in the stomach. I wake with my body completely straight with my hands on my stomach. I feel my whole body cracking up inside’ (Vanessa). Almost half the dreams on file which mention abdomen, belly or stomach show the dreamer being shot, as in the example. This is obviously to do with a particular type of hurt. When human beings learned to stand up, they exposed their vulner­able underbelly.

If we are hurt or threatened we tense the pelvic and abdominal area. Vanessa wakes to just such ten­sion, with a sense of her body being fragmented.

The opposite is to dream of waves of pleasure moving within us, which gives us a sense of integration within ourself and with the world.

In general the abdomen represents the potential of our fully active natural drives—hunger, longing to be held; desire to give of ourself.

If these are hurt, we tend to hold ourself back from active social expression or intimacy of feelings in relationships. Our abdomen is also our digestive ability, both physical and psychological. Stomach or abdominal dreams may refer to some dis-ease in the actual organs. We might not be able to stomach something we have met in the everyday world.

To vomit: a discharging of unpleasant feelings resulting from ingesting (hearing, reading, being told, experiencing) something unpleasant.

In her dream Vanessa was re-enacting the Hungerford di­saster, and feeling the fear it engendered. Shot in the belly, sex; painful response to relationship. Idioms: bellyaching; have a bellyful; eyes bigger than one’s belly, have a strong stomach; turn one’s stomach; butterflies in stomach. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Language of Dreams

(see Fighting, Running, Seduction, Sexual Encounters)

Feeling violated or exploited by an individual, a group, or a situation.

If you are the abuser in the dream, this may represent pent-up displeasure toward yourself or antagonism toward another.

A memory surfacing. Some abuse victims have uncovered their memories through dreams. However, caution must be issued here. Since this topic is widely covered by the media, what you experience in a dream can reenact some of these stories, engendered by your emotional response (fear, indignation, outrage, etc.).... The Language of Dreams

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: Physical abuse can give rise to nightmares and other terror dreams, further depleting our resources due to both broken sleep patterns and the over stimulation of the fright, fight, flight response.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: Dreams of being injured, murdered or killed occur relatively frequently and seem to be a response to threat. Attention, therefore, needs to be paid to the specific circumstances of the dream. We are usually receiving a warning to be careful or to be aware of hidden aggression, either our own or others’.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Many people seem to have dreams about committing adultery or about their spouse committing adultery (cheating or being cheated on). In this dictionary there is a definition for cheating and here I will add a few more thoughts about this dream topic. Many dreams come from the private unconscious and are a reflection on thoughts, fears, desires, issues or are a response to stressful or anxiety provoking situations.

The details of the dream need to be considered before attempting an interpretation. Details such as who is cheating on whom and what are the circumstances surrounding this dream event, need to be established. At times people have dreams about cheating on their spouses as a response to a long and monogamous relationship.

The dream may be a compensation for boredom, monotony or unhappiness. On the other hand, the dream could be about you connecting to deeper parts of self, which is represented by a desirable person of the opposite sex. On rare occasions a person may suspect, or feel on some level, that their mate is not faithful but is not willing to admit this consciously. Thus, in the dream state the individual confronts his fears and from there may begin to deal with the situation on a conscious level. “The dream reveals the reality which conception lags behind.” Franz Kafka... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Self-imposed guilt and/or shame. Are you getting what you want at the expense of others? Dissatisfaction.The desire to change. Guilt. Being part of / performing; You will be faced with taking responsibility for a situation that you were part of. Spouse or partner performing; Affection is a concern.

If you committed it, be on guard against giving your confidence to new friends; if you resisted it, you will have some disappointing setbacks, but they will be temporary. Many people seem to have dreams about committing adultery or about their spouse committing adultery (cheating or being cheated on). In this dictionary there is a definition for cheating and here I will add a few more thoughts about this dream topic. Many dreams come from the private unconscious and are a reflection on thoughts, fears, desires or issues are a response to stressful or anxiety provoking situations.

The details of the dream need to be considered before attempting an interpretation. Details such as who is cheating on whom and what are the circumstances surrounding this dream event, need to be established. At times people have dreams about cheating on their spouses as a response to a long and monogamous relationship.

The dream may be a compensation for boredom, monotony or unhappiness. On the other hand, the dream could be about you connecting to deeper parts of self, which is represented by a desirable person of the opposite sex. On rare occasions a person may suspect, or feel on some level, that their mate is not faithful but is not willing to admit this consciously. Thus, in the dream state the individual confronts his fears and from there may begin to deal with the situation on a conscious level. “The dream reveals the reality which conception lags behind.” Franz Kafka ... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Health, wealth and good fortune. Take extra caution in all your activities. Review the recent past to find out if you have made a mistake that needs to be corrected. Rapid recovery. Wound, illness – Quick response needed. ... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Like any other animal, human beings have devel­oped certain physical and behavioural traits. Some of these traits, such as a newborn baby attempting to suckle the breast, are rooted in millions of years of past experience and can be thought of as instinctive. We can observe such traits in a dog in such behaviour as cocking of the leg in male dogs. We can see some of our own traits in such things as the human desire to elect leaders. Many of these habits are physiological or social. In our dreams we represent these drives or habits in the form of various animals. Our restrained sex drive or ag­gression may be shown in our dream as a dog on a lead.

The power of drives such as the urge to parenthood via sex might be shown as a horse which we are trying to control. More than anything else, though, our dream animal represents our powerful reactions to situations, reactions developed through centuries of human experience in frequently terrible situa­tions. This aspect of ourself is rooted in the older portions of the brain.

The animal in our dreams has commonly been seen only as the sex drive.

A careful examination of animal dreams, though, shows this to be untrue.

The animal represents all our biological needs and responses, which include survival and hunger, reproduction; parental urges; need for exercise and rest; social drives, fear reactions, anger, urge to provide (for young and mate); home/nest building; territory protection, so­cial hierarchy, etc.

If these aspects in an individual are dam­aged or traumatised, we see parents who have lost their natu­ral bonding and caring for their child; individuals who have no sense of social status or responsibility, enabling them to be criminally violent; disturbed and misplaced sexuality. Domi­nating or attempting to kill out the animal in us can cause tension, depression and illness.

The common escape into dry intellectualism is a cause of internal conflict. Complete per­missiveness is no answer either, our higher brain functions need expression too. So one of the challenges of maturing is how to meet and relate to our ‘animals’, and perhaps bring them into expression in a satisfying way. Such drives are fun­damentally a push towards life.

It must be remembered that where sex or sexuality is men­tioned, I am not simply referring to the sex act. I mean sexual­ity in its overall aspect, which includes the urge towards par­enthood, and the love and caring connected with it. (Brain damage or certain drugs or chemicals can diminish the ‘hu­man’ levels of function and only the animal and lizard levels are expressed.) Below are listed some common ways animals are used in our dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Psychological / emotional perspective: To be in the armed forces in dreams signifies belonging to a trained team; to be facing an army highlights our doubts about or refusal to accept a carefully thought out plan of action. While this may be for the greater good, in itself it may be dangerous. By its association with the sea, the navy in dreams signifies a more disciplined response to emotional matters, whereas the air force suggests the need for a targeted response to intellectual and philosophical matters.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

The Language of Dreams

(see Eating, Vegetables)

If seen in pairs, this represents male virility.

Lima beans specifically portend the end to a quarrel.

Among the ancient Romans and Greeks, beans were used for ballots.

A white bean was a positive response; a black bean was negative. What color are the beans in your dream?

Eating beans may act as a humorous counsel from your subconscious not to get “puffed up” so that your words don’t come out as hot air!

In the East, soybeans represent luck.

During the Middle Ages, lentils were eaten to control the temperament. How balanced have your emotions been lately?

Beans are unique in that they twine and grow counterclockwise. You may find similarly that your way of growing and changing is vastly different than those around you.... The Language of Dreams

Ariadne's Book of Dream

For Native Americans, the bear comes to initiate the power of healing medicine and can represent a call to walk the path of a healer or medicine person.

For the urban shaman, the bear’s call may be to a profession in the healing arts such as massage therapy or reflexology. As an archetype, the bear pos sesses strength and a grounded connection to the earth.

The bear often represents the nurturing or mothering aspect that comforts and heals as the primary relationship early in life.

Thus, an angry bear can signify a response to the devouring nature of your own mother.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ariadne's Book of Dream

For a man. a big-breasted woman may express the desire for maternal nurtunng.

For a woman, having larger breasts in a dream may remark on her desire to give more. Breast disease may be a response to feeling that you have given too much to others. Sore nipples in a dream also suggests that others have been sucking your energy and that you feel depleted.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- When we dream of taking part in a broadcast we arc aware of needing to reach a wider audience. This may be risky since we have no means of measuring our audience’s response.

To dream of listening to a broadcast means we should be listening to the message that other people arc trying to get across.

2- Psychologically, the performer in us needs some form of self- expression.

3- Widespread spirituality.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dreamers Dictionary

Vision: Seeing a carcass in a rotting state can evoke disgust, dislike, or grief. Either an event provoking such a response is going to happen soon, or the dream is suggesting that letting go of a situation or a person is long overdue. Dragging a dead corpse in a suitcase: you are still earning around things from the past—things that “died a long time ago,” or your conscience is bothering you. Looking at a dead body: old problems will be solved successfully.

The dream also suggests that a wedding or birth is imminent. Seeing yourself as the cadaver: a great burden has been lifted, you will live to a ripe old age. See Skeleton.

Depth Psychology: A cadaver represents past issues that need to be dealt with.

The corpse you’re rigidly holding onto may be old conventions. Have your feelings for another person turned “cold”? Are you afraid of Death? Do you wish that someone else were dead? A rotten cadaver—in the context of other images in the dream—indicates that a current situation is at a “dead end,” but that something new will come along.... Dreamers Dictionary

Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

To dream of being in a beautiful and well-kept cemetery, you will have unexpected news of the recovery of one whom you had mourned as dead, and you will have your title good to lands occupied by usurpers.

To see an old bramble grown and forgotten cemetery, you will live to see all your loved ones leave you, and you will be left to a stranger’s care.

For young people to dream of wandering through the silent avenues of the dead foreshows they will meet with tender and loving responses from friends, but will have to meet sorrows that friends are powerless to avert. Brides dreaming of passing a cemetery on their way to the wedding ceremony, will be bereft of their husbands by fatal accidents occurring on journeys.

For a mother to carry fresh flowers to a cemetery, indicates she may expect the continued good health of her family.

For a young widow to visit a cemetery means she will soon throw aside her weeds for robes of matrimony.

If she feels sad and depressed she will have new cares and regrets. Old people dreaming of a cemetery, shows they will soon make other journeys where they will find perfect rest.

To see little children gathering flowers and chasing butterflies among the graves, denotes prosperous changes and no graves of any of your friends to weep over. Good health will hold high carnival. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Gives gender - specific: It is not unusual for a woman to dream that she is being pursued in dreams.

The implication is that she has something special which she does not wish to relinquish.

If a man is being chased by a woman or that which he cannot identify then it is usually in response to his fear of being ‘consumed.’... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Being served chicken may comment that you are acting like a chicken because you are held back by your fears. Eating chicken may represent your desire for a “down home.” nourishing experience.

A live chicken may mean that there is a pecking order of dominance within a group that you are involved in; it could be a response to your feeling hen-pecked.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Eating chop suey may appear as a response to feelings that perhaps you have been chopped up and made into a meal to satisfy someone else’s needs.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ariadne's Book of Dream

A closed clam may state that you are shut tight as a clam and are cold emotionally. Eating steamed clams may be a response to an opening in a recent conversation that steamed things up.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: I am packing for a holiday, surrounded by a lovely selection of all sorts of clothes. I am matching outfits, shoes, scarves, handbags. It gives me great pleasure. I am wearing an old navy blue dress which is too shon for me. So shon I feel panic because there will not be enough time to change. I am now on the top deck of a bus. I have one bat­tered suitcase and am wearing the same dress, trying vainly to pull it down over my knees. Suitcase bursts open and it is full of old clothes fit for a jumble sale* (Valerie H). Clothes can mean many things, depending upon dream context. In the example the clothes are feelings of pleasure and confidence, and also discomfort and lack of confidence.

