revenge

Revenge, Dream Interpretation


Revealed to avert, for vengeance belongs to god

Depth Psychology: You find yourself in a very difficult situation and blame others, which is usually a mistake. You are thinking of revenge, hoping to get off the hook. Not a good plan!

To dream that you are taking revenge, symbolizes your bitter heart, which will lead to a loss of friends and cause you more problems unless you change your attitude.

To dream that others take revenge on you, warns that there are enemies in your midst and you and have reason to be cautious about trusting others.

Anxious times, humiliation, and a quarrel, but the latter will soon be made up.

1. Previously unknown jealousies, bitterness or hurt feel­ings need to be addressed (to take revenge on someone).

2. Use caution with the feelings of others, reassess behavior toward others (to have revenge taken on the dreamer).

If you dream of seeking revenge you are processing through your anger and feelings of victimhood. Your dream is showing you that what you do to another, you do to yourself. See Karma and Venting Dreams.

To dream of taking revenge, is a sign of a weak and uncharitable nature, which if not properly governed, will bring you troubles and loss of friends.

If others revenge themselves on you, there will be much to fear from enemies.

A dream of taking revenge for a wrong done you ts a forerunner of the loss of a valued friend If you dream of someone else taking revenge on you, it is a presage of a legacy from someone who is not a relative.

To dream of taking revenge prognosticates a bed of sickness for the dreamer (Raphael).



Revenge | Dream Interpretation

Keywords of this dream: Revenge

Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

To dream that your are atacked{sic} from ambush, denotes that you have lurking secretly near you a danger, which will soon set upon and overthrow you if you are heedless of warnings.

If you lie in ambush to revenge yourself on others, you will unhesitatingly stoop to debasing actions to defraud your friends. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

New American Dream Dictionary

1. Revenge or retribution.

2. Severe domestic problems need to be addressed.

3. Deep regret, self-punishment over a past act (to be beaten). ... New American Dream Dictionary

Islamic Dream Interpretation

In a dream, blood represents unlawful or illegal money, or an evil act that will emanate from the person seeing the dream.

If one sees himself dragging his feet through puddles of blood in a dream, it means that he will finance his business from unlawfully earned money, profit from an illegal business or commit a major sin then be caught.

If one sees blood staining his shirt in a dream, it means that someone will lie to him, though he will not recognize it.

If his shirt is stained with blood or pus from pimples in a dream, it means that a thief will lie to him.

If his shirt is stained with the blood of a lion in a dream, it means that an iniquitous person in authority will lie to him and take advantage of him.

If his shirt is stained with the blood of a ram in a dream, it means that a rich, noble and a well respected person will lie to him, and at the end he will consent to accepting corrupt money. Seeing blood flowing from one’s body or from wounds is a sign of good health, safety, or it could mean coming home after a long journey. Drinking human blood in a dream means money, profits, escape from danger, safety from trials and adversities, or it could mean committing a sin then repenting from it. Falling into a pool of blood in a dream means that one will be accused of a murder or of stealing money.

If one sees a valley filled with blood in a dream, it means that he maybe killed in that locality.

If one sees blood emanating out of his body without cupping or cuts in a dream, it means givingmoney to someone. Ifhe is a poor person, then it means receiving money from someone. Ifone sees himselffalling into a cistern which is filled with blood in a dream, it means that someone is seeking revenge from him. Blood in a jar represents a woman in menstruation. Blood in a dream also represents one’s life, strength, wealth, business, helpers, clothing, earning praise or blame, weak points, unlawful food, lack of benefits, loss of business or money or esteem, inability to draw benefits from one’s usual close ones, such as a father, a son, or a business partner, separation through death from one’s beloveds or dear one’s, such as wife or a kin. One’s blood in a dream also represents his own Satan, or an enemy that dwells inside his house. Drinking one’s own blood in a dream means paying one’s debts with second loan, or vanquishing one’s enemy. Bleeding naturally in a dream means peace and comfort. Excess bleeding in a dream means the opposite.

The bleeding of an unwed woman means finding a husband. Bleeding of a pregnant woman in a dream means a miscarriage and for an elderly woman, bleeding means an illness. Ifone sees blood coming from his anus in a dream, it means that he is tainted with the consequences of an evil act, or it could mean a bad deal, or that he has earned unlawful money then walked out of such a deal.

