scientist

Scientist, Dream Interpretation


Creative rational mind; intellectual curiosity; in some dreamers the fear of rational critical people—or of look­ing at oneself analytically.

Symbolic of analyzing, testing, and examining

To dream that you are a scientist symbolizes your desire to try new things and express your individuality.

To dream of a scientist signifies openness to new ideas.

1. Realization that one’s personality is more scientistlike than not.

2. Eccentricity.

3. Willingness to experiment with someone.

4. Need to have aspects of one’s life validated, i.E., Proven with absolute certainty.

Dreams of a scientist signify that you are exploring and experimenting in life. This dream may be assisting you to release your fears of making a mistake so that you can feel free to discover a breakthrough for yourself. See Laboratory.



Scientist | Dream Interpretation

Keywords of this dream: Scientist

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Architect; Painter) Seeing him in a dream means consenting to reason. He also could represent an opinionated person, an expert, a friend, a real estate broker, a scientist, a commander, or an architect. (Also see Architect; Painter)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Few dreams are, by themselves, problem solving or creative.

The few excep­tions are usually very clear. Example: ‘My mother-in-law died of cancer. I had watched the whole progression of her illness, and was very upset by her death. Shortly after she died the relatives gathered and began to sort through her belongings to share them out. That was the climax of my upset and distress, and I didn’t want any part of this sorting and taking her things. That night I dreamt I was in a room with all the relatives. They were sorting her things, and I felt my waking distress. Then my mother-in-law came into the room. She was very real and seemed happy. She said for me not to be upset as she didn’t at all mind her relatives taking her things. When I woke from the dream all the anxiety and upset had disap­peared. It never returned (told to author dunng a talk given to the Housewives Register in Ilfracombe).

Although in any collection of dreams such clearcut prob­lem solving is fairly rare, nevertheless the basic function in dreams appears to be problem solving.

The proof of this lies in research done in dream withdrawal. As explained in the entry science, sleep and dreams, subjects are woken up as they begin to dream, therefore denying them dreams. This quickly leads to disorientation and breakdown of normal functioning, showing that a lot of problem solving occurs in dreams, even though it may not be as obvious as in the exam­ple. This feature of dreaming can be enhanced to a marked degree by processing dreams and arriving at insights into the information they contain. This enables old problems to be cleared up and new information and attitudes to be brought into use more quickly. Through such active work one be­comes aware of the self, which Carl Jung describes as a cen­tre, but which we might think of as a synthesis of all our experience and being. Gaining insight and allowing the self entrance into our waking affairs, as M L. Von Franz says in Man and His Symbols, gradually produces a wider and more mature personality’ which emerges, and by degrees becomes effective and even visible to others’.

The function of dreams may well be described as an effort on the part of our life process to support, augment and help mature waking consciousness.

A study of dreams suggests that the creative forces which are behind the growth of our body are also inextricably connected with psychological develop­ment. In fact, when the process of physical growth stops, the psychological growth continues.

If this is thwarted in any way, it leads to frustration, physical tension and psychosomatic and eventually physical illness.

The integration of experience.

which dreams are always attempting, if successful cannot help but lead to personal growth. But it is often frozen by the individual avoiding the growing pains’, or the discomfon of breaking through old concepts and beliefs.

Where there is any attempt on the pan of our conscious personality to co-operate with this, the creative aspect of dreaming emerges. In fact anything we are deeply involved in, challenged by or attempting, we will dream about in a creative way. Not only have communities like the American Indians used dreams in this manner—to find better hunting, solve community problems, find a sense of personal life direction— but scientists, writers, designers and thousands of lay people have found very real information in dreams After all, through dreams we have personal use of the greatest computer ever produced in the history of the world—the human brain.

1- In Genesis 41, the story of Pharaoh’s dream is told—the seven fat cows and the seven thin cows. This dream was creative in that, with Joseph’s interpretation, it resolved a national problem where famine followed years of plenty. It may very well be an example of gathered information on the history of Egypt being in the mind of Pharaoh, and the dream putting it together in a problem solving way. See dream process as computer.