In general they indicate the stance or attitudes we use to meet other people or special situations such as work or dan­ger, protection, such as might be given by our feelings of reserve, shyness, anxiety or aggressiveness in fending off sex­ual or other advances, clothes depict self respect and how we see ourselves in society—the difference between what we want and what we feel others want of us; our clothes, espe­cially when we consider their colour, can also express our emotional condition and moods. Constance Newland gives the example of dressing in violet symbolising being inviolate sexually. Overdressed , unable to get clothes off: too cautious in relationships, difficulty in changing attitudes or self image; self protectiveness; avoiding intimacy.

Naked or see-through clothes: example: ‘I am at the doc­tor’s being examined. It is always the same. I have all my clothes off and he examines me from the roots of my hair down to my toenails. I am just at the point where I am going to ask him for his diagnosis when he fades away’ (Miss L). Desire to be attractive and noticed, as in the example, where Miss L is enjoying an acceptable form of intimacy; being open about what you really feel; fear of other people seeing what you really feel, think and desire; anxiety about not being ade­quate socially, lacking ability to conform to social norm. See nude. Ragged or inappropriate clothes: feelings of inadequacy depressed feelings; rebellion against authority or society. Ar­mour, protective clothing : defences against internal anxieties, past hurts and external intimacy. Other people’s clothes: the social attitudes and responses we have adopted from others. Children’s, teenage clothes in adult’s dream: youthful or im­mature attitudes or behaviour. Undressing: revealing one’s real character; move towards intimacy. Dirty, untidy clothes: difficult or grubby feelings; one’s inner condition, such as an untidy mind, or grubby feeling values. Worn out or old clothes: attitudes ready to be left behind; old habits no longer useful; feeling worn out, old or tired. Tight clothes: being too restricted in attitude; being tight emotionally. New clothes: change in attitudes; new feeling about self. Someone else’s clothes: could be feelings from that person; their attitudes, memories. Man in woman’s clothes: unacceptability of male role, with its connection with breadwinning, aggression, being cannon fodder in war, homosexual tendency; desire for mother. Woman in male clothes: unacceptability of female role, motherhood, housewife; lesbian tendency; desire for fa­ther figure. Clothing inappropnate to dream surroundings: at­titudes or behaviour inappropriate to one’s situation. Chang­ing clothes: altering one’s mode of behaviour, role or mood. Idioms: dress to kill; dress up. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- “flic clothes we wear in a dream can often depict the facade, or persona, we create for other people. We have certain roles that we adopt in response to other’s reactions. Clothes which others are wearing in our dreams can also set the scene for an acting out of some of the confrontations which take place.

2- Clothes can often act as a protection against being touched. This protection may also be against having the real self violated. Clothes can conceal or reveal. In covering up nudity they conceal our perceived imperfections and, by implication, disguise our sexuality. In revealing certain parts of us our dreams may show in what ways we are v ulnerable. Getting undressed can suggest the shedding of old beliefs and inhibitions. Losing one’s clothes or being naked highlights our vulnerability and fears. Dressing inappropriately, e.g. wearing formal clothes on a casual occasion and vice versa When we find ourselves in this position in a dream, we are conscious of our own difficulty in ‘fitting in’ with other people. It will depend 011 the dream scenario whether we are surprised or distressed. and it is often the emotion that we experience which gives us the correct interpretation. We may be deliberately not conforming to others’ perception of us, or trying to conform too much in adopting a certain role.

The colour of the clothing is often significant (see Colour). Clothes being worn by someone to whom they do not belong There is confusion in the dreamer’s mind as to which roles are appropriate for each character.

A man wearing woman’s clothing The dreamer needs to be more conscious of their feminine side.

A uniform on a woman The dreamer is highlighting the need to be aware of the more disciplined and masculine side of their personality. Changing clothes We are attempting to change our image. Clothes that have been cut short We may be outgrowing former pleasures and need to look to pastures new for our entertainment. Pretty clothes We have much to appreciate in our lives. Clothes belonging to a particular person We are being reminded of that person, even though we are aware that they cannot necessarily be with us.

Various articles of clothing are believed to have certain symbolic meanings:

Coat/Shawl (and especially a cloak) A coat can suggest warmth and love, but also protection. This protection can be either physical or emotional, and particularly in the case of a cloak, can be the spiritual protection of Faith.

A sheepskin coat may emphasise this significance (also see Sheep in Animals). Fear of losing the coat can suggest the fear of losing faith and belief.

The coat may be too short, or not thick enough We may be fearful that our love, or the protection we have, is not adequate for our needs.

Gloves - also see individual entry The meaning of gloves can be ambivalent. They can represent covering and protecting oneself, but also ‘showing one’s hand’ and challenging the status quo.

Hat/Cap

A hat is a symbol of wisdom and the intellect and also of protection. It can also signify both spirituality and sexuality, depending 011 the other aspects of the dream.

Pyjamas/Nightclothes

Pyjamas suggest relaxation and hence openness.

Raincoat A raincoat again holds the symbolism of protection, but this time against other people’s emotional onslaught. Very occasionally it may suggest some kind of wish to return to a womb- like state.

Shirt A shirt can suggest appropriate action, but also, as in a hair shirt, grief and pcnitencc.

Shoes

Shoes signify our ability or otherwise to be grounded and in touch with everyday life.

Recognising shoes that we, or others, arc wearing in a dream are strange alerts us to an adjustment that needs to be made to our attitude to life. Lacing up shoes in a dream is supposed to be a well-known symbol of death as are shoes on a table. Tie A tie in can have several significances in dreams.

For some it can represent correctness and good behaviour, and for others, presumably because of its shape, it will signify the phallus.

Underclothes

When we dream of underclothes - whether our own or other people’s we arc considering hidden attitudes to self-image or sexuality.

Veil or veil-like garments (also see individual entry) When we, or others, are wearing a veil we are either trying to hide something, or arc only partially accepting knowledge about ourselves or our relationship to others.

3- Clothes can suggest spiritual protection.

For instance, certain types of clothes will highlight roles and status.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: The clothes we wear in a dream can often depict the facade, or persona, we create for other people. We have certain roles that we adopt in response to others’ reactions. Clothes which others are wearing in our dreams can also set the scene for an acting out of some of the confrontations which take place. Some common images which have particular relevance are: getting undressed can suggest the shedding of old beliefs and inhibitions whereas losing one’s clothes or being naked highlights our vulnerability and fears. Dressing inappropriately, perhaps wearing formal clothes on a casual occasion and vice versa, shows we are conscious of our own difficulty in ‘fitting in’ with other people. It will depend on the dream scenario whether we are surprised or distressed, and it is often the emotion that we experience which gives us the correct interpretation. We may be deliberately not conforming to others’ perception of us, or trying to conform too much in adopting a certain role.

The colour of the clothing is often significant. Clothes being worn by someone to whom they do not belong indicate there is confusion in the our mind as to which roles are appropriate for each character.

If a man is wearing woman’s clothing it shows that we need to be more conscious of our feminine side.

A uniform on a woman highlights the need to be aware of the more disciplined and masculine side of our personality.

If we are changing clothes we are attempting, or perhaps need to consider how, to change our image. Clothes that have been cut short indicate that we may be outgrowing former pleasures and need to look to pastures new for our entertainment, whereas particularly pretty clothes show we have much to appreciate in our lives.

If we are aware that clothes belonging to a particular person then we are being reminded of that person, even though we are aware that they cannot necessarily be with us.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ariadne's Book of Dream

As the alchemy of air and water, cumulus, cirrus, or stratus, dark or white clouds come to represent the manifestation of our thinking and our moods. In a dream, a cloudy sky may mean there is no sunshine in your life, and it can be a direct response to or prediction of your mood.

A dark cloud ahead may signify a dark mood of depression and might forebode a negative experience you had better prepare for. Cloudless skies may indicate a positive shift in mood and attitude. Stratus clouds may comment that you are “out in the stratosphere” or unrealistic about your expectations.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Careful research into speech shows that we constantly use a miracle of mental functioning in communi­cating with each other. Each sentence we hear spoken under­goes enormous forms of analysis. Each word is taken and a meaning sought. This is compared with other meanings, de­pending on context in sentence, conversational direction, speaker and speaker’s tone. At unbelievable speed, we formu­late our response, with similar search and comparisons, as well as filters controlling social situation, mood, status of per­son being addressed, and so on. All this takes place with almost no awareness, so we can think of it as a process of the unconscious. Factors which govern subjects spoken of and choice of words are also largely unconscious. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Gives gender - specific: It is supposed that men are more logical in their thought processes and women more intuitive. However, when a woman dreams of a strategic response to a conflict she is accessing her more logical side. Conversely, when a man follows his own instincts he will be seeking an intuitive answer.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Gives gender - specific: Men and women perceive danger differently in dreams. Men often confront the difficulty, whereas women may attempt to placate or work round it. Interestingly, as the differences between the genders become blurred in everyday life, these natural responses are also modified.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Directing traffic may be a response to feeling that you are in charge of others and directing their destinations. It may also compensate for frustration about not being in control of others’ behavior.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Diving into the ocean in a dream may represent diving into subconscious memories, which may need to be explored in order to heal deep issues. Diving and gazing at fish may suggest exploring or coming into direct contact with all the abundance and creativity’ that is available to you through exploring your subconscious. Diving may also appear as a response to feeling submerged.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Dogs are man’s companions and loyal “ friends and thus can come in a dream to represent a real friendship, fteca dog’s extreme loyalty to its owner, the appearance of a dog can represent a tendency toward being too loyal to-your friends and thus sacrificing yourself and your needs.

A dead dog can come to represent the death of a fnendship, and the birth of a puppy can come to signify the amval of a new friendship.

A bite from a dog can be a response to an argument with a fnend. Dogs as guardians can signify the need for personal protection, or they may comment that you feel watched, as by a watchdog.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The brain is not a computer, but it has the power to compute.

The word computare is Latin, and comes from putare, to think. Neither is a computer any­thing like a human brain. But there are parallels. Christopher Evans, a psychologist, computer scientist and world authority on microprocessors, says the brain and computers are both information handling devices, taking impulses which in them­selves mean nothing, like sound waves, and processing them. It is also his theory that both computers and the waking-brain function are taken off-line to re-program. Our behaviour re­sponses and information bases need bringing up to date with any new experience and information that is relevant. In the case of the computer, off-line means having modifications made to programs, in the human it means sleeping and dreaming, the dream being the powerful activity of review, sifting and reprogramming. Thirdly, the brain and computer use programs. In humans, a program means a learnt set of responses, values or activities, such as walking or talking, but including more subtle activities such as judging social or busi­ness situations.

If, as Christopher Evans believes, dreaming is partly a pe­riod of revising and updating responses, insights and skills, then by working with the process one can make it more effi­cient.

The background for this statement is that many people have recurring dreams which change very little. Looking at this from the programming’ view, the attempt to revise is thwarted. But individuals can free such ‘stuck’ dreams by us­ing dream processing.

Also, as some dreams are obviously a synthesis of experi­ence and information gathered over a lifetime, the dream pro­cess is much more than a computing function which sorts new information and updates. It is also capable of creative leaps through synthesis and conjecture. J.B. Priestley’s dream of the birds (see religion and dreams) appears to be a mas­sive synthesis of things observed over a lifetime. It also depicts a brain function like computer simulation, which takes infor­mation and forms it into an expenmental view of possibilities arising from the thousands of millions of separate bits of gath­ered data. See ESP in dreams; creative and problem solving dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Just before his title fight in 1947, Sugar Ray Robinson dreamt he was in the ring with Doyle. ‘I hit him a few good punches and he was on his back, his blank eyes staring up at me.’ Doyle never moved and the crowd were shouting ‘He’s dead! He’s dead!’ He was so upset by the dream Robinson asked Adkins, his trainer and promoter, to call off the fight. Adkins told him ‘Dreams don’t come true.

