spine

Spine, Dream Interpretation


See “posture”

See backbone in body

The support that brings everything back into order. Honesty and civil courage. See Stairs, Tower, Skyscraper / High-Rise.

To dream about yours or someone else’s spine, represents your responsibilities and the support you have in your life. You need to keep your head high even in difficult times.

1. One knows he/she is going to have to be courageous in the near future.

2. One knows someone else is going to have to be courageous in the near future.

Dreams of a spine are a message for you to hold your head up high, to face your challenges, and rise to the occasion of your current growth opportunity.

If you dream of a curvature of the spine, then this signifies that you are ashamed of something and are attempting to hide.

If you dream of an erect spine, then this denotes confidence, fearlessness and a readiness to take on the world. See Posture and Back.

see Backbone in Body



Spine | Dream Interpretation

Keywords of this dream: Spine

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of the color brown symbolize that which is plain, functional, and earthy. This dream could be a call for you to become more grounded. See Chakra-1st-Base of Spine and Color.... Strangest Dream Explanations

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Depending on the details of the dream, this dream symbol could have several different meanings.

The bull in your dream could represent powerful sexual energy, stubbornness, strength, and, at times, clumsiness. It could also symbolize optimism about the future and an ability to focus on a specific goal. Bulls can represent tenacity and a very strong will. Finally, since the bull is associated with the color red, some believe that it symbolizes the first chakra, which is the energy center located at the base of the spine that represents this material world.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Dream Symbols and Analysis

To dream of a cactus is an indication that you feel your personal space is being invaded. You feel unable to breathe and are seeking space and privacy.

The spines of the cactus are the physical representation of this wish. In many cases, you may feel you are in a situation you cannot get out of. Conversely, the cactus may indicate a personal desire to learn to protect yourself.

To dream of a cactus may also be a subconscious reminder that you need to learn to grow as your life changes.... Dream Symbols and Analysis

Encyclopedia of Dreams

Dreaming of a cactus is usually the indication that you are feeling crowded, or that someone is invading your space, and since the cactus has the prickly spines for defense this represents to the dreamer a wish to establish a boundary and protect your privacy.

A cactus also represents winning out over adversity as it is found in the desert and has adapted itself to hot, dry, growing conditions, thus the dream could be telling the dreamer to adapt to the existing circumstances if he/she cannot change them.... Encyclopedia of Dreams

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Being aware of the heat of a fire is to be aware of someone else’s strong feelings. Baptism by fire signifies a new awareness and awakening of spiritual power and transformation created sometimes through extremes of emotion. Fire is a valid western symbol of the spiritual energy known as kundalini, which rises from the base of the spine to the crown of the head and brings with it a shift in perception.

A fire bucket, as with any hollow vessel, can represent the feminine principle.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

The symbol of igniting a light or fire represents the beginning of an exploration of the spiritual realms. Kundalini – the energy of consciousness or spiritual energy – is perceived as heat at the base of the spine, which may be intensely hot or pleasantly warm. Dreams often picture a spontaneous awakening when the energy, having been ignited, travels up the spine to the top of the head, bringing certain awarenesses along the way.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Feelings arising from the unconscious which might be painful/sting the dreamer, bnng a sense of helplessness/ spinelessness, or are from a non-verbal level of memory. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of jellyfish represent feelings of helplessness and powerlessness. Perhaps you are feeling spineless about your effectiveness in your current challenge. Your dream may be giving you the message to watch your step and walk mindfully through this difficult time.... Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreamers Dictionary

Vision: Looking at a jumping jack is a sign of instability—at work and/or financially. Seeing yourself as a jumping jack: what is missing? Make an honest account of yourself. What happened to you—are you “spineless”?

Depth Psychology: The jumping jack stands for insecurities and feelings of inferiority. You are afraid that people around you won’t take you seriously, that you’re only a toy in the eyes of others. Have you made a fool of yourself lately? Who in your relationship is the “jumping jack”? What about your assertive- ness? See Clown, Fool.... Dreamers Dictionary

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of Pilates represents your desire to become stronger in your core, in your second Chakra, which gives you the ability to keep your head held high, feeling confident with an tall spine, as well as an ability to become more flexible and go with the flow of life. See Yoga and Exercise.... Strangest Dream Explanations

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Our basic spinal and lower brain reactions, such as fight or flight, reproduction, attraction or repulsion, sex drive, need for food and reaction to pain. This includes the fundamental evolutionary ability to change and the urge to survive—very powerful and ancient processes. Our relationship with the reptile in our dreams depicts our relat- edness to such forces in us, and how we deal with the im­pulses from the ancient pan of our brain.

Modern humans face the difficulty of developing an inde­pendent identity and yet keeping a working relationship with the primitive, thus maturing/bringing the primitive into an efficiently functioning connection with the present social world.

