Woke

Keywords of this dream: Woke

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Depends which skin colour one has.

If white: one’s natural drives, feelings about coloured people; or if per­son is known, what you feel about them.

If black or brown: one’s own cultural feelings; same as any person’ dream.

Example: \ was in a cubicle or small toilet with a very black coloured woman. She told me there was something wrong with her vagina. She was undressed. I rubbed her va­gina and we both felt enormous passion. I then awoke but couldn’t at first remember the dream. I have refrained from sexual intercourse for some weeks, as I always feel shattered/ tired afterwards. Anyway I woke very wet, yet couldn’t re­member any orgasm. I could remember some question of sex as I awoke. Then I remembered the dream and continued it in fantasy. I experienced powerful urges to find a woman to have a non-committed sexual relationship with. But in the end I wanted to share my feelings with my wife, but she seemed deep asleep and unresponsive. When I slept again I dreamt I was in London, had got off one bus, but was not at any desti­nation. I was standing about not making a move to find my direction. Then I began to look’ (Alfred C).

To understand this dream in some depth it is helpful to think of a sexual drive as a flow, like a river. As such it can be blocked, in which case it will seek an alternative route. Sexual energy or flow is not simply a mechanical thing, ihough; it is also deeply feeling in its connection with the most profound sides of hu­man life such as parenthood and the canng and providing for young. In the history of white people a great deal of sexual frustration has arisen out of the ideas of sin and guilt in their religion.

A view arose for the white race that the black races had an easier and less frustrating relationship with the natural —which includes not only sexuality but the body as a whole, and nature also. So when Alfred dreams of the black woman, he is meeting what is natural and flowing in himself, but which he has blocked by his will because he felt shattered after sex.

The pan about the bus shows him trying to find a direction in which his sexual feelings could move satisfyingly in connection with other people.

Unfonunately, as Jung points out in Man and His Symbols, people in modern society, whether black, yellow, brown or white, have lost their sense of nature and the cosmos as being anything other than processes without consciousness or living feeling. Jung says. No river contains a spirit, no tree is the life principle of a man. no snake the embodiment of wisdom. No voice now speaks to man from stones, plants, and animals, nor does he speak to them believing they can hear.’ The im­portance of such dreams as Arthur’s is that it shows the pas­sionate relationship between our personality and the pnmitive and natural.

A black person, born and bred in a modern setting, would most likely dream of a black bushman to depict their own natural drives. See identity and dreams; Africa; sex in dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Language of Dreams

(see Flying, bisects, Wings)

Personal growth, especially spiritual. In classical Greek and Roman philosophy, the butterfly’s transformation mirrored that of the ever evolving soul.

Esotericallv: Reincarnation, which may be literal or figurative.

If you see yourself emerging from the cocoon, this speaks of a new, beautiful beginning, and astounding positive changes.

The question of personal identity and uniqueness. In China, there is a story of the sage Hsuang Chou who dreamt of being a butterfly. During the dream, he had no awareness of Hsuang Chou, only the butterfly. WTien he awoke, this experience left him wondering. Was he really Hsuang Chou, or actually a butterfly dreaming of being Hsuang Chou?

In China, the butterflv also symbolizes a happy union, usually a marriage.

An excellent portent for any type of partnership, especially if the butterfly is formed out of jade (see Gems, Jewelry, Stones).

Missives from beyond: The Hopi Indians believe that butterflies carry the souls of the departed.

Swallowing a butterfly: In Ireland and ancient Greece, this signified pregnancy.

The ability to rebound and rejuvenate after a major setback.

If seen in its caterpillar form, it means you’re entering a stage of positive transformation.

If the creature is flying, you may soon receive news from friends afar.

For a young woman, this foretells happy love.... The Language of Dreams

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: Three men with clubs were chasing me, but never actually caught me as I woke in terror. I was deter­mined to tell myself it was only a dream, and the next night as they were chasing me I remembered it was only a dream and lost all fear—stopped running—turned to face them and said This is only a dream, you can’t hurt me.” As they came closer they faded into nothing and I never saw them again’ (Account of dreams when six years old. Mr C).

The example shows how we can be pursued by fears or emotions, and can either continue to avoid them or face them. We are, in a real sense, pursued by what we have created with our thoughts, emotions, action and inaction. What we are avoiding might be sexual feelings; responsibility; expressing what we really feel in public; our fear of death; sense of failure; guilt; emo­tional pain; grief, etc. We can never escape from ourself, so such feelings may pursue us through life unless we meet them.

Chased by opposite sex: afraid of love or sex, haunted by a past relationship. By animal: one’s passions; anger, natural feelings. By Thing or shadowy creature: usually past experi­ence or trauma, a hurt from childhood. Chasing: something you are pursuing in life; something or someone you want; aggression. See follow. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Few dreams are, by themselves, problem solving or creative.

The few excep­tions are usually very clear. Example: ‘My mother-in-law died of cancer. I had watched the whole progression of her illness, and was very upset by her death. Shortly after she died the relatives gathered and began to sort through her belongings to share them out. That was the climax of my upset and distress, and I didn’t want any part of this sorting and taking her things. That night I dreamt I was in a room with all the relatives. They were sorting her things, and I felt my waking distress. Then my mother-in-law came into the room. She was very real and seemed happy. She said for me not to be upset as she didn’t at all mind her relatives taking her things. When I woke from the dream all the anxiety and upset had disap­peared. It never returned (told to author dunng a talk given to the Housewives Register in Ilfracombe).

Although in any collection of dreams such clearcut prob­lem solving is fairly rare, nevertheless the basic function in dreams appears to be problem solving.

The proof of this lies in research done in dream withdrawal. As explained in the entry science, sleep and dreams, subjects are woken up as they begin to dream, therefore denying them dreams. This quickly leads to disorientation and breakdown of normal functioning, showing that a lot of problem solving occurs in dreams, even though it may not be as obvious as in the exam­ple. This feature of dreaming can be enhanced to a marked degree by processing dreams and arriving at insights into the information they contain. This enables old problems to be cleared up and new information and attitudes to be brought into use more quickly. Through such active work one be­comes aware of the self, which Carl Jung describes as a cen­tre, but which we might think of as a synthesis of all our experience and being. Gaining insight and allowing the self entrance into our waking affairs, as M L. Von Franz says in Man and His Symbols, gradually produces a wider and more mature personality’ which emerges, and by degrees becomes effective and even visible to others’.

The function of dreams may well be described as an effort on the part of our life process to support, augment and help mature waking consciousness.

A study of dreams suggests that the creative forces which are behind the growth of our body are also inextricably connected with psychological develop­ment. In fact, when the process of physical growth stops, the psychological growth continues.

If this is thwarted in any way, it leads to frustration, physical tension and psychosomatic and eventually physical illness.

The integration of experience.

which dreams are always attempting, if successful cannot help but lead to personal growth. But it is often frozen by the individual avoiding the growing pains’, or the discomfon of breaking through old concepts and beliefs.

Where there is any attempt on the pan of our conscious personality to co-operate with this, the creative aspect of dreaming emerges. In fact anything we are deeply involved in, challenged by or attempting, we will dream about in a creative way. Not only have communities like the American Indians used dreams in this manner—to find better hunting, solve community problems, find a sense of personal life direction— but scientists, writers, designers and thousands of lay people have found very real information in dreams After all, through dreams we have personal use of the greatest computer ever produced in the history of the world—the human brain.

1- In Genesis 41, the story of Pharaoh’s dream is told—the seven fat cows and the seven thin cows. This dream was creative in that, with Joseph’s interpretation, it resolved a national problem where famine followed years of plenty. It may very well be an example of gathered information on the history of Egypt being in the mind of Pharaoh, and the dream putting it together in a problem solving way. See dream process as computer.

2- William Blake dreamt his dead brother showed him a new way of engraving copper. Blake used the method success­fully.

3- Otto Leowi dreamt of how to prove that nervous impulses were chemical rather than electncal. This led to his Nobel prize.

4- Friedrich Kekule tned for years to define the structure of benzene. He dreamt of a snake with its tail in its mouth, and woke to realise this explained the molecular forma­tion of the benzene ring. He was so impressed he urged colleagues, ‘Gentlemen, leam to dream.’

5- Hilprecht had an amazing dream of the connection be­tween two pieces of agate which enabled him to translate an ancient Babylonian inscription.

6- Elias Howe faced the problem of how to produce an effec­tive sewing machine.

The major difficulty was the needle. He dreamt of natives shaking spears with holes in their points. This led to the invention of the Singer sewing ma­chine.

7- Robert Louis Stevenson claims to have dreamt the plot of many of his stories.

8- Albert Einstein said that during adolescence he dreamt he was riding a sledge. It went faster and faster until it reached the speed of light.

The stars began to change into amazing patterns and colours, dazzling and beautiful. His meditation on that dream throughout the years led to the theory of relativity.

To approach our dreams in order to discover their creativity, first decide what problematic or creative aspect of your life needs ‘dream power’. Define what you have already leamt or know about the problem. Write it down, and from this clarify what it is you want more insight into.

If this breaks down into several issues, choose one at a time. Think about the issue and pursue it as much as you can while awake. Read about it, ask people’s opinions, gather information. This is all data for the dream process.

If the question still needs further insight, be­fore going to sleep imagine you are putting the question to your internal store of wisdom, computer, power centre, or whatever image feels right.

For some people an old being who is neither exclusively man nor woman is a working image.

In the morning note down whatever dream you remember. It does not matter if the dream does not appear to deal with the question; Elias Howe’s native spears were an outlandish image, but nevertheless contained the information he needed. Investigate the dream using the techniques given in the entry dream processing. Some problems take time to define, so use the process until there is a resolution.

If it is a major problem, it may take a year or so; after all, some resolutions need re­structuring of the personality, because the problem cannot disappear while we still have the same attitudes and fears. See secret of the universe dreams; dream processing. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Language of Dreams

Dreaming of crying or moaning is usually a straightforward release of some type of pain, regret, guilt, or sadness.