If they did I’d be a millionaire.* In the eighth round Doyle went down from a left hook to the jaw. He never got up, and died the next day.

The problem is that many such dreams felt to be predictive never come true. Often dreamers want to believe they have precognitive dreams, perhaps to feel they will not be surprised by, and thereby anxious about, the future. When the baby son of Charles Lindbergh was kidnapped, and before it was known he was murdered, 1,300 people sent ‘precognitive’ dreams concerning his fate in response to newspaper head­lines. Only seven of these dreams included the three vital factors—that he was dead, naked and in a ditch.

Out of 8,000 dreams in his Registry for Prophetic Dreams,

Robert Nelson, who was sent dreams pnor to what was pre­dicted, has found only 48 which bear detailed and recognis­able connection with later events. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ariadne's Book of Dream

As an expression of dirty thoughts delivered, a dust storm may come as a response to a shameful experience.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Dying in a dream is rarely literal. It usually represents the death of a fnendship or marks an important transition in your life. It also represents a natural cycle of creativity, which is necessary to the evolution and growth of the individual. It may be a response to something catastrophic that affected you deeply and that it may be difficult to recover from.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

There is a level of human experience which is typified by intense emotional and physical response to life. Such emotions and bodily drives may remain almost entirely unconscious until touched by exploring our dream content in the right setting. When such feelings and bodily movements arise, as they do in dreams, we may be amazed at their power and clarity. See dream processing; sleep move­ments.

If we take away the images and events occurring in a dream and simply look to see what feelings or emotions are evident, the dream is often more understandable than if we try to interpret the symbols. Feelings in dreams are nearly always undistoned. We therefore do not need to interpret them, sim­ply to acknowledge them and see if we can recognise where they occur in waking life.

The images in a dream may be the way we unconsciously pictorialise our flux of feelings and the play of internal energy flows.

For instance love or sexual drive can give rise to physical movement—as in sexual intercourse. Repression of sex or love also represses such physical move­ments, leading to tension and conflict, which might be pre­sented in the drama of a dream.

Example: ‘I was with my wife, walking along a street, on holiday with her. But I felt awful tension. It was the son of stress I feel when I have turned off my sexual flow—as I have at the moment’ (Brian V). Brian can easily see the connection between the dream feelings and his everyday life, although sometimes we need to practise this. But the situation could as easily be expressed as a dream image of a blocked river.

The underlying feelings would then be less easy to grasp.

Example: ‘I was in a very ancient crumbling building, con­fronted by a large stone door, deeply engraved with many designs and creatures. I began to open the door and felt high feelings of anxiety. I realised this was an initiation and I must calm my feelings in order to pass beyond the door, i.e. if I were controlled by my feelings I would run away’ (Derek F). How we meet the emotions in our dreams illustrates our ha­bitual method of dealing with them.

The feelings of anxiety in Derek’s dream were met and moved beyond, but this is un­usual. This is because most of us change our direction as soon as there is a hint of fear.

The amount of nicotine and alcohol human beings consume suggests how poorly we meet anxiety. Going beyond fear or pain is an initiation which opens doors for us. We might now apply for the job, ask for the date, raise the issue, express the creativity, make the journey abroad, which anxiety previously kept us from. We see this in the next example: I had a ring on my marriage finger. It was a thin band of gold. I woke up frightened’ (Angela). Angela is not married and feels anxiety about the commitment.

Dreams give us a safe area to express emotions which might be difficult or dangerous to release socially. Anger in a dream may be expressing what we failed to express in a wak­ing encounter, or it might be our habitual response. It may also be directed against ourself. Dreams also contain many positive emotions. Sometimes they present a new aspect of feeling which is life enhancing.

A person who habitually felt at odds with her father and relatives experienced a dream in which she felt forgiveness for the first time. This was entirely new for her and led to a reconciliation with her family.

Some feeling states in a dream are subtle, and may be more evident in terms of the symbols than the feelings.

A grey drear environment suggests depression and lack of pleasure.

A sunny light environment with flowers and colour shows plea­sure and good feelings.

A country landscape depicts quite a different feeling state to a smoky busy city street. We can define these for ourself using the techniques described under dream processing.

Whatever feelings or emotions we meet in our dreams, many of them are bound to be habitual responses we have to life. Where these habits are negative we can begin to change them by working with the dream images as described in the last question under dream processing. See love; hostility. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Referring to sight, attention to the eyes may reflect the power to see clearly in a situation. They may also represent third sight or psychic abilities. Blue eyes represent clarity and truth; brown eyes, wisdom and depth. Having something in your eye may be a response to having witnessed a painful situation. Closed eyes may remark on your refusal to see something you should face with both eyes open. Being stared at may reveal feelings of insecurity and shame.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Falling in your dream may come as a response to some failure. It may comment on feelings of loss of control. It may also be a response to falling from grace or falling from your stature in life. Falling dreams may recur when you have lost a significant relationship, or have faced a personal disaster in your career, or have been diagnosed with a particular illness.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Gives gender - specific: Fighting tends to be a masculine response to a problem so in a man’s dream he may well be attempting to deal with his own reactions. In a woman’s dream she will be developing her own assertiveness and must decide whether her actions are appropriate. You might like to consult the entry for conflict for further clarification.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Passion, drive, purification. In The Hearth Fire is passion and drive residing in the core of your being (the hearth).It is also the representation of your drive and passion being purified and put into motion. This is a very complex symbol that can have both negative and positive connotations. When interpreting this dream, you need to consider all of its details and your emotional responses in the dream. Fire can be a deeply spiritual symbol representing transformation and enlightenment. On the other hand, it could represent danger, anger, passion, pain or fear. Is the fire in your dream destroying something or simply warming you? Are you currently engaging in negative behaviors or are knowingly making wrong (or destructive) choices? Your unconscious mind may be warning you and at the same time encouraging you to alter those things in your life that may be hurtful and dangerous. ... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

When we will to speak or move, uncon­scious physical and psychological impulses and processes oc­cur to produce the response. These deeply unconscious pro­cesses are often depicted by fish. Also the attitudes and urges we have in common with humanity—the collective uncon­scious, and the impulses or insights arising therefrom—can therefore represent the Self or Christ; sexual drive in connec­tion with reproduction, the many little fishes being sperm. In this sense we are the fish which swam the incredible journey and grew into a human, but is still on the odyssey of life and death.

The fish may be the wisdom we have not yet brought to consciousness, regarding our personal journey in time and eternity. Fishing: creating a receptive state of consciousness which allows the deep insights or processes to become known; trying to find spintual nourishment. Eating fish: inte­grating our inner realisations; partaking of Christ. Eaten by fish: feeling threatened by the unconscious; threat of losing conscious or rational direction of life. Dead fish: non-expres­sion of basic urges. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ariadne's Book of Dream

A flying saucer is a vehicle that moves through space with little connection to the Earth. Its appearance in a dream can signify a response to a “too-spaced-out” attitude, reminding you to get grounded and real or back into this galaxy with your goals. In that it signifies the arrival of aliens, a flying saucer can represent feelings of alienation from your fnends or from the world in general. It may also represent a real en counter of the third kind. UFO dreams can be authentic experiences with alien beings who wish to communicate with you. They demonstrate that the universe has other inhabitants.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ariadne's Book of Dream

A very aggressive sport in which you can make a goal playing offensively and defensively, football may thus metaphorically reflect an individual who will do anything to win and achieve his or her goals. Viewing a football game in your dream may be a response to some aggressive behavior in your workplace. It may mention the need to get more aggressive in pursuing your goals professionally.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Old dream interpretation books say that frogs are a good omens and represent happiness and great friendships. From a more modern point of view, frogs may be considered symbols of the unconscious because they live in the water. Frogs also represent transformation of the positive kind.

A visitor and intended caretaker of your emotions.The frog, unless deformed negatively, removes the little irritations that interfere with your intuition and responses or reactions.Is the frog doing his job properly and acting in accordance with his duties?Are the patterns overcoming the frog? ... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Psychological / emotional perspective: A galaxy is a huge collection and thus symbolizes vastness and depth in dreams, and not only one emotional response but many. Since we in dreams are usually observing the phenomena, there is an element of objectivity in being able to view our emotions in this way.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ariadne's Book of Dream

This less-than-bnlliant character may point to a naive aspect of your personality that may be making stupid mistakes He may come as a response to having missed the point of a situation or event in life. He offers comic relief to your stumblings anc may inspire the inner comic to emerge from your personality... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Hair in dreams represents power. Styling your hair may mention that you are refining your personal power. It may also simply express concerns about your appearance and beauty.

Dyeing hair in various colors may express the powerful attitudes you want to display to the world. Red hair may remark on a fiery and passionate expression of power. Purple hair represents spiritual power. Getting a haircut signifies having your personal power taken away and may be a response to a heated argument in which you felt criticized. Hair falling out in a dream may indicate an emotional response to losing power. It may also mean that you are nervous.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- When dreaming, there is an hallucinatory quality about everything that we see. We usually accept what we experience as real and in the actual dream state do not question. Scenes can change as quickly as the blink of an eye, faces can change, we can be looking at one thing then a few seconds later realise we are looking at something completely different. This is totally acceptable within the dream reality. It is only when we consider the dream afterwards that we realise how odd this may be. During dreams, things can take on qualities of other objects and of other feelings. Dreams can crcate a reality of their own, they do the unexpected - which in normal waking life would be totally illogical and surreal. Within this dream world we need to take a note of what is happening. We do not watch these with amusement, it seems simply that we observe what is going on. Even our own actions can take on an oddness. We may be doing things in a dream which in waking life we would never expect ourselves to do. Freed from the logical quality that mentors our ordinary everyday life, we can be liberated to create a totally different awareness of our own abilities, of our thought patterns and even our own past. We can often dream that we have done things in the past which we have never done, or we can prepare ourselves to do things in the future which again we would never expect to do.

2- Psychologically freeing the mind so it can ‘roam’ under its own speed allows hidden memories, images and thoughts to surface in such a way that we can handle the input when perhaps in real life we may not have been able to do so. We create a reality which suits an action, rather than creating an action which suits the reality.

For instance, an abused child may displace the activity into some kind of response that would be acceptable, not allowing the reality of the abuse to come through until such times as he or she was able to come to terms with it.

3- The hallucination that we experience in dreams can also be direct messages from the unconscious.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Ariadne's Book of Dream

The heart is the symbol of love. It may appear as a sign of love’s potential within you or coming to you. It may state “Have a heart.” A bleeding heart may comment that you are being too sentimental.

A broken heart may be a response to the loss of a relationship.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Eating a chocolate kiss in a dream may describe your response to a loving kiss that came from one of your admirers the day before.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

If the house is one we know, live in now or in the past, what is said about home applies.

If it is a house created by the dream: one’s body and personality in all its aspects.

Inside the house: within oneself. Outside the house and garden: extroversion or the relationship with environment. Ground floor: practical everyday life; sexuality, hips and legs. Basement : unconscious: see basement, cellar. First, other middle floors: internal needs, rest, sleep, hungers; the trunk. Top floor, attic: thinking, the conscious mind, memory, the head: see attic above in this entry. Front of house: our persona, facade; social self; face. Things in house: aspects of one’s feelings and makeup. Other people in^ house: different facets of dreamer. Windows : one’s outlook! on life; how you see others: see larger entry on window below in this entry. People, things coming from downstairs: influences, fears, impressions from unconscious or passions, or from everyday worries. Peo­ple, things from upstairs: influence of rational self. Attackers, intruders from outside: social pressures or response to criti­cisms. Repairs, enlargement, renovation: reassessment or change of attitudes or character; personal growth. Damage, structural faults: faults in character structure; hurts such as broken relationship; bodily illness. House falling down, burn­ing: big changes in attitudes; leaving old standards or depen­dencies behind; sickness: see last example in falling. Cramped house: feeling of need for personal change; feeling restricted in home environment or in present personal atti­tudes. Kitchen: creativity; nourishing oneself; mother role; diet: see cooking. Living room, personal leisure; space’ to be oneself, everyday life. Dining room: appetites, social or family contact; mental or psychological diet. Bedroom: pnvacy, sex; intimacy, rest: see bed under furniture. Study, library: mental growth, mind. Larder: hungers, sensual satisfaction. Toilet: privacy, release of tension; letting go of emotions, fantasies or desire which we need to discharge: see toilet. Nursery, child’s bedroom: feelings about your children; one’s own childhood feelings and memories. Floor: basic attitudes and confidence; what supports you, such as health and good will of others. Ceiling: boundary of ideas or awareness. Row of houses: other people. See room; stairs; wall; attic in this entry. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Hunting wild game can point to the need to hunt down prospects for your business. However, hunting down your animal power may be a negative response to giving up your supernatural or mystical powers.