2- William Blake dreamt his dead brother showed him a new way of engraving copper. Blake used the method success­fully.

3- Otto Leowi dreamt of how to prove that nervous impulses were chemical rather than electncal. This led to his Nobel prize.

4- Friedrich Kekule tned for years to define the structure of benzene. He dreamt of a snake with its tail in its mouth, and woke to realise this explained the molecular forma­tion of the benzene ring. He was so impressed he urged colleagues, ‘Gentlemen, leam to dream.’

5- Hilprecht had an amazing dream of the connection be­tween two pieces of agate which enabled him to translate an ancient Babylonian inscription.

6- Elias Howe faced the problem of how to produce an effec­tive sewing machine.

The major difficulty was the needle. He dreamt of natives shaking spears with holes in their points. This led to the invention of the Singer sewing ma­chine.

7- Robert Louis Stevenson claims to have dreamt the plot of many of his stories.

8- Albert Einstein said that during adolescence he dreamt he was riding a sledge. It went faster and faster until it reached the speed of light.

The stars began to change into amazing patterns and colours, dazzling and beautiful. His meditation on that dream throughout the years led to the theory of relativity.

To approach our dreams in order to discover their creativity, first decide what problematic or creative aspect of your life needs ‘dream power’. Define what you have already leamt or know about the problem. Write it down, and from this clarify what it is you want more insight into.

If this breaks down into several issues, choose one at a time. Think about the issue and pursue it as much as you can while awake. Read about it, ask people’s opinions, gather information. This is all data for the dream process.

If the question still needs further insight, be­fore going to sleep imagine you are putting the question to your internal store of wisdom, computer, power centre, or whatever image feels right.

For some people an old being who is neither exclusively man nor woman is a working image.

In the morning note down whatever dream you remember. It does not matter if the dream does not appear to deal with the question; Elias Howe’s native spears were an outlandish image, but nevertheless contained the information he needed. Investigate the dream using the techniques given in the entry dream processing. Some problems take time to define, so use the process until there is a resolution.

If it is a major problem, it may take a year or so; after all, some resolutions need re­structuring of the personality, because the problem cannot disappear while we still have the same attitudes and fears. See secret of the universe dreams; dream processing. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

About Dream Interpretation

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‘one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm’), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‘research workers on dreams’, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‘Les savants ne sont pas curieux’, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‘interpretation of dreams’ is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

About Dream Interpretation

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems

I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‰_÷one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm‰_ª), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‰_÷research workers on dreams‰_ª, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‰_÷Les savants ne sont pas curieux‰_ª, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‰_÷interpretation of dreams‰_ª is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

DreamPedia

Dream Interpretation / Dream Dictionary / Dream Meanings Knowledge is power, so learn to understand the mysteries that are hidden in your dreams. Our dreams contain the messages we need to solve. Dreams come in many shapes and sizes, some vague, some detailed, some frightening, some inspiring. They all contain encoded messages aimed at improving your life. Once we uncover the mysterious symbols and images of our unconscious, we discover the secrets to a happier life. The dream interpretation world has its own language; a visual and symbolic language, filled with obscure clues and hidden meanings. Learn how to accurately decipher your dream experiences, using centuries-old folk wisdom.
Dreams really are, in the truest sense, a doorway: to greater self-awareness, knowledge, success, and the possibility of a rich, full life. Sounds great, but how do you open and walk through that door? You’ll see that there is an actual pathway, with clearly delineated steps, that can take you from wishful thinking about dreams to a reliable dream habit. You’ll find your previously mysterious, invisible inner life can be revealed on a regular basis to assist you in many useful ways. You’ll discover some specific benefits of an active dream life, familiarize yourself with the steps in the dream process, and fine tune your understanding of sleep and dream dynamics. This way, you can build motivation and enthusiasm, be aligned with the natural flow of dreams, and get out of your own way by becoming aware of what inhibits dreaming.
Symbols are the language of dreams, an intuitive shortcut your soul uses to talk to you. They convey a vast amount of encoded information that always pertains to your own process of living and evolving. Every symbol is somehow about you. In a typical dream scene composed of a group of symbols you can find clues to how you’re developing, what you want to create, how you need to heal, or how to make correct choices.
To truly understand what a symbol represents, you must feel into or merge into the symbol, pretend to be the thing, and speak from its point of view about what it knows. This way, you enter the direct experience of what it is to be a daisy, a polar bear, a set of lost keys, or a school bus. And the symbol comes alive. Once you become the symbol, it’s easier to see how the image is a part of you and your life process.
They have become the “interpreters supreme” when it comes to dreams.
It seems that most people remember their dreams. Not all, certainly, but the majority And, whether we realize it or not, dreams have a profound influence on our well-being. Scientists have proven that dreams are necessary; without them we would probably go insane! By examining our dreams, we are able to establish physical and mental needs to bring balance to our lives.
Modern science says that we spend between 25 percent and 50 percent of our sleeping time in the dream state. We have an average of six dream periods every night and each dream lasts anywhere up to forty minutes. Apparently if we didn’t have these dreams we would go crazy Most of them are from our unconscious mind, trying to get a message across to us for our own well-being. Who is to say they are wrong? That may be exactly what our unconscious mind is—proddings from the spirits.