If it is the cry of an animal, the emotions are likely tied to whatever that creature represents.

The cry of a child can represent your own inner child trying to get attention (see Baby). Alternatively, for new parents this is a circumstantial dream caused by normal concerns, and by being woken up so frequently by the newborn.... The Language of Dreams

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Many dreams of dead people come from women who have lost their husband. It is common to have disturbing dreams for some period afterwards; or not be able to dream about the husband (or wife) at all; or to see the partner in the distance but not get near. In accepting the death, meeting any feelings of loss, grief, anger and continu­ing love, the dream may become as below.

The example both shows the resolution of the loss, but also the paradox felt at realising the meeting was an inner reality. Example: ‘A couple of months ago as I was waking I felt my husband’s arm across me and most realistically experienced my hand wrapping around his arm and turning towards him (which I had done so often in his lifetime) and saying “1 thought you had died. Thank God you have not.” Then I awoke alone and terribly shaken’ (Mrs I).

A critic might say this is only a dream in which a lonely woman is replaying memories of her dead husband’s presence for her own comfort—thus her disap­pointment on being disillusioned. Whatever our opinion, the woman has within her such memories to replay. These are reality.

The inner reality is of what experience was left within her from the relationship. Her challenge is whether she can meet this treasure with its share of pain, and draw out of it the essence which enriches her own being. That is the spiritual life of her husband.

The aliveness’ of her husband in that sense is also social, because many other people share memo­ries of him. What arises in their own lives from such memo­ries is the observable influence of the now dead person.

But the dead also touch us more mysteriously, as in the next example. Example: In a recent news programme on tele­vision, a man who survived a Japanese prisoner of war camp in Singapore had been given a photograph of children by a dying soldier he did not know.

The man had asked him to tell his family of his death, but did not give his name.

The photo­graph was kept for 40 odd years, the man still wanting to complete his promise but not knowing how. One night he dreamt he was told the man’s name. Enquiries soon found the family of the man, who had an identical photograph. See husband under family. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The symbols of death or the fear of death can be: sunset; evening; a crossed river or falling in a river, a skeleton; snarling dogs; sleep; anaesthetic; gravestones; ceme­tery; blackness, or something black; ace of spades; a fallen mirror; stopped clock; a pulled tooth; an empty abyss, the chill wind; falling leaves; a withering plant; an empty house; a lightning-struck tree; coffin; struggling breaths; the dead ani­mal in the gutter; the rotting carcass, underground; the depths of the sea; the Void.

What lies beyond death is conjecture, but the archetype of death we are considering is not completely about physical death. It is about our observation of it in others; our concep­tions of it gained from our culture and our impressions; the feelings which generate around our experiences and thoughts; our attempts to deal with our own aging and approach to death, plus what material the deeper strata of our unconscious release regarding it. It is about how our sense of conscious personal existence meets the prospect of its disintegration.

Unless we can come to terms with what is behind the haunting images of death we meet in our dreams, we fail to live fully and daringly, we are too haunted by death lurking in the shadows of injury and the unknown. Images of death and the associated emotions, carried within for years, can have a negative influence on our health. Coming to terms means the courage to feel the emotions of fear or chill and discover them for what they are—emotions. They are certainly not death, only our feelings about it.

The differences shown in the two following examples illustrate the avoiding and the meeting. Example: 4So to get to the bedroom I had to jump across this gap. I tried to jump but missed and I fell and hit the bottom.

The next thing I remember was I was floating up. I looked down and saw myself lying face down with arms spread out and I suddenly realised I was dead. I was so frightened that I woke up. I had the feelings of fear of dying, but I felt no pain’ (Cath). Example: “Suddenly I was in a huge underground cav­ern. It was hundreds of feet high and as wide. It had two great statues in it, both to do with death.

The whole place overpow­ered me with a sense of decay and skeletal death, darkness, underground, earth, the end. I cried out in the dismal cave, “Death, where is your sting! Grave, where is your victory!” I immediately had the sense of being a bodiless awareness. I knew this was what occurred at death. Fear and the sense of decay left me’ (Andrew).

Summarising these and many other dreams, it is not only the accumulated images of death, but also bodilessness and loss of power and identity which bring so much fear. There are two antipodes of human experience. At the tip of one is focused self-determining self consciousness. At the tip of the other is unfocused void without identity. Strangely enough we experience both each day in some degree—the first while awake, the second when we sleep. Yet to face the second with consciousness feels like all the horrors of death and loss. Yet facing it is important, especially to the second half of life.

The symbols of rebirth are: the cave; an egg; spring; the tree; the cross; dawn; emerging out of the sea; the snake; the bird; a seed; arising from the earth or faeces; green shoot from a dead branch; phoenix; flame; a pearl; the womb. Rebirth is as difficult to face as death. It holds within it not just the memones of the struggles and difficulties of our own physical birth and growth, but also the challenge of becoming the un­known future, the dark possibility, the new.

The dream of Andrew in the underground cavern is an example of positive rebirth. After realising himself as bodiless awareness he emerges from the cave and finds himself near a tree. Example: ‘A tremendous jolt of power poured into me from the tree. I saw that we had arrived at a place where a line of trees, about a 100 yards in length, stood very close together in a slight semicircle on the top of a bank.

The trees had great spiritual power and the place was a holy temple. Two spiritual beings were there—an ancient Earth Being, and Christ’ (Andrew).

The next example is of a dream typical of meeting memo­ries of physical birth. As can be seen, the experience is pow­erful enough to cause physical shaking. Example: All I can see of what I enter is a very narrow space with a light showing through. But immediately I enter I realise I have made a mis­take for I am being forced swiftly through a dark, very narrow tunnel. I feel pain as I am dragged along and I hear loud banging noises which frighten me, but although they are loud they seem to come from inside my head. I feel terrified and breathless and very relieved when I wake before reaching the end of the tunnel. In fact as I write this account I am shiver­ing” (female, anon). ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: I was in a cubicle or small toilet with a very black coloured woman. She told me there was something wrong with her vagina. She was undressed. I rubbed her vagina and we both felt enormous passion. I then woke but couldn’t at first remember the dream. I have re­frained from sexual intercourse for some weeks, as I always feel shattered/tired afterwards. Anyway I awoke very wet, yet couldn’t remember any ejaculation. Then I remembered the dream and continued it in fantasy. I experienced powerful urges to find a woman to have a non-committed sexual rela­tionship with. But in the end I wanted to share my feelings with my wife, but she seemed deep asleep’ (Alan P).

The example shows how our sexual needs attempt to satisfy them­selves even though we may make a conscious attempt to deny them.

The ejaculation, male or female, shows the sexual na­ture of one’s dream, even if the symbols seem to have no obvious connection.

The attitudes in one’s dream also show something of our relationship to sex. This may be mechanical, fearful, loving, etc. Alan sees sex as a problem to be solved, and has difficulties around commitment. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

There is a level of human experience which is typified by intense emotional and physical response to life. Such emotions and bodily drives may remain almost entirely unconscious until touched by exploring our dream content in the right setting. When such feelings and bodily movements arise, as they do in dreams, we may be amazed at their power and clarity. See dream processing; sleep move­ments.

If we take away the images and events occurring in a dream and simply look to see what feelings or emotions are evident, the dream is often more understandable than if we try to interpret the symbols. Feelings in dreams are nearly always undistoned. We therefore do not need to interpret them, sim­ply to acknowledge them and see if we can recognise where they occur in waking life.

The images in a dream may be the way we unconsciously pictorialise our flux of feelings and the play of internal energy flows.

For instance love or sexual drive can give rise to physical movement—as in sexual intercourse. Repression of sex or love also represses such physical move­ments, leading to tension and conflict, which might be pre­sented in the drama of a dream.

Example: ‘I was with my wife, walking along a street, on holiday with her. But I felt awful tension. It was the son of stress I feel when I have turned off my sexual flow—as I have at the moment’ (Brian V). Brian can easily see the connection between the dream feelings and his everyday life, although sometimes we need to practise this. But the situation could as easily be expressed as a dream image of a blocked river.

The underlying feelings would then be less easy to grasp.

Example: ‘I was in a very ancient crumbling building, con­fronted by a large stone door, deeply engraved with many designs and creatures. I began to open the door and felt high feelings of anxiety. I realised this was an initiation and I must calm my feelings in order to pass beyond the door, i.e. if I were controlled by my feelings I would run away’ (Derek F). How we meet the emotions in our dreams illustrates our ha­bitual method of dealing with them.

The feelings of anxiety in Derek’s dream were met and moved beyond, but this is un­usual. This is because most of us change our direction as soon as there is a hint of fear.

The amount of nicotine and alcohol human beings consume suggests how poorly we meet anxiety. Going beyond fear or pain is an initiation which opens doors for us. We might now apply for the job, ask for the date, raise the issue, express the creativity, make the journey abroad, which anxiety previously kept us from. We see this in the next example: I had a ring on my marriage finger. It was a thin band of gold. I woke up frightened’ (Angela). Angela is not married and feels anxiety about the commitment.

Dreams give us a safe area to express emotions which might be difficult or dangerous to release socially. Anger in a dream may be expressing what we failed to express in a wak­ing encounter, or it might be our habitual response. It may also be directed against ourself. Dreams also contain many positive emotions. Sometimes they present a new aspect of feeling which is life enhancing.

A person who habitually felt at odds with her father and relatives experienced a dream in which she felt forgiveness for the first time. This was entirely new for her and led to a reconciliation with her family.

Some feeling states in a dream are subtle, and may be more evident in terms of the symbols than the feelings.

A grey drear environment suggests depression and lack of pleasure.

A sunny light environment with flowers and colour shows plea­sure and good feelings.

A country landscape depicts quite a different feeling state to a smoky busy city street. We can define these for ourself using the techniques described under dream processing.