For woman, hunting in a dream may represent that she is husband hunting.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ariadne's Book of Dream

A storm of high velocity that can create a great deal of destruction, a hurricane in a dream is often a response to an extreme emotional situation or trauma in your life, which can leave you with a great deal of emotional debris to cope with. It may reflect extreme moodiness.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Psychological / emotional perspective: In dreams emotions can become exaggerated and a hysterical response suggests that we need to consider very carefully what has thrown us so comprehensively off-balance. Often we can express in dreams what we dare not in waking life. While disturbing, such a dream scenario can lead to healing.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

As can be seen from the entry on hypnosis, the dream process is quite amenable to suggestion and conscious influence. It is probably most helpful to think of this action as similar to the process of memory. In seeking information from memory we hold a question or idea in consciousness, the resulting associated memories or information being largely spontaneous.

The question held directs what information is taken from the enormous pool of memory.

A question might even call together scattered pieces of information which are then put together into a new composite, a new realisation. So the process is not only recall of existing memory, but also creative. It may also access skills, such as the ability to sub­tract one number from another. Because of these factors our conscious queries can influence the process of dreaming, causing them to respond. As dreams have access to our full memory, our creative potential as well as learnt skills, such response to concerns or queries are often of great value.

To make use of this, first consider the query as fully as possible while awake. Look at it from as many viewpoints as possible, talk it over with others. Make note of the areas that are already clear, and what still remains to be clarified. Just before going to sleep, use imagery to put your question to your unconscious resources. Imagine standing before a circle of gentle light—a symbol of one’s total self—and ask it for the information sought. Then, as if you have asked a question of a wise friend, create a relaxed state as if listening for the consid­ered reply. In most cases, dreams which follow will in some way be a response to what is sought, though not necessarily in the way imagined. See dream process as computer; creativity and problem solving in dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

One of Carl Jung s most interesting areas of thought is that of individuation. In a nutshell the word refers to the processes involved in becoming a self-aware human being.

The area of our being we refer to when we say T, ‘me’ or ‘myself’ is our conscious self awareness, our sense of self, which Jung calls the ego.

The autobiography of Helen Keller has helped in understanding what may be the difference be­tween an animal and a human being with self awareness. Helen, made blind and deaf through illness before learning to speak, lived in a dark unconscious world lacking any self awareness until the age of seven, when she was taught the deaf and dumb language. At first her teacher’s fingers touch­ing hers were simply a tactile but meaningless experience. Then, perhaps because she had leamt one word prior to her illness, meaning flooded her darkness. She tells us that ‘noth­ingness was blotted out’. Through language she became a person and developed a sense of self, whereas before there had been nothing.

The journey of individuation is not only that of becoming a person, but also expanding the boundaries of what we can allow ourselves to experience as an ego. As we can see from an observation of our dreams, but mostly from an extensive exploration of their feeling content, our ego is conscious of only a small area of experience.

The fundamental life pro­cesses in one’s being may be barely felt. In many contempo­rary women the reproductive drive is talked about as some­thing which has few connections with their personality. Few people have a living, feeling contact with their early child­hood, in fact many people doubt that such can exist. Because of these factors the ego can be said to exist as an encapsulated small area of consciousness, surrounded by huge areas of ex­perience it is unaware of.

In a different degree, there exists in each of us a drive towards the growth of our personal awareness, towards greater power, greater inclusion of the areas of our being which remain unconscious.

A paradox exists here, because the urge is towards integration, yet individuation is also the process of a greater self differentiation. This is a spontaneous process, just as is the growth of a tree from a seed (the tree in dreams often represents this process of self becoming), but our personal responsibility for our process of growth is neces­sary at a certain point, to make conscious what is uncon­scious.

Because dreams are constantly expressing aspects of indi­viduation it is wonh knowing the main areas of the process. Without sticking rigidly to Jungian concepts—which see indi­viduation as occurring from mid-life onwards in a few individuals—aspects of some of the main stages are as fol­lows. Early babyhood—the emergence of self consciousness through the deeply biological, sensual and gestural levels of experience, all deeply felt; the felt responses to emerging from a non-changing world in the womb to the need to reach out for food and make other needs known. Learning how to deal with a changing environment, and otherness in terms of rela­tionship.

Childhood—learning the basics of motor, verbal and social skills, the very basics of physical and emotional indepen­dence. One faces here the finding of strength to escape the domination of mother—difficult, because one is dependent upon the parent in a very real way—and develop in the psyche a satisfying sexual connection. In dream imagery this means, for the male, an easy sexual relationship with female dream figures, and a means of dealing with male figures in competition (father); see sex in dreams.

The dream of the mystic beautiful woman precedes this, a female figure one blends with in an idealistic sense, but who is never sexual.

The conflict with father—really the internal struggle with one’s image of father as more potent than self—when re­solved becomes an acceptance of the power of one’s own manhood. Women face a slightly different situation.

The woman’s first deeply sensual and sexual love object—in a bonded parent-child relationship—was her mother. So be­neath any love she may develop for a man lies the love for a woman. Whereas a man, in sexual love which takes him deeply into his psyche, may realise he is making love to his mother, a woman in the same situation may find her father or her mother as the love object. In the unconscious motivations which lead one to choose a mate, a man is influenced by the relationship he developed with his mother, a woman is influ­enced by both mother and father in her choice. Example: ‘I went across the road to where my mother’s sister lived. I wanted to cuddle her and touch her bare breasts, but we never seemed to manage this. There were always interruptions or blocks.’ (Sid L).

At these deep levels of fantasy and desire, one has to recog­nise that the first sexual experience is—hopefully—at the mother’s breast. This can be transformed into later fantasies/ dreams/desires of penis in the mouth, or penis in the vagina, or penis as breast, mouth as vagina.

For most of us, however, growth towards maturity does not present itself in such primi­tively sexual ways, simply because we are largely unconscious of such factors. In general we face the task of building a self image out of the influences, rich or traumatic, of our experi­ence. We leam to stand, as well as we may, amidst the welter of impressions, ideas, influences and urges, which constitute our life and body. What we inherit, what we experience, and what we do with these creates who we are.

One of the major themes of individuation is the journey from attachment and dependence towards independence and involved detachment. This is an overall theme we mature in all our life. In its widest sense, it pertains to the fact that the origins of our consciousness lie in a non-differentiated state of being in which no sense of T exists. Out of this womb condi­tion we gradually develop an ego and personal choice. In fact we may swing to an extreme of egotism and materialistic feel­ings of independence from others and nature.

The observable beginnings of this move to independence are seen as our at­tempt to become independent of mother and father. But de­pendence has many faces: we may have a dependent relation­ship with husband or wife; we may depend upon our work or social status for our self confidence; our youth and good looks may be the things we depend upon for our sense of who we are, our self image. With the approach of middle and old age we will then face a crisis in which an independence from these factors is necessary for our psychological equilibnum.

The Hindu practice of becoming a sanyassin, leaving behind family, name, social standing, possessions, is one way of meeting the need for inner independence from these in order to meet old age and death in a positive manner. Most people face it in a quieter, less demonstrative way. Indeed, death might be thought of as the greatest challenge to our identifica­tion with body, family, worldly status and the external world as a means to identity. We leave this world naked except for the quality of our own being.

Meeting oneself, and self responsibility, are further themes of individuation.

The fact that our waking self is a small spot­light of awareness amidst a huge ocean of unconscious life processes creates a situation of tension, certainly a threshold or ‘iron curtain’, between the known and unknown.

If one imagines the spotlighted area of self as a place one is standing in, then individuation is the process of extending the bound­ary of awareness, or even turning the spotlight occasionally into the surrounding gloom. In this way one places together impressions of what the light had revealed of the landscape in which we stand, clues to how we got to be where we are, and how we relate to these. But one may remain, or choose to remain, largely unconscious of self.

The iron curtain may be defended with our desire not to know what really motivates us, what past hurts and angers we hide. It may be easier for us to live with an exterior God or authority than to recognise the ultimate need for self responsibility and self cultivation.

To hide from this, humanity has developed innumerable escape routes—extenonsed religious practice, making scapegoats of other minority groups or individuals, rigid belief in a political system or philosophy, search for samadhi or God as a final solution, suicide. This aspect of our matunng process shows itself as a paradox (common to maturity) of becoming more sceptical, and yet finding a deeper sense of self in its connec­tions with the cosmos. We lose God and the beliefs of humanity’s childhood, yet realise we are the God we searched for. This meeting with self, in all its deep feeling of connec­tion, its uncertainty, its vulnerable power, is not without pain and joy. Example: ‘On the railway platform milled hundreds of people, all men I think. They were all ragged, thin, dirty and unshaven. I knew I was among them. I looked up at the mountainside and there was a guard watching us. He was cruel looking, oriental, in green fatigues. On his peaked cap was a red star. He carried a machine gun. Then I looked at the men around me and I realised they were all me. Each one had my face. I was looking at myself. Then I felt fear and terror’ (Anon).

The last of the great themes of individuation is summed up in William Blake’s words ‘1 must Create a System, or be en- slav’d by another Man’s; I will not Reason and Compare: my business is to Create.’ A function observable in dreams is that of scanning our massive life experience (even a child’s life experience has millions of bits of information) to see what it says of life and survival. Out of this we unconsciously create a working philosophy of what life means to us. It is made up not only of what we have experienced and learnt in the gen­eral sense, but also from the hidden information in the cul­tural riches we have inherited from literature, music, art, the­atre and architecture.

The word hidden” is used because the unconscious ‘reads’ the symbolised information in these sources. It is, after all, the master of imagery in dreams. But unless we expand the boundaries of our awareness we may not know this inner philosopher.

If we do get to know it through dreams, we will be amazed by the beauty of its in­sight into everyday human life.

In connection with this there is an urge to be, and perhaps to procreate oneself in the world. Sometimes this is experi­enced as a sense of frustration—that there is more of us than we have been able to express, or to make real. While physical procreation can be seen as a physical survival urge, this drive to create in other spheres may be an urge to survive death as an identity. Dreams frequently present the idea that our sur­vival of death only comes about from what we have given of ourself to others. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

According to modem theory, the amount of information the human brain can hold is more than is held in all the books in the Library of the British Museum. Gradually it is becoming recognised that informa­tion gathered is not simply what we ‘learn’ from vocal com­munication, or read, or set out to leam. In fact an unimagin­able amount of information gathering has gone on prior to speech, and goes on at an unimaginable speed prior to school years. Consider a small preschool child walking into the gar­den It has learnt gradually to relate to muscular movement, balance and its own motivations and feeling reactions in a way enabling it to walk. It has already grasped thousands of bits of ‘information’ about such things as plants in the garden, the neighbour’s cat, the road outside, possible dangers, safe areas. Stupendous amounts have already been absorbed about interrelationships.

An idea of ‘reality’ in the sense of what is probable, and what would be dangerously out of norm, has been formed. We gather information in ways little recognised. How our parents relate to their environment and to other people is all recorded and leamt from, bringing about enor­mous ‘programming’ affecting how we act in similar circum­stances.