The point is that if we are being given these messages for our own well-being, it would behoove us to try to understand them, to listen to the spirits.

The uncon¬scious, or the spirits, employ symbols with which we are familiar. They present the message using objects that per¬tain to our everyday life, the better that we may under¬stand what is being communicated. Sigmund Freud believed that the unconscious mind contains repressed material—wishes, thoughts, experi-ences—that the individual will not accept into the con¬scious mind. These things are therefore repressed and often disguised. Carl Jung called this repressed material the “Personal Unconscious.” He believed that there was also the “Collective Unconscious,” which contained elements from racial memories and experiences. Discover how to:

  • Recognize your dream cycles, Increase your ability to remember your dreams, Keep and use a dream diary, Notice your waking dreams, Uncover hidden messages in your dreams, Focus your dreams to solve problems or make decisions, Form a dream support group.

Dream Interpretation & an A to Z dictionary of symbols and their meanings helps you make sense of your dreams and harness them to increase your creativity, solve problems, find life purpose, and obtain accurate personal guidance.

A to Z Dream Dictionary and Dream Interpretation will help you become an expert dream interpreter. ... DreamPedia

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The brain is not a computer, but it has the power to compute.

The word computare is Latin, and comes from putare, to think. Neither is a computer any­thing like a human brain. But there are parallels. Christopher Evans, a psychologist, computer scientist and world authority on microprocessors, says the brain and computers are both information handling devices, taking impulses which in them­selves mean nothing, like sound waves, and processing them. It is also his theory that both computers and the waking-brain function are taken off-line to re-program. Our behaviour re­sponses and information bases need bringing up to date with any new experience and information that is relevant. In the case of the computer, off-line means having modifications made to programs, in the human it means sleeping and dreaming, the dream being the powerful activity of review, sifting and reprogramming. Thirdly, the brain and computer use programs. In humans, a program means a learnt set of responses, values or activities, such as walking or talking, but including more subtle activities such as judging social or busi­ness situations.

If, as Christopher Evans believes, dreaming is partly a pe­riod of revising and updating responses, insights and skills, then by working with the process one can make it more effi­cient.

The background for this statement is that many people have recurring dreams which change very little. Looking at this from the programming’ view, the attempt to revise is thwarted. But individuals can free such ‘stuck’ dreams by us­ing dream processing.

Also, as some dreams are obviously a synthesis of experi­ence and information gathered over a lifetime, the dream pro­cess is much more than a computing function which sorts new information and updates. It is also capable of creative leaps through synthesis and conjecture. J.B. Priestley’s dream of the birds (see religion and dreams) appears to be a mas­sive synthesis of things observed over a lifetime. It also depicts a brain function like computer simulation, which takes infor­mation and forms it into an expenmental view of possibilities arising from the thousands of millions of separate bits of gath­ered data. See ESP in dreams; creative and problem solving dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example:41 dreamt my sister was attacking me with a pair of scissors. She backed me against a wall and stabbed me. During the day after the dream my sister phoned me at work and said she’d had an awful dream in which she stabbed me with scissors’ (D).