Whatever feelings or emotions we meet in our dreams, many of them are bound to be habitual responses we have to life. Where these habits are negative we can begin to change them by working with the dream images as described in the last question under dream processing. See love; hostility. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Passion; sexuality, anger, desire; burning feelings such as resentment or frustration; our desire to destroy. Also our life process, often described as a flame which burns forever through different generations but leaves only ash behind, our vital energy; occasionally refers to physical illness.

Example: T was in a small terraced house with a friend I had known years earlier. It was her house, there were two or three children in it. Suddenly it caught fire, I wanted to stay and put the fire out but she did not. She dragged me outside and down the street. We saw the house burn down. I had this dream the day I got home from hospital, after undergoing a hysterectomy’ (Mrs G). Here the fire depicts the consuming feelings of loss regarding Mrs G’s childbearing function. Also the loss of an area or era of life. Underground flames: uncon­scious emotions or desires which one may need to face for real growth. Fire in the sky: great changes in viewpoint; meet­ing the next step in maturity.

Example: ‘I found quite a large old fireplace. I asked my husband if he would like a fire. I thought it would be cosy if we both enjoyed the fire together. Woke up with a warm feeling towards my husband; he reached out to me’ (Dinah Y). Here fire is not only homemaking and human warmth, but also sexuality. Fireplace: homeliness; the womb. Idioms: bap­tism of fire; between two fires; fire up; go through fire and water; play with fire; under fire; the old illness/love flared up. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: During childhood I leamt to fly in a long sequence of dreams. Each linked very clearly to the last. I would go to the nearby churchyard and in the beginning I would run along as fast as I could then jump and just manage to extend the jump by a great effon of will. In subsequent practices I managed gradually to extend the jump for many yards; and eventually I could skim along indefinitely.

The next stage though was to extend my height, and this took enor­mous effort of will and body. I made active swimming mo­tions and climbed, but only held altitude with great and con­stant concentration. With further practice still, this clumsy mode of flying was left behind as I leamt to use pure motiva­tion or will to lift me into the air and carry me easily and gracefully wherever I wished. At this stage my flying was swift, mobile and without struggle’ (Jason V).

The example illustrates how much will, effort and learning can be involved in flying in dreams. This aspect of flying connects with the gaining of independence and the expression of one’s poten­tial. We are all born into a certain paradigm or ‘reality’. At one time, part of the ‘reality’ for most Britons was that anyone without a white skin was a heathen or savage. At other times the reality’ has been that anything heavier than air could not fly. Meteors did not exist because theory discounted them. And so on.

To break free of such paradigms and from the gravity’ or hold our parental and social authority has on us to find a measure of emotional and intellectual freedom, takes the son of will, effort and learning depicted.

Flying expresses also the dealing with our internal influ­ences which hold us down, such as self doubt, anxiety, de­pression.

Example: ‘I was flying. I felt nervous at first that I would fall down, but not afraid. I soon became confident and felt very happy and wanted the sensation to continue. I was (lying over a building, could have been a small church, crematorium or graveyard but did not feel afraid or upset. When I woke I lay in bed and tried very hard to keep the feelings with me and, for reasons unknown, I do not wish to forget it’ (Mrs SM). In flying, Mrs SM is finding a way to look at death—the graveyard—which gives her a different viewpoint, a different feeling reaction to it, and she doesn’t want to lose that pre­cious newly learnt view. In their maturing process some peo- pie learn to see their thoughts and emotions as things they expenence rather than things they are, and this brings the sort of new viewpoint seen in the example.

Example: ‘I was in a building with a group of people. I was being chased and suddenly flew up in the air to escape my pursuers’ (Michael O). Learning independence, and the abil­ity to make decisions despite what others feel, may be done by ignoring our own feelings. This may be achieved by always keeping busy; never having quiet moments alone; filling empty periods with entertainment or company; smoking, drinking alcohol, taking sedatives or tranquillisers; ngid posi­tive thinking. Then, as Michael does in his dream, we fly from issues we are pursued by instead of resolving them. This may lead us to the extremes of being either rigidly materialistic, or as rigidly ethereal. In either case we lose contact with every­day human issues, and may begin to have the escape-type flying dream, or an out of body experience.

Example: 41 knew I could fly. I picked up one of the young women I felt love for and flew with her.’ Laughingly I felt like superman, and flew easily’ (Simon W). Flying alone occurs most frequently, showing the independent aspect of flying. But because it often involves our positive feelings of pleasure, flying may depict our sexuality, as above, especially aspects of it expressing freedom from social norms and restraints.

Example: ‘I was floating atop a tree near houses and a rising walkway. I was saying to people around the tree that I had found something wonderful. Reaching out my hand I told them they could join me if they accepted this possibility in themselves. Some thought it was a publicity campaign, but were enjoying the spectacle.

A few reached out and were im­mediately with me, until there were about six of us, men and women. We joined hands, experiencing a most amazing sense of well-being. Then we slowly and effortlessly flew to a great height, leaving a trail of coloured smoke which could be seen for miles. It was to demonstrate the triumph of the human spirit. We then descended and were going somewhere else to show others’ (Margareta H). Transcendence is also depicted by flying.

The tree is Margareta’s personal life. She is at the growing tip, transcending, leaving behind her past. Being high in flight, on a hill or mountain also represents the action of seeing our life as a whole, having a sense of our overall direc­tion and destiny, our essential self. This frequently gives rise to the drive to give of one’s best to others, as Margareta does in leaving behind a sign—the spire of colour.

Some researchers believe flying dreams often precede lucid dreams. See lucid dreams; out of body experience. See also Hill; mountain. Idioms: fly by night, flying high; send flying. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘1 dream insects are dropping either on me from the ceiling of our bedroom, or crawling over my pillow. My long-suffering husband is always woken when I sit bolt upright in bed, my eyes wide open and my arm pointing at the ceiling. I try to brush them off. I can still see them—spiders or woodlice. I am now well aware it is a dream. But no matter how hard I stare the insects are there in perfect detail. I am not frightened, but wish it would go away’ (Sue D). Sue’s dream only became a hallucination when she opened her eyes and continued to see the insects in per­fect clarity.

A hallucination can be experienced through any of the senses singly, or all of them together. So one might have a hallucinatory smell or sound.

To understand hallucinations, which are quite common without any use of drugs such as alcohol, LSD or cannabis, one must remember that everyone has the natural ability to produce such images. One of the definitions of a dream according to Freud is its hallucinatory quality. While asleep we can create full sensory, vocal, motor and emotional expenence in our dream. While dreaming we usually accept what we experience as real.

A hallucination is an experience of the function which produces dreams’ occur­ring while we have our eyes open.

The voices heard, people seen, smells smelt, although appearing to be outside us, are no more exterior than the things and images of our dreams. With this information one can understand that much classed as psychic phenomena and religious experience is an encoun­ter with the dream process. That does not, of course, deny its imponance.

There are probably many reasons why Sue should experi­ence a hallucination and her husband not. One might be that powerful drives and emotions might be pushing for attention in her life. Some of the primary drives are the reproductive drive, urge towards independence, pressure to meet uncon­scious emotions and past trauma and fears, any of which, in order to achieve their ends, can produce hallucinations.

A hallucination is therefore not an ‘illusion’ but a means of giving information from deeper levels of self. Given such names as mediumship or mystical insight, in some cultures or individuals the ability to hallucinate is often rewarded so­cially.

Drugs such as LSD, cannabis, psilocybin, mescaline, pey- ote and opium can produce hallucinations. This is sometimes because they allow the dream process to break through into consciousness with less intervention.

If this occurs without warning it can be very disturbing.

The very real dangers are that unconscious content, which in ordinary dreaming breaks through a threshold in a regu­lated way, emerges with little regulation. Fears, paranoid feel­ings, past traumas, can emerge into the consciousness of an individual who has no skill in handling such dangerous forces. Because the propensity of the unconscious is to create images, an area of emotion might emerge in an image such as the devil. Such images, and the power they contain, not being integrated in a proper therapeutic setting, may haunt the indi­vidual, perhaps for years. Even at a much milder level, ele­ments of the unconscious will emerge and disrupt the person’s ability to appraise reality and make judgments. Un­acknowledged fears may lead the drug user to rationalise their reasons for avoiding social activity or the world of work. See ESP and dreams; dead lover in husband under family. See also out of body experience.... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Depicts how you see the relationship with your husband; your relationship with your sexuality; sexual and emotional desire and pleasure; how you relate to intimacy in body, mind and spirit; habits of relationship developed with one’s father.

Example: ‘My recurring dream—some disaster is happen­ing. I try to contact the police or my husband. Can never contact either. I try ringing 999 again and again and can feel terror, and sometimes dreadful anger or complete panic. I cry, I scream and shout and never get through! Recently I have stopped trying to contact my husband. I managed once to reach him but he said he was too busy and I would have to deal with it myself. I woke in a furious temper with him and kicked him while he was still asleep’ (Mrs GS).

The husband here depicts Mrs S’s feelings of not being able to get through’ to her man. This is a common female dream theme, possibly arising from the husband not daring to express emotion or meet his panner with his own feelings.

For Mrs S this is an emergency. Although the dream dramatises it, there is still real frustration, anger, and a break in marital communica­tions.

Example: There were three of us. My husband, a male friend and 1, all nding small white enamel bikes. My husband proceeded slowly, first, with his back to us. Then my friend followed. Suddenly my friend ahead of me turned and gazed fully at me. He gave a glonous smile which lit up the whole of his face. I felt a great sense of well-being surge through me’ (Joan B).

The triangle: the example shows typical (low of feeling towards another male.

The other male here depicts

Joan’s desire to be attractive to other men. This is a danger signal unless one fully acknowledges ihe impulse.

Example: ‘I was with my husband and our three children. About 2 or 3 yards to our right stood my husband’s first wife —she died about a year before I first met him. I remember feeling she no longer minded me being with him, so I put my arms around him from the back, and felt more secure and comfortable with him’ (Mrs NS).

