schools

Schools, Dream Interpretation


Schools in our dreams represent places of learning where we receive the lessons we need to grow intellectually and psychologically. Entenng an elementary school represents learning something basic such as balancing your checkbook or getting enough to eat.

A high school may represent that which prepares you for worR in the world or lessons about your spiritual nature. Enrolling in a university or college might represent being ready to leam what it takes to graduate in life. It may represent concerns about your professional career or ways of achieving recognition and status in society.



Schools | Dream Interpretation

Keywords of this dream: Schools

DreamPedia

TEETH

My most popular requests for dream interpretation are by far, dreams about teeth falling out. Apparently this is quite disturbing to people who have this dream...they simply MUST know what it means! In my experience, a dream about one’s teeth falling out usually symbolizes that the dreamer is having a challenge getting their voice heard, or feelings acknowledged. This may be referring to their conversations with a particular person such as their significant other, boss or friend; or can be generalized for people who are shy; to include almost everyone they come in contact with. The dreamer needs to brush up on conversational skills, believe in the value of their own opinion, learn how to be less intimidated by aggressive people, and become more assertive in making their voice heard. Once they do that, this dream (which is a common recurring dream) should evolve, show improvement or disappear altogether.


PEOPLE

Every person that appears in a dream is supposed to represent an aspect of One’s Self, and not actually be about that other person at all. Rather, it is a quality or characteristic about that person that your dream is focusing on, and how it applies to YOU.

Try to think about what aspect(s) this could be. It can be something you admire and wish to follow or incorporate into your own personality. It could be a more negative characteristic that you may dislike intensely in your waking life, but which is telling you something about yourself and your beliefs, judgments or attitude. It could be a call to alter your thinking in some manner, in order to be more open-minded and accepting of this aspect in others and your own personality, because it is hampering your spiritual growth & making life harder for yourself. The other person in your dream is always mirroring something back to you about YOURSELF.

Try to discover what that something is, and go from there. Once you get it through your head that the other person’s appearance in your dream is NOT about them, but really about YOU, then you will be much more successful interpreting your own dreams. This takes constant reinforcing - I still find myself wanting to think it’s about that other person instead of me.

FLYING

usually represents freedom from the physical body, as we experience in sleep & while dreaming where we don’t use our physical bodies but instead use our mental & spiritual bodies to experience our dreams. Everybody seems to have a natural inclination to want to fly, unless that is changed by a fear of flying due to a frightening incident in his or her waking lives. Flying = freedom. This could mean a desire for freedom, an “escape” from restraints in your physical life (like a mini-vacation for the mind) or any number of possibilities. Tie it in with the context of your dream...what were you doing in your dream besides flying? How did it make you feel? Also, the type of flying I’m referring to here is the person flying on their own without an airplane or any aircraft at all. Airplanes & other aircraft are different symbols dealing with spiritual awareness, among other things.


SCHOOL

This type of dream relates to your current “lesson in life,” and if you learn how to interpret it, you’ll find out how you are progressing...yes, folks, you’re still taking tests and getting graded! Our “true selves” are our souls, and not our physical bodies. You are a spirit / soul having a physical dream, not the other way around. Ever feel like your life is like a play, and you are acting out some role that you don’t even understand, even surprising yourself with your actions sometimes? Bingo! When we sleep, that proverbial “Veil of Forgetfulness” that prevents us from “cheating on the test” is lifted, and we are shown what type of progress we are making (or, GULP, not making) and given guidance on what to do next. We always have free will in our waking physical lives, though. If we stubbornly refuse to finish our tests, then we have that right - but we are doomed to repeat it until we pass it. And each time we turn away from the test, the next time it will be more unpleasant until finally we are forced to acknowledge it’s importance for our growth. The things we consider vitally important in our waking physical lives are not nearly as important as the TRUE reason we are here, which is to overcome our shortcomings so that we may get closer to our Source / God / Higher Power. To avoid learning the lesson is like forcing your soul to a fate similar to the mythical Greek god named Sisyphus who was doomed to keep rolling a boulder uphill for eternity, only to watch it roll back down & have to repeat the same tedious hard chore again & again. That sounds like school to me! So pay attention to the messages in dreams about schools, and you may advance faster. Do you really want to repeat kindergarten again?


CAR or VEHICLE

This is supposed to symbolize you in your waking life, in your physical body. Your physical body is used by the soul pretty much like we use a car...it’s driven for awhile and we give it gas / nourishment & repairs as needed until it stops running, and then we go back home. Pay attention to your car, which symbolizes your physical body. Are you behind the wheel, or is someone else in control? You want to be in charge of your life, naturally. What is the color & condition of this vehicle? Do you seem to be driving it the right way, on a safe road in good condition, or is the road rocky, winding, or suddenly ends at a cliff? That would signal that you need redirection. The bigger the vehicle, the more energy you may be successfully using for your daily lessons, depending on the context of your dream. Note all clues as to how you are faring, and make adjustments accordingly.


HOUSE

You drive a car, but typically you LIVE in a house/apartment. Dreams about a house symbolize a larger aspect of your Self, and the aspects of self, which make us whole. Each room is said to symbolize a different aspect of your Self, for example:

An Attic symbolizes your Higher Self, and your spiritual development & progress. Look at other symbols in the attic of your dream, and try to evaluate what they mean. Also pay attention to the feeling(s) you experience in your dream...is it serious, enlightening or what, exactly? All these things are clues for you.

A Bathroom would symbolize the need for cleansing / purging / elimination of something in your life that isn’t quite working, or that has served it’s purpose and now it’s time to move on.


