supernatural

Supernatural, Dream Interpretation


Spiritual good and evil is not naturally discerned, and it must be judged; see “witchcraft”

To see or hear supernatural activity in your dream symbolizes a lack of control in your life. You may be experiencing some disruptions that are hindering your goals. You may also wish to look up “E.S.P.”, “Ghosts”, “Possessed”, “Telekinesis”, and “Witch”.



Supernatural Dreams | Dream Interpretation

Keywords of this dream: Supernatural

New American Dream Dictionary

1. If one fears being abducted, it signifies a deep fear of los­ing one’s home and family.

2. If the dreamer pictures self as an alien, it means that ideas about the supernatural are getting out­landish.

3. If aliens appear, they symbolize specific fears which can be determined by the context of the dream.

4. Deceased persons.

5. Fear of alienation. ... New American Dream Dictionary

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Animals emerge from the Lower World as powerful archetypes and energies. They may lend their wisdom, attributes, and supernatural powers to the dreamer.

The appearance of any animal in a dream may point out that man and nature are not separate but are intricately connected.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Horns

1- The deer is a noble animal, so the interpretation differs if the antlers are mounted, as in a trophy, or are seen on the animal.

If the latter then the interpretation is that of something which is supernormal, and may represent intellectual powers.

If the former, then antlers may be interpreted as attempting to achieve high status.

2- Psychologically these represent awareness of the potential for conflict between one’s nobler self and the baser instincts.

3- Supernatural powers, fertility and nobleness of spirit are represented by antlers.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Supernatural powers, fertility and nobleness of spirit are represented by antlers.

An attribute of the primeval horned god and his lust for life, they suggest power over nature.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Fortune telling by celestial influences of supernatural powers; see “witchcraft”... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Dream Meanings of Versatile

The axe represents power, thunder, conquest of error and sacrifice. As a symbol it is seen in most religions usually representing divine, supernatural power.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

The Language of Dreams

(see Animals)

The grizzly or domineering side of our moods (e.g., acting “bearish”).

The wildness within that wishes more expression.

Heraldic: Among the medieval artisans, this creature provided the perfect vehicle for visual puns, and usually stood for for-BEAR-ance.

She-bear protecting cubs: The maternal instinct fully developed; righteous anger or anxiety with real foundations.

Hibernation: An alternative type of death dream. Also, resting and storing up energy for difficult times ahead (see Cave).

Fearlessness.

The term “berserkers” among warrior clans came from “bear sarks,” a shirt originated by Artemis to give strength and protection to those defending her lands.

Native American: Supernatural power and fortitude.

Biblical: The she-bear, particularly, is portrayed as ferocious (noted in Samuel, Hosea, and Proverbs).

To what project or relationship are you, or should you be, applying this type of fervently protective energy?... The Language of Dreams

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Used to sweep a floor clean, a broom may suggest the need to clean up some dirt or negativity in your life.

Associated with witches, a broom appearing in a dream may point out that someone is acting like a witch or seems to have supernatural powers over you.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

About Dream Interpretation

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‘one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm’), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‘research workers on dreams’, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‘Les savants ne sont pas curieux’, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‘interpretation of dreams’ is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

About Dream Interpretation

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems

I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‰_÷one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm‰_ª), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‰_÷research workers on dreams‰_ª, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‰_÷Les savants ne sont pas curieux‰_ª, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‰_÷interpretation of dreams‰_ª is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Greece Antiphon, a Greek living in the fourth century bc. wrote the first known descriptive book of dreams. It was designed to be used for practical and profes­sional interpretations. He maintained that dreams are not cre­ated by supernatural powers but natural conditions. In the second century ad a similar book was written by Anemidorus, a Greek physician who lived in Rome. He claimed to have gathered his infonnation from ancient sources, possibly from the Egyptian dream book dating from the second millennium bc. He may have used works from the Assurbanipal library, later destroyed, which held one of the most complete collec­tions of dream literature. Anemidorus classified dreams into dreams, visions, oracles, fantasies and apparitions. He identi­fied two classes of dreams: the somnium, which forecast events; and the insomnium, which are concerned with present matters.

For the somnium dreams Anemidorus gave a dream dictionary.

For example, he said abyss meant an impending danger, a dream of warning, and to see a candle being lighted forecasts a binh, to exhibit a lighted candle augers content­ment and prosperity, a dimly burning candle shows sickness, sadness and delay. This last interpretation is taken from folk­lore of the times and, because dreams tend to use commonly used verbal images, was probably true. He maintained that a person’s name—that is their identity, and the family, national and social background from which they arose—has a bearing on what their dream means.

Plato (429-347 bc) said that even good men dream of un­controlled and violent actions, including sexual aggression. These actions are not committed by good men while awake, but criminals act them out without guilt. Democritus said that dreams are not products of an ethereal soul, but of visual impressions which influence our imagination. Aristotle (383— 322 bc) stated that dreams can predict future events. Earlier Hippocrates, the ‘father of medicine’, discovered that dreams can reveal the onset of organic illness. Such dreams, he said, can be seen as illogically representing external reality.