The first wife: the dreamer is now feeling easier about her husband’s first relationship.

The first wife represents her sense of competing for her husband’s affections, even though his ‘first woman’ was dead.

Example: ‘My dead husband came into my bedroom and got into bed with me to make love to me. I was not afraid. But owing to his sexual appetites during my married life with him I was horrified, and resisted him with all my might. On wak­ing I felt weak and exhausted.

The last time he came to me I responded to him and he never came back again. This hap­pened three times.

The last time I don’t think it was a dream. I was not asleep. I think it was his ghost’ (GL). Dead hus­band: in any experience of an apparently psychic nature, we must always remember the unconscious is a great dramatist. It can create the drama of a dream in moments. In doing so it makes our inner feelings into apparently real people and ob­jects outside us. While asleep we lightly dismiss this amazing process as a dream’. When it happens while our eyes are open or we are near waking, for some reason we call it a ghost or psychic event. Yet the dream process is obviously capable of creating total body sensations, emotions, full visual impres­sions, vocalisation—what else is a dream? On the other hand, the dream process is not dealing in pointless imaginations. Many women tend to believe they have little sexual drive, so it is easier for GL to see her drive in the form of her husband. But of course, her husband may also depict how she felt about sex in connection with his ‘sexual appetites’. It is a general rule, however, that our dream process will dramatise into a past life, or a psychic’ experience, emotions linked with trauma or sexual drive which we find difficult to meet in the present.

Example: ‘I dreamt many times I lost my husband, such as not being able to find the car park where he was waiting, and seeing him go off in the distance. I wake in a panic to find him next to me in bed. These dreams persisted, and then he died quite suddenly. He was perfectly healthy at the time of the dreams and I wonder if it was a premonition of me really losing him’ (Mrs AD). Cannot find husband: many middle aged women dream of ‘losing’ their husband while out with him, perhaps shopping, or walking in a town somewhere. Sometimes the dream ponrays him actually killed. Mrs AD wonders if her dream was a premonition. It is more likely a form of practising the loss, so it does not come as such a shock.

The greatest shocks occur when we have never even considered the event—such as a young child losing its mother, an event it has never practised, not even in fantasy, so has no inbuilt shock absorbers. As most of us know, men tend to die before women, and this information is in the mind of middle-aged married women. Mrs AD may have uncon­sciously observed slight changes in her husband’s body and behaviour, and therefore readied herself.

Other woman’s husband: one’s own husband, feelings about that man, desire for a non-committed relationship with less responsibility. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Islamic Dream Interpretation

It is related that Abdullah bin Zubair (RA) saw in his dream that he is engaged in a duel with Abdul Malik ibn Marwan, defeating the latter.

The former also sees himself pinning his foe to the ground by means of four nails. When he awoke in the morning, he sent his man to Muhammad bin Sireen (RA) for the interpretation of the dream. He also cautioned him not to reveal to the Imaam the name of the one who saw the dream, nor the winnr nor the loser. When the Imaam heard this he exclaimed: “This is not your dream! Nor can anyone except Abdul Malik ibn Marewan or Abdullah bin Zubair see such a dream!” The Imaam decline to interpret the dream.

The person returned to Abdullah bin Zubair and informed him tof the Imaam’s refusal to interpret the dream until the real person who had seen the dream is not known. Abdullah bin Zubair 9RA) sent his messenger back to tell the Imaam that it was he who had seen the dream When the Imaam was informed to this and the fact that the loser was Abdul Malik bin Marwan he said that Ibne Marwan will gain victory over Abdullah bin Zubair, killing him in the process. Thereafter, the chain of Khilafat will reamin in the family of ibne Marwan. This interpretation was given because of the fact that ibne Marwan was pinned to the ground by means of four nails.

The interpretation turned out to be exactly as the Imaam had stated!.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘In my dream I woke up and had the feeling that a lot of time had passed. I felt I had lost all this time.

A group of friends I was with had gone ahead, left me behind, and I wondered if I would ever catch up’ (Patience C). Oneself left behind: feelings of rejection or inadequacy; sense of waking up to what you have not done or experienced in life, as Patience does in her dream. Leaving something, someone behind: leaving the past behind, breakup of relation­ship. Idioms: fall behind; put it all behind me. See also bag. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

My Dream Interpretation

If your dream featured loud noise, this foretells arguments or disagreements with family members. However, if the loud noise in your dream actually woke you up, you can expect a change for the better.

To hear a sudden loud noise in your dream may represent a breakthrough in your personal struggles. Perhaps you have burst through a barrier of resistance which had been holding you back for a long time.... My Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Sometimes in the practice of deep relaxation, meditation or sensory deprivation, our being enters into a state akin to sleep, yet we maintain a personal waking awareness. This is like a journey into a deep interior world of mind and body where our senses no longer function in their waking manner, where the brain works in a different way, and where awareness is introverted in a degree we do not usually experience. It can be a frightening world, simply because we are not accustomed to it. In a similar way a measure of waking awareness can arise while dreaming. This is called lucid dreaming. During it we can change or wilfully direct what is happening in the dream in a way not usual to the dream state.

Example: 4I had backed my car into a big yard, a commer­cial area. My wife, two of my sons and I got out of the car. As we stood in the yard talking I realised there was a motorbike where my car should be. I said to everyone, “There was a car here a moment ago, now it’s a motorbike. Do you know what that means? It means we are dreaming.” Mark my son was now with us, and my ex-wife. I asked them if they realised they were dreaming. They got very vague and didn’t reply. I asked them again and felt very clearly awake’ (William V). William’s is a fairly typical lucid dream, but there are features which it does not illustrate. During the days or weeks prior to a lucid dream, many people experience an increase in (lying dreams.

The next example shows another common feature.

Example: In many of my dreams I become aware that I am dreaming. Also, if anything unpleasant threatens me in the dream I get away from it by waking myself (Alan). Lucidity often has this feature of enabling the dreamer to avoid un­pleasant elements of the dream.

The decision to avoid any unpleasant internal emotions is a common feature of a per­son’s conscious life, so this aspect of lucidity is simply a way of taking such a decision into the dream. Some writers even suggest it as a way of dealing with frightening dreams. Avoid­ance does not solve the problem, it simply pushes the emo­tion deeper into the unconscious where it can do damage more surreptitiously. Recent findings regarding suppressed gnef and stress, which connects them with a higher incidence of cancer, suggests that suppression is not a healthy way of dealing with feelings.

Another approach to lucidity is that it can be a son of playground where one can walk through walls, jump from high buildings and fly, change the sofa into an attractive lover, and so on. True, the realisation that our dream life is a differ­ent world and that it does have completely different principles at work than our waking world is imponant. Often people introven into their dream life the morals and fears which are only relevant to being awake in physical life.

To avoid a charging bull is cenainly imponant in waking life. In our dream life, though, to meet its charge is to integrate the enor­mous energy which the bull represents, an energy which is our own but which we may have been avoiding or running away’ from previously. Realising such simple differences revolutionises the way we relate to our own internal events and possibilities.

To treat lucid dreams as if they offered no other attainable expenence than to manipulate the dream en­vironment, or avoid an encounter, is to miss an amazing fea­ture of human potential.

Example: ‘In my dream I was watching a fern grow. It was small but opened out very rapidly. As I watched I became aware that the fern was simply an image representing a pro­cess occurring within myself which I grew increasingly aware of as I watched. Then I was fully awake in my dream and realised that my dream, perhaps any dream, was an expres­sion of actual and real events occurring in my body and mind. I felt enormous excitement, as if I were witnessing something of great importance’ (Francis P). It is now acceptable, through the work of Freud, Jung and many others, to consider that within images of the dream lie valuable information about what is occurring within the dreamer, perhaps unconsciously. Strangely, though, it is almost never considered that one can have direct perception into this level of internal ‘events’ with­out the dream. What Francis describes is an experience of being on the cusp of symbols and direct perception. Consider­ing the enormous advantage of such direct information gath­ering, it is surprising it is seldom mentioned except in the writings of Corriere and Han, The Dream Makers.

Example: After defining why I had not woken in sleep recently, i.e. loss of belief, I had the following experience. I awoke in my sleep and began to see, without any symbols, that my attitudes and sleep movements expressed a feeling of restrained antagonism or irritation to my wife. I could also observe the feelings were arising from my discipline of sexual­ity. Realising I did not want those feelings I altered them and woke enough to turn towards her’ (Francis P). After the first of his direct perception dreams, Francis attempted to use this function again, resulting in the above, and other, such dreams. Just as classic dream interpretation says that the dream symbols represent psychobiological logical processes which might be uncovered by dream processing, what we see in Francis’ lucidity is a direct route to self insight, and through it a rapid personal growth to improved life experience. Such dreams provide not only psychological insight, but very fre­quently a direct perception of processes occurring in the body, as the following example illustrates.

Example: ‘Although deeply asleep I was wide awake with­out any shape or form. I had direct experience, without any pictures, of the action of the energies in my body. I had no awareness of body shape, only of the flow of activities in the organs. I checked over what I could observe, and noticed a tension in my neck was interfering with the flow and ex­change of energies between the head and trunk. It was also obvious from what I could see that the tension was due to an attitude I had to authority, and if the tension remained it could lead to physical ill health’ (Tony C).

An effective way to develop lucidity is frequently to con­sider the events of waking life as if they were a dream. Try to see events as one might see dream symbols. What do they mean in terms of one’s motivations, fears, personal growth? What do they suggest about oneself? For instance a person who works in a photographic darkroom developing films and prints might see they were trying to bnng to consciousness the latent—unconscious—side of themselves.

A banker might feel they were working at how best to deal with their sexual and personal resources. In this way one might actually apply what is said in this dream dictionary to one’s outer circumstances.