As explained in the entry on the dream as spiritual guide, we have great ability in ‘reading’ symbols, ritual, an, music, body language, architecture, drama, and extracting ‘meaning’ from them. So we have immense stores of information from these sources. Work done with people exploring their dreams over a long period suggests that some of these information resources are never focused on enough to make conscious what we have actually learnt. Sometimes it is enough simply to ask oneself a question to begin to focus some of these resources. Such questions as what social attitude and response to authority did I learn at school? What feeling reaction do I get when I am in the presence of someone I know well? These may help to bring to awareness aspects of information gath­ered but remaining unconscious. These unfocused, or uncon­scious, areas of information can explain why we have appar­ently irrational feeling responses to some people or situations.

the body A lot of what we call the unconscious are basic physiological and psychological functions.

For instance in a modern house, when we flush the toilet, we do not have to bring a bucket of water and fill the cistern again.

A self regu­lating mechanism allows water to flow in and switches it off when full. This is a clever built-in function that had to be done manually at one time. Nowadays we have built into some dwellings fire sprinklers or burglar alarms. Through re­peated actions over thousands or millions of years, many ba­sic functions, or functions only switched on in emergencies, have been built into our being. We do not need to think about them, just as we do not have to give awareness to the fire sprinkling system or toilet each time we walk through a room or flush the toilet. They are therefore unconscious.

Research with animals in connection with rewards and conditioned reflexes has shown that by gradually leading an animal towards a certain performance by rewarding it each time it gets nearer to the goal, it can do the most amazing things. It can increase the circulation of blood to its ear, slow its heart, and in fact influence body functions which were thought to be completely involuntary. Where human beings have learnt to use some of these techniques—such as raising the temperature of an arm at will, or helping to increase the efficiency of the immune system—the actual processes still remain unconscious. In general, however, the body’s func­tions are thought to be outside our awareness, and so are one of the areas of the unconscious. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dreamers Dictionary

Vision: Getting into the wrong sleeve of a jacket: you are baffled about something or have been given wrong information.

Depth Psychology: The jacket indicates the kind of affection you can give and receive.

The state of the jacket is a metaphor for your feelings. See Shirt, Pants, Clothes.

A jacket that is old, worn-out, or has holes means you have been emotionally harmed, but it also suggests that you are finally letting go of old, negative responses (throw the jacket away)!... Dreamers Dictionary

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Being in jail in your dreams may comment on your lack of personal freedom. It may also come as a response to guilt feelings.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Juggling presupposes a learned response and an expertise which we may need spiritually to balance our lives.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

The Language of Dreams

(see Body)

Flexibility. Learn to bend so that you don’t break.

Kneeling represents humility or subjugation, usually with religious overtones.

A fast response that wasn’t necessarily well considered (e.g., a “knee-jerk reaction”)... The Language of Dreams

Ariadne's Book of Dream

The sugary-sweet drink, a favorite of children, may represent the desire for the sweetness of life. It may also comment that you need some good help frcm someone.

The presence of Kool-Aid in a dream may be a response to a sickeningly sweet situation in which you felt oversaturated by someone’s charm-... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ariadne's Book of Dream

The appearance of a lizard delivers the ability to see many dimensions at once.

The view of life as a dream is one that the lizard cames to the individual who needs to expand his or her thinking regarding the greater meaning of life. As the lizard is sometimes difficult to see, it reflects unseen dimensions of the world.

A chameleon, for instance, can represent maintaining a level of invisibility or may commcnt on being in camouflage. Its appearance can also be a response to not noticing the obvious. As a prehistonc reptile, a lizard may come to mention the need to explore your prerecorded history in order to greater understand your present attitudes and beliefs.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Smearing your mascara may be a response to having been smeared by some gossip. Since mascara enhances and brings attention to the eyes, it may comment on a woman’s beauty.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: In a dream, to have a path or the road in front of you meandering – that is, not going in any particular direction – suggests that we very often have to ‘go with the flow’, to simply follow what happens without actually thinking of the direction in which we are going. Sometimes the meandering has a kind of purpose, in that by wandering about in an apparently aimless fashion we are learning to live in the moment and understand our own reactions and responses to the outside world.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

The Language of Dreams

(see Copper, Gold, Iron Ore, Silver) Strength and resiliency.

How is the metal used in the dream? Are you building with it, and if so, what? For example, building a wall out of metal represents a very strong obstacle to intimacy.

As with crystals and gems, each specific metal has different symbolism:

Aluminum: flexibility

• Copper: guidance and control

• Flint: durability and utility

• Iron ore: love, safety, and willpower

• Lead: foundations or delays

• Quicksilver: quick responses

• Steel: rigidity, hard-heartedness

• Tin: improved luck... The Language of Dreams

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Psychological / emotional perspective: In his devotion to the mystical life, the monk in dreams symbolizes an emotional response to a vocation, perhaps to a life of ascetism. He symbolizes holiness – and no matter what religion – that part of us that searches for the divine. He can have the same significance as the hermit or wanderer.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Mosquitoes attacking your body might arrive in a dream as a response to negative influences in your environment. They may point out that someone is feeding on your life force and leaving a swelling imtation.

A mosquito may appear to advise that you stop letting others suck your blood. (See Insect.)... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ariadne's Book of Dream

The neck supports the head and thus may be vividly portrayed to signify strength and tenacity.

A long neck may signify- high ideals.

A short neck may represent a stout or brave individual.

A whiplash injury may be a response ro a crippling clash with someone.

The neck may also represent crucifixion in that Jesus’ head hung down on the cross.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘At about two or three in the morning my wife Brenda and I were suddenly awoken from sleep by a noise. As we lifted our heads to listen we identified it as the handle on our children’s bedroom door being turned.

The house only had two bedrooms, and the children’s room was directly opposite ours. Both of us had had the same thought—”Oh no, it’s the children again.” Much to our annoyance they had been waking in the middle of the night claiming it was morning and time to play. We had tried to suppress it, but here it was again.

As these thoughts went through our minds we heard the sound of feet clomping down the stairs. This was strange as the children usually stayed in their room. Brenda got up, de­termined to get whoever it was back into bed. I heard her switch the light on, go down the stairs, switch the sitting room light on, and I followed her via the sounds of her movement as she looked in the kitchen and even toilet—we didn’t have a bathroom. Then up she came again and opened the children’s door—strange because we had assumed it had been opened. When she came back into our room she looked puzzled and a little scared. “They’re all asleep and in bed ‘ she said. ‘We talked over the mystery for some time, trying to under­stand just how we had heard the door handle rattle then foot­steps going down the stairs, yet the door wasn’t open. Also, the door handles on our doors were too high for the children to reach without standing on a chair. There was a stool in the children’s bedroom they used for that, yet it wasn’t even near the door when Brenda opened it.

Having no answer to the puzzle we stopped talking and settled to wait for sleep again. Suddenly a noise came from the children’s bedroom. It sounded like the stool being dragged and then the door handle turning again but the door not opening. “You go this time” Brenda said, obviously disturbed.

‘I opened our door quickly just in time to see the opposite door handle turn again. Still the door didn’t open. I reached across, turned the handle and slowly opened the door. It stopped as something was blocking it. Just then my daughter Helen’s small face peered around the door—high because she was standing on the stool. Puzzled by what had happened, I was careful what I said to her. “What do you want love?” I asked.

‘Unperturbed she replied, “I want to go to the toilet.” The toilet was downstairs, through the sitting room, and through the kitchen.

‘Now I had a clue so asked, “Did you go downstairs be­fore?”

“Yes,” she said, “but Mummy sent me back to bed.” * (Tony C).

This is an unusual example of an out of body experience (OBE). Mostly they are described from the point of view of the person projecting, and are therefore difficult to corroborate. Here, three people experience the OBE in their own way. From Tony and Brenda’s point of view what happened caused sensory stimuli, but only auditory. Helen’s statement says that she was sure she had physically walked down the stairs and been sent back to bed by her mother. Tony and Brenda felt there was a direct connection between what they were think­ing and feeling—get the children back to bed—and what Helen experienced as an objective reality.

OBEs have been reported in thousands in every culture and in every period of history.

A more general experience of OBE than the above might include a feeling of rushing along a tunnel or release from a tight place prior to the awareness of independence from the body. In this first stage some people experience a sense of physical paralysis which may be fright­ening (see paralysis). Their awareness then seems to become an observing point outside the body, as well as the sense of paralysis. Then there is usually an intense awareness of one­self and surroundings, unlike dreaming or even lucidity. Some projectors feel they are even more vitally aware and rational than during the waking state. Looking back on one’s body may occur here. Once the awareness is independent of the body, the boundaries of time and space as they are known in the body do not exist. One can easily pass through walls, fly, travel to or immediately be in a far distant place, witnessing what may be, or appears to be, physically real there.

Sir Auckland Geddes, an eminent British anatomist, de­scribes his own OBE, which contains many of these features. Example: Becoming suddenly and violently ill with gas­troenteritis he quickly became unable to move or phone for help. As this was occurring he noticed he had an A and a B consciousness.

The A was his normal awareness, and the B was external to his body, watching. From the B self he could see not only his body, but also the house, garden and sur­rounds. He need only think of a friend or place and immedi­ately he was there and was later able to find confirmation for his observations. In looking at his body, he noticed that the brain was only an end organ, like a condensing plate, upon which memory and awareness played.

The mind, he said, was not in the brain, the brain was in the mind, like a radio in the play of signals. He then observed his daughter come in and discover his condition, saw her telephone a doctor friend, and saw him also at the same time.

Many cases of OBE occur near death, where a person has died* of a hean attack for instance, and is later revived. Be­cause of this there are attempts to consider the possibility of survival of death through study of these cases. In fact many people experiencing an OBE have a very different view of death than prior to their experience.

Early attempts to explain OBEs suggested a subtle or astral body, which is a double of our physical and mental self, but able to pass through walls. It was said to be connected to the physical body during an OBE by a silver cord—a son of life­line which kept the physical body alive. This is like the con­cept that the people we dream about are not creations of our own psyche, but real in their own right. Whatever one may believe an OBE to be, it can be observed that many people in this condition have no silver cord, and have no body at all, but are simply a bodiless observer, or are an animal, a geo­metric shape, a colour or sound (see identity and dreams).

The person’s own unconscious concepts of self seem to be the factor which shapes the form of the OBE. If, therefore, one feels sure one must travel to a distant point, then in the OBE one travels.

If one believes one is immediately there by the power of thought, one is there.

If one cannot conceive of existing without a body, then one has a body, and so on.

This approach explains many aspects of the OBE, but there is still not a clear concept of what the relationship with the physical world is.

The many cases of OBE which occur during a near-death experience also suggest it may be connected with a survival response to death; not necessarily as a way of trying to transcend death, but perhaps as a primeval form of warning relatives of death.

If there is survival of death, then the OBE may be an anticipatory form, or a preparatory condition lead­ing to the new form. See hallucinations, hallucinogens. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘It starts as a dream, but I gradually become aware that I cannot move.

The harder I try to move the worse it gets and I become very fnghtened. I can neither move nor wake myself up. Sometimes I feel as if I am leaving my body. But to deal with the fear I have learnt—it’s a recur­ring thing—to stop struggling, knowing that I will eventually wake’ (Susan Y). This is a common experience which may be due to the fact the body is paralysed during periods of the dream process; all brain signals to the voluntary muscles are inhibited. This is not sensed as a problem if we are uncon­sciously involved in a dream.

If enough self awareness arises in the dream state, then awareness of the inability to move may occur, along with the anxiety this can arouse. Another factor is illustrated by what Susan says—the harder she tries to move the worse it gets. Our unconscious is very open to suggestion.

If this were not so we would lack necessary sur­vival responses. In a dimly lit situation we may mistake a shape for a lurking figure. Our body reactions, such as heart­beat, react to the mistake as if it is real, until we gain fresh information. Whatever we feel to be real becomes a fact as far as our body reactions are concerned.

The fear that one cannot move becomes a fact because we believe it. When Susan re­laxes, and thereby drops the fear of paralysis, she can be free of it. This applies to anything we feel is true—we create it as an internal reality. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

For a man the penis represents more than simply his sexual appetite. It depicts the whole drive of life through his glandular system which develops the body type he has, pre­disposes his body towards male sexual characteristics; brings a cenain creative explosiveness to his personality, creates urges towards fatherhood and loving his woman, with con­nected desires to supply the needs of family if he is emotion­ally healthy.