Hippocrates was born on the island of Kos. On the island was the famous temple dedicated to Aesculapius, the god of medicine. There were about 300 such temples in Greece alone, dedicated to healing through the use of dreams. Hip­pocrates was an Aesculapian, and learnt his form of dream interpretation from them. In such temples the patient would ritually have to cleanse themselves by washing, and abstain from sex, alcohol and even food. They would then be led into what was sometimes a subterranean room with harmless snakes in—these were the symbol of the god. In the morning the patients were asked their dream, and it was expected they would dream an answer to their illness or problem. There are many attestations to the efficacy of this technique from pa­tients. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

New American Dream Dictionary

1. Victory.

2. Heroic character.

3. If in a cage, the dreamer be­lieves he or she has eaglelike qualities but is being suppressed.

4. If in a nest of eagles high on a mountain, a dreamer sees him/ herself as part of an elite group.

5. If the dreamer kills an eagle, it is a measure of his/her ruthlessness.

6. Supernatural ability and power. ... New American Dream Dictionary

Christian Dream Symbols

Symbolic of a supernatural power source... Christian Dream Symbols

Little Giant Encyclopedia

Baldness, Beard.

A symbol of wealth and fertility. In mythology, cutting off the hair is the equivalent of castration. Samson was robbed of his strength when Delilah cut off his locks. Hair for men is a sign of freedom; for women, long hair is a sign of femininity. According to Robert Bly, wild men and wild women are always covered with hair. Those who dream about “hairy” beings are on the way to satisfying their own nature, longing for vitality. This longing for “the wild energies” to be set free is clearly expressed in the musical Hair, which depicts the mythology of the sixties generation.

Today, hair often appears in dreams in connection with wanting to create a certain image, one that we would like to present to the outside world. It also may refer to “splitting hairs.”

According to an ancient Indian interpretation, hair that has been cut off means grief and sorrow.

Also, hair-dreams are thought to be about close relatives. And, in addition, they may mean spiritual and intellectual property.

According to Freud, hair, as a secondary sexual characteristic, has phallic meaning. Also, according to Freud and Steckel in The Language of Dreams, dreaming of hair means castration.

In mythology, hair and beards play an important role.

The chiefs of the Masai were afraid they would lose their supernatural powers when their hair or beards were cut.

For many primitive tribes, hair was considered taboo.

To be protected from danger means never getting your hair cut. Kings in Franconia (Germany) would lose their throne if they had their hair cut. Young warriors of Teutonic tribes could cut their hair and beard only after they had killed their first enemy. Hair, therefore, seems to mean power, strength, and magical vitality.

Folklore: Abundant hair means wealth; little or gray hair, troubles.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Intuition; creative ideas, the crazy irrational notions we sometimes call intuition.

The hare occasionally appears as a supernatural figure giving advice, or as a sacrificial animal. As such it depicts our ability to make great changes in life. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Encyclopedia of Dreams

To dream you are the victim of haunting by the spirit, or supernatural side, shows that you have many things on your mind, and/or things that ‘come back to haunt you’. Use all the parts of your dream to find out just what situation in your life is haunting you and put your mind at ease.... Encyclopedia of Dreams

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Antlers

1- Horns appearing in dreams hark back to the idea of the animal in the human.

The god Pan, who represents sexuality as well as life force, wore horns.

A horn also represents the penis and masculinity. Because it is penetrative, it can also signify the desire to hurt. Protcctivcncss is also a quality of horns since the male animal will use his horns to protect his territory.

A musical or hunting horn suggests a summoning or a warning in dreams.

2- Horns in a dream suggest superiority; cither earned or conferred. It is interesting that horns are supposed to bestow the powers of the animal on the wearer. In Pagan times, as well as some tribes today, the donning of horns signifies a particular senior position within the tribe. In Chinese medicine, rhinoceros horn is reputed to be an aphrodisiac. This is possibly because of its association with masculine power.

3- In a spiritual sense, because horns are associated with the head, they represent intellectual as well as supernatural power.

Because thcv rise above the head, they also symbolise Divinity and the power of the soul.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

In a spiritual sense, because horns are associated with the head, they represent intellectual as well as supernatural power. Because they rise above the head, they also symbolize divinity and the power of the soul.

The horn of plenty or cornucopia symbolizes gifts from the gods.

The gate of horn was a classical concept – dreams that passed through this portal were said to be terrifying but true.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Hunting wild game can point to the need to hunt down prospects for your business. However, hunting down your animal power may be a negative response to giving up your supernatural or mystical powers.