The Poseidia Institute of Vir­ginia Beach, Va., have run a number of group ‘mutual dream­ing’ experiments. Although the Institute suggests very positive results, a critical survey of the dreams and reports reveals a lack of hard evidence. Like other areas of ESP dreaming, it can seldom ever be willed. But the dreams did show themes related to problems regarding intimate meeting. Also, some of the dreams were directly about the goal of dream meeting, as in the following example.

Example: ‘I find the group of people I am looking for. There were maybe six or more people. They were asleep on mattresses except for two or three. These were awake and waiting for me, and wearing small pointed hats such as Ti­betan Lamas wear. In the dream I realised this meant they had achieved sufficient inner growth to remain awake in sleep. We started to communicate and were going to wake the others’ (Tom C). See dream as a meeting place.

the dream as extended perception Even everyday mental func­tions such as thought and memory occur largely uncon­sciously. During sleep, perhaps because we surrender our vo­lition, what is left of self awareness enters the realm where the nine-tenths of the iceberg of our mind is active. In this realm faculties can function which on waking seem unobtainable.

For example:

1- Extending awareness to a point distant from the body, to witness events confirmed by other people. This is often called out of body experience (OBE), but some of these experiences suggest the nature of consciousness and time may not be dualistic (having to be either here or there). See out of body experience.

2-Being aware of the death or danger of a member of family. Kinship and love seem to be major factors in the way the unconscious functions. See dead people dreams.

3-Seeing into the workings of the body and diagnosing an illness before it becomes apparent to waking observation. Dr Vasali Kasatkin and Professor Medard Boss have specialised in the study of such dreams. In a recent dream told to me, a man looked back into a bedroom and saw a piece of the wall fall away. Waves of water gushed from a main pipe.

The dreamer struggled to hold back the piece of broken pipe. Within two weeks his colon burst and he had to have a major operation. See meditation.

4-Access to a computer-like ability to son through a massive store of information and experience to solve problems. These dreams are often confused with precognitive ability. Prediction does occur from these dreams, but it arises, as with weather prediction, from a massive gathering of in­formation, most of which we have forgotten consciously. Monon Schatzman, in a New Scientist anicle, showed how subjects can produce answers to complex mathematical problems in their dreams. See dream process as com­puter; creativity and problem solving in dreams.

5-Tapping a collective mind which stores all experience, and is sensed as godlike or holy. See dream as spiritual guide.

It seems likely that before the development of speech the human animal communicated largely through body lan­guage. Some dreams suggest we still have this ability to read a person’s health, sexual situation, intentions and even their past, through body shape, posture and tiny movements. See postures, movement and body language.

See Cayce, Edgar; collective unconscious; wife under family. See also hallucinations. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

My Dream Interpretation

To dream that you are working on an experiment suggests that you need to be more daring and try something new and different. Take a chance. Also see “Scientist”... My Dream Interpretation

Dreamers Dictionary

Four in a dream is usually a positive symbol. There are Four earth elements, Four seasons, and Four psychological functions in the human system.

The Four is where the change in the human personality takes place.

The number Four belongs to Uranus. Four-people want to revolutionize the world: they are scientists, clerics, social reformers, nonconformists, and artists. They brood, attack problems, and have a quick wit. Four analyv.es and organizes. It stands against the carefree mentality of the Three—having received the Divine one. Four-people have the clarity needed to understand the center, the “I,” and what holds life together. But a Four-person can also suffocate in this orderliness. Four-people have staying- power and willpower, as well as a tendency to be melancholy.

Generally speaking, the Four represents immense inner strength, energy, vitality, and a great love for and connection with nature. You are asked to either support and advance these qualities, or you need them in greater measure in order to fulfill your life’s work. See Uranus.