To bleed in a dream also means being a spendthrift, a money wasting family, or it could mean suffering from a venereal disease. (Also see Vascular blockage)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

About Dream Interpretation

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‘one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm’), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‘research workers on dreams’, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‘Les savants ne sont pas curieux’, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‘interpretation of dreams’ is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

About Dream Interpretation

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems

I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‰_÷one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm‰_ª), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‰_÷research workers on dreams‰_ª, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‰_÷Les savants ne sont pas curieux‰_ª, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‰_÷interpretation of dreams‰_ª is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

Dreamers Dictionary

Vision: If you are fencing (with a rapier), it means a quarrel with friends and losing them.

Depth Psychology: Fencing might be a sign of wanting revenge, to get even.

For now try to stay away from fights and quarrels! See Dagger, Rapier.... Dreamers Dictionary

Dreamers Dictionary

Symbol: uThe law of a sinful world is the law of fighting.”

Vision: You are watching a fight: conciliatory words will defuse the tension between other people. Fighting on a battlefield: adversaries, enemies, hate, or envy make your life difficult, but you are able to defend yourself successfully. Witnessing a fight: don’t use the old saving: “living well is the best revenge” as a motto for your life, because: “those who laugh last laugh best!” See Beating.

Depth Psychology: Dreaming about fighting reflects the difficulties you have in balancing conflicting personality traits. Decide which you want to nurture and which you want to minimize—it will restore your peace!... Dreamers Dictionary

Dreamers Dictionary

Vision: Seeing a flea: you would like to take revenge on a certain person. Being bitten by fleas: you are bothered by persons of ill will. Catching a flea: all ordinary’ problems will be solved. Has someone put a wbug” in your ear? See Bug, Flies, Insect.... Dreamers Dictionary

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of a hornet denote vengeful, angry, destructive and out of control emotions; perhaps someone hurt you and you are wanting to sting someone as an act of revenge. Keep in mind what goes around comes around. See Bee.... Strangest Dream Explanations

Dream Symbols and Analysis

Some people perceive hurricanes as nature’s revenge on humans.

To dream of a hurricane reflects a notion of being overwhelmed by strong emotions or drastic changes. Perhaps you are not ready to deal with it yet and this thought has been bothering you.... Dream Symbols and Analysis

Dreamers Dictionary

Symbol: The knife is an instrument of sacrifice and also of execution. See Court, Death. Revenge.

Vision: Looking at a large knife: an unpleasant situation is ahead—a situation to which you have contributed. Seemg a sharp knife: a difficult decision or separation. Looking at a knife and fork: expect a friendly invitation. In a woman’s dream, the knife is either a phallic symbol or represents hidden aggression. What did you do with the knife? Did someone threaten you with the knife? See Cutting, Pocketknife.

Depth Psychology: The knife is a symbol of primitive but dangerous eruptions of violence.

Are you finding yourself on the edge? Who is attacking you with “cutting words”? See Dagger, Weapon.... Dreamers Dictionary

Dreamers Dictionary

Symbol: Lightning is a symbol of the powerful and swift fires of the heavens.

Vision: Dreaming about lightning always points to unpleasant things to come, maybe on the job. Getting hit by lightning means an impending illness or annoying issues; it can also be a timely warning, allowing you to prevent the above. Seeing a quick bolt of lightning, followed by Thunder might indicate sudden, unusual events on the job, or good fortune. Feeling the pain of being struck by lightning: bad news or unexpected hardships will uhit you like lightning.” Seeing a lightning storm means good fortune and new chances. See Weather. Lightning striking your House: expect financial losses, sometimes health problems. See Fire.

Depth Psychology: Lightning symbolizes a sudden discharge of inner tension. It also can be a sign of “lightning-quick insights” (sudden recognition of certain connections, or the solution to a problem). Sometimes it might also be a sudden fear of punishment or the revenge of another person.... Dreamers Dictionary

Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

To dream that you are naked, foretells scandal and unwise engagements.

To see others naked, foretells that you will be tempted by designing persons to leave the path of duty. Sickness will be no small factor against your success.

To dream that you suddenly discover your nudity, and are trying to conceal it, denotes that you have sought illicit pleasure contrary to your noblest instincts and are desirous of abandoning those desires.

For a young woman to dream that she admires her nudity, foretells that she will win, but not hold honest men’s regard. She will win fortune by her charms.

If she thinks herself ill-formed, her reputation will be sullied by scandal.

If she dreams of swimming in clear water naked, she will enjoy illicit loves, but nature will revenge herself by sickness, or loss of charms.

If she sees naked men swimming in clear water, she will have many admirers.

If the water is muddy, a jealous admirer will cause ill-natured gossip about her. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Seeing a pistol in your dream, denotes bad fortune, generally.