For woman, hunting in a dream may represent that she is husband hunting.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreaming of jade, or of what the Mayan culture called the “dream stone” is a sign of lucidity and supernatural support to assist you in bridging the gap between your awakened reality and your dreamtime. Jade also represents confidence, -sufficiency and the ability to transform your cherished desires into physical reality.... Strangest Dream Explanations

Christian Dream Symbols

Symbolic of a connection to a supernatural source of power... Christian Dream Symbols

Christian Dream Symbols

Symbolic of supernatural power, Ezek. 1:14... Christian Dream Symbols

Christian Dream Symbols

Symbolic of a supernatural being ... Christian Dream Symbols

Mystic Dream Book

To dream of things happening by supernatural or unknown means is a sign that changes are coming in your affairs, through some unexpected source.

The ultimate result, fortunate or otherwise, will depend upon the details of your dream, but as a rule, the result will be beneficial. But the unexpected happening may mean the loss of a friend, or some event that appears at the time to be unfortunate.... Mystic Dream Book

Little Giant Encyclopedia

In the past (but still relevant today), the image of supernatural power that you wish you had. This dream symbol frequently appears when one is feeling worthless. Today, it refers more to the dreamer himself and his magical qualities.

A magician represents the integrated whole and the individuality of the dreamer— that’s the reason why the magician in the Tarot was assigned the number One. This integration and uniqueness is what makes him magical.

The message here might be that the dreamer ought to concentrate on his “magical powers” and know that they contribute to success on his life path. But no personal magic will make itself known unless the dreamer chooses to pursue his own path.

If he doesn’t do that, everything will seem jinxed. He will not get ahead and a multitude of obstacles will get in his way. On the other hand, this dream symbol may also point out that too much emphasis is being put on the individual at the expense of the collective. See Witch.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

The Language of Dreams

(see Clothes, Costmnes)

Facades. Tilings not being what they seem. Or, the image you present to the world being only a partial truth.

Adapting to difficult circumstances: Ancient people wore masks to help them commune with specific energies. Today, we don figurative masks and temporary per-sonas when faced with new, unfamiliar, or demanding situations. This results in stressing particular characteristics that help us cope in these new settings.

The element of surprise and mystery, like at a costumed dance where you wonder what’s behind the mask.

Emotions or ideas that abide in your subconscious may manifest through a dream mask’s color, shape, or depiction.

For example, a red mask that looks angry can reveal your own outrage that was either subdued or silenced.

Jungian: The dreamer’s connection to the archetypes in the Collective Unconscious, mediating therein between two distinct factions, such as the mundane and the supernatural aspects of self.... The Language of Dreams

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Pertaining to evil, supernatural influences; a warning to prevent association; see “witchcraft”... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- When something appears as radiant in a dream it is being marked as having some kind of special quality which we may need to explore further.

2- Radiance represents something out of the ordinary or supernatural. It also suggests purity of thought, wisdom and the transcendence of the mundane.

3- Radiance is a sign of pure spirituality. It will enlighten and dazzle us and at the same time draw us in.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

True radiance, being a quality of light, is a sign of pure spirituality. It is pictured in representations of holy figures and has the ability to dazzle us – to stop us in our tracks – and at the same time draw us in and enlighten us. Radiance represents something out of the ordinary or supernatural. It also suggests purity of thought, wisdom and the transcendence of the mundane.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ariadne's Book of Dream

A bird associated with magic, Raven comes to show you the magical potential in life, which can be used to manifest your dreams. It can also demonstrate the karmic lessons associated with using black magic or bad magic as a way of controlling others.

If Raven appears in a dream, he has come as a sorcerer bringing supernatural powers to you. (See Birds.)... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Christian Dream Symbols

A demonic spirit posing as a guide to the supernatural.

A spirit guide manifests itself in a dream as a talking animal or a person. Sometimes demons pose as a dead relative... Christian Dream Symbols

Ariadne's Book of Dream

A bird with supernatural powers, the thunder- bird may arrive to summon you to use your personal power wisely or to make a loud and important statement to the world.

A thunderbird may come as a sign that powerful circumstances or a turn in events arc sure to happen soon.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Dream Symbols and Analysis

The walrus has been a symbol of protection.

To dream of a walrus means that you most likely are the dominant person in many of your waking life relationships. You use your intelligence to outthink those people that look to best you. Conversely, the walrus may indicate that you have the ability to ignore catty comments and criticism from others. Eskimos and some northern Native American tribes hold the walrus in high esteem and have given it supernatural attributes.... Dream Symbols and Analysis

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- When we dream of using a wand we are aware of our influence over others. Conversely, if someone else uses a wand we are aware of the power of suggestion, either for negative or for positive within the situation.

2- Conventionally the wand is an instrument of supernatural forces, and it is often this image which is the most important. We are aware of some force external to ourselves which needs harnessing.

3- Obviously a wand works in tandem with magic, so to dream of a wand can symbolise ‘magical’ powers which may influence us.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Psychological / emotional perspective: Conventionally the wand is an instrument of supernatural forces, and it is often this image that is the most important. We are aware of some force external to ourselves, which needs harnessing. From an emotional perspective, learning to use and direct the innate power we have gives us the ability to change our circumstances.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

Dreaming of a witch represents supernatural ability and wisdom.... Tryskelion Dream Interpretation
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