The second instruction is, on waking, at a convenient mo­ment, imagine oneself standing within one’s recent dream. As you get a sense of this dream environment, realise that you are taking waking awareness into the dream. From the standpoint of being fully aware of the dream action and events, what will you now do in and with the dream? Re-dream it with con­sciousness.

For example the things you run from in your nor­mal dreaming you could now face. See dream processing for fun her suggestions. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

little fish in round container: could be sperm, or depict becoming, or wanting to become, pregnant. Example: ‘Last week I suddenly started having a recurring dream. In it I woke, walked downstairs, went into the kitchen and looked in the kettle. It was full of little fish’ (Karen).

The fact that Karen goes ‘downstairs’, suggesting the lower part of her body, and the shape of the kettle, which is a round container, make it likely this dream is about pregnancy. See Christ under arche­types; religion and dreams, sea. Idioms: big fish, big fish in a small pond; cold fish; fishing for compliments; fish out of water, queer fish; smell something fishy. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Being self responsible for state of mind; listen­ing to intuition and unconscious.

For people involved in any form of personal growth, they occasionally have a dream in which some form of instruction is given as an aid to their unfolding. Such dreams are worth following as the uncon­scious has the ability to sift and consider our collective experi­ence, and present what applies to our need.

Example: ‘While recovering from a major operation and experiencing enormous pain I dreamt my father—dead—ap­peared standing at the end of the bed, and he said in a very matter of fact voice, “Think of five pink bouquets.” My father would never have used those words, so the scene impressed itself on me. I therefore woke and tried to visualise the five bouquets. I managed to get three in a row, four, but I could not manage five until I had formed them into a diamond with one in the middle. When I achieved that my pain subsided, and did so each time I used the image—why I do not know’ (Ken S). Ken’s experience suggests a psychosomatic effect from his dream-proposed meditation. Such meditations often show ways to alter character attitudes or help find strength to make necessary changes in life. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Many dreams lead us to feel an intensity of emotion we may seldom if ever feel in waking life.

If the emotions felt are frightening or disgusting we call the dream a nightmare. One of the common features of a nightmare is that we are desperately trying to get away from the situation; feel stuck in a terrible condition; or on waking feel enormous relief that it was just a dream. Because of the intensity of a nightmare we remember it long after other dreams; even if we seldom ever recall other dreams, even worry about what it means.

As so many dreams have been investigated in depth, using such varied approaches as hypnosis, exploration of associa­tions and emotional content, and LSD psychotherapy, in which the person can explore usually unconscious memories, imagery and feelings, we can be certain we know what night­mares are. They arise from six main causes.

Unconscious memories of intense emotions, such as those arising in a child being left in a hospital without its mother. Example: see second example in dark.

Intense anxiety produced—but not fully released at the time—by external situations such as involvement in war scenes, sexual assault (this applies to males as well as females, as they are frequently assaulted). Example: ‘A THING is marauding around the rather bleak, dark house I am in with a small boy.

To avoid it I lock myself in a room with the boy.

The THING finds the room and tries to break the door down. I frantically try to hold it closed with my hands and one foot pressed against it, my back against a wall for leverage. It was a terrible struggle and I woke myself by screaming’ (Terry F). When Terry allowed the sense of fear to arise in him while awake, he felt as he did when a child—the boy in the dream—during the bombing of the Second World War. His sense of insecurity dating from that time had emerged when he left a secure job, and had arisen in the images of the nightmare. Un­derstanding his fears, he was able to avoid their usual paralysing influence.

Childhood fears, such as loss of parent, being lost or abandoned, fear of attack by stranger or parent, anxiety about own internal drives.

Many nightmares in adults have a similar source, namely fear connected with internal drives such as aggression, sexuality and the process of growth and change, such as encounter with adolescence, loss of sexual characteristics, old age and death. Example: see third example in doors under house, buildings.

Serious illness. Example: ‘I dream night after night that a cat is gnawing at my throat’ (male from Landscapes of the Night).

The dreamer had developing cancer of the throat. These physical illness dreams are not as common as the other classes of nightmare.

Precognition of fateful events. Example: My husband, a pilot in the RAF, had recently lost a friend in an air crash. He woke one morning very troubled—he is usually a very positive person. He told me he had dreamt his friend was flying a black jet, and wanted my husband to fly with him.

Although a simple dream, my husband could not shake off the dark feelings. Shortly afterwards his own jet went down and he was killed in the crash’ (Anon.).

Understanding the causes of nightmares enables us to deal with them.

The things we run from in the nightmare need to be met while we are awake. We can do this by sitting and imagining ourselves back in the dream and facing or meeting what we were frightened of. Terry imagined himself opening the door he was fighting to keep closed. In doing this and remaining quiet he could feel the childhood feelings arising. Once he recognised them for what they were, the terror went out of them.

A young woman told me she had experienced a recurring nightmare of a piece of cloth touching her face. She would scream and scream and wake her family. One night her brother sat with her and made her meet those feelings de­picted by the cloth. When she did so she realised it was her grandmother’s funeral shroud. She cried about the loss of her grandmother, felt her feelings about death, and was never troubled again by the nightmare.

The techniques given in dream processing will help in meeting such feelings. Even the simple act of imagining ourselves back in the nightmare and facing the frightening thing will begin the process of changing our relationship with our internal fears. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘At about two or three in the morning my wife Brenda and I were suddenly awoken from sleep by a noise. As we lifted our heads to listen we identified it as the handle on our children’s bedroom door being turned.

The house only had two bedrooms, and the children’s room was directly opposite ours. Both of us had had the same thought—”Oh no, it’s the children again.” Much to our annoyance they had been waking in the middle of the night claiming it was morning and time to play. We had tried to suppress it, but here it was again.

As these thoughts went through our minds we heard the sound of feet clomping down the stairs. This was strange as the children usually stayed in their room. Brenda got up, de­termined to get whoever it was back into bed. I heard her switch the light on, go down the stairs, switch the sitting room light on, and I followed her via the sounds of her movement as she looked in the kitchen and even toilet—we didn’t have a bathroom. Then up she came again and opened the children’s door—strange because we had assumed it had been opened. When she came back into our room she looked puzzled and a little scared. “They’re all asleep and in bed ‘ she said. ‘We talked over the mystery for some time, trying to under­stand just how we had heard the door handle rattle then foot­steps going down the stairs, yet the door wasn’t open. Also, the door handles on our doors were too high for the children to reach without standing on a chair. There was a stool in the children’s bedroom they used for that, yet it wasn’t even near the door when Brenda opened it.

Having no answer to the puzzle we stopped talking and settled to wait for sleep again. Suddenly a noise came from the children’s bedroom. It sounded like the stool being dragged and then the door handle turning again but the door not opening. “You go this time” Brenda said, obviously disturbed.

‘I opened our door quickly just in time to see the opposite door handle turn again. Still the door didn’t open. I reached across, turned the handle and slowly opened the door. It stopped as something was blocking it. Just then my daughter Helen’s small face peered around the door—high because she was standing on the stool. Puzzled by what had happened, I was careful what I said to her. “What do you want love?” I asked.

‘Unperturbed she replied, “I want to go to the toilet.” The toilet was downstairs, through the sitting room, and through the kitchen.

‘Now I had a clue so asked, “Did you go downstairs be­fore?”

“Yes,” she said, “but Mummy sent me back to bed.” * (Tony C).

This is an unusual example of an out of body experience (OBE). Mostly they are described from the point of view of the person projecting, and are therefore difficult to corroborate. Here, three people experience the OBE in their own way. From Tony and Brenda’s point of view what happened caused sensory stimuli, but only auditory. Helen’s statement says that she was sure she had physically walked down the stairs and been sent back to bed by her mother. Tony and Brenda felt there was a direct connection between what they were think­ing and feeling—get the children back to bed—and what Helen experienced as an objective reality.

OBEs have been reported in thousands in every culture and in every period of history.

A more general experience of OBE than the above might include a feeling of rushing along a tunnel or release from a tight place prior to the awareness of independence from the body. In this first stage some people experience a sense of physical paralysis which may be fright­ening (see paralysis). Their awareness then seems to become an observing point outside the body, as well as the sense of paralysis. Then there is usually an intense awareness of one­self and surroundings, unlike dreaming or even lucidity. Some projectors feel they are even more vitally aware and rational than during the waking state. Looking back on one’s body may occur here. Once the awareness is independent of the body, the boundaries of time and space as they are known in the body do not exist. One can easily pass through walls, fly, travel to or immediately be in a far distant place, witnessing what may be, or appears to be, physically real there.

Sir Auckland Geddes, an eminent British anatomist, de­scribes his own OBE, which contains many of these features. Example: Becoming suddenly and violently ill with gas­troenteritis he quickly became unable to move or phone for help. As this was occurring he noticed he had an A and a B consciousness.

The A was his normal awareness, and the B was external to his body, watching. From the B self he could see not only his body, but also the house, garden and sur­rounds. He need only think of a friend or place and immedi­ately he was there and was later able to find confirmation for his observations. In looking at his body, he noticed that the brain was only an end organ, like a condensing plate, upon which memory and awareness played.

The mind, he said, was not in the brain, the brain was in the mind, like a radio in the play of signals. He then observed his daughter come in and discover his condition, saw her telephone a doctor friend, and saw him also at the same time.

Many cases of OBE occur near death, where a person has died* of a hean attack for instance, and is later revived. Be­cause of this there are attempts to consider the possibility of survival of death through study of these cases. In fact many people experiencing an OBE have a very different view of death than prior to their experience.

Early attempts to explain OBEs suggested a subtle or astral body, which is a double of our physical and mental self, but able to pass through walls. It was said to be connected to the physical body during an OBE by a silver cord—a son of life­line which kept the physical body alive. This is like the con­cept that the people we dream about are not creations of our own psyche, but real in their own right. Whatever one may believe an OBE to be, it can be observed that many people in this condition have no silver cord, and have no body at all, but are simply a bodiless observer, or are an animal, a geo­metric shape, a colour or sound (see identity and dreams).