The positive aspect of the penis/masculinity is for him to demand his woman meets his maleness, his canng aggression, his sexual desire, with her own fiery energy and strength. In general, direct reference to sexual feelings, fears, or problems. As these can be quite complex several examples are given below.

Example: ‘So for the third time I held the woman and made love.

The woman’s vagina was like a (lower, I don’t mean to look at, but in physical sensation. My penis felt like it was penetrating petals of flesh and touching with great plea­sure a central receptive area I was left with the feeling of being able to make love again and again without any negative effects. It was a very positive and healthy feeling’ (John T). John is feeling confident about his sexual drive. Although a powerful drive, subtle feelings and fears have an intense influ­ence not only on the pleasure of sex, but also the response of the physical organs.

The relationship with the penis and sex act in one s dream shows what fears, hurts or attitudes are influencing the sexual flow. See castration.

In a woman’s dream, one’s relationship with, desire for, a mate; relationship with one’s own male self—ambition, work capability, aggression, intellect; depicts the relationship with, genital sexuality with, one’s panner. As with Sally in the next example, the events in the dream define the problem or rela­tionship. Example: ‘My lover Terry, myself and another woman are all on our bed.

The other woman seemed very sure of herself and kissed Terry in a very intimate way, he doing the same to her as I lay very near to both of them. Then Terry stuck his bottom in the air and staned to lick my chest and breast. I found myself licking around the penis, felt I was under some kind of pressure from both the other two to do so but didn’t feel too shattered as I did it with love for Terry, but I had a bitter taste in my mouth’ (Sally P). In talking about this dream Sally said she often struggled with what she wanted and what her panner wanted in sex. She might go along with his needs, but not find it palatable. Even if she did do it with some love, it might have a bad taste in her mouth*.

Example: T felt as if I were as one with Terry and I realised he was trying to make a journey into his mother s vagina, as his penis. Her vagina looked like a long dark tunnel and was threatening to him. I said, “You haven’t given your mother satisfaction and you say you will not.” Then he was really smashed up in body. Withdrawing into a garden with a high green hedge. I took a leaf from the hedge and began to pull it apan with my hands. Terry said, “Look what you are doing, teasing me.” I felt withdrawal wasn’t the way and staned to follow him, walking alongside the hedge. I said, “It feels like you are strangling me, so why don’t you do it and kill me?” (We have been going through a lot of sexual withdrawal, Terry saying his sexuality was his to do with as he wanted.)’ (Sally P). This second dream of Sally’s is a shrewd summing up of Terry’s sexual fears. In fact Terry suffered a great deal of anxi­ety about sex, and later uncovered the son of fear and desire to avoid giving his mother satisfaction in becoming a full blooded man shown in the dream. Our unconscious is a very capable psychologist, and while Terry in Sally’s dream repre­sents her insights regarding him—and must not be seen as a statement of fact about Terry—such insights are often enor­mously useful in dealing with relationship difficulties.

Example: ‘Was in a house with my wife. Outside the door was something which wanted to come into her—an invisible being. We were frightened and it said “Do not be afraid, I want you to put your penis in your wife and wait for me to activate you. In that way you will form a body for me.” I woke and realised the dream was moving me to parenthood. Al­ready having three children I realised this would mean an­other 20 years of responsibility. Nevertheless my wife and I made love. Two weeks later I dreamt my wife was pregnant with a son. In fact nine months later she bore a son’ (Nigel I). In this interesting dream sequence the penis is Nigel’s drive to be a father. See castrate; bed; knob; pole; reptiles; sausage; examples in flower and tunnel. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Several people in dream: not feeling lonely; involve­ment of many aspects of oneself in what is being dreamt about; social ability. Large crowds: enormous involvement of self in issue, one’s relationship or feelings about the social environment one lives in; in groups we have a feeling of being looked at or on view—how we relate to that may be depicted by what we are doing in the dream group. See party; roles.

Example: ‘I was outdoors with a group of people acting as leader. We were in the middle of a war situation with bullets playing around us. Maybe aeroplanes were also attacking. I was leading the group from cover to cover, avoiding the bul­lets’ (Paul W). Despite feeling attacked, either by external events, or from inner conflicts, Paul is using leadership skills to deal with his own fears and tendencies.

If a friend told us he had just had an argument with his wife and was going to leave her, we might sit down and counsel them by listening and helping them to son out the hun feelings from their long- term wishes. We might point out they had felt this way before, but it passed—in other words give feedback they had missed. In a similar way, our various emotions and drives often need this son of skill employed by ourself. This unifies us, leading to coping skills as in Paul’s dream.

Example: Walking alone through a small town. I was heading for a place that a group of people, in a street parallel to mine, were also heading for.

A person from the group tried to persuade me that the right way to get to the place was along the street the group was walking. I knew the street did not matter, only the general direction.

The person was quite dis­turbed by my independence. It made him or her feel uncenain co have their leader apparently questioned. I felt uncenain too for a moment’ (Ivor S).

A group of people, as in Ivor’s dream, can also depict how one meets the pressure of social norms. As social relationship is one of the most imponant factors outside personal survival—and survival depends upon it— such dreams help us to clarify our individual contact with society. Human beings have an unconscious but highly devel­oped sense of the psychological social environment. Ivor’s dream shows something we are all involved in—how we are relating to humans collectively. Are we in conflict with group behaviour and direction? Do we conform, but perhaps have conflict with our individual drives? Do we find a way between the opposites? Much of our response is laid down in child­hood and remains unconscious unless we review it.

In some dreams, a group of people represent what is meant by the word God. This may sound unlikely, but the uncon­scious, because it is highly capable of synthesis, often looks at humanity as a whole. Collectively humanity has vast creative and destructive powers which intimately affect us as individu­als. Collectively it has performed miracles which, looked at as an individual, appear impossible. How could a little human being build the Great Pyramid, or a space shuttle? The Bible echoes this concept in such phrases as Whatever you do to the least of one of these, you do to me. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: I went back in time in circles, almost as if going unconscious. I went back and back and then there came this awful smell such as I’ve never expe­rienced. I always felt it was the smell of death. I would wake ternfied. One night my husband, a practical and down to eanh man, said he would read me to sleep to see if it helped me not to have the dream. It made no difference, I still had the nightmare. Imagine my surprise though. He said “I knew you’d had the dream again for there was an awful smell in the room for a minute” (Mrs E C).

A smell can remind us of a particular situation or person. Odour attracts, repels, relaxes or offends, and so depicts feeling responses and intuition, and may summarise what we feel about a person or situation. Frequently in dreams a smell expresses an intuition of some­thing rotten in one’s life if the smell is bad—rotten might mean ‘bad’ emotions felt in a relationship, a hunch or feelings about something, as in the example; memories. Good smell: good feelings; non-verbalised intimations or love.

Also explainable by the large number of idioms regarding smell. Idioms: on the right scent; throw someone off the scent; in bad/good odour with; odour of sanctity; smell a rat; smell of greasepaint; smells fishy; something stinks to high heaven; like stink; raise a stink; what you did stinks. See nose under body. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Rising up from the ashes, the phoenix represents a personal transformation through death and rebirth. It may fly into a dream as a response to events that dismember the ego and bnng about a strengthening of the soul and spirit of the individual.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Dreaming about the police could symbolize many different things, so please consider all of the details carefully.

If the police are chasing you, it suggests that you may be feeling some guilt about something that you have done or have been thinking of doing.

The police could be addressing Karmic Law as well as the laws in our physical world.

If you are feeling that you can’t meet all of your obligations and fear repercussions due to an unmet commitment, the police may be an unwelcome sight. On a more positive note and depending on the details of your dream, the police could symbolize support and protection. Your emotional response to the dream will provide you with good clues to interpreting this dream accurately. Old dream interpretation books say that dreaming about police is an indication that you will obtain unexpected assistance with a current problem.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

If we keep a record of our dreams it will soon become obvious that some of our dream themes, charac­ters or places recur again and again. These recurrences are of various types.

A cenain theme may have begun in childhood and continued throughout our life—either without change, or as a gradually changing series of dreams. It might be that the feature which recurs is a setting, perhaps a house we visit again and again, but the details differ. Sometimes a senes of such dreams begin after or dunng a particular event or phase of our life, such as puberty or marriage.

Example: ‘This dream has recurred over 30 years. There is a railway station, remote in a rural area, a central waiting room with platform going round all sides. On the platform mill hundreds of people, all men I think. They are all ragged, thin, dirty and unshaven. I know I am among them. I looked up at the mountainside and there is a guard watching us. He is cruel looking, oriental, in green fatigues. On his peaked cap is a red star. He carries a machine gun. Then I looked at the men around me and I realise they are all me. Each one has my face. I am looking at myself. Then I feel fear and terror (Anon.).

The theme of the dream can incorporate anxious emotions, such as the above example, or any aspect of experi­ence. One woman, an epileptic, reports a dream which is the same in every detail and occurs every night. In general such dreams recur because there are ways the dreamer habitually responds to their internal or external world. Because their attitude or response is unchanging, the dream which reflects it remains the same. It is noticeable in those who explore their dreams using such techniques as described under dream pro­cessing that recurring themes disappear or change because the attitudes or habitual anxieties which gave rise to them have been met or transformed.

A recurring environment in a dream where the other fac­tors change is not the same. We use the same words over and over in speech, yet each sentence may be different.

The envi­ronment or character represents a particular aspect of oneself, but the different events which surround it show it in the changing process of our psychological growth. Where there is no such change, as in the examples above, it suggests an area of our mental emotional self is stuck in a habitual feeling state or response.

Some recurring dreams can be ‘stopped’ by simply receiv­ing information about them. One woman dreamt the same dream from childhood. She was walking past railings in the town she lived in as a child. She always woke in dread and perspiration from this dream. At 40 she told her sister about it.

The response was ‘Oh, that’s simple. Don’t you remember that when you were about four we were walking past those railings and we were set on by a bunch of boys. Then I said to them, ‘Don’t hurt us, our mother’s dead!” They left us alone, but you should have seen the look on your face.’ After realis­ing the dread was connected with the loss of her mother, the dream never recurred. Another woman who repeatedly dreamt of being in a tight and frightening place, found the dream never returned after she had connected it to being in the womb.

Recurring dreams, such as that of the railings, suggest that pan of the process underlying dreams is a self regulatory (homocostatic) one.

The dream process tries to present trou­blesome emotions or situations to the conscious mind of the dreamer to resolve the trauma or difficulty underlying the dream.

An obvious example of this is seen in the recurring nightmare of a young woman who felt a piece of cloth touch her face, and repeatedly woke her family with her screams. Her brother, tiring of this, one night woke her from her screams and made her talk about her feelings. His persistence gradually revealed that she associated the cloth with the burial shroud of her grandmother. This brought to the surface grief and feelings about death she had never allowed herself to feel before.

The nightmare never returned. See nightmares; dream processing. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Premier in Dream Dictionary

Repetitive dreams are a clear message from our dreaming mind that we are stuck in a particular mind set or behavioural cycle.

• If a dream continues to repeat itself, it is worth exploring it’s meaning as it needs your conscious understanding and action in order to resolve something in your emotional make-up.

• Recurring dreams can be a trauma relieving response to the original event that triggered them.... The Premier in Dream Dictionary

Ariadne's Book of Dream

A referee as a character in your dreams may point to some problem that needs mediation. He may ask you to follow the rules of the game in any of your social interactions. His appearance may be a response to your own intervention in the arguments of others.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Larder

1- The refrigerator is a symbol of preservation. In dreams this becomes self preservation and suggests we may be turning cold emotionallv or sexually.

To dream of rotten food in a refrigerator suggests we feel we may not be being sustained properly by those around us.

2- To dream of refrigerating leftover food indicates we are storing up resentment. This, in turn, will ‘cool down’ our own responses to love and affection.