Four-people have birthdays on the 4th, 13th, 22nd (a master number), or 31st of the month.... Dreamers Dictionary

The Language of Dreams

(see Birds, Feathers, Wings)

The energy of pure joy to keep you aloft thefloiver of the world, extracting the nectar of life wherever you go.

This is the only bird in nature that can fly backwards. As such, consider what part of the past you’re retrieving for productive review.

Love. In folk ?nagic, hummingbird feathers were a common component in love charms. Just take care that this is not forced or manipulated. Such a relationship will not last.

Among the Native Americans and Basque people, this represents total honest}’. They believe that hummingbirds cannot tell a he.

Reveling in freedom and playfulness. Scientists have shown that these birds seem to enjoy both tremendously. How much free time or play time have you had lately?... The Language of Dreams

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Like the goddess Athena, Jodie displays the trait of a strong intellectual capacity. She attests to the fact that a woman may receive a great deal of recognition for her smarts. Her roles as a scientist and teacher command respect. She may appear in a dream to summon a woman into a professional career where she might use her intellect rather than her beauty.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

There have been many claims that one can learn while asleep—possibly with the aid of a re­corded series of suggestions or information being spoken from a speaker under one’s pillow. Different research projects have arrived at a variety of conclusions.

The major scientific con­clusion is that we do not learn from what we hear while asleep. Sleep is important in the process of learning, however.

If one learns a list of nonsense words, memory of them eight or twenty-four hours later is better if we have slept; memory eight hours later without sleep is not as efficient as twenty- four hours later with intervening sleep. This suggests memory traces are strengthened during sleep.

That we do learn, in the sense of creating new information or perception, while we sleep is generally accepted. Albert Einstein suggested that the creative scientists are those who have access to their dreams. He meant that in order to be innovative we must be able periodically to leave behind the practical everyday path of commonsense and rational thought.

The rational tends to move in areas of thought connected with what is already known.

To create something new, to find a new direction, we may need to be capable of retrieving appar­ently irrational ideas, sift them and reconstruct them in practi­cal ways.

Dreams have this ability to fantasise, to look at and experi­ence the irrational, to take an idea and move it completely out of its old setting or viewpoint. Because our mind can do this in sleep, we can touch not only our creativity, but also our ability to problem solve. As a personal test of this, try the following experiment. At the end of this explanation a prob­lem will be set. It is one that requires no special training or information to solve.

The solution is simple and will be seen as conect when reached. But do not even begin to think about the problem until you go to bed! It would discount the experi­ment if you did. On going to bed, think about the problem for no more than 15 minutes.

If you solve the problem note how long it took.

If not, stop thinking about it and go to sleep, making the resolve to remember any dreams. It is likely that you will dream the answer.

If not, on waking spend a funher 15 minutes trying to reach the answer.

The letters 0,T,T,F,F,-,-, form the beginning of an intelli­gible series. Add two more letters which make it obvious that an infinite number of letters could be added. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Language of Dreams

(see Landmarks, Locations)

Esoteric wisdom shared from the Collective Unconscious.

A good omen that portends achievement and financial gains.

Precision is needed in your evaluations to assure success. Scientists have shown the tremendous accuracy used in designing and building these great edifices; no less care should be taken with things you value.

In India, an alternative fire emblem. Similarly, in ancient Greece the pictograph of a pyramid could represent an idea or spirit that had fiery characteristics.

Mesopotamian: The meeting place between the gods and mortals. Edifices similar to pyramids were seen in Babylon at the core of the city around 3500 B.C.E. These buildings were called the Gate of the Gods. In your dream, such structures may represent a personally designed astral temple, where you can commune with your subconscious, your Higher Self, or the Divine.... The Language of Dreams

My Dream Interpretation

To dream that you are working on an experiment suggests that you need to be more daring and try something new and different. Take a chance. Also see “Scientist”, below.... My Dream Interpretation

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Baker; Pastry chef) A pastry chef in a dream represents a man of knowledge, catering a wedding, vesting ranks of authority, or children.

A sweets maker in a dream also represents a good and a gentle person, a compiler of literary works, a scientist, a slanderer, or an agitator. (Also see Sweets)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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