If you own one, you will cultivate a low, designing character.

If you hear the report of one, you will be made aware of some scheme to ruin your interests.

To dream of shooting off your pistol, signifies that you will bear some innocent person envy, and you will go far to revenge the imagined wrong. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Dreamers Dictionary

Vision: A closed pocketknife: you are a discreet and unassuming person.

An open pocketknife: you are seething with anger, aggression, and rage—and out for revenge, something you are not yet able to acknowledge. See Knife.... Dreamers Dictionary

Dream Symbols and Analysis

To dream of poison ivy indicates hostile attitudes or scheming thoughts running through your head. It symbolizes jealousy, anger, and revenge. On the other hand, poison ivy may likewise signify getting into a situation that you should avoid.... Dream Symbols and Analysis

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Box; Fist fight; Strike) In a dream, punching someone means speaking to him with roughness. Holding a fist in a dream means abstaining from performing one’s obligatory prayers. Punching someone in a dream also means using base and ignoble words in a fight between believers, or it could mean revenge, indebtedness, a court appeal, a summon or a lawsuit. (Also see Spur)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

Dreamers Dictionary

Symbol: The rod is a symbol of the power of invisible things.

Vision: W alking with a cane or seeing one: you have a good sense of yourself and should continue on your path—even if you have been uncertain at times. Leaning on a cane: you thought you could trust another person, but are now faced with the opposite situation. Getting hit with a cane: you are either learning a painful lesson or want revenge.

A broken cane: a quarrel with a person close to you.

Depth Psychology: The rod, as a phallic symbol, usually refers to sexual needs and desires. See Crutch.... Dreamers Dictionary

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of a scorpion denote feelings of revenge and that you should tread with awareness lest you get stung. This dream is giving you the message to release your resentments otherwise your poisonous thoughts will prevent you from attracting that which you desire.... Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreamers Dictionary

Depth Psychology: The twelve signs of the Zodiac reflect your life and its developmental stages, possibilities, and experiences.

If you meet any one of the following symbols in your dreams, the “central tasks” described below might be important for that month. See Astrology, Planets, Star.

Aries: learn patience and focused action, rein in anger.

Taurus: learn to be more flexible and find your place, rein in your urges.

Gemini: learn to be more sensitive and find a synthesis between that and your tendency to be superficial.

Cancer: learn to be independent and assertive—rein in your self-pity.

Leo: learn what true authority means—rein in your pride.

Virgo: learn to trust—rein in your skepticism toward everything and even-body.

Libra: learn to finally make a decision—rein in your ten- dencv to be dishonest.

Scorpio: learn to say goodbye, to let go—rein in your desire for revenge.

Sagittarius: learn to face unpleasantness—rein in your arrogance.

Capricorn: learn to understand others—curb your tendency to generalize.

Aquarius: learn to do one thing at a time—rein in your restlessness.

Pisces: learn to be alone—rein in your fantasies and your tendency to “run.”... Dreamers Dictionary

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of a soap opera signify that you are being a drama queen or king, glorifying and glamorizing your emotional mood swings from hope to pain and back on this roller coaster called life.

If you dream of a particular soap opera or star, then you are either relating to the story line or fantasizing that it was you. Your dream reflects that you have been participating in revenge, glamour, lust, fantasy, betrayal, and victimhood. See Drama Queen.... Strangest Dream Explanations

Little Giant Encyclopedia

Something secret, monumental. It could be torturing somebody with suspense, but it is often connected to fear of pain.

If you are torturing somebody else, it is usually aggression against your own habits, for which the Other is simply a symbol.

If you are being tortured, you are harming yourself, revealing a tendency toward masochism, which we probably all have.

On the other hand, hidden behind such a dream might be a need for more tension or excitement in your life.

An unconscious sadomasochistic attitude may be clamoring for release. Are you sure that what is called sexual lust is not part of a full range of sexual pleasure? In another sense, these dream situations might be an expression of tension due to repressed feelings of revenge. You may not be willing, except in dreams, to do to others what you feel is being done to you. Those are a few of the scenarios such dreams deal with.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

Dreamers Dictionary

Vision: Seeing a wasp: you have a devious “friend”—don’t get “stung.” Getting stung by a wasp: you have betrayed a friend, who is taking revenge by spreading stories about you.

Depth Psychology: The wasp—unlike the bee—is lazy, hurtful, and often vicious. This describes you or someone in your surroundings who is mean and angry or who hates and wants revenge— defend yourself! See Insects.... Dreamers Dictionary

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