3- Religious austerity can be pictured as a refrigerator.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Psychological / emotional perspective: To dream of refrigerating leftover food indicates we are storing up resentment. This, in turn, will ‘cool down’ our own responses to love and affection.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

See response... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Animals

1- Reptiles in dreams link with our basic and instinctive reactions and responses. WTien there is a basic urge such as a need for food, sex, etc. - we sometimes cannot face it full on, but will symbolise it as a reptile.

2- When there is a need to understand why we do things, we first need to control our basic drives. Many reptilian dreams arc about control or management. Control of a crocodile would suggest some fear of an aggressive nature. Feeding a lizard or stroking a snake can be very simply interpreted.

3- With understanding of the basic urges and the way to manage them we can create a firm foundation. From there we can progress spiritually.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: Reptiles in dreams link with our basic and instinctive reactions and responses. When there is a basic urge – such as a need for food, sex, etc. – We sometimes cannot face it full on, but will symbolize it as a reptile.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Our basic spinal and lower brain reactions, such as fight or flight, reproduction, attraction or repulsion, sex drive, need for food and reaction to pain. This includes the fundamental evolutionary ability to change and the urge to survive—very powerful and ancient processes. Our relationship with the reptile in our dreams depicts our relat- edness to such forces in us, and how we deal with the im­pulses from the ancient pan of our brain.

Modern humans face the difficulty of developing an inde­pendent identity and yet keeping a working relationship with the primitive, thus maturing/bringing the primitive into an efficiently functioning connection with the present social world.

The survival urge at base might be kill or run, but it can be transformed into the ambition which helps, say, an opera singer meet difficulties in her career. Also the very primitive has in itself the promise of the future, of new aspects of human consciousness. This is because many extraordinary human functions take place unconsciously, in the realm of the reptile/spine/lower brain/right brain/autonomic nervous sys­tem. Being unconscious they are less amenable to our waking will. They function fully only in some fight or flight, survive or die, situations.

If we begin to touch these with consciousness, as we do in dreams, new functions are added to conscious­ness. See The dream as extended perception under ESP and dreams.

frog

Unconscious life or growth processes which can lead to transformation (the frog/prince story); the growth from child­hood vulnerability—tadpole to frog—therefore the process of life in general and its wisdom. Frogspawn: sperm, ovum and reproduction.

lizard

Example: ‘My wife and I saw a large lizard on the wall near a banana. It was there to catch the flies.

The lizard turned so it was facing away from us—head up the wall. We then were able to see it had large wing-like flaps which spread from its head in an invened V. With amazement we saw on these flaps wonderful pictures, in full colour, of birds. In fleet­ing thoughts I wondered if the bird “paintings” were to attract birds, or were some form of camouflage. But I felt cenain the lizard had “painted” these wonderful pictures with its uncon­scious an’ (David T). Generally, a lizard is very much the same as a snake, except it lacks the poisonous aspect; aware­ness of unconscious or instinctive drives, functions and pro­cesses. In the above dream, the banana is both David’s plea­sure and sexuality, while the lizard is the creativity emerging from his unconscious through the attention he is giving it—he is looking at the lizard. Chameleon: either one’s desire to fade into the background, or adaptability.

snake

Example: A small snake about a foot long had dropped down my shirt neck. I could feel it on the left side of my neck Fearing it was poisonous and might bite me, I moved very slowly. At one point I put my head on the ground, hoping the snake would wish to crawl away. It did not. Then I was near an elephant I loved, and hoped it would remove the snake. It did not. Even as I slept I felt the snake was an expression of the attitude of not shanng myself with anybody except family’ (David T).

For months prior to the above dream David had experienced a great deal of neck pain. After dis­cussing the dream with his wife, and realising much of his thinking and feeling was intumed, the pain disappeared. So the snake was both poisoner’ and ‘healer’. This may be why snakes are used as a symbol of the medical profession.

The Hebrew word for the serpent in the Garden of Eden is Nahash, which can be translated as blind impulsive urges, such as our instinctive drives.

So, generally, snakes depict many different things, but usu­ally the life process.

If we think of a person’s life from con­ception to death, we see a flowing moving event, similar in many ways to the speeded up films of a seed growing into a plant, flowering and dying.

The snake depicts the force or energy behind that movement and purposiveness—the force of life which leads us both to growth and death. That energy —like electricity in a house, which can be heat, power, sound and vision—lies behind all our functions. So in some dreams the snake expresses our sexuality, in others the rising of that energy up our body to express itself as digestion—the intesti­nal snake; as the healing or poisonous energy of our emotions and thoughts.

Example: ‘I was in a huge cathedral, the mother church. I wanted to go to the toilet/gents. As I held my penis to urinate it became a snake and reached down to the urinal to drink. It was thirsty. I struggled with it, pulling it away from the un­clean liquid. Still holding it I walked to a basin and gave it pure water to drink’ (Bill A). Here the connection between snake and sexuality is obvious. But the snake is not just Bill’s penis. It is the direction his sexual urges take him he is strug­gling with. Out of his sense of love and connection with life— the cathedral—he wants to lift his drive towards something which will not leave him with a sense of uncleanness. Snake in connection with any hole: sexual relatedness.

A snake biting us: unconscious worries about our health, frustrated sexual impulse, our emotions turned against our­selves as internalised aggression, can poison us and cause very real illness, so may be shown as the biting snake. Snake biting others: biting remarks, a poisonous tongue.

A crowned or light-encircled snake: when our ‘blind impulses’ or instinctive or unconscious urges and functions are in some measure inte­grated with our conscious will and insight, this is seen as the crowned snake or even winged snake. It shows real self awareness and maturity. In coils of snake: feeling bound in the ‘blind impulses’ or habitual drives and feeling responses. Instincts and habits can be redirected, as illustrated by Hercu­les’ labours. Snake with tail in mouth: sense of the circle of life—binh, growth, reproduction, aging, death, rebirth; the eternal. Snake coiling up tree, pole, cross: the blind instinctive forces of life emerging into conscious experience—in other words the essence of human expenence with its involvement in pain, pleasure, time and eternity; the process of personal growth or evolution; healing because personal growth often moves us beyond old attitudes or situations which led to inner tension or even sickness. Snake in grass: sense or intuition of talk behind your back; danger, sneakiness. Colours: green, our internal life process directed, perhaps through satisfied feelings, love and creativity, into a healing process or one which leads to our personal growth and positive change; white, eternal aspect of our life process, or becoming con­scious of it; blue, religious feelings or coldness in relations. See colours; anxiety dreams; death and rebirth, the self under archetypes; dreams and Ancient Greece; cellar under house, buildings; hypnosis and dreams; jungle; paralysis. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Eating in a restaurant may point to concerns about being nurtured in a social situation. Being in a restaurant and waiting for hours to be served may come as a response to a frustrating experience around getting your emotional needs met.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Since a rocket explodes in space, it is often a response to sexual ecstasy. It may also mention that it is time to launch your ideas or a business. Your project will take off.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

My Dream Interpretation

To dream about a sand storm represents unexpressed fears or emotions, such as anger, rage, turmoil, etc. It is possible that you feel the “sands of time” are passing you by, and you are being left behind. On a more positive note, this dream can also signify the rising of spirit within, in response to overwhelming challenges.

If you dream of taking cover from the storm, your real life troubles should quickly blow over. Stay strong!... My Dream Interpretation

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Screaming in a dream may represent the act of giving expression to your fears or anger. It may compensate for holding back your emotions in waking life. It may also be a response to a night terror or bad dream.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

of the universe dreams Writers commonly quote the experience of William James who, while under anaesthetic, dreamt he found the secret of the universe. What he was left with was the doggerel ‘Higamus Hogumus women are mo­nogamous—Hogumus Higamus, men are polygamous’ The conclusion is that dreams cannot be truly revelatory. While it may be true to say that some such dreams contain little which adds to the dreamer’s understanding, some dreams give in­sights which profoundly alter the dreamer’s future attitudes or actions.

Revelatory dreams are more common to men than women. This may be because more men concern themselves with questions of what the universe is.

If the dreamer creates a mental or emotional tension in themselves through the inten­sity with which they pursue such questions—and we need to accept that often such intensity anses out of anxiety regarding death and one’s identity—then the self-regulatory process of dreaming might well produce an apparent revelation to ease the tension. On the opposite tack, research into mental func­tioning during dreaming, or in a dreamlike state as in research using LSD, shows that there is an enormously increased abil­ity to access associated ideas, allow feeling responses and achieve novel viewpoints. Freud pointed out that dreams have access to greater memory resources and associated ideas. P H. Stafford and B.H. Golightly, in their book dealing with LSD as an aid to problem solving, say that this dreamlike state en­ables subjects to ‘form and keep in mind a much broader picture . . . imagine what is needed—for the problem—or not possible . . . diminish fear of making mistakes*. One subject says ‘1 had almost total recall of a course I did in thermodynamics; something I had not given any thought to in years.’

Although humans have such power to scan enormous blocks of information or experience, look at it from new an­gles, sift it with particular questions in mind and so discover new connections in old information, there are problems, oth­erwise we would all be doing it.

The nature of dream con­sciousness, and the faculties described, is fundamentally dif­ferent to waking awareness, which limits, edits, looks for specifics, avoids views conflicting with its accepted norm, and uses verbalisation.

A nonverbal, symbolic scan of massive in­formation is largely lost when translated to waking conscious­ness.

My experience is that the content of revelatory dreams is almost wholly lost on waking.

If the individual explores the dream while awake, however, and dares to take consciousness into the realm of the dream, then the enormous waves of emotional impact, the massive collection of details, the per­sonality changing influence of major new insights, can be met.

The reason most of us do not touch this creative process is in fact the same reason most of us do not attempt other daring activities—it takes guts. See creativity and problem solving in dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

This is one of the major aspects of dreaming. Unless we are born blind, virtually every dream shows us looking at, seeing or viewing the events, objects, environment and people of the dream. In a word count from a sample of 1,000 dreams, the words see, saw, look, looking occurred 1,077 times. This is the highest occurrence of any words in the sample. Next were feel, feelings, felt with a score of 855, and house, houses with 412.

This suggests that dreams are almost entirely about giving attention to, being aware of, being confronted by, considering or realising some aspect of the enormously wide range of experience which human consciousness meets. Therefore, whatever appears in the dream shows we are giving some thought to, feeling or confronting what is depicted. During each day we meet, in sensory impressions, in memory, in emotion, in thought, a huge variety of things. It is therefore of great interest what comparatively few subjects our spontane­ous dream response chooses to give attention to out of all the range. It seems likely these chosen areas are important to us.

Looking at something implies our attitudes or response to what is seen. Being looked at by someone else in the dream suggests seeing oneself from a viewpoint which is not our norm. By actually attempting to stand in the role of the other person, as described in dream processing, we can become conscious of this different viewpoint. By standing in our own role in the dream, and actually taking time to consider what it is we are ‘seeing, and the impressions involved, we can ‘see’ or become aware of what the dream is getting us to look at regarding ourself. Idioms: from the look of things; look after, look askance at; look at; look before you leap; look blue, look down on; look for, look forward to; look into; look out, look over something; look small; look the other way; look up to; look for a fight; not like the look of; as far as I can see; as I see it; do you see what I mean; I’ll see about that; I see, see over something; overseer; see eye to eye; see life; see red; see which way the wind blows; catch sight of; get out of my sight, in sight of; lose sight of; out of sight, out of mind, second sight; at first sight. See searching. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Shark offers the medicine or power to confront your greatest fears. It can come as a response to a fearful situation. Once the fear is conquered, the courage and strength of Shark can deliver you to the bottom of the ocean of fear and beyond the limits of what you perceive as safe waters in order to conquer negative emotions. Being attacked by a shark in a dream might signify a confrontation with someone who could take advantage of your naivete.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- In dreams a shell represents the defences we use in order to prevent ourselves from being hurt. We can create a hard shell in response to previous hurt, or a soft shell which would indicate that we are still open to being hurt. Shells were also once a unit of currency and in dreams can still be seen as this.

2- A shell carries within it so much symbolism. It can be seen as a magical symbol which holds within it the power of transformation.