The survival urge at base might be kill or run, but it can be transformed into the ambition which helps, say, an opera singer meet difficulties in her career. Also the very primitive has in itself the promise of the future, of new aspects of human consciousness. This is because many extraordinary human functions take place unconsciously, in the realm of the reptile/spine/lower brain/right brain/autonomic nervous sys­tem. Being unconscious they are less amenable to our waking will. They function fully only in some fight or flight, survive or die, situations.

If we begin to touch these with consciousness, as we do in dreams, new functions are added to conscious­ness. See The dream as extended perception under ESP and dreams.

frog

Unconscious life or growth processes which can lead to transformation (the frog/prince story); the growth from child­hood vulnerability—tadpole to frog—therefore the process of life in general and its wisdom. Frogspawn: sperm, ovum and reproduction.

lizard

Example: ‘My wife and I saw a large lizard on the wall near a banana. It was there to catch the flies.

The lizard turned so it was facing away from us—head up the wall. We then were able to see it had large wing-like flaps which spread from its head in an invened V. With amazement we saw on these flaps wonderful pictures, in full colour, of birds. In fleet­ing thoughts I wondered if the bird “paintings” were to attract birds, or were some form of camouflage. But I felt cenain the lizard had “painted” these wonderful pictures with its uncon­scious an’ (David T). Generally, a lizard is very much the same as a snake, except it lacks the poisonous aspect; aware­ness of unconscious or instinctive drives, functions and pro­cesses. In the above dream, the banana is both David’s plea­sure and sexuality, while the lizard is the creativity emerging from his unconscious through the attention he is giving it—he is looking at the lizard. Chameleon: either one’s desire to fade into the background, or adaptability.

snake

Example: A small snake about a foot long had dropped down my shirt neck. I could feel it on the left side of my neck Fearing it was poisonous and might bite me, I moved very slowly. At one point I put my head on the ground, hoping the snake would wish to crawl away. It did not. Then I was near an elephant I loved, and hoped it would remove the snake. It did not. Even as I slept I felt the snake was an expression of the attitude of not shanng myself with anybody except family’ (David T).

For months prior to the above dream David had experienced a great deal of neck pain. After dis­cussing the dream with his wife, and realising much of his thinking and feeling was intumed, the pain disappeared. So the snake was both poisoner’ and ‘healer’. This may be why snakes are used as a symbol of the medical profession.

The Hebrew word for the serpent in the Garden of Eden is Nahash, which can be translated as blind impulsive urges, such as our instinctive drives.

So, generally, snakes depict many different things, but usu­ally the life process.

If we think of a person’s life from con­ception to death, we see a flowing moving event, similar in many ways to the speeded up films of a seed growing into a plant, flowering and dying.

The snake depicts the force or energy behind that movement and purposiveness—the force of life which leads us both to growth and death. That energy —like electricity in a house, which can be heat, power, sound and vision—lies behind all our functions. So in some dreams the snake expresses our sexuality, in others the rising of that energy up our body to express itself as digestion—the intesti­nal snake; as the healing or poisonous energy of our emotions and thoughts.

Example: ‘I was in a huge cathedral, the mother church. I wanted to go to the toilet/gents. As I held my penis to urinate it became a snake and reached down to the urinal to drink. It was thirsty. I struggled with it, pulling it away from the un­clean liquid. Still holding it I walked to a basin and gave it pure water to drink’ (Bill A). Here the connection between snake and sexuality is obvious. But the snake is not just Bill’s penis. It is the direction his sexual urges take him he is strug­gling with. Out of his sense of love and connection with life— the cathedral—he wants to lift his drive towards something which will not leave him with a sense of uncleanness. Snake in connection with any hole: sexual relatedness.

A snake biting us: unconscious worries about our health, frustrated sexual impulse, our emotions turned against our­selves as internalised aggression, can poison us and cause very real illness, so may be shown as the biting snake. Snake biting others: biting remarks, a poisonous tongue.

A crowned or light-encircled snake: when our ‘blind impulses’ or instinctive or unconscious urges and functions are in some measure inte­grated with our conscious will and insight, this is seen as the crowned snake or even winged snake. It shows real self awareness and maturity. In coils of snake: feeling bound in the ‘blind impulses’ or habitual drives and feeling responses. Instincts and habits can be redirected, as illustrated by Hercu­les’ labours. Snake with tail in mouth: sense of the circle of life—binh, growth, reproduction, aging, death, rebirth; the eternal. Snake coiling up tree, pole, cross: the blind instinctive forces of life emerging into conscious experience—in other words the essence of human expenence with its involvement in pain, pleasure, time and eternity; the process of personal growth or evolution; healing because personal growth often moves us beyond old attitudes or situations which led to inner tension or even sickness. Snake in grass: sense or intuition of talk behind your back; danger, sneakiness. Colours: green, our internal life process directed, perhaps through satisfied feelings, love and creativity, into a healing process or one which leads to our personal growth and positive change; white, eternal aspect of our life process, or becoming con­scious of it; blue, religious feelings or coldness in relations. See colours; anxiety dreams; death and rebirth, the self under archetypes; dreams and Ancient Greece; cellar under house, buildings; hypnosis and dreams; jungle; paralysis. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Fear or conflict; excitement. Idioms: give one the shivers; send shivers up one’s spine. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ariadne's Book of Dream

In general, the snake can be one of the most powerful forces emerging from a dream.