A Kitchen would symbolize the need or act of supplying nourishment or food for the body / mind / soul...whatever is currently “cooking” or developing in your life. If the food is plentiful, you have what you need. If the cupboard is bare, time to go shopping for new nourishment, and you need to figure out what is needed for that “shopping list.”

A Dining Room is similar to the kitchen, but has more to do with immediate needs for supplying & utilizing nourishment, and less with the preparation or taking stock of those needs.

The Main Room or Living Room symbolizes your daily interactions with others, and often you will have other people appearing in your dreams in this room. Remember, they represent aspects of YOUR Self, and not themselves.

(See PEOPLE, above)

Bedrooms symbolize the unconscious mind aspect of your self, rest, dreams, sometimes and sexuality issues in your life.

The Upstairs symbolizes your spiritual awareness aspect of self, or the Higher Self that holds all the keys or knowledge to this life’s role you are acting out, and always has your higher good looked after, no matter how it might seem otherwise.

The Downstairs / Basement symbolizes your subconscious mind / aspect of self, which deals with habits, old coping skills, self-regulation, ego.

That’s usually the part of our Selves that makes us feel “torn” between knowing we should do one thing, and inexplicably ending up doing the opposite. (Don’t you HATE that?)

Old belief patterns & fears have to be corrected, if that is the case. Tackle & overcome it, and you will feel much more peaceful about your life.

The Ground Floor of a house represents your daily agenda; what’s currently going on in your life.

Revisiting Old Houses from Childhood or Earlier Times: this points to issues that probably are resurfacing in your current life, and need to be looked at, analyzed, and healed so you can move forward and not backward.

If you find yourself repeating the same old tired mistakes, or dealing with the same old tired fears, chances are you will have this dream.

A Hallway symbolizes that you have reached an area that is necessary to journey through in order to get to the other side, and it may be a narrow path that has to be traversed with care and awareness.

If you have that “closed in, claustrophobic feeling” then you need to expand your awareness/open your mind to more possibilities for completing this phase of your journey.

TORNADO

This symbol points to emotional turmoil, as in a “whirlwind of emotions”; and / or rapid or sudden changes in your life. It is a sign to “get a grip” on what is possibly spinning out of control & deal more effectively with your emotions. Meditation and finding some private “thinking time” for yourself might be a good idea.


COLORS

Pink:

the color of love in all its forms. Often used to show healing through love.

Red:

passion or anger.

Black:

the unconscious mind; void; death of the old.

Grey:

fear or confusion. White: truth, “coming clean,” purity; can also be symbolic of death & new beginnings.

Green:

healing, growth, newness.

Blue:

spirituality; could be a metaphor for “being blue” (look at context of dream).

Yellow:

peacefulness, hope (as in “sunny disposition”); could be a cowardice metaphor.


NUMBERS

I am not a numerologist, but I will put a few basic numbers here

One:

unity, completeness.

Two:

balance of yin-yang principles, or male / female energies-either it’s needed or it’s achieved.

Three:

(common dream symbol) the trinity of the Father, Son & Holy Spirit, and the 3 principles uniting in harmony, as in body-mind-spirit harmony. This dream has an important spiritual message for you - pay attention!

Five:

changes!


BABY or PREGNANCY

Newness or creation in your life, a new aspect of self is being formed and coming into being!... DreamPedia

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals)

Red cows appearing in a dream are a positive, hopeful omen of peace and plenty. In Persia, these represented the spirit of dawn, which is filled with renewed vitality and courage.

In Greece, an all-white cow was ail alternative symbol for the moon.

A natural source of nourishment (see Meat).

Among the Celts and people of Scandinavian heritages, an emblem of continued provision.

A sacred animal in India, representative of life itself.

The milk from cows is used to nourish kings and priests, so this dream may represent self-nourishment.

Among ancient Egyptians, Indians, and Scandinavians, the cow was an emblem of the Great iMother, and some psychological schools still ascribe this image as possibly being linked to your own mother (see Women).... The Language of Dreams

About Dream Interpretation

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‘one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm’), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‘research workers on dreams’, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‘Les savants ne sont pas curieux’, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‘interpretation of dreams’ is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

About Dream Interpretation

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems

I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‰_÷one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm‰_ª), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‰_÷research workers on dreams‰_ª, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‰_÷Les savants ne sont pas curieux‰_ª, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‰_÷interpretation of dreams‰_ª is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

My Dream Interpretation

If your dream involved a drugstore, it indicates that you would benefit from a change of scene. Maybe you should consider changing your social group, or even switching schools or jobs.... My Dream Interpretation

Encyclopedia of Dreams

There are two schools of thought about your dreams of a mirror. One is that if you see yourself in a mirror it foretells of a terrible illness or failure, (death of a business), and the other school of thought is, to see oneself in a mirror is a sign that you will soon be facing issues within yourself that you have been subconsciously hiding from yourself.

If the mirror is broken then will there be news of a death in the family.... Encyclopedia of Dreams

Dream Meanings of Versatile

A path in a dream can indicate the direction that we should take spiritually.

The idea that there is a path in life resonates with chinese thought, which calls the tao ‘the way’. In some schools of thought the left hand path represents evil or black magic.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Islamic Dream - Cafer-i Sadik

whoever sees a polytheist, and [if] the dreamer was hidden in presence, then it is indicative of: knowledge, victory over his enemies. And if he was not hidden in presence, then he will befriend the deities of the corrupt beliefs / schools.... Islamic Dream - Cafer-i Sadik
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