The spiral of the shell suggests involution and evolution (going inwards and coming outwards).

The ability to shelter is also symbolised, and being a receptacle it also links with the feminine, emotional side of nature.

3- Spiritually a shell is a miniature representation of the process of life and death.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: In dreams a shell represents the defences we use in order to prevent ourselves from being hurt. We can create a hard shell in response to previous hurt, or a soft shell, which would indicate that we are still open to being hurt. Shells were also once a unit of currency and in dreams can still be seen as this.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Eating a Snickers bar may be a response to a situation from which you derived a great deal of enjovmcnt. It points to a humorous conversation or interaction. It could be associated with someone with a guod sense of humor.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Wholeness; an all round’ view or a rounded character. Ball: interaction between two people, sexual and otherwise (the ball’ is in your court), in that throwing the ball may show someone trying to get one’s attention and response. Ball games, being thrown a ball: challenges, prowess, compe­tition in the game of life; having and letting go; sex play; masturbation; a man’s ‘balls’; wholeness. Idioms: have a ball, ball at one s feet; one’s eye on the ball; start the ball rolling; new ball game, play ball with someone; he has/hasn’t the balls. See the self under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- Dreaming of a statue is to be linking with the unresponsive, cold side of human nature. We may be worshipping or loving someone and not getting any response.

2- There is a basic side of nature which needs to look up to some- dung and this can be represented in dreams by a statue. Sometimes this statue is representative of an idea or concept rather than a person. Much can be gained by identifying what the statue stands for.

3- Spiritually; as we progress, we come up against the knowledge that we have given value lo something - for instance, a relationship that no longer has significance. It is ‘dead’ and therefore solidified.

If the statue comes to life again, it can be rescued.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: Dreaming of a statue is to be linking with the unresponsive, cold side of human nature. We may be worshipping or loving someone and not getting any response. We come up against the knowledge that we have given value to something that no longer has significance.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ariadne's Book of Dream

A steamroller may point out that you have allowed someone to flatten your spirit. It may be the response to a conversation in which you felt run over by the persuasive ideas of another. Or you may have felt that you have been pushed away from your own intention It may be a response to emotional trauma.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Change in emotional responses; forgiveness; melting of frigidity or emotional distancing through withdrawal of feelings. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- In dreams, to be conscious of a thaw is to note a change in our own emotional responses. We 110 longer have a need to be as emotionally distanced as previously.

2- Psychologically we have the ability to ‘warm up’ a situation, and to melt coldness away.

If we arc aware of coldness within ourselves, on an emotional level we need to discover what the problem is or was, and why we have reacted as we did.

3- A spiritual thaw would suggest the ability to come to terms with old barriers and to become warm and loving.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: In dreams, to be conscious of a thaw is to note a change in our own emotional responses. We no longer have a need to be as emotionally distanced as previously.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dreaming of a thumb suggests awareness of how powerful we are.

The thumb pointing upwards represents beneficial energy, whilst pointing downwards indicates a negative response.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Tires on your vehicle represent the emotional qualities you ride on.

A flat tire may arrive as a response to a big emotional issue that deflated you and stopped your progress temporarily.

A flat tire on the right-hand side might reflect trouble related to the masculine side of the personality, which is associated with reason or logic. One on the left side symbolizes that an emotional issue may have wounded your feminine side or intuitive and receptive nature. Back tires relate to emotional issues of the past, and front tires signify more recent issues. Therefore, a flat left rear tire would metaphoncally represent a big emotional issue from the past that affects your intuition.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Toes help you to walk forward in a balanced manner.1 Therefore, a stubbed or injured toe may appear as a response to an emotional injury that caught you off balance.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Transmission problems in a car or truck may be a response to an inability to shift geans and to proceed with increased power. Problems with transmission may also reflect your denial or inability to receive a message.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Hanging out underwear may be a sign that you are exposing your underlying beliefs, attitudes, and feelings to the world. Looking down and seeing yourself in underwear may be a response to an embarrassing situation in waking life in which you felt exposed.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ariadne's Book of Dream

A vehicle is one of the symbols most commonly found in our dreams, since it literally takes us to new realms and dimensions.

• Dented vehicle: Going out and finding that your vehicle has been dented may come as a response to an event that “dented” your self-esteem. It could come after a personal insult that caused you to feel degraded.

A huge dent may have even damaged your reputation.

• Recreational vehicle: On the open road, this vehicle may represent an early retirement from work. It may signify a desire to travel and see the countryside. It points to a leisurely lifestyle and thus may mention “Take your time and enjoy a little scenery.”... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ariadne's Book of Dream

The scavenger of the bird tribe, the vulture teaches us to honor death as pan of a natural cycle of life.

The vulture picks the meat down to the bone to reveal the power in having examined something down to its internal stnicture or the bare bones.

A vulture may come to liberate you from the fear of death and, in shamanistic terms, to reduce the personality to its original structure.

The vulture also signifies respect for all the dead who have passed on to other levels of evolution.

The appearance of a vulture in a dream may be a response to someone who is taking advantage of what another has accomplished. (See Birds.)... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- Water is usually taken in dreams to symbolise all that is emotional and feminine. It is a mvstcrious substance, given that it has the ability to (low through, over and round objects. It has the quality of being able to wear away anything which gets in its way. Water can also stand for the dreamer’s potential and his ability to create a new life in response to his own inner urgings.

2- Water also represents cleansing, being able to wash away the contamination that we may experience in everyday life. In baptism, water is a cleanser of previously held ‘sins’, often also those inherited from the family. Entering water suggests beginning something new. Deep water signifies either being out of depth, or entering our own subconscious.

3- Spiritual rebirth The Life-force.

Water appears so often in dreams as an image, with so many different meanings, that it is possible only to suggest sonic probable ones. Thus, being immersed in water can suggest pregnancy and birth. Flowing water signifies peace and comfort, while rushing water can indicate passion. Deep water suggests the unconscious, while shallow water represents a lack of essential energy. Going down into water indicates a need to renew one’s strength, to go back to the beginning, while coming up out of the water suggests a fresh start.

To be on the water (as in a boat) can represent indecision or a lack of emotional commitment, while to be in the water but not moving can suggest inertia. Other images associated with water are:

Bathing suggests purification.

Canals svmbolise the birth process.

Dams, islands and other obstacles are conscious attempts to control the force of the water, and therefore our emotions. Diving represents going down into the unconscious, or perhaps trying to find the parts of ourselves which we have suppressed. Drowning highlights our ability to push things into the unconscious only to have them emerge as a force which can overcome us. Floods represent the chaotic side of us, which is usually uncontrollable. This side requires attention when it wells up and threatens to overwhelm us.

Fountains suggest womanhood, and particularly the Great Mother (see Introduction).

Lake

A lake, like a pool, can signify a stage of transition between the conscious and the spiritual Self. When come upon unexpectedly it can give us the opportunity to appreciate and understand ourselves.

To be reflected in a pool indicates the dreamer needs to conic to terms with the Shadow (see Introduction). We must learn to acccpt that there will be a part of ourselves that we do not like very much but, when harnessed, it can give much energy for change. Rivers or streams always represent the dreamer’s life and the way that he is living it. It will depend on the dreamer’s attitude as to whether he see his life as a large river or a small stream.

If the river is rushing by we may feel that life is moving loo quickly for us.

If we can sec the sea as well as the river, we may be aware that a great change must occur or that attention musl be paid to the unconscious within.

If the river is very deep we should perhaps be paying attention to the rest of the world, and how we relate to it. Crossing a river indicates great changes.

If the river causes fear we are perhaps creating an unnecessary difficulty for ourselves.

If the water in the river appears to be contaminated we are not doing the best we can for ourselves.

Sea or ocean The sea very often represents cosmic consciousness, that is, the original chaotic state from which all life emerges. Inherent in that state is all knowledge i.e. completedness, although that may be obscured by our fear of the depths. We do not fear that which we understand.

A shallow sea suggests superficial emotion.

The waves in the sea represent emotion and lust.

A calm sea suggests a peaceful existence, while a stormy sea signifies passion, either negative or positive.

To be conscious of the rise and fall of the tides is to be conscious both of the passage of time and of the rise and fall of our own emotions.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Ariadne's Book of Dream

An element that is associated with the emotions and the subconscious, water reflects our responses to emotional issues. It represents the fluid movement of creative energy as waves or npples coming onto the shore of the conscious mind. In a dream, water represents hidden emotions that need to become fluid and made conscious before being released.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: Water is usually taken in dreams to symbolize all that is emotional and feminine. Water can also stand for our potential and our ability to create a new life for ourselves in response to our own inner urgings. Water also represents cleansing, being able to wash away the contamination that we may experience in everyday life. Water appears so often in dreams as an image, with so many different meanings, that it is possible only to suggest some probable ones. Entering water suggests new beginnings and being immersed in water is a return to the womb and can suggest pregnancy and birth. Flowing water signifies peace and comfort, while rushing water can indicate passion. Deep water suggests the unconscious and can also indicate that we feel out of our depth, while shallow water represents a lack of essential energy.

To be on the water (as in a boat) can represent indecision or a lack of emotional commitment, while to be in the water but not moving can suggest inertia. Going down into water indicates a need to renew one’s strength, to go back to the beginning, while coming up out of the water suggests a fresh start.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Changing external situations, or internal response to situations; our moods and emotions.

The following idioms give indications of the meaning. Idioms: sunny disposition; things don’t look so bnght; things will brighten up; it never rains but it pours, like living under a cloud, things are a bit rough/stormy/overcast. See rain; flood; cloud; snow; light­ning; thunder. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Weather, as being part of the ‘environment’ of the dream, usually indicates our moods and emotions. We are very much aware of changing external situations and have to be careful to adjust our conduct in response to these.

Weather also can indicate our internal responses to situations. If. for instance, there was a storm in our dream our emotions would be stormy, perhaps angry and aggressive.

If we arc watching a very blue, unclouded sky, we may be recognising that we have the ability to keep the situations that we are in under control. We do possess the ability to control internal moods and emotions which may not have been possible in the past. Being aware of the weather would indicate that we need to recognise that we are part of a greater whole rather than just individuals in our own right.

3- Different types of weather maybe symbolic of a spiritual response.

The dreamer requires an answer to a question, for example (see Wind).... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Ariadne's Book of Dream

The qualities of weather appearing in dre; express the alchemy of emotions and thoughts that gent your many moods. Whether it’s stormy or clear blue skies that lie ahead, the weather can offer a prediction of what Is ahead for you. Much of a person’s mood depends on life’s events, which may trigger emotional responses translated into weather conditions in night dreams. Mother Nature’s consequences, such as hurricanes and tornadoes, may come to represent life’s big and little shocks, both of which affect your mood and can alter life’s direction.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Different types of weather may be symbolic of a spiritual response. Sunshine suggests good feeling and happiness, whereas rain might suggest tears. Wind symbolizes the intellect, a windy day might suggest a time for intellectual pursuits.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Psychological / emotional perspective: Weather can indicate our internal responses to situations. If, for instance, there was a storm in our dream our emotions would be stormy, perhaps angry and aggressive.

If we are watching a very blue, unclouded sky, we may be recognizing that we have the ability to keep the situations that we are in under control. We do possess the ability to control internal moods and emotions that may not have been possible in the past. Being aware of the weather would indicate that we need to recognize that we are part of a greater whole rather than just individuals in our own right.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: Weather, as being part of the ‘environment’ of the dream, usually indicates our moods and emotions. We are very much aware of changing external situations and have to be careful to adjust our conduct in response to these.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Whenever we say yes to a person or situation in a dream, we are opening to the influence of that aspect of our­self. It is important to define what leads us to agreement in the dream. Is it that one says yes because of feelings that one ought, one should, or it was expected? Was the yes out of anxiety? Was it said because that was what you agreed with, or was it the most useful response? See no. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Oneself at that age; the attitudes and responses de­veloped at that age.

If dreamer younger than youth: one s potential of growth and change; the part of self growing to­wards that age. See boy, girl. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences


Related Searches