The person’s own unconscious concepts of self seem to be the factor which shapes the form of the OBE. If, therefore, one feels sure one must travel to a distant point, then in the OBE one travels.

If one believes one is immediately there by the power of thought, one is there.

If one cannot conceive of existing without a body, then one has a body, and so on.

This approach explains many aspects of the OBE, but there is still not a clear concept of what the relationship with the physical world is.

The many cases of OBE which occur during a near-death experience also suggest it may be connected with a survival response to death; not necessarily as a way of trying to transcend death, but perhaps as a primeval form of warning relatives of death.

If there is survival of death, then the OBE may be an anticipatory form, or a preparatory condition lead­ing to the new form. See hallucinations, hallucinogens. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

lives While there may be some evidence for reincarna­tion in the work of Dr Ian Stevenson, dreams which clearly state reincarnation in their theme most likely represent pres­ent life situations.

Example: ‘I dream of living in China, a long time ago. I was married to a man with whom I had two children. He began to tire of me and brought concubines into our house­hold. I hated him. When I woke I realised I had dreamt about a past life’ (Patricia L). Patricia had in fact been married to a man in this life who, after her two children were born, began to bring other women home. This broke up their marriage. From Patricia’s point of view, this happened because in a past life her husband and she had not resolved their difficulties, so had to meet them again in this lifetime—whatsoever ye sow, so shall ye reap. Where such dreams have been thoroughly explored, I have found that their imagery arises from emotions and trauma which the dreamer finds difficult to meet. Placing it in a past life enables one to avoid the difficulty of experienc­ing present life pain. Patricia says she hated her Chinese hus­band.

The dream process can create a drama to represent our present situation using any form of structure. It is, after all, the master dramatist. This function of the unconscious explains many ‘past life’ memories elicited by hypnotic regression. Most of them are explainable in terms of present life trauma or situation. See hallucination, hallucinogens. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

For a man the penis represents more than simply his sexual appetite. It depicts the whole drive of life through his glandular system which develops the body type he has, pre­disposes his body towards male sexual characteristics; brings a cenain creative explosiveness to his personality, creates urges towards fatherhood and loving his woman, with con­nected desires to supply the needs of family if he is emotion­ally healthy.

The positive aspect of the penis/masculinity is for him to demand his woman meets his maleness, his canng aggression, his sexual desire, with her own fiery energy and strength. In general, direct reference to sexual feelings, fears, or problems. As these can be quite complex several examples are given below.

Example: ‘So for the third time I held the woman and made love.

The woman’s vagina was like a (lower, I don’t mean to look at, but in physical sensation. My penis felt like it was penetrating petals of flesh and touching with great plea­sure a central receptive area I was left with the feeling of being able to make love again and again without any negative effects. It was a very positive and healthy feeling’ (John T). John is feeling confident about his sexual drive. Although a powerful drive, subtle feelings and fears have an intense influ­ence not only on the pleasure of sex, but also the response of the physical organs.

The relationship with the penis and sex act in one s dream shows what fears, hurts or attitudes are influencing the sexual flow. See castration.

In a woman’s dream, one’s relationship with, desire for, a mate; relationship with one’s own male self—ambition, work capability, aggression, intellect; depicts the relationship with, genital sexuality with, one’s panner. As with Sally in the next example, the events in the dream define the problem or rela­tionship. Example: ‘My lover Terry, myself and another woman are all on our bed.

The other woman seemed very sure of herself and kissed Terry in a very intimate way, he doing the same to her as I lay very near to both of them. Then Terry stuck his bottom in the air and staned to lick my chest and breast. I found myself licking around the penis, felt I was under some kind of pressure from both the other two to do so but didn’t feel too shattered as I did it with love for Terry, but I had a bitter taste in my mouth’ (Sally P). In talking about this dream Sally said she often struggled with what she wanted and what her panner wanted in sex. She might go along with his needs, but not find it palatable. Even if she did do it with some love, it might have a bad taste in her mouth*.

Example: T felt as if I were as one with Terry and I realised he was trying to make a journey into his mother s vagina, as his penis. Her vagina looked like a long dark tunnel and was threatening to him. I said, “You haven’t given your mother satisfaction and you say you will not.” Then he was really smashed up in body. Withdrawing into a garden with a high green hedge. I took a leaf from the hedge and began to pull it apan with my hands. Terry said, “Look what you are doing, teasing me.” I felt withdrawal wasn’t the way and staned to follow him, walking alongside the hedge. I said, “It feels like you are strangling me, so why don’t you do it and kill me?” (We have been going through a lot of sexual withdrawal, Terry saying his sexuality was his to do with as he wanted.)’ (Sally P). This second dream of Sally’s is a shrewd summing up of Terry’s sexual fears. In fact Terry suffered a great deal of anxi­ety about sex, and later uncovered the son of fear and desire to avoid giving his mother satisfaction in becoming a full blooded man shown in the dream. Our unconscious is a very capable psychologist, and while Terry in Sally’s dream repre­sents her insights regarding him—and must not be seen as a statement of fact about Terry—such insights are often enor­mously useful in dealing with relationship difficulties.

Example: ‘Was in a house with my wife. Outside the door was something which wanted to come into her—an invisible being. We were frightened and it said “Do not be afraid, I want you to put your penis in your wife and wait for me to activate you. In that way you will form a body for me.” I woke and realised the dream was moving me to parenthood. Al­ready having three children I realised this would mean an­other 20 years of responsibility. Nevertheless my wife and I made love. Two weeks later I dreamt my wife was pregnant with a son. In fact nine months later she bore a son’ (Nigel I). In this interesting dream sequence the penis is Nigel’s drive to be a father. See castrate; bed; knob; pole; reptiles; sausage; examples in flower and tunnel. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The Way of Dreams and Visions

General Meaning: The beginning of something new in your life that is not yet visible, but will be soon enough. We conceive many things in our spirits and not everything we conceive is a blessing.

• Some of them are the blessings that we have asked the Lord for. Others are things that we do not desire, but have conceived because of fear or sin.

Dreams Positive:

To dream that you are pregnant means that something new is about to manifest in your life.

If you are a man, you might dream that your wife is pregnant instead, and it would mean the same thing to you.

• You need to discern if the child you are pregnant with is good or not.

• If you dream that you miscarry or that a baby is stillborn, but do not really feel any concern in your dream, then it has a good interpretation.

• It means that you conceived something that was not of God, but that He has prevented it from coming to pass.

• It is a good sign that you have left the things of the past behind, or perhaps brought your flesh into line.

• I have often dreamed that I was pregnant. In one dream I was three months pregnant. It was a clear dream. When I woke up I worked it out, and three months before I had been released into ministry training.

• The Lord was confirming that He had indeed started that process in me and that I would carry it to full term.

• If you dream of giving birth early or not realizing you were pregnant, it means that the Lord has been doing something in your life behind the scenes and it will suddenly come to pass.

Negative:

If you dream that you are pregnant with the baby of someone from the past that you do not like, this is negative.

• It means that you have held onto something from that time of your life and it has taken root in you.

• Perhaps you were involved with a ministry in the past that you do not feel positive about any longer.

• Dreaming of being pregnant surrounding those circumstances means that you conceived something spiritually during that time that you have still held onto.

• If you dream that you are pregnant with someone’s baby that is very negative to you, it could mean that you have given the flesh control of your life and conceived something that is not of the Lord.

• If you dream that you miscarry and you feel the pain and the struggle in the dream, then this is not a good picture.

• It means that the enemy is trying to steal the blessing that the Lord has given to you.

• If you are in ministry training, consider the tests you have faced over the last while. It could be a warning that you are going off track and need to get back again.

Visions Positive:

The interpretations for visions can be tricky. Your vision can either speak of a spiritual birth that the person is going through, or it could speak of an actual pregnancy! • If you see a baby in the womb, this could speak of the Lord conceiving and birthing something new in that person.

• Just as in the case where the Holy Spirit conceived Jesus in Mary’s womb, this would be a picture of something good that the Lord has conceived in their spirits.

• In a literal sense, it can also mean that this person you are praying with will have an actual baby! You need to use some tact when interpreting such a vision.

• I remember receiving prayer once from Apostle Les and in the spirit he saw me holding a baby. I was trying to take a spiritual picture from it, but discovered shortly afterwards that I was already 5 months pregnant! • The best thing to do is to share the vision you get with the person.

If they have desired a child, then perhaps the Lord is confirming to them that this is His will. Perhaps the Lord is even saying that they are pregnant right now.

• When praying for a couple desiring to fall pregnant, Apostle Daphne Crause clearly saw a baby in the womb. It turned out that the woman was indeed pregnant at the time. That word brought both confirmation and hope that this was of the Lord.

• Spiritually speaking, when we have faith we birth the blessings of God in our lives. This can speak of both spiritual and natural blessings.

• Hebrews 11:11 Through faith also Sara herself laid hold of the ability to fall pregnant, and gave birth past the time of life, because she judged him faithful who had promised.

Negative:

Apostle Daphne has been used of the Lord very often to pray for couples to fall pregnant, because of her own travail in this area. In her book the Way to Effective Prayer she gives both her story and some very practical steps to follow if you are trying to fall pregnant.

• I remember her praying for a lady once who was having medical problems with her pregnancy. Doctors said that it would be a hard birth, and her chances of having any children in the future were near impossible.

• Daphne went into prayer and saw something demonic attacking the child in the womb. She stood against this, and against all odds the woman went on to have not just one, but three children afterwards! • If you see a vision of a woman miscarrying and it is not literal, then it means that the person you are praying for is losing the blessing that God has given by allowing sin in their lives or because of a curse.

• To have a vision of someone that is barren is an indication of a curse in that person’s life.

See also:

Baby, Birth, Child.... The Way of Dreams and Visions

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: \ tried to turn but my legs were like lead.