The power of Snake bnngs active libidinous or sexual energy out of the subconscious for creative use. Snake power is healing power that when cultivated and used can heal your physical and emotional wounds.

The undulating movement of Snake moves the energy known as kundalini up the spine of its initiate to activate a spintual awakening. It may announce the call to the profession of a healer or shaman. Snake may signify wisdom in its association with the tree of knowledge. Snakes may sometimes represent deep-seatec fears that disrupt your life, or sexual fears where there has beer trauma or violanon.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Little Giant Encyclopedia

Spine, Thistle, Rose. According to dream interpreter Artemidorus, obstacles and difficulty with a woman.

Folklore: Poverty.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The tree depicts the living structure of our inner self. Its roots show our connection with our physical body and the earth, its trunk the way we direct the energies of our being— growth, sex, thought, emotion.

The branches are the abilities, directions and many facets we develop in life—varied and yet all connected in the common life process of our being.

The tree can also symbolise new growth, stages of life and death, with its spring leaves and blossom, then the falling leaves.

The top of the tree, or the ends of the branches, are our aspirations, the growing vulnerable tip of our personal growth and spiritual realisation.

The leaves may represent our per­sonal life which may fall off the tree of life (die) but what gave it life continues to exist.

The tree is our whole life, the evolu­tionary urge which pushes us into being and growth. It de­picts the force or process which is behind all other life forms —but seen as it expresses in our personal existence.

In some old manuscripts pictures show a man lying on the ground and his penis growing into a tree, with fruits, birds, and perhaps people in its protective shade. This illustrates how one’s personal life energy can branch out from its source in the basic drives, and become creativity, fruitfulness, some- thing given to others.

The tree can also represent the spine, and the different levels of human experience—physical, sen­sual, sexual, hungers, emotions, relatedness, communication, thought, awareness.

Example: ‘I was about eight years old when I had this dream. In it I was sitting in a large garden. I believe there was a big house nearby which was our family house—not our real house. With me were other members of my family, and there was a baby boy too. Nearby was a laige tree. We climbed this tree, the baby as well, to see what was at the top.

The baby fell out of the tree. We climbed down and took the baby to a room and lay it on a bed. It seemed to be asleep and didn’t wake up. Later we went back to the room to see the baby but it had gone. In its place was a bluebird. As we looked the bluebird flew away’ (told to author on LBC radio programme).

The tree in this dream depicts the child’s sense of her life as it might develop or grow in the future. Climbing it shows her exploring what it might be like to grow up. At about eight most children unconsciously develop a philosophy which en­ables them to meet the difficulties of meeting the growth of self awareness, which includes the knowledge of death at the end of life.

The dreamer looks at this by having the baby fall out of the tree. Death is seen as the bluebird which flies away.

Example: ‘I flew low over small trees which were just com­ing into leaf. They had beautiful soft green leaves. I knew it was autumn and the leaves were only just coming out because it had been a cloudy, overcast summer. I felt the leaves would have time to mature because the sun would be out in the autumn, and the trees would not die’ (Colin C). Colin dreamt this in his early 50s, at a time when he felt frustrated by not being able to achieve a regular source of income or, more important, feel satisfied with what he had achieved in life.

The flying shows him taking an overview of his situation.

The poor summer is his feelings that the years of his life which should have been most productive had been poor—literally, the sun had not shone on his endeavours. But he feels encouraged because he senses that his personal ‘summer’ is still to come, and his many endeavours—the trees—would not prove un­productive.

A wood, collection of trees: the natural forces in one’s own being, therefore one’s connection with or awareness of the unconscious, other people’s personal growth and connection with self. Dead tree: past way of life; something which was full of life for you in the past, but is now dead; dead relative. Falling tree: sense of threat to one’s identity, loss of relative. Christmas tree, other evergreen: the eternal aspect of our tran­sitory experience. Human, animal hung on tree: personal sac­rifice; the death of some part of self so further growth can occur—death of dependence so independence can arise; the pains and struggles, the sense of crucifixion occurring in the maturing process. Oak: strength, masculinity. Flowering tree: fertility, femininity. Idioms: top of the tree; family tree; bark up the wrong tree. See death and rebirth and the self under archetypes; second example in wife under family; fifth exam­ple in flying. See also individuation. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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