shire

Shire, Dream Interpretation


1. Mother.

2. The unconscious or unknown.

3. Sadness or de­pression.

4. Reaching the “bottom” of existence.



Shire | Dream Interpretation

Keywords of this dream: Shire

Gypsy Dream Dictionary

Birds, in general, mean success. Flying birds indicate a coming journey.

To have a bird land on your hand, arm, or head means an unexpected love is coming into your life.

To kill a bird, or find a dead bird, is an ill omen. Gypsies in different parts of England have different ideas about dreams concerning specific birds. Following are a few of those ideas:

Blackbird: A need for caution. Examine all business matters carefully.

Canary: Death of a friend.

A sudden departure.

A flying canary means temporary sickness.

Crow: You will be disappointed in an expectation and will have to make do with what you have.

Dove: Fidelity in love; happiness at home.

A flock of doves means an abundance of love and happiness. Two doves together mean reconciliation.

Eagle: A soaring eagle indicates great business success.

Falcon / Hawk: A soaring falcon or hawk, as with an eagle, means business success.

A swooping falcon or hawk means success in a legal matter.

To carry the bird on your arm and / or release it means to branch out, embracing new associates in your business or personal life.

Lark: A short vacation, with fun and relaxation.

Nightingale: To hear or see a nightingale is the forerunner of joyful news, great success in business, joy in love.

To hear a nightingale sing is to be assured of happiness.

Owl: You must give great thought to a coming problem, rather than making a snap decision.

If the owl flies away, you will find the problem is not as big as it seems.

To hear an owl hoot is to be warned of coming problems.

Parrot: Beware of slander. Don’t listen to gossip.

Peacock: To dream of a peacock is a sign of popularity, but beware of pride and vanity If it is a peacock which suddenly spreads its tail, beware of ostentation.

To hear a peacock scream means there is an approaching storm that will do you some damage. This could be a domestic or business “storm.”

Pigeon: To dream of a flying pigeon, according to Gypsies in Yorkshire, is to expect news in the form of a letter.

If you don’t see the pigeon land, it could be good or bad news.

If you see the bird land, then it is definitely good news.

Raven: A favorite bird of the Gypsies. Many dream books call this a bird of ill omen, but Romanis say that to dream of it signifies a family reunion with much happiness and joy to come.

If it is flying, the reunion will be unexpected; if at rest, it will be something you organize.

Swallow: Flying swallows mean happiness and good fortune. Nesting swallows mean close friendship.

Swan: You will have a happy and contented family life.

If there are young signets with the swan(s), then you will have children.

Vulture: Represents a bitter enemy.

To kill a vulture is to triumph over your enemy To see one devouring its prey is a warning about a lawsuit.... Gypsy Dream Dictionary

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals, Lion, Tiger)

With a mouse: The power of good over evil. In ancient Egypt, the great God Ra was sometimes depicted as a cat slaying a make with similar connotations.

The ability to land on your feet, even in difficult circumstances, and remain independent.

An emblem of rebirth and new beginnings. Cats have nine lives, upon which one are you now embarking?

If seen on a sailing vessel, very good luck and health (see Boat). Cats eliminated mice from ships on long journeys, thereby decreasing disease.

Magical or mystical energy.

The cat was a sacred creature to the Greek goddess Hecate, and the Roman goddess Diana, both patronesses of witches. Additionally, it was the most commonly mentioned familiar for witches in old Grimoires, medieval books of practical magic that included spells, herbals, and folk wisdom.

An alternative symbol of feminine, lunar characteristics.

Hissing and scratching: A “catty” nature rearing its ugly head, or withheld aggression toward women.

The Cheshire Cat is an emblem of haughty or arrogant attitudes (see Laughter).... The Language of Dreams

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Although the wolf can depict our sense that ‘things’ are out to get us, the wolf is often just fear. Fear is one of our insiinctive reactions to situations, so is depicted by an animal. We may find ourselves a pnsoner of such feelings, as Anna in the following example: ‘I was in a caravan in the middle of a field and in this field was a large black wolf. Every time I tried to run from the caravan to the edge of the field, the wolf chased me back, so I was a prisoner in the caravan. It all sounds so simple now, but at the time I was truly ternfied.’

This next example from Oliver, a boy of six, illustrates how such fears can be met with a little courage. It is a dream which recurred several times, so his descnption is of a series of dreams: ‘1 am in my bed in my own room and I hear what I know to be a wolf wearing the son of clogs worn in Lanca­shire. He (the wolf) gets to a certain point, there is a bang, and I wake terrified. My mother’s reassurances do not help. Each night he gets a bit nearer before my panicky awakening.

The night comes when I know he will reach me. Sure enough he arrives, and the bedroom door—in my dream—is flung wide open with a tremendous bang. There is no one there. I never dreamt it again.’ Idioms: wolf at the door, wolf in sheep’s clothing; cry wolf, throw to the wolves. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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