The man caught me and I fought. He tried to rape me but couldn’t do it. As I talked to him I began to feel sorry for him and not frightened. I realised that inside he was a nice person. In the end I found I liked him so much I began to kiss him myself (Mrs JB). Rape in dreams is very different from rape in real life, as we create our own dream, so why introduce rape? Perhaps in the above example Mrs JB discovers her own power in the situation as she realises the weakness of the male.

Example: A man is trying to make love and at the last moment I repel him as I know it will cause a pregnancy. When I was about 10 I was raped and for many years had a fear of men’ (Anon.). This is the other side of rape. Rape in this dream may be memories, the effects of which are still visible in the life of this dreamer, causing her difficulties in warm sexuality.

Example: The devil attacked a woman. He was invisible.

The woman turned black as he raped her. She didn’t die. At this point I woke and went to the toiler. On returning to bed I continued the dream, particularly wondenng what I was in conflict with in the image of the devil. I found it disturbinr and frightening to be confronted by such a powerful oppo­nent. Partly because of the rape, I realised it was repressed sexuality. I then approached the “black” woman with tender­ness and this transformed the devil into available sexual or emotional energy. I tried this again and again. Each time it worked, and I could observe the devil was my sexual warmth and love which had become negative through restraint’ (Neil V). In this male dream, it is the conflict with his sexuality which causes the devilish’ rape. When he can find tender­ness, the negative aspect disappears. Rape also depicts the real evil of another person disregarding our personal needs and feelings, abusing not only the body, but particularly the ‘person’. Being raped by someone known: feeling anxious about sex with them, fighting off desire for them. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

If we keep a record of our dreams it will soon become obvious that some of our dream themes, charac­ters or places recur again and again. These recurrences are of various types.

A cenain theme may have begun in childhood and continued throughout our life—either without change, or as a gradually changing series of dreams. It might be that the feature which recurs is a setting, perhaps a house we visit again and again, but the details differ. Sometimes a senes of such dreams begin after or dunng a particular event or phase of our life, such as puberty or marriage.

Example: ‘This dream has recurred over 30 years. There is a railway station, remote in a rural area, a central waiting room with platform going round all sides. On the platform mill hundreds of people, all men I think. They are all ragged, thin, dirty and unshaven. I know I am among them. I looked up at the mountainside and there is a guard watching us. He is cruel looking, oriental, in green fatigues. On his peaked cap is a red star. He carries a machine gun. Then I looked at the men around me and I realise they are all me. Each one has my face. I am looking at myself. Then I feel fear and terror (Anon.).

The theme of the dream can incorporate anxious emotions, such as the above example, or any aspect of experi­ence. One woman, an epileptic, reports a dream which is the same in every detail and occurs every night. In general such dreams recur because there are ways the dreamer habitually responds to their internal or external world. Because their attitude or response is unchanging, the dream which reflects it remains the same. It is noticeable in those who explore their dreams using such techniques as described under dream pro­cessing that recurring themes disappear or change because the attitudes or habitual anxieties which gave rise to them have been met or transformed.

A recurring environment in a dream where the other fac­tors change is not the same. We use the same words over and over in speech, yet each sentence may be different.

The envi­ronment or character represents a particular aspect of oneself, but the different events which surround it show it in the changing process of our psychological growth. Where there is no such change, as in the examples above, it suggests an area of our mental emotional self is stuck in a habitual feeling state or response.

Some recurring dreams can be ‘stopped’ by simply receiv­ing information about them. One woman dreamt the same dream from childhood. She was walking past railings in the town she lived in as a child. She always woke in dread and perspiration from this dream. At 40 she told her sister about it.

The response was ‘Oh, that’s simple. Don’t you remember that when you were about four we were walking past those railings and we were set on by a bunch of boys. Then I said to them, ‘Don’t hurt us, our mother’s dead!” They left us alone, but you should have seen the look on your face.’ After realis­ing the dread was connected with the loss of her mother, the dream never recurred. Another woman who repeatedly dreamt of being in a tight and frightening place, found the dream never returned after she had connected it to being in the womb.

Recurring dreams, such as that of the railings, suggest that pan of the process underlying dreams is a self regulatory (homocostatic) one.

The dream process tries to present trou­blesome emotions or situations to the conscious mind of the dreamer to resolve the trauma or difficulty underlying the dream.

An obvious example of this is seen in the recurring nightmare of a young woman who felt a piece of cloth touch her face, and repeatedly woke her family with her screams. Her brother, tiring of this, one night woke her from her screams and made her talk about her feelings. His persistence gradually revealed that she associated the cloth with the burial shroud of her grandmother. This brought to the surface grief and feelings about death she had never allowed herself to feel before.

The nightmare never returned. See nightmares; dream processing. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: Many times in my adult life I have woken to find I have made love to my wife while asleep. Or I wake to discover myself in the middle of the sexual act. At such times I have usually been avoiding my sexual drive and it has burst through to fulfil itself while I was asleep or under the sway of dreams.

For instance most times this hap­pened I have been in the middle of a dream in which there is a sense of absolute imperative that I must make love/have sex.

It is like being lost in a storm of glamour and fantasy or vision in which I am totally involved.

The whirl of the “dream” is towards the wonder, totality of the need to have sex. As this imperative is expressed in my still spontaneous, dreaming physical action, the experience of sex is also visionary and enormous’ (Charles W).

This fairly common dreaming experience demonstrates powerfully how dreams are an expression of a self regulatory or compensatory action in the psyche and body. Charles says that he had been restraining his sexual activity. This shows the enormous gulf which can exist between what we will to do as a conscious personality, and what our being needs to do or wishes to do outside conscious decision making.

The ‘glamour and fantasy’ Charles describes are regular features of how these deeper needs make themselves known, or attempt to coerce the conscious mind, into fulfilling the need.

If we reject the fantasy, the unconscious processes will attempt a more radical approach, as in actual physical movement while we sleep. This may have given rise to ideas about possession or devils in past ages, when it was not understood that we can split our mind by such conflicts. Fear of the possessing’ influ­ence actually heightens its power through suggestion. It is much better to understand what one’s needs are, and seek an acceptable fulfilment. See abreaction. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: A shadow thing came very quickly up the stairs, along our corridor and into the bed­room, over to the bed to bend over me. I felt fear as I never felt it before and I started to make a noise. It was also the shadow making the noise and it was frightened, and moved towards the window. I felt sorry it was frightened too, but then it was too late as it had gone. I woke up making a howling noise, my husband said, he felt the fear in the room strongly too’ (Gloria F). In the example, Gloria is meeting her own feeling of fear. This is obvious because the shadowy thing felt the fear also. In fact it is the feeling of fear. Such shadowy figures are our own rejected emotions or potentials. See the Shadow under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Things we repeat over and over, like habits; move­ment towards greater awareness or insight.

Example: We walk around, go upstairs, and I notice a staircase leading to a room or rooms.

The stairs are painted in the green too, and they go up square, about eight steps in a flight, but round and round—spiral. I am scared by them, don’t want to go up, but am curious. We move in and nobody but myself has really taken any notice of the stairs. Nobody has been up. Half way up I can see there is a glass roof, the wooden frames painted green. I am terrified but have to go on. Then I wake. Next dream I got up there. It smelt very musty. Lots of draw sheets covering things. I bent to lift a sheet. It was raining. I could hear it thrashing on the glass. Then I woke (Ann H). In this example we have the spiral and the square combined in the stairs. In this way the dream manages to combine many different ideas such as climbing to the un­known, spiralling or circling something, and the squareness or down-to-eanh nature of what is being discovered. There arc things we have learnt, yet not realised consciously. Like a jigsaw puzzle, we have all the pieces, and we sense the con­nection, but we have never formed it into a conscious thought or verbal idea. It therefore remains as a feeling sense or hunch, but not a rational idea. Ann is spiralling towards, or circling around, such a realisation. She is frightened because it may be difficult—one may realise that all the years of mar­riage point to having been used as a doormat. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Any dream in which an obvious change occurs in one of the dream figures shows transformation. Each of us go through major transformations during growth— not just physically, as when we change from a toothless baby to a walking, toothy child, but also psychologically.

Example: ‘On a hot summer day I was walking with a beautiful black woman through countryside. She stopped and told me she had a problem.

To show me she pulled down the strap of her dress. On her shoulder the black skin was peeling to reveal golden white skin underneath. She said that if she kept seeing me she would become completely white. She was going to ask advice from her mother about what to do. As we walked on two black men fought with me. They wanted to take her back to the village. I woke feeling I was winning’ (paraphrased from The Way of The Dream, Fraser Boa). Here the dreamer is relating well to his own feelings of sexuality and sensuality. However, he is beginning to see a female part­ner as a real person, not just as his sexuality paints her. Also, the reference to seeking advice from the mother suggests his ability to love is still not freed from emotional and erotic connections with his mother, and needs transforming. One often hears people, even in their 40s, saying It is difficult (developing a relationship) with that person because my mother doesn’t like them.’ The dreamer ‘fights’ the opposing drives, which want to take the man’s love back to the village, his childhood level of love—thus he moves towards becoming independent in love and life.

The transformation is towards mature love and relatedness.

For a further description of the major areas and themes of transformation, see individuation. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Islamic Dream Interpretation

this incident is related to a group of people living on the Island of Saqliyyah . It is narrated that their king was bent on annihilating the Muslims.

For this, he prepared a powerful navy comprising of thousands of soldiers. At this point he saw a dream in which he saw himself mounted on an elephant while drums were beaten and trumpets were blown before him. When he awoke he summoned some of his clergymen and asked them to interpret the dream. They gave him the glad tiding of victory. He demanded proof from them for their interpretation.

The said that the elephant is the most powerful animal on land and mounting such a powerful animal means becoming the master of power and strength. And the beating of drums and blowings of trumpets are signs of happiness, ecstasy and victory. Also drums are only beaten in the presence of asking if there is some reason for happiness.

When the king heard this, he became both surprised and delighted. He then summoned some Jewish ulama and asked them for their interpretation. They also interpdreted the dream as a glad tiding of victory. He then called some Muslim ulamaa and demanded that they interpret the dream. They all pointed to an experienced aalim to respond to the king’s demand.

The aalim said to the king that he would interpret the dream only if he guaranteed their safety which he did.

The learned aalim interpreted the dream thus; “O king, I see no wisdom in your wanting to kill the Muslims and marching on them for this purpose. Please do not deploy your army for they will not return to you alive. They will be defeated and destroyed. And do not for one moment think that I give this interpretation because I am a Muslim”.

The king asked him for proof to which he replied that the Holy Book of Allah was the source for his proof. He quoted the verse: Have you not seen what your Lord had done to the people of the elephants. He recited the entire Soorah Feel.

The king said: “This is your proof regarding the elephants. What have you to say about the drums?” He recited the verse: And when the trumpet will be blowns, this will be a very hard day for the non-believers-not an easy one.

When the king heard this he became utterly shocked and perplexed since the shaikh’s explanation was rational and irrefutable.

To avoid embarrassment to himself he dismissed the sheikh and his colleagues saying that he would have believed him if he (the sheikh) were not a Muslim. But since he is a Muslim he is biased in his delivery of interpretation.

The Shaikh said: “You will soon find out for yourself, o king!”.

When the sheikh and his colleagues departed the king began to ponder deeply about what the sheikh had said. He became convinced and decided not to go ahead with his plans. When the clergy heard of this they approached him and urged him to go ahead with his plan. They reasoned with him not to believe the interpretation of the sheikh as he was a Muslim and a Muslim would obviously be opposed to king Muslims. They also sought his permission to kill the sheikh which he refused. They continued to incite him against the Muslim and urged him to go ahead with his plans. He had no choice but to accede. He deployed a huge army under the command of his son.

The two sides met in the middle of the sea.

For three days a fierce battle ensued between the Muslims and non-Muslims. One the third day the Christians army was defeated. Not a single person was spared. When the king came to learn about this, he called for the sheikh and admitted his folly before him. He then secretly accepted Islam at his hands and bestowed many of his favours on him. It is said that he also learned the Holy Qur’aan by the Shaikh and this affair of the king became popular in Saqliyyah.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Expression of oneself, not simply ideas, but subtle feelings or realisations. Spontaneous speech, voice that speaks through or to one: our personality or mind is not a totally unified whole. Some aspects of self we may not identify with. Because we disown them, they become split from our main expression. Contacting them may be like meeting a stranger— thus in dreams they are shown as exterior to self, or a separate voice, perhaps disembodied. Also some aspects of self express spontaneously—see autonomous complex.

The voice may therefore be one’s intuition; expression of unconscious but not integrated parts of self; fears; the Self being met in the dream.

Example: ‘I was going mad. I was crawling around on my hands and knees and wailing and behaving in a most peculiar manner. I actually felt mad. But inside my head a tiny voice kept saying, “You aren’t completely insane yet—there’s still a chance.’’ People around me kept saying to each other, “We think she’s possessed by devils.’’ My sane voice then said *’Make the sign of the cross, cast out the evil spirit.” I kept trying to do that but my hands wouldn’t or couldn’t complete the sign. I woke still feeling disturbed’ (Margaret F). Margaret has fears about her sanity.

The voice here is that of her uncon­scious, speaking from a more whole view of her being. Such a voice might very well be the voice of one’s fears and confu­sion, however.

Example: ‘My present lover, Tony,’ and a man I had loved years before were standing side by side.

A voice was telling me to go to Tony (Miranda L). Here Miranda’s unconscious is summarising her feelings and helping her transfer her feelings of love connected with the past to her new lover. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Wanting is a primal drive which, through social­isation, we may crush and thereby lose contact with what we want from our own feelings and needs. In doing so we may also lose much of our decisiveness and creativity.

Example: ‘1 still want him all to myself. We never touch or kiss or anything in the dreams, and I want him to, but would never let on I wanted this. I am a bit coy in my dreams’ (Pauline B). Pauline is dreaming about a past lover whom she has tried to forget, but when we pick out the wants’ we see how strong her feelings are. Looking at dreams in this way helps us define what our desires are.

Example: The older man still wanted something from me. I didn’t want to be involved with him at all and yet had to be polite, etc., so he wouldn’t hit out at me/us. We needed some kind of contact with this man, I lent forward and kissed him on his face and drew back quickly as I didn’t want to give any more than that, I had a fear that he would want more’ (Sandra O). Sandra had divorced an older husband, and was living with a younger man.

The complication of her wants’ is shown in the dream. When it is a ‘don’t want’ in the dream, it is helpful to change it to a positive. ‘I didn’t want to go with my mother’ could become ‘I wanted to do my own thing.’

Because what we want is complex and often in conflict, our dream characters may want something which we oppose, as in the following example. Example: To escape from a man chasing me, I decided I must get a taxi home. Got in one driven by a woman who wanted to take me to the man who was chasing me. Woke up sweating’ (Ann G).

The urge to integrate the male pan of herself, seen as the taxi driver, is in conflict with Ann’s fear of it. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: 41 gave birth to a baby girl I named Char­lotte. I had mixed emotions about this, uncertainty, excite­ment. I wanted to share the news with my friends. I phoned one, a woman in Australia. I told her with enthusiasm, but she listened quietly and remained silent. I felt uneasy, then she said “We lost Luke”—her son—”the week before.” I then woke with muddled feelings’ (Mo).

A woman in a woman’s dream: an aspect of herself, but often a facet of herself she is not immediately identifying with.

The above example helps make this plain. Mo explored her feelings about the dream characters. It all fell into place when she asked herself what she had ‘lost’ recently. She had left a lover of some years’ standing. This gave her a lot more free­dom and new opportunity, depicted by the baby, but also muddled feelings of loss. Her Australian friend represents her feelings of grieving for the death’ of her relationship. Her muddled feelings arise because she both loves the new life which opens up, but grieves for the death of her romance.

A woman’s sister, female children: particularly used to rep­resent herself.

The character of the dream woman, loving, angry, businesslike, lazy, sexual, gives a clue to what pan of the dreamer it is referring to.

If the dream woman is a person known well, the above can still be the case, but the woman may represent what the dreamer feels about that person.

A woman younger than the dreamer oneself at that age.

An older woman: could be the dreamer’s mother, her feelings about aging, her sense of inherited wisdom. Two women and the dreamer, conflicting feelings or drives. One woman, one man: behaviour patterns arising from parental relationship.

A goddess or holy woman, the dreamer’s highest potential; what she is capable of but may not yet have lived.

Man dreaming of a woman

Example: ‘On a raised mobile platform a goddess stood. I loved her and (lew to her, skim­ming above the heads of the people. I calked to her. She told me the only love I could receive from her was that which I gave to a human woman. Inasmuch as I gave love to a human female, she would love me. She was all women’ (Andrew P).

The example shows Andrew meeting his archetypal concep­tion of a woman, his ideal. But he understands that you can­not love an ideal. His love must find a real woman. Through a real love he would call love from out of himself, out of his unconscious reserve.

In a man’s dream: his present relationship with his own feelings and intuitive self; his sensitivity and contact with his unconscious through receptivity; or how he is relating to his female partner.

The latter is especially so if the woman in the dream is his partner, how capable he is of loving a woman.

An old woman, usually the dreamer’s mother.

The woman, because she is his feelings, is obviously also his sexual desires and how he meets them.

A younger woman: can depict his desires for a woman of that age, or his more vulnerable emo­tions. Two women and the dreamer: an ‘eternal triangle’; con­flicting feelings.

If one woman and one man: pattern of be­haviour developed in relationship with parents.

The conditions or situations of the woman, see under ap­propriate entries, such as illness; murder, swimming; etc. See anima and the Great Mother under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Islamic Dream - Cafer-i Sadik

whoever was awoken / alarmed from a woman coming to him [in the dream] and she is the reason, that is [interpreted as] his non-fulfillment of zakat to its rightful people.... Islamic Dream - Cafer-i Sadik

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Having written a dream down, by using highlighting pens to make all matching words the same colour, one can immediately see the main issues in some dreams.

Example: ‘We walk around, go upstairs, and I notice a staircase leading to a room or rooms. It goes up square, about eight steps in a flight, but round and round—spiral. I am scared by them, don’t want to go up, but am curious. We move in and nobody but myself has really taken any notice of the stairs. Nobody has been up . In one dream I try to go up but the children are scared for me. They plead, ‘Don’t go up Mum, just forget them”. Then I wake. In the next dream I wait till they are asleep. Half way up_ I am terrified but have to go on. Then I wake. Next dream I got up there. Then I woke’ (Ann H). Ann’s dream theme recurs, so is important to her. In marking just some of the words we see that the ‘up’ or go up’ is important. Childhood fears hold Ann back for a while, but she dares to climb.

If we look at the entries for climb and stairs, we see they depict taking steps towards ex­ploring the unknown, daring to explore one’s potential or opportunities.

By marking the words in this way we might also highlight certain statements otherwise hidden in the dream. Particularly watch out for the connections with the word T, such as I want, I do, I will, I have, I know, I cannot, etc. Example: ‘1 want to withdraw.’ I was full of sadness but was trying not to show it.’ ‘1 felt keyed up and ready to fight.’ Taking such statements out of context and looking for connections with everyday feelings oi situations often throws considerable light on the dream.

If what you realise is then considered in con­nection with the plot of the dream, the viewpoint your uncon­scious has on the situation might become evident.

For in­stance, the statement ‘I felt keyed up’ occurred within a classroom, and helped the dreamer understand the anger gen­erated at school. See amplification; plot of the dream; the comments on dream processing in the Introduction; dream processing; postures, movement, body language; settings; symbols and dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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